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Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
Amusement Park Math WebQuest
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Amusement Park Math WebQuest

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Thanks to That Math Lady, I am able to create WebQuests such as this one, that my students - and students nationwide - will be able to use!

Thanks to That Math Lady, I am able to create WebQuests such as this one, that my students - and students nationwide - will be able to use!

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  • 1. Elementary Math WebQuest By That Math Lady www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 2. Your Student’s Mission• Your student is planning a day-trip to a local amusement park with a maximum of 4 guests.• The trip must include rented car transportation from their house (or a local destination) to the amusement park and back home.• The student will also calculate mileage, fuel usage, and the price of the trip as well as admittance to the park (and a food allowance).• If an amusement park is not an option, consider a trip to theaters, museums, national parks, etc. www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 3. Math Standards• Time: – CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.A.1 Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes. – CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2 Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, and money. – CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.3 Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted.• Money: – CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.C.8 Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. – CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. – CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2 Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, and money. – CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.3 Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. – CCSS.Math.Content.5.NBT.A.4 Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.• Length: – CCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. – CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2 Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, and money. – CCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.3 Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 4. Step One: Calculating Distance• Students must determine the distance from their house to the local amusement park of their choice.• To obtain this data, students may use: – Google Maps (http://maps.google.com/) – Mapquest (http://www.mapquest.com/) – Bing Maps (http://www.bing.com/maps/) – Yahoo Maps (http://maps.yahoo.com/) www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 5. Step Two: Renting a Vehicle• Students are responsible for “renting a vehicle” from a well-known, yet local, rental company. They must consider the price of the vehicle for a one-day rental, the fuel efficiency of that vehicle, and passenger capacity (they can take up to 4 guests with them).• To obtain this data, students may use: – CarRentals (www.carrentals.com) – Kayak (www.kayak.com/cars) – Orbitz (http://www.orbitz.com/car-rental/) www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 6. Step Three: Analyzing the Rented Vehicle for Travel• Students must analyze the fuel efficiency of the vehicle and calculate the amount of gas that will be needed to drive from their house, to the park, and back.• The student will need to know the car’s mpg (miles per gallon), fuel tank size, and current price of gas.• To obtain this data, students may use: – GasBuddy (http://www.gasbuddy.com/) – Motor Trend (http://www.motortrend.com/new_cars/) www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 7. Step Four: Planning the Trip• Students must determine the time of travel from their original destination to the park.• Students must plan for 6 hours at the park (during open hours only).• Students must create an itinerary of travel from the time they leave their house until the time they arrive back.• Students must also choose a number of guests that are going on the trip with them; they must account for $20/person for food when calculating costs.• To obtain this data, students may use the information gathered during Step One (Calculating Distance) and the information gathered at their amusement park’s home website. Some examples include: – Walt Disney World (http://disneyworld.disney.go.com/) – Carowinds (http://www.carowinds.com) – Cedar Point (http://www.cedarpoint.com) www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 8. Step Five: Putting it ALL TOGETHER!• The student will organize and present his planning, including all web resources.• The student will present his findings in a multimedia presentation (PowerPoint, Prezi, YouTube video, etc.)• Student will be assessed on his understanding and application of the math standards (see rubric on Slide 10) www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 9. Teacher Tips• Model, model, model! Make sure you encourage your students to problem solve by demonstration!• Consider using each step as a checkpoint in this assignment. Formatively assess student productivity and understanding.• Allow students to work in small groups on this project- based learning assignment.• Encourage parents to become involved and guide (and monitor) students while using the Internet at home.• Foster independent thinking! www.thatmathlady.com © 2012
  • 10. Math Rubric www.thatmathlady.com © 2012 Standards 4 3 2 1 Student predicts travel Student can calculate costs based on any travel costs by dividing Major calculation Student makes someCCSS.Math.Content.3.OA.A.3/ previous knowledge and miles traveled by car’s errors display inability minor errors inCCSS.Math.Content.4.OA.A.3 then compares mpg (then multiplying to multiply/divide calculations. predictions with mpg by price of units. scenario outcomes. gas/gallon). Student creates a The frequency of Student successfully reasonable budget prior Student attempts to student errors clearly calculates cost of trip to trip planning; calculate trip costs, demonstrate a lack ofCCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.C.8 inc. car rental, fuel, successfully calculates however makes some comprehension and food, and park costs and displays costs errors. ability to apply money admission using a graph or table. adding skills. In addition to the Student’s itinerary is Student’s itinerary is itinerary, student takes broken down into time Student’s itinerary is incomplete and/or traffic, rest area stops of travel to-and-from missing inc. major errors thatCCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.A.1 and/or other traffic park and time at park, departure/arrival times demonstrate a lack of incidentals into clearly demonstrating or includes minor understanding consideration while trip his ability to calculate calculation errors. elapsed time. planning. elapsed time. Student can total the Student can total the Student’s presentation Student’s cost of the trip, miles cost of the trip, miles contains an presentation of traveled and time spent traveled and time spent insignificant error inCCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2 material is difficult to per traveler in addition for the group of calculating either total assess for clear to the group in a clearly travelers in a clearly cost, miles traveled, or understanding. formatted way. formatted way. time spent. Student can round Student calculates all Student can round prices prices; gives various prices as-is and Student does not to the nearest tenth, asCCSS.Math.Content.5.NBT.A.4 reasons why estimating estimates final totals to accurately estimate to not include to the nearest tenth or the nearest whole costs. hundredths (cents). whole dollar is helpful. dollar.
  • 11. WebQuest Summary• Why a WebQuest? – Student-centered – Project-based Learning (PBL) – Interactive with technology – Creates opportunities for literacy in a math classroom – Fun for students!• Don’t forget to score your students on their creativity and presentation format!• Make sure the teacher has fun, too!• Like this WebQuest? Want more? E-mail thatmathlady@gmail.com with your requests! www.thatmathlady.com © 2012

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