transportation and the health and wealth of cities
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

transportation and the health and wealth of cities

on

  • 6,006 views

Since 1950, conventional urban transportation planning has been largely directed at providing fast and efficient mobility for private travel – freeways were built, streets were widened and buildings ...

Since 1950, conventional urban transportation planning has been largely directed at providing fast and efficient mobility for private travel – freeways were built, streets were widened and buildings were razed for parking. Most cities went along with the program and suffered tremendously, but there have been a handful of cities that resisted the status quo and developed an alternative city friendly approach to transportation. These cities focused on transportation solutions that were compatible with, and enhanced their urban fabric, life and character.

Transportation planners have largely overlooked the story of how and why these trailblazing cities forged a different approach. But the transportation policies that these cities adopted contain important lessons about the path forward for creating sustainable places. The success of these cities has spurred a growing number of municipalities to adopt their own versions of city friendly transportation planning. They are now also beginning to reap the benefits that come from reducing car dependency. In this presentation I will tell the story of some of the places that pioneered city friendly transportation planning and how this approach can help to rein in sprawl and help to revitalize traditional urban centers.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
6,006
Views on SlideShare
1,182
Embed Views
4,824

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0

3 Embeds 4,824

http://www.engr.uconn.edu 4820
https://www.linkedin.com 3
http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

transportation and the health and wealth of cities transportation and the health and wealth of cities Presentation Transcript

  • Norman W. Garrick University of Connecticut Transportation and the Health and Wealth of Cities
  • Norman W. Garrick
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • What is Transportation For? Lewis Mumford (The Highway and the City, 1964)
  • Pharmacies in Washington, DC ½ Mile
  • Pharmacies in Hartford ½ Mile
  • The Model T http://www.seriouswheels.com/pics-1800-1919/1915-Ford-Model-T-b-nf.jpg From 1909 to 1927, the Ford Motor Company built more than 15 million Model T cars. Without a doubt, Henry Ford transformed the economic and social fabric of the 20th century http://www.modelt.ca/background.html
  • Vehicle Miles Traveled Ref for Vehicle Data ---- http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2007_fcvt_fotw474.html Ref for VMT ---- http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/statistics/2007/vmt421.cfm 1908 The Model T 1930s The Depression 1940-45 World War II 1956 Highway Bill 1973 First Oil Crisis 1979 Second Oil Crisis 2004 ??? 1949 Housing Act
  • Vehicle Miles Traveled Ref for Vehicle Data ---- http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2007_fcvt_fotw474.html Ref for VMT ---- http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/statistics/2007/vmt421.cfm US Canada Germany Japan
  • Vehicle Miles Traveled Ref for Vehicle Data ---- http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2007_fcvt_fotw474.html Ref for VMT ---- http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinformation/statistics/2007/vmt421.cfm
  • Driving to Exhaustion
    • 1946
    • The average American drove 6 miles every day
    • 2004
    • The average American drove 30 miles per day
  • Cities will be part of the country; I shall live 30 miles from my office in one direction, under a pine tree; my secretary will live 30 miles away from it too, in the other direction, under another pine tree. We shall both have our own car. We shall use up tires, wear out road surfaces and gears, consume oil and gasoline. All of which will necessitate a great deal of work … enough for all. - Le Corbusier, 1935
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Norman W. Garrick Kingston, Jamaica
  • Portmore, Jamaica
  • Storrs, CT
  •  
  • Atlanta, GA
  • Hartford 1930s
  • Hartford 1960s
  •  
  •  
  • Land Consumption for Transportation in American Cities?
    • Cambridge, MA
    • Somerville, MA
    • Evanston, IL
    • Silver Spring, MD
    • New Haven, CT
    • Hartford, CT
    • Alameda, CA
    • San Mateo, CA
    • Lowell, MA
  • Land Consumption for Transportation in American Cities?
    • Cambridge, MA
    • Somerville, MA
    • Evanston, IL
    • Silver Spring, MD
    • New Haven, CT
    • Hartford, CT
    • Alameda, CA
    • San Mateo, CA
    • Lowell, MA
    Low Auto Use Cites High Auto Use Cites
  • Driving versus Parking Provision Rate of Driving Parking per Activity
  • Activity Density versus Parking Provision Parking per Activity Activities per Sq. Mile
  • Why Are These Cities So Different?
    • How can one city get by with only ¼ parking space per activity?
    • Why do some cities provide 4 times more parking per activity than others?
  • Conventional Transportation Planning More People More Auto Travel More Auto Facilities Building Spiral of Decay Fewer People Fewer Buildings
  • City Friendly Transportation Planning What is the vision for the city? Create a transportation system that supports this vision
  • Activity Density versus Parking Provision Parking per Activity Activities per Sq. Mile
  • Activity Density versus Parking Provision Parking per Activity Activities per Sq. Mile Cambridge Hartford
  • Highway Expansion 1950s and 1960s Hartford Proposed Built
  • Highway Expansion 1950s and 1960s Cambridge Proposed Built
  • Conventional Parking Policy
    • Minimum of X spaces per 1000 sq. feet
  • Parking Policy and the Cycle of Decay In February, 2010 developers in Indianapolis proposed to rehabilitate a long-vacant building, and turn it into 24 apartments. The city's zoning code required one parking space per apartment, but there was no room for surface parking on the lot. The developers requested a variance. The property was surrounded on three sides by surface parking lots, and three bus routes ran down the street. "To require this site to meet the required off-street parking standards,” the city’s planning staff wrote in support of the variance, “would require the demolition of a portion of the building or acquisition of adjacent sites." The planning commission, denied the variance, and the building remained empty. From an Article by Michael Manville, UCLA
  • City Friendly Parking Policy Cambridge
    • In 1981, Cambridge was one of the first cities in the country to implement a parking cap
  • Era of Transportation Choices? The Automobile Era
  • Zurich
  • What is the cost of gas in Switzerland?
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •