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Launch slides part 2
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  • Point 1. Taking action on your product’s carbon footprint is beneficial in the eyes of consumersPoint 2. We are getting to a point where some consumers will rate environmental impacts over brand name.Point 3. However, price and quality are still ahead. As education improves and we emerge from recession this may well changePoint 4. Education and information is important, so a format for this is important
  • “by 2012 we would require all direct import suppliers to source 95 percent of their production from factories that receive one of our two highest audit ratings for social and environmental” Walmartpractices.
  • Calculated carbon footprints for various stores and warehouse developments providing building advice to design teams to further reductions.Comparative study of the latest store specifications to understand the carbon implications associated with the base design for implementation into 2010 specification. Investigative report into the embodied water in construction materials and the potential risks to business. Working collaboratively with architects and materials experts develop design recommendations within various time frames for achieving a zero carbon specificationAssess the climate change implication for the M&S portfolio and develop a strategic adaptation plan to minimise future vulnerabilities.http://corporate.marksandspencer.com/media/press_releases/planA/SustainableRetailer
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  • Reuse-A-Shoe Program to collect athletic shoes:Expanded to include US, Canada, U.K., Netherlands, Germany, Australia, JapanRecycled more than 20 million pairs of athletic shoes since 1993Nike Grind Program to grind shoes collected through Reuse-A-Shoe to create athletic fieldsHave contributed to more than 250 sport surfaces through collaboration with industry-leading sports surfacing companiesProcessed almost 1.2 million pairs of shoes in 2006
  • Transcript

    • 1. Tom Bell, Consarc <br />&amp; <br />Steve Blackshaw, Winvic Construction<br />iCon: The making of a new <br />beacon for the low carbon economy<br />
    • 2.
    • 3. iCon: <br />The Making of a new beacon for the low carbon economy<br />
    • 4. One Team:<br /><ul><li>A Client with high ambitionsand an appetite for pushing the boundaries
    • 5. Joined up design team thinking. The team was selected as a result of an anonymous and international design competition chaired and judged by the RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) and the BRE (Building Research Establishment); of which there were 72 submissions.
    • 6. A dedicated Contractor - Winvic were selected from a shortlist of 8 national and international contractors</li></li></ul><li>
    • 7.
    • 8. The Environmental Building Brief:<br /><ul><li>It must minimise carbon use to no more than 15kg/CO2/m2 per annum
    • 9. It must achieve the highly respected EU accreditation for buildings environmental performance of Breeam Excellent.
    • 10. It must continue to champion and enact these goals ‘in-use’ through the operation of the building, long after the architect, engineers and construction teams have gone.
    • 11. All of which had to be delivered on time and within budget (£150sqft to Cat A).</li></li></ul><li>Principles of Design: <br />Achieving A Carbon Footprint ofno more than 15kgCO2/m2 per annum<br />Conventional Air Conditioned Office: 89.0kgCo2/m2<br />CIBSE TM 46:2008 Energy Benchmarks: 52.3kgCo2/m2<br />
    • 12. BRE Environmental Building: 34.0kgCo2/m2<br />
    • 13. Lincoln Innovation Centre: 29.0kgCo2/m2<br />ECON 19 “Best Practice” 28.1kgCo2/m2<br />
    • 14. Rivergreen Offices 24.5kgCo2/m2<br />
    • 15. iCon Daventry 12.2kgCo2/m2<br />
    • 16. Passive Ventilation<br />
    • 17. Super Insulation / Timber Structure<br />
    • 18. <ul><li>Good Air TightnessiCon Achieves 5.5m3/hour/m2Building reg requires 10m3/hour/m2</li></li></ul><li>Heat Recovery:iCon utilises an Exhaust Air Heat PumpKey Benefits:- Uses extract air only, provides greater efficiencies- Creates negaitive air pressure, no loss of heat- COP (coefficient to performance) increased<br />
    • 19. <ul><li>Daylight &amp; Daylight linked Dimming:High ceilings and high windows help daylight to penetrate further into the offices. In additional a photocell in each light fitting is installed such that the light output of the lamp is automatically reduced when daylight is available. This can reduce lighting energy by as much as 60%</li></li></ul><li>Principles of Design: <br />BREEAM Excellent (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method). <br /> Why BREEAM Excellent and not BREEAM Outstanding? <br />
    • 20.
    • 21. Principles of Design: <br />Ongoing building monitoring<br /> -We intend to learn from this building data -University of Northampton PhD monitoring-Carbon Buzz<br />
    • 22. Impact: Thermal Mass becomes equivalent of concrete: making timber viable<br />
    • 23. Dispelling Myths: <br /><ul><li>“Eco-Bling” or “Green Wash” - do we really need it and at what cost?</li></ul> All technologies are valid, but they must be utilised intelligently. <br /> To reduce carbon emissions at the iCon from 52kgCO2/m2 to 12.2kgCO2/m2<br /> As built (EAHP + Passive Measures) <br /> = Net saving of £80sqm on Mechanical Installations<br /> Photovoltaic + Balanced ventilation system <br /> = Cost of £450sqm on Mechanical Installations<br />
    • 24. Dispelling Myths: <br /><ul><li>Exemplar environmental buildings V Energy Performance Certificates?</li></ul>EPC ratings are based upon a notional models<br /><ul><li>Starting with an efficient design and low energy requirements is therefore inhibitive
    • 25. Adversely poor design with environmental bolt-on can achieve higher grades
    • 26. Are there too many caveats for existing / listed buildings? </li></li></ul><li>Forward Thinking: <br /><ul><li>Are you up to date with policy?
    • 27. Zero Carbon V Low Carbon –quality V quantity?
    • 28. It’s time to get tough on unregulated carbon loads?
    • 29. Lets share what we know – Carbon Buzz.</li></li></ul><li>Peter Jones OBE<br />Ecolateral<br />Sustainability in the waste industry<br />
    • 30. Sustainability in the UK Waste and Resources Sector<br />Daventry iCon Event<br />30th June 2011 <br />Peter Jones, OBE<br />ecolateraljones@btinternet.com<br />
    • 31. KEY SECTORAL DRIVERS<br />End of PFI support <br />Private Balance Sheets to take the strain<br />Carbon taxation<br />Resource Efficiency Agenda<br />Global Warming Impacts<br />Electricity Market Reform<br />Economics of Jobs<br />EU Producer Responsibility <br />Energy Security<br />Transfer of Value and profit from gatefees to outputs.<br />
    • 32. C<br />O<br />S<br />T<br />Plastics<br />Recovery<br />Tax by 2010<br />Landfill Tax<br />Recycling Logistics<br />(glass/paper/metals/<br />card/news/compost)<br />Landfill Gate Fee<br />Transport to Landfill<br />zero<br />I<br />N<br />C<br />O<br />M<br />E<br />Compost<br />Card<br />Paper<br />Metals<br />Plastics<br />UK Landfill Inputs Collapse <br />
    • 33. 1 tonne bale of waste floc<br />The Resources Hierarchy<br />Compost/fertiliser soil fuels<br />Recycling into new Materials<br />Pyrolysis to Carbon<br />Anaerobic Digestion<br />Gasification/steam turbine<br />Gasification/internal combustion<br />Gasification/hydrogen/fuel cells<br />Value by Financial and Fossil Carbon Tradeoffs<br />
    • 34. SPATIALS for PLANNERS<br />200 landfills @ 20 hectares=4000 ha<br />1500 Resource Parks @ 10 hectares = 15,000 ha.<br />60 million tonnes consumed, 60 million tonnes disposed<br />What is built now is not necessarily that which is viable 2015 plus.<br />
    • 35.
    • 36. Market Led Decisions in Scrap Resources<br />2010 UK Energy Market £108 Billion as electricity,gas,heat &amp; transport fuels<br />2010 Recycling market £1 billion for 15 -20 million tonnes<br />Composting soils market £0.1 billion for 4 million tes<br />
    • 37.
    • 38. Anaerobic digestion (AD)<br />Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a method of waste treatment that produces a gas with high methane content from organic materials.<br />The methane can be used to produce heat, electricity, or a combination of the two.<br />34<br />
    • 39. New Thinking in Waste<br />Define the fossil energy sinks<br />That defines the energy need<br />That defines the technology<br />That defines the ‘fuel’ mix<br />That defines the logistics<br />That defines the collection discipline<br />
    • 40. The Lights Go Out???<br />Source: DTI<br />
    • 41. GAPS in the WASTE REVIEW<br />Material Flow Tracking<br />Material resources Standards<br />Producer Responsibility<br />Scotland &amp; Carbon Evaluation<br />Energy Linkage<br />Water Linkage<br />
    • 42. What are “Good” Fossil Substitution Sinks?<br /><ul><li>Food –freezing,preparation+retail
    • 43. Diversified industrial estates
    • 44. Hospitals
    • 45. Prisons
    • 46. Bus and truck complexes
    • 47. Docks and Airports and Distribution
    • 48. Data centres
    • 49. Energy distribution pipes and wires
    • 50. Confectionery factories
    • 51. Sewage plants
    • 52. Road fuel distribution depots
    • 53. Industrial gases operations</li></li></ul><li>Costs for Producer Responsibility<br />50<br />20<br />10<br />5<br />Cost as value % retail support<br />Glass containers<br />Fridges<br />Paper &amp; board<br />Tyres<br />Brown goods<br />Cars<br />Plastics<br />250 500 1,000 2,000 8,000<br />Thousand tonnes output<br />Source: Labour Market Trends &amp; UK National Accounts (The Blue Book)<br />
    • 54. Why is there an Investment Hiatus in Waste?<br />Innovation Risk comprises those on-<br />………Feedstock supply<br />………Site and Land<br />………Technology<br />……..Exit markets for output<br />……..Funding <br /> THERE IS NO PLc with a singular approach to these risks!<br />
    • 55. New Alliances in Carbon Efficiency<br />Electrical &amp;Heat Users<br />Energy Suppliers<br /><ul><li>Technology Skills
    • 56. Grid Backup
    • 57. Grid Inputs
    • 58. Regulatory Risk
    • 59. Infrastructure
    • 60. Contracts
    • 61. Locations
    • 62. Economic Rolein Communities
    • 63. Carbon CSRAgenda
    • 64. Forward Price Uncertainty</li></ul>TechnologySuppliers<br />Waste &amp; ResourceLogistics<br /><ul><li>Rising Gate Fees
    • 65. Process Technology
    • 66. Conditioning Technology
    • 67. Supply Chain
    • 68. Strong Balance Sheets</li></ul>Solutions&amp;ESCOs<br />
    • 69. Forward Issues<br />Linking Waste , energy, property and technology single wire or grid injection entities<br />A coherent Planning approach<br />Strong NGO Support &amp; transparency<br />Standards of feedstock<br />Carbon protocols<br />Context of other markets-hydrogen<br />The “spark gap”<br />
    • 70. Peter T. Jones OBE<br />ecolateraljones@btinternet.com<br />
    • 71. Guy Battle<br />Dcarbon8, Deloitte<br />Next generation business thinking<br />
    • 72. Re-Imagining BusinessSustainability Transformation<br />
    • 73. Sustainability Services Centre of Excellence<br />Sustainability Services A unique blend of industry leaders<br />At Deloitte, we bring together the vast breadth of the firm to provide a range of integrated and holistic services and solutions for all businesses. Whether your challenge is sustainable consumption, climate risk planning or even the design of a sustainable eco-city we have the in-depth knowledge and passion to help you make the right choices for long-term success.<br />Deloitte has significantly enhanced its dedicated Sustainability Service team during 2010 with the acquisition of the leading carbon management consultant dcarbon8 and through its groundbreaking merger with the leading international real estate advisors Drivers Jonas Deloitte. Our core advisory services and solutions are divided into three principle divisions.<br />Responsible Business<br />Forward looking businesses are considering how to integrate sustainability into their organisation and the opportunities this offers to create economic value. Our Responsible Business Services team can help support your organisation by providing you with the following services: corporate strategy; operational integration and implementation; and reporting, assurance, communication and branding.<br />Climate Change &amp; Carbon Management<br />Businesses have now realised that the low carbon economy is not something to be shied away from, but rather an opportunity to embrace. We offer a full range of climate change and carbon management services that include: climate risk and adaptation planning; carbon strategy; carbon accounting, assurance and CRC compliance; carbon footprinting and reduction; Carbon Trust services; and carbon markets and offsets.<br />Sustainable Property &amp; Real Estate<br />We can offer a one-stop shop for all sustainability issues relating to the built environment. Our work covers building carbon management services; sustainable property investment, design advisory and certification, occupational estate strategy; and planning advisory for the development of major eco-developments.<br />46<br />
    • 74. Sustainability ?<br />Sustainability: from the verb to sustain meaning: to hold up; to bear; to support; to provide for;  to maintain; to sanction; to keep going; to keep up; to prolong; to support the life of. (Chambers Concise Dictionary<br />
    • 75. 48<br />Sustainability is not just about the Planet<br />Reducing costs/Improving efficiency<br />Growth/New Markets<br />Increased Margins and Profits<br />Shareholder and Customer Value<br />
    • 76. Trends<br />Sustainability trends and business opportunities<br />Traditional business approaches are becoming rapidly out-dated ;The Old Paradigm– abundant raw materials, cheap energy and limitless sink for waste; New Paradigm– climate change, consumer awareness, environmental and social performance matters Sustainability is no longer an add on- but rather a way of doing business<br />Business opportunities<br />Resources<br /><ul><li>Energy costs are increasing
    • 77. Carbon is being taxed
    • 78. Resources are becoming more scarce
    • 79. New and better market penetration
    • 80. Brand enhancement
    • 81. Innovation and new product development
    • 82. Value-chain partnerships
    • 83. Consumer loyalty
    • 84. Asset value
    • 85. Staff productivity and wellbeing</li></ul>Growth<br /><ul><li>Climate risk impacting asset values
    • 86. Potential design on-costs
    • 87. Supply chain risks</li></ul>Climate Change<br />Regulation<br /><ul><li>Increasing regulations around carbon and energy
    • 88. Zero carbon development by 2016 and 2019
    • 89. Reduced material costs
    • 90. Reduced operational costs
    • 91. Improved construction efficiency
    • 92. Reduced staff non-productivity
    • 93. Reduced planning costs and timer
    • 94. Reduced risk</li></ul>Costs <br />Global Change<br /><ul><li>Need to rebuild Trust post GFC
    • 95. Talent attraction in a global marketplace
    • 96. Role of business in building a better global society</li></ul>Consumer Behaviour<br /><ul><li>Consumer increasingly choosing green
    • 97. Rise of ethical brands
    • 98. Increasing demand for transparency</li></ul>49<br />
    • 99.
    • 100. 7<br />6<br />5<br />4<br />3<br />2<br />1<br />0<br />2020<br />2030<br />2040<br />2050<br />2060<br />2070<br />2080<br />2090<br />2100<br />Predicted Global Changes <br />IPCC - Predicted global mean temperature change ºC under 3 scenarios<br />Temperature ºC<br />High<br />(A1F1)<br />Med<br />(A1B)<br />Low<br />(B1)<br />World<br />Stabilisation<br />Scenario<br />(-4%/ yr from 2016)<br />Year<br />
    • 101. Climate Modelling<br />The following is a graph of the initial outputs from the modelling of possible heat waves (using the standard UK definition of at least consecutive 5 days over 25C). <br /> <br />. <br />Outputs: Heat Waves<br /> <br />. <br />52<br />
    • 102. Climate Modelling<br />The following graphs show the predictions of the likelihood of heat waves in 2020, 2050 and 2080 under the low, medium and high scenarios (using the standard UK definition of at least 5 consecutive days over 25C). <br /> <br />. <br />Outputs: Heat Waves<br /> <br />. <br />53<br />
    • 103.
    • 104. Customer Expectations<br />Consumers<br />~60% of consumers rated environmental impact as more important than a product’s brand name. European Commission (2009)<br />63% of people are more likely to buy a product if they know action is being taken to reduce its carbon footprint. Carbon Trust Research (2009)<br />22% of consumers will actively spend more to buy green<br />Green consumers are more 29% loyal and spend more than other consumers<br />There is a large latent market for green products and services, which companies will be keen to exploit.<br />95% of consumers “willing to buy green” Deloitte (2009)<br />
    • 105. What is driving sustainability?<br />There are a number of factors driving sustainability across business<br />What should you be thinking about?<br />Increased legislation, regulation and regulatory divers. Mirrored in a patchwork way across the world leading to significant complexities when operating across multiple jurisdictions<br />Increased regulation<br />Stakeholder &amp; media pressure<br />Increasing pressure for companies to have a sustainability strategy and share it transparently with their stakeholders<br />Resource constraints<br />There is an increasing awareness amongst consumer facing of the growing constraints on resources<br />There is increasing market evidence that a sustainability programme can lead to material cost savings in some areas<br />Cost savings<br />Customer Expectations<br />Customers are increasingly aware of sustainability and demand more sustainable products<br />Disclosure<br />Increase in voluntary reporting and participation in sustainability indices. Reporting requirements will continue to expand from carbon to all sustainability areas including supply chain management<br />56<br />
    • 106. Where is the Market?<br />
    • 107. What is driving sustainability - CEO’s are setting the pace<br />Paul Polman, CEO Unilever, United Kingdom<br />Maurice Levy, CEO Publicis Group France<br />Mark Parker, CEO<br />Nike USA<br /> <br />“We are living in a resource-constrained world in which we need to look at fundamentally new business models. This platform is not about rhetoric. It’s about action.”  <br />“We need to walk the talk on sustainable consumption before we regain the trust of consumers”  <br />“As a CEO, if you want to plan for success you need to decouple your growth strategy from environmental impact”<br />58<br />
    • 108. Many companies are now demanding disclosure from their supply chain<br />Disclosure<br />“If a supplier cannot be compliant with requirements on the environment and sustainability, we’ll stop doing business with them.” John Paterson, IBM Chief Procurement Officer, 2010<br />
    • 109. Proof that it pays<br />Marks and Spencer<br />Mission: Become the world&apos;s most sustainable retailer by 2015<br /><ul><li>Plan A strategy 2007: 100 commitments to achieve within 5 yrs
    • 110. Working with customers and supply chains to:
    • 111. Combat climate change
    • 112. Reduce waste
    • 113. Use sustainable raw materials
    • 114. Trade ethically
    • 115. Help customers lead healthier lifestyle</li></ul>In 2011 M&amp;S reported the following:<br /><ul><li>Cut CO2 emissions by 40,000t
    • 116. Reduced 10,000t of packaging
    • 117. Diverted 20,000t of waste from landfill
    • 118. Saved 100 million litres of water</li></ul>June 2011 Marc Bolland Report a Net annual cost savings of around £70m (£50m in 2010)<br />
    • 119. Resource Constraints<br />Life Cycle Assessment<br />Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)<br /><ul><li>Unilever have pledged to increases sales by 50% but in doing so will not allow their environmental footprint to change
    • 120. This implies a de-coupling of growth from environmental impact
    • 121. Unilever have carried out detailed LCAs of many products, including detergents, hygiene and food products and using this measure as a strategic methodology to measure and reduce
    • 122. Benefits will include reduce costs, increased efficiencies
    • 123. www.sustainable-living.unilever.com/the-opportunity/</li></ul>ww.sustainablel-iving.unilver.com<br />61<br />
    • 124. 62<br />6 Ideas<br />(For The construction industry)<br />
    • 125. 6 Ideas<br /><ul><li>Integrate sustainability into the DNA of the organisation
    • 126. Set business strategy to meet changing shale of the market
    • 127. Good practice and targets
    • 128. Implementation road map</li></ul>Sustainability Transformation<br />Develop a Transformational Sustainability Business Strategy<br /><ul><li>Integrate message and activities across business – As One
    • 129. Leadership and Employee engagement
    • 130. Transformation and behaviour change management</li></ul>Climate Change Adaptation<br />Future proof your business and supply chain against climate change risk<br />Sustainable Supply Chain<br />Supply chain assurance AND improvement planning<br /><ul><li>Assess supply chain performance- identify risk, good practice and cost savings
    • 131. Ensure compliance with responsible sourcing and future resilience
    • 132. Reduce supply chain cost base</li></ul>Sustainable Product Design<br />Reduce costs of production and develop closed loop manufacture and supply solutions<br /><ul><li>Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of key products
    • 133. Map environmental impact and costs through value chain
    • 134. Develop reduction/good practice strategies including marketing stories
    • 135. Identify closed loop product development opportunities</li></ul>Implementation and Change Management<br />Develop internal behaviour change programme and implement strategy<br /><ul><li>Reduce the business costs associated with incremental and extreme weather events
    • 136. Plan for risks within the supply chain related to global climate change
    • 137. Increase value of building assets for longevity, cut insurance premiums</li></ul>Integrated Reporting<br />Implement an integrated system for reporting for your financial and environmental performance<br /><ul><li>Automate carbon, water and waste reporting
    • 138. Scope 3 reporting
    • 139. Develop and produce end of year integrated CSR/Financial report</li></li></ul><li>Zero Embodied Carbon Store RoadmapMarks &amp; Spencer andThe Carbon Trust<br />February 2011<br />
    • 140. Key Questions for the study<br />What is the definition of a zero embodied carbon building?<br />What strategies may be adopted to deliver a zero carbon outcome?<br />Is zero carbon feasible without offsetting?<br />What role does the supply chain (materials manufacturers and contractors) have in delivering the solution?<br />How can designers help deliver real time and future visions for such a solution and what would such a store look like?<br />Do low carbon buildings cost more?<br />65<br />
    • 141. What do we mean by embodied carbon<br />Direct and Indirect economic data collection<br />66<br />
    • 142. What do we mean by embodied carbon<br />Direct and Indirect economic data collection<br />As operational efficiencies increase, the importance of embodied carbon also increases. <br />67<br />
    • 143. 3. Embodied Emissions are more important than operational<br />68<br />
    • 144. The Baseline<br />
    • 145. Baseline Assessment <br />70<br />The graphs above show the embodied carbon of a store over a 60year lifecycle. This shows the relative importance of raw materials (shell &amp; Core) and maintenance (fit-out).<br />
    • 146. Baseline Assessment <br />71<br />Fit-Out<br />Base Build<br />The breakdown of materials shows the prominence of steel, concrete, aluminium and waste in the Shell &amp; Core, and the steel, vinyl flooring and aluminium in the Fit-out. <br />
    • 147. Baseline Assessment <br />Base Build<br />Fit-Out<br />72<br />
    • 148. Baseline Assessment <br />73<br />The graph shows the breakdown of carbon emissions associated with the notional M&amp;S store within each year of the 60year lifecycle. The orange line illustrates the cumulative carbon emissions associated with the building.<br />
    • 149. Strategies for achieving Zero Carbon<br />
    • 150. Five Approaches to Delivering Zero Embodied Carbon<br />Materials substitution<br /><ul><li> Use of low carbon materials</li></ul>Supply Chain Reductions<br /> Low carbon initiatives within the supply chain<br />Living Buildings<br /><ul><li>Buildings that continue to absorb more over their lifetime and act as carbon sinks</li></ul>Closed Loop Management<br /> Zero waste, nothing thrown away, closed ecosystem<br />Carbon Offsetting<br /><ul><li>Local of far offsetting of unavoidable emissions</li></ul>75<br />
    • 151.
    • 152. Low Carbon Materials Definitions<br />77<br />
    • 153.
    • 154.
    • 155. Key Findings<br />
    • 156. 81<br />AukettFitroyRobinson, Darnton ESG, FieldenCleggBradley, Sheppard Robson, TTG Architects<br />
    • 157. Achieving Zero Embodied Carbon Today<br />Reductions only<br />Key findings are as follows:<br /><ul><li>A 25% reduction in embodied carbon will reduce capital costs by 1%
    • 158. A 50% reduction in embodied carbon results in an increase of approximately 7%. In time this is expected to reduce as low carbon materials become more cost effective
    • 159. Although future and evolving technologies will make achieving 75% reduction possible, it is not presently viable to achieve further incremental reductions cost effectively</li></ul>82<br />
    • 160. Achieving Zero Embodied Carbon Today<br />Reductions &amp; offsetting<br /><ul><li>Based on the latest DEFRA projections on carbon value, offset options are expected to increase from £12/tCO2e to £25 /tCO2e in 2020, £70 /tCO2e in 2030 and £200 /tCO2e in 2050 increasing offset costs accordingly. At some point it will be cheaper to reduce than offset.</li></ul>Now<br /><ul><li>Possible to achieve 25% reduction and offset the remaining 75% using CERs/VERs (cost effective option) at no cost premium </li></ul>Recommendations<br /><ul><li>Combine reductions and offsetting until reductions become cost effective
    • 161. Incentivise supply chain by taxing carbon content of all products and services
    • 162. Developed community offset strategy that permits local investment to local projects e.g. The M&amp;S Community Carbon Fund. </li></ul>83<br />
    • 163. Approaches to Zero Carbon<br />Incremental reductions through design change<br />Design submission: Darnton EGS submitted 2 designs for different time periods, based on current and future material availability. The first design used material substitution, the second addressed the store functionality and use of intelligent building systems.<br />Key design elements:<br /><ul><li>Material substitution with natural materials
    • 164. Lightweight design to minimise foundation requirements
    • 165. Flexible floor layout
    • 166. Prefabrication of modular components Combined structural and functional components e.g. intelligent columns which provide structural support and collect rainwater.</li></ul>84<br />Design Submission: TTG Architects concentrated on the current potential to increase the recycled content in construction materials. Many of the limitations and barriers of today’s market were highlighted. <br />Key design elements: <br /><ul><li>Reclaimed steel building frame
    • 167. Reduction in floor to floor height from 5.1m to 4.4m</li></ul>Reducing wall area<br />Foundation requirements<br />Fit-out requirements<br /><ul><li>Open plan back of house
    • 168. Omission of ceilings to back of house areas</li></li></ul><li>The FutureLiving Buildings and Closed Loop System Management<br />85<br />
    • 169. Approaches to Zero Carbon<br />Living buildings &amp; Sequestration<br />The use of products that either act as carbon sinks or sequester carbon over their lifecycle<br />How?<br />A living building is a building which absorbs more carbon over its lifetime than is emitted . The building is either constructed from organic materials that sequester carbon during their growth (e.g. timber, hemp, straw, bamboo), or man-made materials (for example, lime cements) which react with carbon dioxide through carbonation<br />However, in order to account for the carbon sequestration, it is essential that the carbon is not re-emitted back into the environment at the end of its life, i.e. through decomposition (land filling) etc<br />To ensure transparency and accountability, tracking/logging systems need to be implemented to adequately manage renewable materials throughout their lifecycle. <br />86<br />
    • 170. 4. Approaches to Zero Carbon<br />Closed loop approach<br />Closed loop approaches draw on innovative sustainability concepts such as industrial ecology, cradle to cradle design and bio mimicry to minimise and eventually reduce to zero impacts harmful to the environment. <br />87<br />Closed loop systems are a conceptual sustainable approach to managing the entire life-cycle of a product, whereby all materials not safely consumed in the use of the product are designed to be a valuable input into the same or other processes at their end of life . In this way waste is eliminated, materials never leave the M&amp;S ecosystem and are either: <br />a) recaptured and reused in the process of making the same or other products, or <br />b) bio-degraded/bio-composted to become useful inputs to the broader biosphere. <br />
    • 171. Logistics waste and auxiliary products reuse<br />Manufacturing process reuse<br />Waste from consumption<br />Product and by-product reuse<br />Raw materials<br />Closed Loop Manufacture and Supply<br />Open Loop Manufatcure and Supply<br />Manufacturing<br />Manufacturing<br />Manufacturing<br />Material sourcing<br />Material sourcing<br />Distribution <br /> Logistics<br />Distribution <br /> Logistics<br />Distribution logistics<br /> Materials <br />Sourcing<br /> Materials <br />Sourcing<br /> Sales <br /> and <br />Retail<br /> Sales <br /> and <br />Retail<br />Reverse logistics<br />Reverse logistics<br />Product <br /> Recycling <br /> and Materials <br /> Recovery<br />Sales and retail<br />Sales and retail<br />Consumption <br /> and Use<br />Consumption <br /> and Use<br />Consumption / use<br />Product disposal<br />(e.g. landfill)<br />Source: World Economic Forum in collaboration with Deloitte<br />
    • 172. Approaches to Zero Carbon Design<br />89<br /><ul><li>Closed loop systems have the potential to reduce capital costs through material availability and energy savings.
    • 173. The store will be entirely dismountable at its end of life and all components may be reused within the M&amp;S ecosystem with no (or minimal) reprocessing. Zero Waste
    • 174. Combined with low energy design a store would typically absorb more carbon that it emitted in its construction and operation</li></li></ul><li>Approaches to Zero Carbon<br />CASE STUDY: Sheppard Robson - Closed Loop Buildings<br />Design Submission: Inspired by a beehive structure SR’s submission uses a single unit for external and internal cladding and structural components<br />90<br />Key elements of the design:<br /><ul><li>Closed loop building components
    • 175. Modular components
    • 176. Prefabricated unit s which are capable of using a variety of materials purpose dependent.
    • 177. Flexible design &amp; flooring systems which maximise area footprint</li></li></ul><li>Portable building component (Northern Line)<br />
    • 178. Portable building component (Victoria Line)<br />
    • 179. Key Recommendations<br />93<br />
    • 180. Key recommendations for developers/designers/procurement teams<br />Encourage supply chain engagement and innovation<br />Incentivise use of low carbon materials (allowable solutions)<br /> Facilitate low carbon design<br />Develop closed loop systems and materials management<br />Develop corporate strategies around offsetting, sequestration and zero carbon<br />94<br />
    • 181. Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (“DTTL”), a UK private company limited by guarantee, and its network of member firms, each of which is a legally separate and independent entity. Please see www.deloitte.co.uk/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of DTTL and its member firms.<br />Deloitte LLP is the United Kingdom member firm of DTTL.<br />This publication has been written in general terms and therefore cannot be relied on to cover specific situations; application of the principles set out will depend upon the particular circumstances involved and we recommend that you obtain professional advice before acting or refraining from acting on any of the contents of this publication. Deloitte LLP would be pleased to advise readers on how to apply the principles set out in this publication to their specific circumstances. Deloitte LLP accepts no duty of care or liability for any loss occasioned to any person acting or refraining from action as a result of any material in this publication.<br />© 2011 Deloitte LLP. All rights reserved.<br />Deloitte LLP is a limited liability partnership registered in England and Wales with registered number OC303675 and its registered office at 2 New Street Square, London EC4A 3BZ, United Kingdom. Tel: +44 (0) 20 7936 3000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7583 1198.<br />Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited<br />
    • 182. Tea/coffee break<br />&amp;<br />Exhibition<br />
    • 183. Simon Cox<br />Prologis<br />Embracing the green agenda<br />
    • 184. Embracing the Green Agenda <br />Simon Cox – First Vice President Project Management and UK Sustainability Officer<br />
    • 185. 99<br />Prologis<br />Prologis is the leading global provider of industrial real estate, offering customers more than 600 million square feet of distribution space in markets across the Americas, Europe and Asia.<br />The company leases its 3,500 industrial facilities in 22 countries to manufacturers, retailers, transportation companies, third-party logistics providers and other enterprises with large-scale distribution needs.<br />Since merging with AMB Property Corporation on June 3, 2011, Prologis now manages combined assets valued at more than $44 billion.<br />
    • 186. 100<br />Corporate Responsibility – Three Dimensions<br />Prologis takes pride in being a responsible global citizen. <br />Our approach to corporate responsibility comprises three dimensions of care: for the planet, for people and for the pursuit of excellence in business. <br />
    • 187. Corporate Responsibility<br />Carbon Disclosure Leadership Index<br />
    • 188. 102<br />UK Approach – Sainsbury’s RDC - Pineham Northampton<br />
    • 189. 103<br />Award Winning Sustainable Development<br />Property Week Green Award (2007)<br />IAS Sustainable Achievement (2007)<br />Estates Gazette Green Award (2008)<br />
    • 190. 104<br />BREEAM Excellent <br />
    • 191. 105<br />Embodied Carbon LCA – Planet Positive <br />
    • 192. 106<br />ProLogis Key Metrics – BREEAM Excellent <br />
    • 193. 107<br />BREEAM – Research and Development <br /><ul><li> SusCon College - The Bridge, Dartford
    • 194. BREEAM ‘Outstanding’ (Interim) - 88.85%
    • 195. Highest BREEAM ‘Education’ rating</li></li></ul><li>EPC ‘A’ Rated – Standard Product<br />
    • 196. Glasgow M8 – Operational Emissions<br /><ul><li> Predicted Emissions:
    • 197. 7.6 kgCO2e/m2/annum
    • 198. Building Regulations:
    • 199. 18.0 kgCO2e/m2/annum
    • 200. Existing Buildings
    • 201. 39.0 kgCO2e/m2/annum
    • 202. Carbon Savings (30 years):
    • 203. 14,376t compared to Building Regulations
    • 204. 43,405t compared to Existing Buildings</li></li></ul><li>Glasgow M8 – Energy Costs<br /><ul><li> Predicted Emissions:
    • 205. 23.0 kWh/m2/annum
    • 206. Building Regulations
    • 207. 55.7 kWh/m2/annum
    • 208. Existing Buildings
    • 209. 118.0 kWh/m2/annum
    • 210. Potential annual cost savings:
    • 211. £ 99,144 compared to Building Regulations
    • 212. £ 508,764 compared to Existing Buildings</li></ul>(Based on Electricity at 9.5p / kWh and Gas at 6.6p kWh)<br />
    • 213. Life Cycle Assessment – Standard Product<br />
    • 214. Embodied Carbon Profiling - RICS<br />
    • 215. Emission Reduction<br />
    • 216. Materials Specification: Solar, Cyclic, Safe<br /><ul><li> Low embodied energy
    • 217. Recycled and recyclable
    • 218. Reused and reusable
    • 219. Non toxic</li></li></ul><li>115<br />Planet Positive Certification Process <br />Planet Positive validate Deloitte carbon report<br />110% of unavoidable emissions are mitigated<br />Donation to Cool Earth<br />Budget set aside for UK community or school projects <br />
    • 220. 116<br />Embodied Carbon – DIRFT 2<br />
    • 221. Our Contribution to Cool Earth<br />Amazon Rainforest<br />622 acres protected<br />161,629 t/CO2 stored<br />Each acre protects:<br />6 endangered mammals<br />322 types of plants<br />11,000 species of insects<br />44 mature trees<br />DIRFT 2 Warehouse <br />817,594 sq/ft<br />18.77 acres<br />29,387 t/CO2<br />
    • 222. 118<br />DIRFT 2 – Zone 1 – Tesco Intermodal Facility<br />
    • 223. 119<br />840,000 square Feet – Dedicated Rail Served Site<br />
    • 224. 120<br />DIRFT II – Rail Connectivity<br />
    • 225. 121<br />DIRFT II – A5 Bridge Slide <br />
    • 226. 122<br />DIRFT II – A5 Bridge Slide<br />
    • 227. 123<br />DIRFT II –A5 Rail Tunnel Complete<br />
    • 228. 124<br />DIRFT 2 - Rail Freight Strategy<br />
    • 229. 125<br />DIRFT 2 – Tesco goods in yard<br />
    • 230. 126<br />DIRFT 2 – Tesco<br />
    • 231. 127<br />The end of the Line?<br />
    • 232. 128<br />DIRFT 3<br />
    • 233. 129<br />Thank you <br />
    • 234. Paul Fryer<br />IBM<br />Bringing a smarter planet to life<br />
    • 235. June 2011<br />BRINGING ASMARTER PLANET….to life !Paul FryerIBM<br />
    • 236. A Smarter Planet …..?<br />
    • 237. April 2010 <br />
    • 238. The Transistor <br />
    • 239. Chips in Everything<br />
    • 240. Connecting Everything <br />
    • 241. Growth of Computing Power <br />
    • 242. Perfect Storm <br />Transistors in Everything<br />Telecommunications<br />Computing Power<br />
    • 243. Something Else ?<br />
    • 244. So what is a Smarter Planet ?<br />+<br />+<br />=<br />A smarter planet: Is about thinking and acting in new ways to make our systems more efficient,productive and responsive.<br />BUT<br />What does that mean ?<br />
    • 245. What a smarter planet is NOT?<br />+<br />+<br />=<br />A smarter planet: Is not an IBM product.<br />
    • 246.
    • 247. 2016<br />
    • 248. Renewable Energy<br />
    • 249. What else do we need to create a <br />smarter planet ?<br />+<br />+<br />=<br />A smarter planet: Also requires imagination and foresight.<br />A smarter planet will be conceived and built by brilliant minds, creative thinking using world class technology and systems, partners and clients.<br />The world has all of these…..<br />
    • 250. Watson<br />
    • 251. Watson<br />
    • 252. Watson<br />This poet laureate&apos;s “Enoch Arden” sold 17,000 copies on its publication day in 1864<br />
    • 253. What could be smarter ?<br />Smarter Traffic<br />Smarter Money<br />Smarter Food<br />Smarter Cities<br />Smarter Retail<br />Smarter Water<br />Smarter Communications<br />Smarter Oil<br />Smarter Power<br />Smarter Health<br />Safer Citizens<br />
    • 254. Bringing a Smarter Planet to Life<br />
    • 255. Workshops<br />1.15pm &amp; 2.15pm<br />
    • 256. Lunch<br />&amp;<br />Exhibition<br />
    • 257. Panel Discussion<br />Hosted by<br />Northamptonshire Institute for Urban Affairs<br />
    • 258. Thanks<br />Tours of the iCon Building<br />

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