ARF Multicultural Council - AdWeek 2009

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At Advertising Week 2009, the Multicultural Council of the Advertising Research Foundation presents "The Time is Right: On the Path to Multicultural Business Growth."

The Advertising Research Foundation is focusing on the business issues acting as an impediment to the growth of Multicultural Advertising and Marketing.

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ARF Multicultural Council - AdWeek 2009

  1. 1. The ARF presents: Multicultural Council The Time is Right: On the Path to Multicultural Business Growth September 2009
  2. 2. 2 Welcome & ARF Updates Joel Rubinson Chief Research Officer
  3. 3. 3 Thank You to Our Sponsors
  4. 4. 4 Don’t turn off your cell phones! Follow The_ARF Ad Week events on Twitter at #arfadweek
  5. 5. Upcoming ARF Event – Industry Leader Forum Winning with Social Media November 3, 2009 • New York Athletic Club Social media has provided brand advertisers and marketers, media and agencies with new ways of listening to consumers. Listening leads the way to engaging in conversations and uncovering new actionable insights. Chris Brogan, President of New Marketing Labs, co-author of The New York Times Best Seller Trust Agents, a blog in the top 10 of the Advertising Age Power 150 and in the top 100 on Technorati keynotes Google shows how to use search as a predictive listening tool IBM presents a model for integrating listening into an organization ESPN demonstrates how listening engages and serves fans Panelists from Crispin Porter + Bogusky, Meredith Corporation and Motivequest plus networking, breakout sessions, meet the speakers and more!
  6. 6. Upcoming ARF Events TO FIND OUT MORE AND REGISTER – WWW.THEARF.ORG Online Research Quality Council A Special Meeting SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 Time Warner Building, NYC ARF Member Day OCTOBER 22 ARF Headquarters, NYC DECEMBER 4, 2009 Time Warner Building, NYC 360 Measurement Day Workshop
  7. 7. 7 Welcome Raymond Pettit SVP, Research and Standards The ARF
  8. 8. 8 ARF's Multicultural Program Ron Franklin Global Hue Vice Chairman of Research (retired) and President NSights Worldwide
  9. 9. 9 The Time is Right To get on the Path to Multicultural Business Growth
  10. 10. 10 Multicultural Consumers Are A Large and Growing Population Minorities, now roughly one-third of the U.S. population, are expected to become the majority in 2042, with the nation projected to be 54% “minority” in 2050. They are the consumers of the future Source: U.S Census Press Release, 2008
  11. 11. 11 Cohort Ratios The population is becoming more diverse. Source: From speech by Michael Powell, October 23, 2003. 1.5:1Age 10 2:1Age 40-under 5:1Age 70-plus
  12. 12. 12 In the Future 24.4% 14.6% 8.0% 102.6MM 61.4MM 33.4MM 9.0% 12.1% 2.8% 22.4MM 29.9MM 6.9MM Hispanics African-Americans Asian-Americans Roughly one-quarter Roughly Population projected to be roughly one-half multicultured by 2050.
  13. 13. 13 Diversity will be the “new norm” Multicultured consumers are the customers of the future.
  14. 14. 14 Multicultural Consumers Have Considerable Dollars To Spend… 20509.1Asian 72,373.2Total Multicultural 15951.0Hispanic 16913.1African American Country Ranking2008 Buying Power (billions of dollars) 1 United States 13,751.4 2 Japan 4,384.2 3 Germany 3,317.4 4 China 3,205.5 5 United Kingdom 2,772.0 6 France 2,589.8 7 Total Multicultural 2,373.2 8 Italy 2,101.6 Multicultural Market would rank as the 7th Largest Global Economy Source: The Multicultural Economy 2008, Selig Center for Economic Growth; 2007 World Development Indicators Database, World Bank
  15. 15. 15 & They Have A Strong Affinity To Brands… It’s risky to buy a brand you are not familiar with. I like to buy brands that make me feel I’ve made it. AA 61% Hispanic 61% AA 58% Hispanic 61% Once I find a brand I like, it is very difficult to get me to change brands. The brands you buy tell a lot about the type of person you are. AA 70% Hispanic 66% AA 51% Hispanic 52% Source: 2009 Yankelovich Multicultural Monitor
  16. 16. 16 …Multicultural Consumers Are A Marketers Dream! Multicultural Consumers
  17. 17. 17 However, Marketers Are NOT Investing in Consumers Who Are Their Future
  18. 18. 18 The Proof Is In The Pudding In total, ad revenue targeted towards Hispanic in Spanish- language was essentially flat compared to 2007. Since the recession spending is estimated to be down by -14%. Source: The Nielsen Company -0.5%$5,760.1$5,780.7Total -7%$103.1$110.3Local Newspaper 10%$179.7$164.1National Magazine -12%$532.9$608.9Spot Radio -3%$1,619.0$1,669.6Spot TV 3%$3,325.4$3,233.9Network & Cable TV Advertising by Medium
  19. 19. 19 The Proof Is In The Pudding Advertising toward African Americans declined in 2008 from 2007. Post recession estimates suggest the decline has at least doubled. Source: The Nielsen Company -9%$1,965.9$2,754.1Total -42%$94.7$164.4Network TV -9%$112.3$124.0Syndicated TV 3%$497.6$484.6Cable TV -11%$530.8$597.5National Magazine -7%$730.6$783.6Spot Radio Advertising by Medium
  20. 20. 20 The Advertising Research Foundation (ARF) is focusing on the business issues acting as an impediment to the growth of Multicultural Advertising and Marketing
  21. 21. 21 Components of Growth Consistent & Relevant Measurement Awareness of Opportunity/Value Executional Expertise Personnel Resources
  22. 22. 22 Strategic Structure Goal / Mission To establish the ARF as the premier visionary organization that provides a scientific approach for resolving contemporary multicultural marketing problems. Marketing Objective To position the ARF as the thought-leader for incorporating multicultural consumers into “mainstream” marketing and advertising. Marketing Strategy To develop ARF initiatives that respect and understand the contributions, opportunities and importance of cultural consumers to the future business environment.
  23. 23. 23 Benefactors Consumers Corporations Top 200 Blacks African-American Afro Caribbeans Africans Hispanics Cuban Mexican Puerto Rican South American American Latino Asians Chinese Korean Indian Japanese
  24. 24. 24 Strategic Tactics Develop a 3-year program that: (a) Shows that it is “good” business to invest marketing dollars to specifically address multicultural segment opportunities. -- Share Point Analysis -- Opportunity Gap Analysis (b) Establish that the goal is to deliver relevant communications not “over-delivery”.
  25. 25. 25 Strategic Tactics (c) Develop mathematical models that confirm the value of multicultural consumers and allow marketers to determine the ROI of their targeted efforts -- Measurement “umbrella” issue • Need uniformity of measurement by vendors • Better measurement by vendors • Research vendors should be “leaders” not just ‘order takers’
  26. 26. 26 Strategic Tactics (d) Illustrate ‘successful’ efforts with great case studies of brands that have done it “right” and seize the opportunity -- Need case studies with great results (e) Structure an ARF Multicultural Summer Intern Program for Juniors in college and first year graduate school students to replenish, rejuvenate and refresh the cultural resources needed to “fuel” cultural growth by marketers and advertisers.
  27. 27. 27 Advisory Board Yvonne Montanino – Unilever Daniel Bloom – Bank of America Loida Rosario – DePaul University Ed Martin – Hershey's Rodolfo Rodriguez – General Mills Dr. Jerome Williams – University of Texas at Austin To guide, inform and direct the development of our program elements we will have an Advisory Board. It’s members are: Millie Carrasquillo – NBC Universal, Telemundo Don Williams – Harvel Esther Franklin – Starcom MediaVest Group Ramon Portilla – Walmart Andrea Fant-Hobbs – Verizon (T) (T) Denotes Tentative
  28. 28. 28 Introduction to Measurement Issues and Prior Council Work Kevin Brockenbrough VP, Associate Director – Account Planning David Burgos VP, Multicultural Practice
  29. 29. Multicultural IS Mainstream Why multicultural? 1 in 3 US residents is of multicultural origin • 40% among 0-17 y.o. 2+ trillion combined purchasing power • 21% of total US Multicultural Source: US Census LAX 65 MIA 61 HOU 56 SFO 50 NYC 48 ATL 44 CHG 42 DET 30 SEA 23VEG 44 DEN 31 Growth and influence of multicultural consumers is not limited to largest metropolitan areas any more…
  30. 30. Multicultural Super Council Mission To uncover the real business opportunity in multicultural marketing and set the path for future improvements in multicultural advertising research
  31. 31. Multicultural Super Council The Advisory Board is made up of high level marketing leaders with a commitment to ‘multicultural as mainstream’. The Advisory Board will supply the general strategic direction, influence, and leadership needed to fulfill the mission of the council. They will meet on a regular basis in conjunction with the MC Council meetings – 3-4 times a year (in the morning prior to the scheduled council meetings). There may also be additional opportunities to convene during ARF events, such as the Annual and/or Audience measurement conferences. The Steering Committee is an action committee involved in research, outreach, and education. Their focus is on the technical aspects of researching, understanding, and advancing methods, data, plans, training, and models. In conjunction with the Advisory Board, they integrate strategy and tactics; marry theory and practice; contribute to standards setting, and do relevant research. Depending on the level of activities they pursue, this committee, or special subcommittees created for a specific purpose, could meet 6-12 times a year.
  32. 32. The research issue
  33. 33. The research issue We are not being consistent in the way we define multicultural segments Our definitions may not be the most appropriate from a marketing perspective Definitions Sampling frame We are not being consistent in the way we sample  multicultural segments Our data collection methods may be under‐ representing multicultural markets or sub‐ segments within them
  34. 34. The research issue The business  opportunity Less than adequate level of  investment limits data quality  improvements Advertisers are not fully aware of REAL opportunity of multicultural markets – dollar value Definitions Sampling frame Missed incremental revenue
  35. 35. The business  opportunity Definitions Sampling frame Focus and Priorities Clearly articulate the opportunity, present and future, with and for advertisers Work with advertisers, agencies and research companies to ensure that measurements are relevant, accurate, consistent and fully representative of the multicultural opportunity – best practices
  36. 36. Outreach and knowledge sharing
  37. 37. Outreach and knowledge sharing • Focus on strategy, issues, concerns and opportunities (Ogilvy Awards, ANA, etc.) • Promote information sharing among members and industry leaders – council meetings
  38. 38. 38 Marketing to Multicultural Audiences Nancy Bates Secretary of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology United States Census Bureau
  39. 39. 39 Nancy Bates and Mary Mulry (U.S. Census Bureau) Joe Panzarella, Vita Harris, Darlene Billia, Tanya White (DraftFCB) Linda Jacobsen (Population Reference Bureau) Other cast of thousands…. Advertising Week Multicultural Advertising Council Segmenting the Population for the 2010 Census September 22, 2009
  40. 40. 40 The Census 2010 Challenge… • The campaign • The “product” • The target audience • Timing • Truth in advertising • A little help from friends…
  41. 41. 41 Fundamental Research Question How to segment entire US population according to mailback propensity and then…. take that knowledge and apply it to the marketing and advertising world? Audience segmentation (WHO/WHAT/WHERE) Overlay consumer data (MEDIA CONSUMPTION) Barriers and motivators survey (WHY)
  42. 42. 42 Attributes of the Hard To Count Housing Factors: • Percent Vacant • Percent Not Single Unit Structure • Percent Renter Occupied • Percent Crowded Occupancy Social and Demographic Factors: • Percent Not Husband/Wife Households • Percent Household with no phone service • Percent Not High School Graduate • Percent with Public Assistance Income • Percent Unemployed • Percent below poverty level • Percent Linguistically Isolated Households • Percent Moved into Unit (1999-2000)
  43. 43. 43 What do HTC populations look like? • Unique factors underlying group of variables • Principal components factor analysis using Planning Database • Input the 12 hard-to-count (HTC) variables • Yielded 3 uncorrelated factors
  44. 44. 44 Underlying constructs of HTC areas 6%7%11%Percent of all tracts 67%67%64% Average Census 2000 mail return rate* *overall avg.=75% crowded housing ling. isolation < H.S. education Multi-units Renters non-spousal moved last year • Vacant housing • Poverty • Unemployment • <H.S. education High Factor- Loading Variables Factor 3 High density w/linguistic isol. Factor 2 Unattached, Single, mobiles Factor 1 Economically Disadvantaged
  45. 45. 45 How to segment all populations? • Mutually exclusive groupings of objects • k-means cluster analysis using PDB • Input the 12 hard-to-count (HTC) score variables • Yielded 8 clusters Several iterations Looking for constructs identified previously
  46. 46. 46 Audience segmentation
  47. 47. 47 Characteristics of the 8 clusters Advantaged homeowners single family; spousal; low mobility; suburban;$69K; 85% white All around average (owner skewed) suburb & rural; $45K; 80% white All around average (renter skewed) more urban; fewer spousal; $45K; 69% white Young/mobile/singles renters; high ed; few children; urban; $40K; racially diverse Economically Disadvantaged (owner skewed) urban & rural; single mothers; $26K; 49% Black; 1/3 live alone Economically Disadvantaged (renter skewed) urban; female-headed; $22K; 59% Black; 23% Hispanic Ethnic enclave (owner skewed) 43% foreign born; spousal; 50% w/children; $35K; 61% Hispanic Ethnic enclave (renter skewed) 62% foreign born; low ed; younger; urban; $32K; 59% Hisp; 11% Asian; 34% ling. Isolated * Source: 2006 American Community Survey
  48. 48. 48 Distribution of Occupied Housing Units by Cluster 36% 16% 3% 26% 3% 6% 2% 8% Avg I (own) Avg II (rent) Econ Dis I (own) Econ Dis II (rent) Eth Enc I (own) Eth Encl II (rent) Mobile sing Adv. Homeown
  49. 49. 49
  50. 50. 50
  51. 51. 51 Example: Hispanic Audience Profile by Cluster
  52. 52. 52 HTC Audience Insights – Cluster Characteristics -61% Hispanic -Primarily age 18-49 -1st generation skew (43% foreign born) -Urban & rural tracts -Spousal skewed -50% w/children -Linguistically isolated -59% Hispanic -11% Asian Primarily age 18-49 -Heavily skewed 1st generation (62% foreign born) -Lower education -Urban skewed -59% Black -23% Hispanic -Primarily age 18-49 -Female-headed household skewed -Urban skewed - $22K income Ethnic Enclave I Ethnic Enclave II Economically Disadvantaged II Source: American Community Survey: 2006; SMRB Summer 2008
  53. 53. HOBBIES/SPORTS/INTERESTS Index SOCCER 187 BASEBALL 145 BASKETBALL 132 FOOTBALL 110 THEME PARKS 104 PROVIDE MY KIDS WITH THINGS I DIDN’T HAVE (117 INDEX) RELY ON MAGAZINES TO KEEP ME INFORMED (127 INDEX) LIKE OTHER PEOPLE TO THINK I’M FINANCIALLY SUCCESSFUL (103 INDEX) WILLING TO GIVE UP FAMILY TIME TO ADVANCE (INDEX 163) RADIO IS MAIN MY SOURCE OF ENTERTAINMENT (172 INDEX) I PREFER TO SHOP WITH MY FAMILY (130 INDEX) PSYCHOGRAPHICS MEDIA SNAPSHOT 7.79 MAGAZINE ISSUES IN LAST MONTH (79 INDEX) 29.6 HOURS OF TV LAST WEEK (108 INDEX) 10 NEWSPAPER ISSUES LAST MONTH (62 INDEX) USED THE INTERNET 27 TIMES LAST MONTH (51 INDEX) ETHNIC ENCLAVE I MEDIA QUINTILES 101 93 88 86 72 46 29 RADIO CABLE TV OUTDOOR MAGAZINES TV NEWSPAPERS INTERNET EthnicEnclaveI TotalOccupiedHousingUnits3%represents3.4 millionHH’s MailReturnRate70%,HTCScore63
  54. 54. MEDIA SNAPSHOT 10.12 MAGAZINE ISSUES IN LAST MONTH (102 INDEX) 35.2 HOURS OF TV LAST WEEK (128 INDEX) 14 NEWSPAPER ISSUES LAST MONTH (88 INDEX) USED THE INTERNET 32 TIMES LAST MONTH (59 INDEX) ENJOY WATCHING KIDS TV SHOWS WITH MY KIDS (132 INDEX) RARELY SIT DOWN TO A MEAL TOGETHER AT HOME (156 INDEX) I’M NO GOOD AT SAVING MONEY (129 INDEX) I FEEL VERY ALONE IN THE WORLD (128 INDEX) ONLY WORK AT CURRENT JOB FOR THE MONEY (116 INDEX) OFTEN NOTICE THE ADS ON: -TRAINS (371 INDEX) -BUSES (251 INDEX) -BUS STOPS (292 INDEX) PSYCHOGRAPHICS HOBBIES/SPORTS/INTERESTS Index DANCE (Performance) 226 COMEDY CLUB 174 BICYCLING 169 LIVE THEATER 146 AEROBICS 143 BASEBALL 141 BASKETBALL 127 ECON. DISADV. II MEDIA QUINTILES 164 159 155 126 100 61 53 CABLE TV RADIO MAGAZINES NEWSPAPERS TV INTERNET OUTDOOR EconomicallyDisadvantaged II TotalOccupiedHousingUnits3%represents3million HH’s MailReturnRate58%,HTCScore92
  55. 55. 55 Research Question: why? • From segmentation we know who, what, how, where but… not why. • What are the motivators to participate? The barriers? • What are the different mindsets toward Census? • What are the profiles of the mindsets? • What message might motivate the mindsets? • What are insights and tactics for reaching each mindset?
  56. 56. 56 Unacquainted 7% Unacquainted 7% Leading Edge 26% Leading Edge 26% Head Nodders 41% Head Nodders 41% Cynical Fifth 19% Cynical Fifth 19% Insulated 6% Insulated 6% Mindsets for Messaging Census Barriers Attitudes and Motivators Survey
  57. 57. 57 Feel part of their community 81% Unaware of Census 100% Non-White 48% Non-US born 42% Unacquainted 7% Peripheral • Never heard of the Census, know nothing about it at all • Low community stakedness and civic participation — Least likely to indicate participation in the Census, • Ethnic, majority minority (Hispanic, Asian, AI, Black) • Almost half non-U.S. born • Most speaking in-language at home • Largest household size (4+ people), most likely to have children in household • least educated, lowest income
  58. 58. 58 Insulated 6% Indifferent Motivated by individual benefits of Census 88% Female 68% High school or less 56% • Have heard of the Census but “Don’t know” much— low familiarity • Question impact of Census because they haven’t seen results in their neighborhood • Ethnic (Hispanic, Black, American Indian, other) • Many don’t speak English at home (mostly Spanish) • Less likely to have children • Downscale: low income ($25K or less, low education (more than half HS or less)
  59. 59. 59 HISPANICAUDIENCE REACH MESSAGING Head Nodders Head Nodders Cynical FifthCynical FifthLeading EdgeLeading Edge InsulatedInsulated UnacquaintedUnacquainted ETHNIC ENCLAVE II AAA I ETHNIC ENCLAVE I ADV HOMEOWNER ETHNIC ENCLAVE II AAA I ETHNIC ENCLAVE I ADV HOMEOWNER ETHNIC ENCLAVE II ETHNIC ENCLAVE II ETHNIC ENCLAVE II AAA II ETHNIC ENCLAVE II AAA II 1 2SIZE 3
  60. 60. 60 Hispanic — Ethnic Enclave II, AAA I, Ethnic Enclave I & ADV Homeowner
  61. 61. 61 In Summary… Use audience segmentation to understand • Socio-economic composition of clusters • Size and location of clusters • Similarities/differences in HTC clusters • Behavior: mailback response propensity
  62. 62. 62 In Summary… • Census forms will be mailed in English and Spanish • Translated forms available in 6 languages • Language guides available in 59 languages • In-language media/advertising in 28 languages • 7 multicultural partner ad agencies Largest U.S. multi-cultural social marketing campaign…ever?
  63. 63. 63 Nancy Bates Senior Researcher for Survey Methodology U.S. Census Bureau nancy.a.bates@census.gov (301) 763-5248 Advertising Week Multicultural Advertising Council
  64. 64. 64 Case Studies of Multicultural Marketing Success
  65. 65. 65 Ogilvy Award Winner: “If Looks Could Kill” Toyota Camry Kevin Brockenbrough VP/Associate Director, Account Planning, Burrell
  66. 66. AUTOMOTIVE SILVER WINNER
  67. 67. Current Perception Desired Perception
  68. 68. Marketing Strategy: Surprising Experiences What did she want? •Glamorous career •Thrilling adventure •Romance •Fashion •Travel
  69. 69. Segmentation by Lifestyle and Psychographics •Self-confident risk takers •Style conscious •Savvy •Strong Family Ties •Seeks New Experiences
  70. 70. Target Audience: African American Women Only •Competitive “intenders” •25-40 years of age •HH income of $70K+ •Passion points: entertainment, fashion and adventure
  71. 71. Research reveals: Camry’s a “family car that does not fit my lifestyle.” Tools Used: •Custom African American consumer segmentation study •Qualitative testing (before and after creative development) •Projective story telling techniques Areas examined: •Lifestyles •Aspirations •Purchase Considerations •Media Habits “it’s all about me.”
  72. 72. Campaign Idea: An Alternate Reality Game for the African American Female Audience
  73. 73. ILCK VIDEO
  74. 74. Communications Support •Online advertising •Print •Radio •Public Relations •Events
  75. 75. Business Results • The “If Looks Could Kill” campaign was tested among people who visited the site (web-intercept sample of 211), as well as among a sample of 118 people who were sent to the site (“push” sample) of Hall & Partners respondents. • The site immediately changed competitive intenders image of Camry from “suburban family car to one that is sleek and stylish.” There was high resonance among both Camry loyalists and competitive intenders with the hero of the story, “Bianca”, a single African American woman seen as daring, independent and resilient.
  76. 76. Results: Awareness KEY AWARENESS AND ACTION MEASURES GOAL ACTUALS Media Impressions 83MM Impres sions 296MM Impressions PR Impressions 15MM 1B Impressions Unique Visits 500K- 2MM 194K Unique Visits Actions 10K- 100K 25K Actions Musical artist: Keysia Cole
  77. 77. Results: Imagery KEY BRAND IMAGERY MEASURES (Hall & Partners) GOAL ACTUALS Pre- Exposure (Push Sample) Post- Exposure (Push Sample) % Change Change Perceptions +3-5 % points 84% 96% +12% Drive Consideration +3-5 % points 64% 82% +18% Generate Awareness/ Vibrancy +3-5 % points 64% 97% +33% Attendees at an ILCK event
  78. 78. Consumer Response “A new fresh internet interactive movie /mystery /puzzle! I LOVED it and can’t wait to finish all the episodes. Noticed product branding that was subtle, but effective.” “It really shows off the car and what it would be like driving it in everyday situations. It does not have that family car image. It seems younger, fresh and fabulous.” “It was interesting that a Camry would be featured in a show about fashion. I usually do not associate the two. This episode made the Camry appear young and modern.”
  79. 79. Thank You. Q and A
  80. 80. MCM Marketing Strategy: Consumer insights drive results Jimmy Hernandez VP, Strategic Account Planning GlobalHue
  81. 81. 81 MCM consumers see differently *Source: Yankelovich 2006 Multicultural Monitor ““Very little, if any, of theVery little, if any, of the marketing and advertising Imarketing and advertising I see has any relevance to mesee has any relevance to me”” 50%50% AfricanAfrican AmericansAmericans 51%51% HispanicsHispanics
  82. 82. Reframe the question From “What’s Hispanic/ African American about it?” To “What is relevant to Hispanics/African Americans about it?”
  83. 83. Likeability 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Bi‐lingual Hispanics Spanish dominant Hispanics Translation to Spanish Ads Original Spanish Ads Original, targeted communication drives response Brand Linkage 40% 45% 50% 55% 60% 65% 70% Bi‐lingual Hispanics Translation to Spanish Ads Original Spanish Ads Source: Nielsen Hispanic advertising study 2007
  84. 84. 84 Source: Nielsen IAG Report 02.27.06 Communication that “relates to my life” resonates
  85. 85. Consumer insights drive results 1. Targeting household dynamics
  86. 86. Verizon Telecom The Challenge: In an aggressive category with little perceived differentiation, price ends up being the key purchase driver Drive relevance of the Verizon Spanish language TV package in order to drive call volume (direct response TV)
  87. 87. Hispanic household dynamics drive engagement with home entertainment Multiple generations under same roof… The adults are not just “mom” and “dad”… Multiple levels of acculturation… Different cultural experiences…. …Translates to different viewing experiences – social vs individual
  88. 88. Tap into communal viewing behaviors Verizon as enabler of family connections • Content is only a catalyst that allows families to connect – the interaction is the real entertainment • Solving Hispanic cultural dilemma – parents want their children to “be American,” but at the same time maintain their roots
  89. 89. The Results Spot DRTV average cost per call is 50% lower than for comparative General market CPC in similar timeframe Conversion rate: 25% (vs. 18% for GM)
  90. 90. Consumer insights drive results 1. Targeting household dynamics 2. Engaging with the community “third place”
  91. 91. 92 For AA, being part of the community is key Yankelovich 2006 Multicultural Monitor A company contributing to a charity or my local community is important in deciding where to shop 37%37% AfricanAfrican AmericansAmericans 35%35% HispanicsHispanics 35%35% NonNon –– HispanicHispanic WhitesWhites 66% of African Americans agree when a company does something good or has a presence in the community, they try to buy products from that company as often as possible.
  92. 92. The church as community • Ultimate trusted source in the community • The base and guardian of family values • The hub for communal social activity • Gospel choir music as intrinsic part of cultural expression
  93. 93. Music as conduit for brand engagement: Vzw provided opportunity for church choirs to perform and compete in front of the largest audiences of their lives. Winning choirs received a cash prize to go on to compete in a grand finale for a larger cash prize that goes to their church and choir ministry.
  94. 94. 95
  95. 95. Confidential and proprietary material for authorized Verizon Wireless personnel only. Use, disclosure or distribution of this material is not permitted to any unauthorized persons or third parties except by written agreement. Within one year “How Sweet the Sound” grew from a choir concert in Memphis, TN to an eleven city tour • Increased brand affinity and consideration among more than one third of consumers • Sales for Verizon Wireless grew 14% in the markets where program was activated vs. the prior year Results
  96. 96. Consumer insights drive results 1. Targeting household dynamics 2. Engaging with the community “third place” 3. Understanding personal aspirations
  97. 97. U.S. Navy The Challenge: • The Military is seen as an option of last resort • No longer prestigious, lacking status • Reinvigorate interest in and excitement of Navy as career and employer of choice • Develop a strong lead generation platform
  98. 98. Tap into achievement as status For today’s young African Americans, success is status: •Inner-directed = pride in achievements, self- respect, confidence •Outer-directed = gaining respect of others through high valued careers
  99. 99. Navy empowers your personal success • Navy as facilitator to the life you want to make for yourself • Demystify and elevate the Navy by showcasing real stories of current and past Navy Officers • Highlight the short-term educational benefits and long-term career opportunities with the Navy
  100. 100. The results 300,000 contacts via online  discussions exceeding lead  objectives by 38%
  101. 101. 103 Raymond Pettit SVP, Research and Standards Kevin Brockenbrough VP Associate Director, Account Planning David Burgos VP, Multicultural Practice Next Steps and Adjournment
  102. 102. 104 Thank You to Our Sponsors

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