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Serialism Explained
 

Serialism Explained

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Visit us at - http://www.themusicespionage.co.uk/

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    Serialism Explained Serialism Explained Presentation Transcript

    • Serialism
    • Serialismis a method or technique of composition, that uses a series of values to manipulate different musical elements.
      Serialism began primarily with Arnold Schoenberg and his twelve-tone technique.
      Serialism of the first type is most specifically defined as the structural principle according to which a recurring series of ordered elements happen.
    • Twelve Tone Technique
      The basis of twelve-tone technique is the tone row, an ordered arrangement of the twelve notes of the chromatic scale
      (every note has equal value, so the music is Atonal).
      Set a specific ordering of all twelve notes
      2. No note is repeated within the set
    • Prime Order
      C♯/DbF♯/Gb D♯/EbC A A♯/Bb G E B F DG♯/Ab
      One you have written your ‘Prime Order’ you can then apply certain rules to modify this form but still stay within the constrains of your selected order.
      There are four main transformations you can apply to the Prime Order;
      Transposition – Retrograde – Inverted – Retrograde Inverted
    • Prime Order
      Transposed
      (Pitch up or down in)
      Retrograde
      (Reversed)
      Inverted
      (Opposite Intervals)
      Retrograde Inverted
      (Opposite Intervals & Reversed )
    • Inversion
      Up 5 Semitone
      Down 5 Semitone
      Described simply, it is the upside-down version of the prime order. For example the interval between the 1st and 2nd note is up 5 semitones, so this would mean going down 5 semitones and repeating this throughout.
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