How history authors, experts, and costumed interpreters can use The History List
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How history authors, experts, and costumed interpreters can use The History List

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Individual presenters, such as authors, filmmakers, performers, costumed interpreters, artisans and craftsmen, and other experts who present history-related programs can take full advantage of The ...

Individual presenters, such as authors, filmmakers, performers, costumed interpreters, artisans and craftsmen, and other experts who present history-related programs can take full advantage of The History List by using an Organization page and listing themselves as the “organization.” Complete details, along with many examples, are shown in this presentation.

There are two requirements: These are scheduled events, such book tours, lectures, or programs or exhibits at an historical society, history museum, or historic site, and that they directly relate to history.

There is no cost.

If you are unsure if you and your program, event, or exhibit belongs on The History List, ask us.

Viewing tip: Click the "full-screen" icon below the presentation on the right and the slides, including those with small text, will be easy to read.

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How history authors, experts, and costumed interpreters can use The History List Presentation Transcript

  • 1. How history authors, experts, and costumed interpreters can use The History List
  • 2. The Freedom Trail Foundation, the Massachusetts Historical Society, Historic New England, the USS Constitution Museum, Washington on the Brazos State Historic Site, the Worcester Historical Museum, National Heritage Museum, the Smith-Appleby House Museum, Old Sturbridge Village, Heritage Square Museum, Trappe Historical The History List is used by hundreds of organizations across the country. Now individuals can list their appearances and programs, too. Society, Schooner FAME, the Kentucky Historical Society, the Neon Museum, Brucemore, Sons of the American Revolution, Colonial Williamsburg, Adirondack Museum, Amherst Museum, American Textile Museum, Asa Waters Mansion, History Colorado, Beauport, Sleeper-McCann House, Boston by Foot, Old South Meeting House,
  • 3. “The History List is quickly becoming a pioneer on the web for historical institutions.” Jodie McMenamin Development Officer USS Constitution Museum The History List
  • 4. “This is great. Thanks! I’d love to put this in the hands of our authors. Many of them are giving lectures, book talks and signings at history organizations.” Katie Parry Publicity The History Press The History List
  • 5. Samuel Forman, author of “Dr. Joseph Warren,” speaking at Old South Meeting House in Boston in 2012. Todd Andrlik, author of “Reporting the Revolution,” on his book tour speaking at the Old State House in Boston in 2012. History authors publicizing book tours and appearances can use The History List, too.
  • 6. Experts and costumed interpreters publicizing programs and appearances can also use The History List. The History List
  • 7. When an institution adds your appearance, they list your event under their name. You can also set up your own page and add your own events. There is no cost. • You and your events appear on The History List. • You can add as much text, video, and pictures about yourself and your program as you want. • Include your your contact information. • Every appearance you enter is listed at the bottom of your profile page. The History List
  • 8. Just three steps 1. Sign in—Login to The History List with Facebook for immediate access or request a free account on The History List. 2. Click “Add events” —When you enter your events, list yourself as the organization presenting them. These must be scheduled events and they must relate to history. 3. When you’re finished, complete your profile page. The events you added will already be listed at the bottom of your page. It’s that simple. The slides that follow walk through this and provide tips and examples. The History List
  • 9. Adding your events After you are signed in, click “Add events.” The History List Sign in with Facebook for immediate access, or request a free account on The History List. (Reviewing these requests may take up to 24 hours, though it’s usually much quicker.)
  • 10. Event title: If you are going to be giving the same talk or program several times, choose a title and description that you can use for every appearance. Some examples . . . For an author: "Reporting the Revolutionary War" with author Todd Andrlik Costumed interpreter: An Evening with Lydia Maria Child Expert: Outfitting our Gallant Soldiers Omit the date, location, cost, and other site-specific details. These will be included elsewhere in the listing. The History List
  • 11. Your description: You have nearly unlimited space for text, pictures, and video. If you are on a book tour or presenting the same program several times, create a description that can be duplicated for all of your appearances. Tip: List the stops on your tour in the description so that if someone can’t attend your closest appearance, they can plan to see you at another stop on your tour The History List
  • 12. If you are giving the same presentation several times at the same location, add the other dates and times through these options. (We’ve included every repeating pattern we’ve ever seen.) The History List
  • 13. To create your own presence on The History List and have all of your appearances appear on your own page, enter your name as the organization. If this is the first time you have been listed, the system also creates a profile page that you can complete later. This is the name and address of the venue, such as the library or local historical society, where the event takes place. The History List
  • 14. Include your name, your topic, the city, the state, the era and character you portray, and other words and phrases to help others find this event. Click to preview the listing before publishing it. The History List
  • 15. This appears after you’ve published your event. If you are presenting the same program in several locations, such as you would on a book tour, click this link to duplicate the appearance you just entered. You can then edit the date, time, location, and anything else that is unique to the event. The History List
  • 16. As shown in this example, since the talk is the same at each stop on the tour, it’s easy to enter this once and then duplicate it for the other stops. All of the stops on this book tour. The History List
  • 17. When you are finished adding your events, click this link to go to complete your profile page. The History List
  • 18. An author page on The History List can include text, photos, and video, as well as contact information and links. The History List
  • 19. Completing your profile This profile page was created when you entered your events. You should add information about you, including how to reach you. The titles, dates, times, and locations of these appear at the bottom of your page automatically. Click Edit any time you want to edit your page. The History List
  • 20. List yourself as the “organization” and add information about you, your books, the character you portray, or your area of expertise. You have essentially unlimited space for text, images, and video. Enter the address you use for correspondence, which might be your home, office, organization, P.O. box, or your publisher. The History List
  • 21. All of these are optional. Including them will help people find and contact you. Click to preview the listing before publishing it. The History List
  • 22. Examples of event pages • From authors • From experts • From costumed interpreters The History List
  • 23. Event page: An author gives a talk at a history museum. The History List
  • 24. Event page: The author of a biography of an historical figure presents a lecture based on his new book at a library. The History List
  • 25. Event page: An author gives a lecture at a museum and historic site. The History List
  • 26. Event page: For an historical society’s monthly program, an author gives a lecture based on his new book The History List
  • 27. Event page: For an historical society’s monthly program, a noted authority gives a lecture on her area of expertise. The History List
  • 28. Event page: For an historical society’s monthly program, a costumed interpreter gives a program on the historical figure she portrays. The History List
  • 29.  Learn more and get started with The History List  www.TheHistoryList.com/getting-started For questions: Editors@TheHistoryList.com. For updates: TheHistoryList on Twitter