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EFG 2013 - Presentations as a showreel

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The below presentation showreel includes presentations by: …

The below presentation showreel includes presentations by:



Graeme Martin - Organizational Trust: What is it and does it matter anyway?
Ryan Cheyne - VIPs are both your employees and customers
Robert Ordever - Engaging those on the edge
Sarah Barrett - ‘Walk the talk’
Karine Del Moro - The Power of Linkage: Drawing Connections between Employee and Customer Engagement to Drive Business Performance
Yves Duhaldeborde - Advances in linkage analyses: Bridging data sources to drive business performance
Alison Innes-Farquhar - ‘Role of Learning and Development in delivering business Change’
Caroline Hopkins - Inspirational and Caring Leadership
David Macleod - Engage for Success

Published in: Business, Education

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  • Motivational – and able to motivate and inspire others to succeed  Makes time to guide and support teams and individuals Takes an interest in individuals and their welfare, inside and outside of the workplace Gives employees the freedom to try new ideas and learn from their experience Acknowledges individual achievement and effort Empowers - colleagues and creates an environment of trust Shares and exchanges information pro-actively at all levelsCommunicates organisational and team vision, value and strategy; links to individual role and objectives. Gives constructive, specific and timely feedbackCreates an environment of trust Ability - to put the customer first.Lives and breathes the customer both internally and externally Promotes Partnership Working & Service deliveryCommits resources in the pursuit of Customer ExcellenceActively seeks customer consultation and involvement Role Model - (Respect)Leads by example Fully adopts & promote Red Thread Vision/Values Evaluates and acknowledges personal weaknesses and is willing to address them Commitments made are realistic and deliverable; keeps promises Standards – sets, maintains and monitors high standards Customer focus features in employee objectives Respects the confidentiality of employeesDeals with conflict as a mediator and can achieve mutually agreeable resolutionsHolds regular one-one reviews
  • Introductions Why are we here? The Red Thread Road Shows are about to hit a town or City near you(Next Slide)
  • IntroductionShow how L&D has truly empowered business transformation at HC-One.
  • The back story …Demise of Southern Cross and legacy of decline:Disillusioned and disengaged staffPoor service quality in some areasLittle investment in infrastructureState of learning and development?Then HC-One takes over …
  • HC-One, a new company, the 3rd largest care home operator in the UKFaced the challenge of re-engaging colleagues and enhancing quality and safety.Encapsulated in a mission to run the kindest care homes in the UKDecided to make L&D a key part of realising that vision through empowering colleagues to deliver the kindest most trustworthy care.Big innovation was to use e-learning and other online tools
  • 12 months on, and HC-One has touchBlended learning platformAvailable to all colleagues 24/7 in the workplace and at homeA range of mandatory and specialist learning material to meet key business needsFantastic response form learners. Touch has engaged colleagues and is helping transform the business.How was this achieved?
  • Promoting engagement
  • Promoting engagement (cont)We will move from a culture of “training for compliance” to a culture of “training for quality and kindness”This is “competent compliance” - we’re not doing it because we have to, we’re doing this because it makes us better at what we do.Examples: Embedding of corporate culture in learningLocalisation (learning activities, conversation cards)Case studies and scenariosBeating tough audits with a total focus on kindnessMaking essential compliance training fun and effective
  • Promoting engagement (cont)We will seek to embed learning, rather than just provide training Examples:Empowering the learner (access, LMS and learning record)Empowering the Home Manager (local admin and tracking)Peer-contributed content (video, podcast, SME input etc)
  • We will move “beyond the module”, using the most appropriate channel to meet the business need:Examples:Courses and resourcesMini moviesInfographicsVideo/PodcastsWorkshopsDitching slides for facilitating cultural change and blended learning
  • Internal marketing and support:We used a communication plan – designed to deliver the right message to the right person at the right time.Communication began at the outset of the project and continues post-launch.Could show a timeline with communication highlights picked out.Will highlight: Posters, Postcards, Newsletter, Competition, Roadshow, Flip book, Welcome moviePick our Roadshow. Briefly describe rationale and impact.
  • Brief description of the scope of the pilot.Allowed many assumptions to be tested, particularly with regard to infrastructure and communication.Thorough evaluation conducted
  • Launch and uptakeDetails of launch Adoption figures:% active usersDistribution of usersCourse completions (with comparison to previous 8 months)Training hours delivered?
  • Introduction of Nick, Caroline, Lisa and Martin
  • "Your biggest tool of leadership is communication. Make it bold and enlivening and passionate – if you can't communicate, you're just not there". Anita Roddick
  • "Your biggest tool of leadership is communication. Make it bold and enlivening and passionate – if you can't communicate, you're just not there". Anita Roddick
  • "Your biggest tool of leadership is communication. Make it bold and enlivening and passionate – if you can't communicate, you're just not there". Anita Roddick
  • "Your biggest tool of leadership is communication. Make it bold and enlivening and passionate – if you can't communicate, you're just not there". Anita Roddick
  • Survey of staff at Barking and Dagenham – results are shown Inducements – economic – pay and benefits + levels of job security – not surprisingly, very lowBut levels of “organisational support” also very low – like the level of support from their team, but not the organisation as a wholeContributions – high levels of engagement with the job, but not with the organisation as a wholePC =OCB =Deal is not balanced. Significant imbalance, in the views of staff, in favour of the organisationNumber of tensions undermining the deal
  • Introduction of Nick, Caroline, Lisa and Martin
  • Name that tune
  • We will pass round some very smelly soaps – this is about acceptance of good and bad
  • Mindful Practice
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 2. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Perry Timms Founder PTHR
    • 3. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 4. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Professor Graeme Martin Professor and Chair of Management Dundee University
    • 5. Re-visiting Organizational Trust: Reflections on What it Means and on Trust Repair Graeme Martin (University of Dundee) Branko Bozic (University of Glasgow) Sabina Siebert (University of Glasgow)
    • 6. Some Preliminary Comments on Conventional Views of Trust • ‘Problematising’ the interest in organizational trust and its repair and why now? – The claim • Trust is seen as an essential, but distinct, component of engagement - discretionary effort is contingent on trust • Levels of trust in institutions and organizations are declining – ‘Where has all the Trust Gone’ (Hope-Hailey et al, 2012, CIPD) – The aim (of organizations and their leaders) • To encourage more trust in organizations and in the ‘leadership brand’ – The task • To rebuild/restore/repair trust in our organizations and leaders
    • 7. The Academic Problem: Leaders Might be Asking the Wrong Questions the Wrong Way Based on the Wrong Assumptions • Current state of play in organizational trust repair research and practice – Dominant explanations of what we know • The ‘functionalist paradigm’ and consensus/trust as natural, (we’re all in it together) and assumptions that trust is good (for everyone) if only we (and they) get it - communications are the key; ‘plant’ psychology and unconstrained managerial agency (rational choice and actions) – all contestable! – Dominant ways of knowing what we know • cause and effect research (variance theory) in how we come to know about trust repair – the what and why • No attempt to map out the ‘how’, history and context • Similar to engagement research and consulting
    • 8. An Alternative View • Need for more complex perspectives to address the questions: – Why do repeated transgressions of organizational trust occur? - The RBS story as our starting point – The ‘paradox of embedded agency’ • How can we change what we are a part of and have created through our agency? • Why don’t/can’t organizations/managers in financial services learn? – why, how and what kinds of work needs to be done to maintain organizational trustworthiness over time, with whom and how?
    • 9. Insights from Institutional Logics • Institutions logics matter in understanding trust and trust repair • Patterns of cultural symbols and material practices, including assumptions, values and beliefs, that individuals and organizations socially construct to provide meaning to their daily activity and reproduce through their actions – Managerial sensemaking and actions (agency) constrained by embedded levels of institutional logics – Leading to the paradox of embedded agency - How can we change what we are a part of? – What we focus on, who and what our goals are, the identities and schemas we draw on, and how we collectively act influence our sensemaking – Through our sensemaking and enactment of trust repair we recreate these institutional logics/ constraints on trust relations – The role of leaders in reproducing these logics and ‘institutional entrepreneurs’ in changing them
    • 10. Embedded Levels of Institutional Logics • Organizational trust and trust repair strategies and practice embedded in – Societal level logics – Field level logics – Organizational logics
    • 11. Our Process Framework of Repeated Transgressions • A cyclical process of organizational transgression and attempted repair, embedded in three levels of institutional logics (see Figure 1) • A series of processes in which organizational mistrust is generated through but never fully recovered • The importance of field (sector)-level logics in sensemaking • The importance of identity work, goals and how senior managers’ frame issues
    • 12. Processes in a Cycle of Trust Repair at RBS Macro Micro foundations of trust repair Societal Inter- Institutional Logics, e.g. market, corporate, profession, state, etc. Field-level Logics in Banking & Finance Availability and accessibility of information regarding transgression Sensemaking influences focus of attention of individual managers Identities, goals and frames of reference of managers Intra and inter - action among senior executives, managers and stakeholders Collective Decision-making, Sensemaking and Mobilisation of resources Managerial trust repair strategies and practices Salience of current practices and identities Activated by Individual social skills lead to Reinforce or change the System that gives rise to trust transgression Bounded intentionality concerning selection of trust repair strategies Organizational Logics in RBS Externally or internally- generated breach of trust
    • 13. Repeated Transgressions and Trust Repair in RBS: A Case Illustration • Thematic analysis of documentary evidence, TV coverage, academic evaluations, interviews with RBS HR managers • Depicting the Cycles at RBS
    • 14. Reflections on the Process of Trust Repair at RBS 1 • RBS caught up in a cycle of repeated transgressions – attempts to rebuild trust frustrated by further scandals • A corporate/organizational culture, shaped by the Goodwin/Mathewson imprimatur – – Nationalism, growth thro’ acquisitions and strategy execution – “making things happen” – Managerial identities – non-bankers/non-City/who they weren’t – project managers – Strong performance management culture – Managerial hubris/overconfidence as ‘masters of integration’/lack of responsible ‘followership’ by board/speaking up to power – Shaped by a field level logic in financial services that valued risk and rewards for risk taking – ‘good to be bad’ – the more banks identified with shareholder value, the higher their status in the industry (Roulet, 2013)
    • 15. Reflections on the Process of Trust Repair at RBS 2 • A partial change under Hester’s leadership – More open and regular communications, encouraging voice – New leadership framework and approach to measuring effective leadership – But changes are partial and unevenly spread across the Bank – Hester goes in 2013 – lack of trust in him to take RBS back into the private sector • Industry pressures for rewards require new institutional framework, but resisted by nearly everyone in banking • Speaks to the constraints on managerial agency and identities by field level logics of governance, risk and reliance on financial motivations at national and field levels • But also speaks to inadequate leadership in failing to impact on organizational and field-level logics
    • 16. Some Conclusions • Like engagement, we do not ‘problematise’ trust and trust repair, so we remain trapped in our psychic prison – the paradox of embedded agency • Trust repair is based on a mechanical metaphor, which is a way of seeing but also a way of not seeing • We should focus on creating and maintaining our trustworthiness over time as managers rather than trust, which is the gift of others – trustworthiness has to be worked at constantly • And that requires ‘institutional entrepreneurship’ – not leadership – to come up with novel sensemaking and collective action that challenges rather than reproduces existing logics
    • 17. National Business System – the nature of corporate governance Field level logics – industry recipes, move into investment banking and financial motivation Managerial actions, sensemaking and mobilisation of resources Organizational level logics – closed authoritarian leadership Managerial sensemaking & stakeholder responses re. breach Limited Repair Managerial sensemaking and stakeholder responses re. breach Managerial sensemaking and stakeholder responses re breach Positive signs? 2006 2010 Cycle 1 - Failure of the rights issue Cycle 2 - RBS failure and bailout Cycle 3 - Hester’s performance bonus PATH DEPENDENCY Cycle Amplification Cycle Reduction An Illustrative Process Model of Recurrent Cycles of Trust Transgression and Attempted Repair in RBS No Repair
    • 18. What do We Mean By Trust and Trust Repair? • Trust typically seen as the willingness of a someone (the trustor) to be vulnerable to the actions of another (trustees), based on the expectation that the other (the organization and its leaders) will act in a way that is important to the trustor, irrespective of their ability to control the trustees (Mayer et al, 1995) • Three factors influence such perceptions of organizational trustworthiness – its in the gift of others! – Ability – e.g. are leaders competent? – Benevolence – e.g. are leaders motivated to do something positive for me? – Integrity – e.g. do leaders adhere to values that are important to me?
    • 19. Attribution of Cause of Failed Expectations of Trustworthiness • Locus – Is the failure by the organization a result of internal or external events/actions/outcomes? • Controllability – could leaders have controlled events/actions/outcomes? • Stability – is the cause likely to fluctuate (repeated) or remain stable (e.g. one off)
    • 20. Trust Repair Strategies that Work • Damaged perceptions of ability can be repaired by demonstrating external cause, more uncontrollable ability, or one off • Damaged benevolence can be repaired by demonstrating external cause, one off ability or benevolence breach • Damaged perceptions of integrity can be repaired by demonstrating external cause or one off internal cause • Trustworthiness will be repaired more effectively if anger and fear are reduced before attempts at trust repair • Denials that reduce internal attributions will repair trustworthiness • Excuses that reduce internal attributions, controllability attributions and stability attributions will repair trustworthiness • Apologies that reduce stability attributions will repair trustworthiness • Justifications that reduce the perceived negativity of outcomes will repair trustworthiness
    • 21. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 22. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Ryan Cheyne People Director Pets at Home
    • 23. Ryan Cheyne People Director @ryskicheyne Colleagues, Customers, Cats and Canines THE REAL V.I.Ps
    • 24. Pets at Home
    • 25. More than just a shop!
    • 26. Think Simple
    • 27. Our Values
    • 28. Clarity of Purpose
    • 29. Sales and LfL 0.00% 1.00% 2.00% 3.00% 4.00% 5.00% 6.00% 7.00% 8.00% 9.00% 10.00% 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 FY7 FY8 FY9 FY10 FY11 FY12 Sales LFL
    • 30. EBITDA and Store Nos 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 FY7 FY8 FY9 FY10 FY11 FY12 EBITDA Store Numbers
    • 31. What Makes Pets at Home Special?
    • 32. A Simple Equation Engaged VIP Colleagues Loyal VIP Customers Sales, Profit and Growth
    • 33. How do we do it? • We recruit the right people • We bust a gut to train them • We reward and recognise their efforts
    • 34. Matthew’s Tale
    • 35. Quiz! Before we treated Colleagues like VIPs, what was our LTO? a) 38% b) 58% c) 78% d) 108%
    • 36. Pets at Home Recruitment • We do it ourselves • We create the X Factor • Group Recruitment • Audition Process • Interview • Talent Champions
    • 37. We Bust a Gut to Train Them
    • 38. Recognition - Lucy’s Tale
    • 39. We say Thanks
    • 40. My manager thanks me when I have done a job well 95% 90% 85% 80% 75% 70% 2009 84% 2011 89% 2010 87% 2012 89% 2008 74% 2013 91%
    • 41. We share the recognition
    • 42. So What?
    • 43. Quiz! What was our Labour turnover at the start of 2013? a) 16.5% b) 16.5% c) 16.5% d) David Beckham 16.5%!
    • 44. VIPS Stay 78% 62% 55% 46% 40% 27% 19% 17% 16.5% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Colleague Turnover
    • 45. VIPS are Engaged 66% 73% 89% 90% 90% 93% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Colleague Engagement
    • 46. CTO v Engagement 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Colleague Engagement Colleague Turnover
    • 47. Customer VIPS
    • 48. Fish 4 Opinion
    • 49. High NPS = Higher Spend
    • 50. As Colleague Engagement Increases, so Does Customer Loyalty 88% 96% 99% 78% - 92% 93% - 98% 98% - 100% Average Score: Range of Scores: NetPromoterScore
    • 51. Top Drivers of Loyalty
    • 52. Pet Care Knowledge Also Increases as Colleagues Become More Engaged 88% 96% 99% 78% - 92% 93% - 98% 98% - 100% ColleaguePetCareKnowledge Average Score: Range of Scores:
    • 53. And That’s Important? 4% increase
    • 54. And Add in Colleague Friendliness? 6% increase
    • 55. A Simple Equation Engaged VIP Colleagues Loyal VIP Customers Sales, Profit and Growth
    • 56. and there’s more…
    • 57. Getting to know our customer VIPS
    • 58. Quiz A – Goldie x B – CHARLIE C – Derek x D – Nemo x
    • 59. This stuff is not just for retail
    • 60. Best Companies Lists WL Gore Penta Consulting Admiral Group Virgin Money Royal College of Nursing Robert Half Int. PwC Penna PLC Michael Page KPMG Goldman Sachs American Express UK Allianz Global Assistance Adobe Systems
    • 61. It’s all About the People Engaged Colleagues Loyal Customers Sales, Profit and Growth
    • 62. Ryan Cheyne People Director @ryskicheyne Colleagues, Customers, Cats and Canines THE REAL V.I.Ps
    • 63. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 64. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Robert Ordever People and Development Director Fulham Football Club
    • 65. Engaging those on the Edge Fulham Football Club
    • 66. A bit about us • Staff both employed and ‘casual’ • Strong values centric culture • 13th Year in the Premier League • Average 98% occupancy at Craven Cottage
    • 67. Over 40m investment 4000 new premium seats State of the art hospitality space 50% uplift in corporate covers Conference & events space 7 day public boardwalk
    • 68. Growth • Financial Fair Play • The missing generations • Growing the fan base • Engaging and creating ‘forever memories’
    • 69. Engaging with what? Fulham Football Club
    • 70. Who wouldn’t be engaged? Fulham Football Club
    • 71. Meet ‘Steve’
    • 72. Our approach so far Shifting our focus to ‘the edge’ Being closer and more personal Being open and inclusive Catching people doing the right things Treating every interaction as an opportunity Start by recruiting attitudes
    • 73. Shifting focus to the Edge Investing and demonstrating commitment to the Frontline Empowering those on the edge through strong Values focus
    • 74. Closer more personal Listening Accessibility Building relationships Reduce ‘transactional’ nature of relationship
    • 75. Open and inclusive Behave as a ‘Club’ in every sense Embracing agency staff as our own Insight, Involvement, Trust Finding ways to connect between shifts
    • 76. Catch people doing the right things Reinforcing positive behaviour Being proud of unsung heroes Celebrating success
    • 77. Every interaction an opportunity Assessment process Induction Check-in & Out Briefing De-brief Every conversation
    • 78. Start with great attitude Find people with great energy Attitude and enthusiasm rule Do nothing to detract Find managers who can light the fuse!
    • 79. Game We are only as good as our last
    • 80. Questions Current whereabouts of the Jackson Statue Where Mohamed Al Fayed bought his shirts Secret of Shahid Khan’s moustache
    • 81. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 82. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Professor Graeme Martin Professor and Chair of Management Dundee University
    • 83. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 84. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sarah Barrett Head of Customer and Community Services Mears Group Plc
    • 85. Sarah Barrett Walk the Talk Sharing the journey so far……
    • 86. About Me...
    • 87. About Mears Group Plc www.mearsgroup.co.uk
    • 88. Back Drop
    • 89. Why is Walking The Talk Important? The average person in the UK spends 90’000 hours at work during their lifetime, that’s the equivalent of 60’000 football matches!! Unhappy demotivated people don’t deliver great service - FACT Happy, mo tivated employees Happy customers Money in the till Job security & career progress Great place to work Employee Experience
    • 90. 6 key leadership behaviours to galvanise change 1. Trust & Authority 2. Walk the Talk 3. Clear About What YOU Stand For 4. Mix it up and LEAD the charge 5. External Thinking 6. People matter so share the love @ChangeChat www.worldofbusinesschange.co.uk My Mantra
    • 91. Growth & Acquisition ?? ????? ??? ?????????? ?????????? ???????
    • 92. Sharing the Journey
    • 93. Listening to Customers and Employees Customer Insight Employee Survey Discovery Call To ActionShopping!Red Thread Team What Makes Us Great Where Do We Want To Be How Are We Going To Get There Senior Movers and Shakers
    • 94. Being Really Clear About What We Stand For Vision Making lives better ROOTS Trusted to make a difference Freedom to have ideas and fail but learn Make our relationships matter PASSION Helping People to help themselves
    • 95. Engaging Everyone Behind a Common Cause & Leading the Charge
    • 96. What is Red Thread? Mears at its best is brilliant!!!!!! How we make sure we deliver to the highest standard and create the environment to succeed every time is what Red Thread is all about. It recognises that every person and every branch is different but that there is a core way of doing things that runs across all our successful branches. The Red Thread bottles this magic across a number of different areas:
    • 97. Clearing the Decks! Trust and Authority
    • 98. MEARS 5 Behaviours that make Mears People Great at what we do! Motivational and is able to motivate and inspire others to succeed. Empowers colleagues and creates an environment of Trust. Ability to put the customer first. Role Models, respects and leads by example. Standards, sets, maintains and monitors high standards. Measurable sub categories Embedded into Job Descriptions Embedded into performance Reviews Top Down Lead the Charge- It’s not just what you do, its how you do it that really counts! Top Down BottomUp
    • 99. We are all part of the Mears Red Thread Walking The Talk Proud to be Accountable
    • 100.  A simple tool to assess the environment of each branch  Can be used by all staff and visitors  Will be a Red Thread branch of the year award Walking the Talk The Red Thread Branch
    • 101. Change Club Progress Meeting
    • 102. Walking the Talk Nation Wide!!!! The Mears Red Thread Road show UK tour 29th May- 9th August 2013
    • 103. People Matter so Share the Love
    • 104.  Award winning contract  Delivering firsts  Exceptional levels of customer, client and employee satisfaction. 116 Walking the Talk in Partnership
    • 105.  Red Thread Mobilisation  Outcomes based  Community Network  One Team 117 Growth & Diversification
    • 106. 25 years of serving tenants together!!! 118 TPAS (Customer) ACCREDITATION
    • 107.  Continued drive behind everything achieved on the journey so far.  Commitment to ensure all branches nation wide are ‘red hot’.  New Red Thread Leadership Development Programme.  Relentless communication and engagement.  Continued checking, measuring, assessing and adjusting where necessary. 119 What’s next
    • 108. Great Results Employer of Choice Customer Excellence (Beyond the Sector) Organic Growth Market Share
    • 109. THANK YOU ! ANY QUESTIONS sarah.barrett@mearsgroup.co.uk 07958877027
    • 110. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 111. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Steven Weeks Policy Adviser on employee engagement for NHS Employers
    • 112. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 113. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sarah House-Barklie Ho/O People Strategy and Insight Royal Bank of Scotland (Insurance)
    • 114. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 115. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Karine Del Moro Vice President, Marketing Confirmit
    • 116. Yves Duhaldeborde, Director, Talent & Rewards Towers Watson The Power of Linkage Drawing Connections between Employee and Customer Engagement to Drive Business Performance Karine Del Moro, Vice President, Marketing Confirmit
    • 117. The evolution of Customer Engagement… Customer Feedback Customer Engagement Company Culture
    • 118. Human Resources Employee Engagement Company Culture Customer Feedback Customer Engagement Company Culture Just like employee engagement
    • 119. So in the end, it‟s all about…
    • 120. Building the business case
    • 121. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Advances in linkage analyses Bridging data sources to drive business performance Yves Duhaldeborde Director, Talent and Rewards 8 October 2013
    • 122. towerswatson.com Agenda 1 Linkage case study 4 Questions 3 Augmenting linkage models with qualitative data 2 Comments trends around the world 137
    • 123. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com 1. Identify employee behaviours and elements of store culture that have the biggest influence on key business performance metrics 2. Provide internal stakeholders with actionable people insights to enhance business performance Case study: linkage research at a large retail organisation • 24 banners • 3,500 stores • Over $90 billion sales • 340,000 employees Objectives of the study 138
    • 124. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com The people performance linkage framework The linkage framework defines the connections between business, people, and solutions in the context of national culture and business strategy National Culture Business Strategy EMPLOYEE OPINION EMPLOYEE OUTCOMES/ BEHAVIOUR CUSTOMER MEASURES FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE • Safety • Shrink • Efficiency • Customer satisfaction • EBITDA margin • Sales per square foot • Selling gross % of sales Survey Topics • Customer Focus • Career Development • Communication • Engagement • Trust • Work Environment • Managing Performance 139
    • 125. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com 66 58 50 55 60 65 70 Top 5% Engagement Stores Bottom 5% Engagement Stores Illustrating the effect of engagement: Top 5% vs. Bottom 5% stores 3.55 3.22 4.30 3.38 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 EDITDA Margin Safety Top 5% Engagement Stores Bottom 5% Engagement Scores -1.78 -2.51 -3 -2.5 -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 Top 5% Engagement Stores Bottom 5% Engagement Stores 101.4 99.3 90 95 100 105 Top 5% Engagement Stores Bottom 5% Engagement Stores Shrink (% of sales) Efficiency (ELMS) Customer Satisfaction EBITDA Margin & Safety 140
    • 126. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Illustrating the effect of engagement on customer satisfaction Outcome Measures ENGAGEMENT: Top 5% of Stores ENGAGEMENT: Bottom 5% of Stores Raw Gap Percent Gap Customer Satisfaction 66% 58% 8pp 13.8% 66 58 50 55 60 65 70 Top 5% Bottom 5% Customer Satisfaction Business Performance Measure Correlation with Engagement Customer Satisfaction .14*** Engagement 141
    • 127. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com **Correlation is significant at the 99% level.  Strong customer focus, effective training, integrity and an emphasis on values are associated with high customer satisfaction  Together, these items form a Service Climate index Top Correlated Items – the “Service Climate Index” Correlation My company provides the resources necessary for me to work effectively (tools, equipment, supplies, etc.). .170** My company's focus on values supports how I do business with my customers and other associates. .168** In my work group/department, we have the agility and the flexibility to respond to what our customers need. .166** I understand that my work impacts our customers' shopping experience. .162** I have access to the training I need to be productive in my current job. .162** My company conducts its business activities with honesty and integrity. .155** The customer satisfaction drivers tell a compelling story 142
    • 128. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Service climate matters  There is a 3.2% advantage between top-quartile versus bottom-quartile stores on service climate 55% 57% 59% 61% 63% 65% Top Q Q2 Q3 Bot Q Service Climate: Quartile Analysis YTD Customer Satisfaction 88% 81% 76% 68% Service Climate Score 143
    • 129. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Building a business case: engagement influences store performance  The research findings indicate concrete gains in store performance from improved employee engagement A 10% improvement in store engagement Less shrink, equating to $20,000 saved/store Improved efficiency of over 0.5% A 5% improvement in safety results A 1% jump in customer satisfaction 144
    • 130. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com The full picture: how employee drivers and behaviours influence customer satisfaction and business performance Efficiency Selling Gross % Sales per Square Foot Shrink EBITDA Margin EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOURS OUTCOMESEMPLOYEE DRIVERS Collaboration Engagement “Feel” & “Intention to leave” Safety Service Climate Customer Satisfaction A 10% improvement in the employee drivers is associated with a 0.3 percentage point increase in EBITDA margin 145
    • 131. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Question: “If there was one thing you could change in your organisation, what would that be? How would you change it?” 690,170 comments captured in 2012 Over 50,000,000 words Diving deeper with VERA 25global organisations8 million answers in our 2012 Normative data, from over 900 companies 146
    • 132. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com What are the most frequently discussed topics globally? Operating Efficiency 17% Pay 17% Internal Communications 13% Customer Focus 12% Management 12% Respect & Ethics 11% Training 10% Leadership 9% Motivation 9% Career & Mobility 8% “If there was one thing you could change in your organisation, what would that be? And how would you change it?” (Average frequencies -- Global) 147
    • 133. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com A (quick and partial) world tour of employee comments Europe US / Canada LATAM Afrique APAC 148
    • 134. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Comments trends: Europe 149
    • 135. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Netherlands: Focus on what is really essential Customer focus 18% (+6): “Always put the client first. Put in effort to find out what it is the client needs, what the problem is.” Costs 8% (+4): “Don‟t spend so much money on reorganizations and other internal and people changes. Focus on what is really needed.” UK: Streamline processes, act on our input, manage poor performance/reward good performance Operating efficiency 24% (+7): “We could be much more focused on streamlining processes and challenging the ways things were always done to gain more efficiency. Real resources should be available for the changes to be implemented quickly.” Management 18% (+6): “Most employee issues arise from poor managers. Managers need to feel more supported to tackle difficult team issues and not shy away from them because they are too difficult/can‟t be bothered to deal with.” 150
    • 136. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Switzerland: Looking for more clear and efficient processes Decision process 7% (+2): “Providing more autonomy and decision rights to country-level management can help us be more flexible and responsive to customer needs.” Costs 6% (+2): “Stop the cost cutting. It is hurting the company. Under investment will hurt us in the long term.” Germany: Optimising efficiency in all possible ways Decision process 9% (+4): “Clear Strategy, Clear Decision, Stronger Communication, Clear Goals - The organization has an issue with executing decisions – nobody wants to take any „risk/responsibility‟ and tries to avoid decisions.” Costs 8% (+4): “I do not think it makes sense to reorganize constantly – to change the business process every year as it costs a lot of money, time and effort. Efforts that could be invested better differently.” 151
    • 137. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Sweden: Empower leaders to lead, decisively yet thoughtfully, and involve employees in decision making Innovation 3% (+1): “Empower the local management to handle resources and lead the organisation rather than centrally micromanage local conditions and priorities. This would increase dedication, creativity, teamwork and improve results.” Decision process 6% (+1): “Involve team members to a greater extent in decisions that affect our work. Many decisions are taken by senior leaders and sometimes you wonder how well they understand the work we do. Also, I often lack justifications for decisions already made.” Turkey: Make talent management fair and involve employees in the business Pay 28% (+11): “Pay increases. Even though we worked with big target pressure, we did not see any reflection of our efforts in our pay. Also, the tax cuts from our bonus payments are almost 50%.” Respect & ethics 21% (+10): “Our managers should be fair and shouldn‟t discriminate against any employees. Transparency and regular feedback are very important.” 152
    • 138. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Comments trends: APAC 153
    • 139. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com China: Clarify reward and make work arrangements more flexible. Pay 32% (+15): “I worked here at XYZ for many years but I still do not fully understand my rewards, esp basic salary, I do not know how we determine each employee‟s level and basic salary. Do we match salary with job? Compared with other companies, XYZ salary is not competitive. I feel less and less confident working here and less and less energized.” Production 11% (+9): “Please use a milder way to deal with staff issues, including laying off blue collar staff. If we lay off workers in down time, it is possible that we get new orders and can not find enough labor. We should consider to retain staff in other ways, e.g. Working 4 days a week, take longer leave with only basic pay, etc.” Japan: Role and responsibility of Manager / Management and HR on people related action should be reviewed and redefined. Evaluation 13% (+8): “I got very positive verbal performance feedback from my manager but final rating is low and very limited pay raise. My manager said his manager and HR changed the rating though he evaluated highly” Management 18% (+6): “There are huge skills gap among managers. They should have consistent standard people management and match their words with action.” 154
    • 140. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Comments trends: US / Canada 155
    • 141. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Most specific topics in North AmericaUnited States: Regain focus on customers rather than cost Customer focus 21% (+9): ““Refocus on actually helping customers with their problems instead of how much time you are on a call and selling services customers don't need or want.” “We have recently changed 'hats' and now it's all about sales. Feels like the customer service has been pushed to the back burner.” Operating efficiency 22% (+5): “There is a lot of waste of resources due to inefficient processes or outdated organizational setup / changes. A lot of superficial organizational changes which appear to not address real challenges.” “Increased focus needed on how teams can be more efficient…Less e-mails, fewer meetings, and more time to get projects, work done.” Management 21% (+9): “Training for managers is insufficient. The managers don't know what requirements there are of them, and don't know what is truly expected. The expectation of managers / technicians change on a daily basis.” 156
    • 142. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com 79 71 8180 74 7879 67 7774 61 75 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Company has a deep understanding of what customers think is important We do not promise customers things we cannot deliver My department is easy to do business with %Agree 2009 2010 2011 2012 Growing discontent with customer focus in the U.S. 157
    • 143. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Comments trends: LATAM 158
    • 144. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Brazil: Pay fairly; support people development and work across boundaries Pay 24% (+7): “I believe other firms in the market offer better salaries, performance bonuses, potential for career growth and incentives than this company does. The latest increase in employee turnover is a consequence of this. This is certainly an aspect that needs to be improved.” Career & mobility 15% (+7): “Career plans are essential for professional development and growth. I believe offering more and better career plans would have a significant impact on employee satisfaction. Offering training courses relevant for each job is now a need.” Mexico: Leaders & managers could collaborate and involve others more Strategy 7% (+3): “The executive team has put forward great business changes, however these have not taken into account the views of clients and final users.” Leadership 11% (+2): “Local leadership is too distant from employees. There should be closer communication between employees and local leadership. Top leadership should encourage this.” 159
    • 145. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Comments trends: Africa 160
    • 146. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Nigeria Training 40% (+30): “I think staff should be encouraged to participate in training that would improve their overall productivity and personality. Managers should be made to understand the importance of this and it should be mandatory.” Morocco Pay 21% (+4): “Management should be transparent and provide clear explanations on remuneration and variable pay increases as it is insulting and demotivating.” Career 13% (+5): “The company must ensure that the right persons are in the right place. Management has to avoid the temptation of choosing friends and relatives.” Algeria Pay 38% (+11): “Insufficient wages, not at all in line with the standard of living and the real inflation rate or wage levels in other companies for the same position and the same seniority.” / “The difference in wages between employees is such that you wonder what these people do to deserve such privilege.” 161
    • 147. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Back to our retail case study – how qualitative data enriches linkage research The main barrier for me is having to constantly get passwords from supervisors. Whenever a coupon is short of the minimum even a couple cents we have to get a password in order to use it. When the customer wants package protection removed we also have to get a password . Customers gets annoyed because it takes so long for us to get the password. It would be a lot more efficient for our talk time as well. We really should carry [brand] in all of our UK stores. Placing sizable ranges of [brand] will boost profitability for a majority of brick and mortar locations, and some locations which are currently unprofitable will have the potential to come out of the red. We need better market data, analyses and trend reporting to create more consumer-relevant products. I am greatly concerned the current loss of traction of [brand] in the local and global marketplace. I would like to see more global consistency, focus and investment behind [brand] stories and product launches. At a previous employer, all shipments of new products were packaged in a way that allowed for more efficient processing. It is much easier to sort cartons by their number and then unpack them. This would save time by not having to sort the contents of each carton as it is unpacked I would change the systems that we use here. I find that given our business volume and needs, the current systems are not adequate to allow us to efficiently perform our jobs to meet the needs of the business. Specifically, [system] is very outdated and could be made more efficient - easier to look up stock availability, stock allocations and price look up. 162
    • 148. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com How the augmented insights are helping develop a full talent management strategy and allocate resources Talent Acquisition/ Sourcing Performance Management Compensation and Rewards Career Management Succession Management Leadership and Capability Development Workforce Planning Clear decision- making/governance, minimal approvals required One of the key focus areas for line managers training Retention focus to encourage consistent support for customers Consistent job architecture Focused succession management on leadership levels (not necessarily pivotal roles) Screening for EQ (e.g., personality tests, interview screening); group- based interview supplement Focus on building talent in the organization to continue to foster customer relationships Structure of HR Function HR Technology Manager Effectiveness Change Mgmt and Comms Strong focus on the collaboration and support model within HR (COEs, BP and Shared Services) User interface is a key factor in selection of HR technology Managers spend more time managing than producing Key messages always include link to the customer (what's in it for the customer) Objective: to attract, retain and engage talent who build strong customer relationships by empowering people, emphasizing teamwork and focusing on long-term development 163
    • 149. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com  Linkage research seeks to identify quantitative links across employee attitudes and behaviours, organisational culture and organisational performance  Linkage models are a powerful way to establish the business case for employee engagement and inform talent management strategies  Advances in qualitative research can now help organisations increase the ROI on their human capital strategies, policies and programs Summary 164
    • 150. © 2013 Towers Watson. All rights reserved.towerswatson.com Questions & Comments 165
    • 151. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 152. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Yves Dulhaldeborde Director Talent & Rewards at Towers Watson
    • 153. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 154. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Perry Timms Founder PTHR
    • 155. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 156. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Perry Timms Founder PTHR
    • 157. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 158. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Alison Innes-Farquhar Head of People Development and Engagement HC-One
    • 159. <Montage of headline newspaper stories re. Southern Cross demise>
    • 160. <HC-One brand images, with logo and key figures over • 241 Homes • 10,000 Residents • 15,000 Colleagues> 1 November 2011 …
    • 161. 12 months later …
    • 162. Everything we have done is informed by business and learner needs. Three principles guided development of touch ….
    • 163. Our pilot project tested assumptions and built expectation. <Photo montage with key number over: • 20 homes • 500 colleagues • 1,400 courses completed • 260 evaluation responses
    • 164. Colleague responses Headline outcomes from evaluation (Learner’s and managers)
    • 165. What’s coming…
    • 166. Performance Development
    • 167. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 168. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Caroline Hopkins Co-Founder and Director Mindfulness at Work
    • 169. Inspirational and Caring Leadership
    • 170. “ What‟s this all about?”
    • 171. “Who Are We?”
    • 172. “What is your story?”
    • 173. In the words of Paloma Faith…
    • 174. Listening is one of the greatest gifts we can give to our employees…
    • 175. Engagement...it’s a mix... Line manager is the core ingredient
    • 176. • 45% response rate • 60% EEI • Not understood • Focus on survey for survey’s sake • Not part of managers’ expectations • No linkage between internal comms and engagement • 77% response • 59% EEI • Top 20 teams – EEI ranges from 78% to 96% • 60% Wellbeing index • Managers accountable for engagement – embedded in performance 2009/10 2012 • 64% response rate • 68% EEI • Employee communications and engagement team join HR • Understanding of engagement index • ECC’s first Corporate Action Plan • Team-based action planning • Links to sickness absence 2007/8 2010/11 • 67% response rate • 56% EEI • 39 teams with 70% + EEI • Delivery of Corporate Action Plan • Change and engagement skills development • Supporting toolkits for managers • Links to performance Our council’s engagement journey - so far – a snapshot
    • 177. Creating opportunities for REAL conversations…
    • 178. So what…taking actions that matter Rewarding people and saving money - Essex Extras - Buying extra holiday - Celebrating our people – You Make the Difference in Essex Awards Technology - Modernising IT = more flexible working - Digital media encourages knowledge sharing and cross organisational conversation Collaborative change - New organisational values - Speak up! - Behaviours matter - Performance – more focus on howGreater focus on personal development - Secondments - Online toolkits - E-learning - Job Shadowing Focus on face-to-face - Employee Panel - Essex Engagers - Our Voice Forum - Your Voice Day - Leaders up close and personal - Speed networking Elevating and supporting line managers - Line Manager Community - Range of new training including „Engage Space‟ - Accountability for engagement
    • 179. The serious stuff can be fun!
    • 180. It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.
    • 181. The State of the “Deal” at LBBD Inducements Contributions
    • 182. How does Mindfulness work with this?
    • 183. The Change Model Sensing Non-Judging Patience Realising Letting Go Presencing Beginners Mind Trust Accepting Non-striving
    • 184. Non-judging
    • 185. Patient presence
    • 186. Beginners Mind
    • 187. Trust: Really?
    • 188. Non-striving
    • 189. Acceptance- Eau de Whelming
    • 190. Letting go
    • 191. The Change Model Sensing Non-Judging Patience Realising Letting Go Presencing Beginners Mind Trust Accepting Non-striving
    • 192. Question and Answers
    • 193. Thank You
    • 194. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 195. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Dr Nick Buckley Consultant SoShall Consulting
    • 196. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 197. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Martin Rayson HRD London Borough of Barking and Dagenham
    • 198. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 199. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Lisa Sibley Employee Engagement Manager Essex County Council
    • 200. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 201. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication David MacLeod Chairman MacLeod Review
    • 202. Engage For Success The Focus Group 8th October 2013
    • 203. 238 AN EXAMPLE OF ACTIVE DISENGAGEMENT:
    • 204. THE BIGGER PICTURE 09/10/2013 ENGAGE FOR SUCCESS 239 The context for WHY Employee Engagement is critical: The 20th Century model was “Business as Usual”. MAKE EFFICIENT – aligned but not engaged, central direction, command and control.
    • 205. THE CASE FOR ENGAGEMENT 09/10/2013 PRESENTATION TITLE IN FOOTER 240
    • 206. THE CASE FOR ENGAGEMENT 09/10/2013 PRESENTATION TITLE IN FOOTER 241
    • 207. 242 KEY ENABLER 1: STRATEGIC NARRATIVE Strong, visible, empowering leadership provides a strong strategic narrative about the organisation, where it’s come from and where it’s going. This gives a line of sight between the job and the organisation‟s vision. The story is communicated clearly, consistently and constantly. The past You are here The future
    • 208. 243 KEY ENABLER 2: ENGAGING MANAGERS They: focus their people, offer scope and enable the job to get done treat their people as individuals coach and stretch their people
    • 209. 244 KEY ENABLER 3: EMPLOYEE VOICE There is employee voice throughout the organisation, for reinforcing and challenging views; between functions & externally; employees are really seen as your key asset – not the problem.
    • 210. 245 KEY ENABLER 4: INTEGRITY There is organisational integrity – the values on the wall are reflected in day to day behaviours. These expected behaviours are explicit and bought into by staff. Keep it real – staff see through corporate spin quicker than customers or the public. Integrity enables trust: no engagement without trust
    • 211. THE FOUR ENABLERS OF ENGAGEMENT 09/10/2013 ENGAGE FOR SUCCESS 2012 246
    • 212. 247 Task Force Launch
    • 213. MOVEMENT STRUCTURE 09/10/2013 PRESENTATION TITLE IN FOOTER 248
    • 214. Lord O'Donnell, Former Head of Home Civil Service Marc Bolland, CEO, M&S Mark Elborne, CEO, General Electric, North Europe Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO, WPP Martin Temple, Chairman, EEF Moya Greene, CEO, Royal Mail Nigel Stein, CEO, GKN Paul Drechsler, CEO, Wates Group Peter Cheese, CE, CIPD Sir Peter Housden, PS for Scotland Peter Rogers, CEO, Babcock Peter Sands, CEO, Standard Chartered Peter Searle, CEO, Adecco Group UK & Ireland Richard Baker, Chairman, Virgin Active Rob Devey, CE, Prudential UK and Europe Ronan Dunne, CEO , O2 Rona Fairhead, Group CE, Financial Times Group Simon Walker, Director General, IoD Sir Stephen Bubb, CE, Acevo Stephen Howard, Chief Executive, BITC Steve Elliott, Director General, CIA Steve Mogford, CEO, United Utilities Tim Melville-Ross, Chairman, HEFCE Tim O’Toole, CEO, First Group Will Hutton, Executive Vice Chair, Work Foundation Sir Win Bischoff, Chairman, Lloyds Banking Group Adam Balon, Innocent Adam Crozier, CEO, ITV Adrian Brown, UK and Western Europe CEO RSA Alex Gourlay, CEO, Alliance Boots Amyas Morse, Auditor General, NAO Andy Harrison, CEO, Whitbread Anthony Jenkins, CEO, Barclays Dame Barbara Stocking, CEO, Oxfam Barbara Frost, CE, WaterAid Sir Bob Kerslake, Head of the Civil Service Brendan Barber, General Secretary, TUC Carolyn Downs, CE, Local Govt Assoc Charlie Mayfield, Chairman, JLP Chris Browne, MD, Thomson Airways Chris Hyman, CEO, Serco David Evans, CE, Grass Roots Group Ed Sweeney, Chairman, ACAS Ian King, CEO, BAE Ian Livingston, CEO, BT Ian Powell, Chairman & Senior Partner, PwC Ian Sarson, CEO, Compass Group Jane Wilson, CE, CIPR John Cridland, Director General, CBI John Hannett, General Secretary, USDAW John Neill, Group CE, Unipart John Walker, Chairman, FSB Karen Boswell, MD, East Coast Rail Engage for Success Sponsors
    • 215. www.engageforsuccess.org Twitter – www.twitter.com/engage4success Linked In – http://www.linkedin.com/company/engage-for-success Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/#!/EngageForSuccess Google+ - https://plus.google.com/#communities/118419210283831602780 YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/user/Engage4Success Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/engage4success/ BlogTalkRadio - http://www.blogtalkradio.com/engage-for-success
    • 216. 09/10/2013 ENGAGE FOR SUCCESS 2012 252 www.engageforsuccess.org info@engageforsuccess.org @engage4success ENGAGE FOR SUCCESS
    • 217. Engage For Success The Focus Group 8th October 2013
    • 218. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by:
    • 219. Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Perry Timms Founder PTHR
    • 220. Welcome to Engaging for Growth The Four Pillars of Engagement Leadership, Trust, Skills and Communication Sponsored by: Endorsed by: