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    Version number of this document – Version 4.doc Version number of this document – Version 4.doc Document Transcript

    • School of Design, Engineering & Computing BSc(Hons) Business Communication Systems COURSE DEFINITION September 2000 (Modified January 2001, August 2001, September 2002 and September 2003) v.4
    • © 1998 Bournemouth University Document date: June 1998 Circulation: General School of Design, Engineering and Computing Bournemouth University Poole Dorset BH12 5BB Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Bournemouth University 1998
    • Modifications The following modifications have been made with effect from September 2000: 1. One additional hour per seminar group for the Database System unit 2. Two additional seminar hours for the Group Project unit, but only one of the hours staffed. 3. Minor changes to the learning outcome of the Client/Server Systems Development unit 4. Some changes to the Distributed Multimedia Systems unit (Quality Committee meeting minutes 5th January 2001) The following modifications have been made with effect from September 2001: 1. Addition of the level 3 descriptor for the Internet Application Development unit (Quality Committee meeting minutes 6th. July 2001) 2. Retrospective approval of level 3 unit, Object Oriented Programming, as a BCS final year elective (validated within the MMC programme in September 2000). The following modifications have been made with effect from September 2002: 1. Amendment to the Corporate Business Information unit (Quality Committee meeting 26 June 2002). The following modifications have been made with effect from September 2003: 1. Introduction of 2 new Level H optional units: Windows Application Programming and Digital Communication Systems 2. Amendments to 3 existing Level H optional units: Object Oriented Programming (replacing the unit of the same title) New Advances in Human Computer Interaction (replacing Human Computer Interaction) Web Application Development (replacing Internet Application Development) Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Bournemouth University 1998
    • CONTENTS PAGE BASIC COURSE DATA 1 1 INTRODUCTION 3 2 OVERVIEW OF THE COURSE 5 2.1 Course Aims and Objectives 5 2.2 Course Structure 7 2.3 The Course Themes 7 2.4 Key Skills Development 8 2.5 The Student Learning Experience and Workload 8 2.5.1 Research Week 10 2.5.2 Reading Week 10 2.5.3 Delivery Diagrams 11 2.6 Project and Electives 12 2.7 Integration of Business and Communication Systems 13 2.8 Indicative Hours for Units 14 2.9 Supervised Work Experience (Placement) 15 2.9.1 Placement Management 15 2.9.2 Student Responsibilities 15 2.9.3 Exemption from Placement 16 3 ASSESSMENT 17 3.1 Assessment Philosophy 17 3.1.1 Quality Assurance 17 3.1.2 Design Principles 17 3.2 Contribution of Coursework 18 3.3 Assessment Regulations 19 3.3.1 Principles 19 3.3.2 Period of Registration 19 3.3.3 Pass Mark 19 3.3.4 Compensation 20 3.3.5 Progression 20 3.3.6 Submission of Coursework 20 Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3.3.7 Attendance 21 3.3.8 Determination of Honours Classification 21 3.3.9 Provision for Intermediate Awards 21 3.3.10 Provision for Failed Candidates 22 3.3.11 Provision for Candidates with Valid Reasons for Poor Performance 23 3.3.12 Appeals Procedure 24 3.3.13 The Board of Examiners 24 3.3.14 External Examiners and their Terms of Reference 24 4 ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES 25 4.1 General 25 4.1.1 Entry Requirements Level 1 25 4.1.2 Exceptional Entry 26 4.1.3 Mature Students 26 4.2 Entry with Credit to Levels 2 and 3 27 4.3 Selection Process 27 4.3.1 Open Days 27 5 COURSE MANAGEMENT AND QUALITY ASSURANCE 29 5.1 Academic Responsibility for the Course 29 5.1.1 The Course Leader 29 5.1.2 The Academic Tutor 30 5.1.3 The Projects Co-ordinator 30 5.1.4 The Placements Tutor and Placement Administrator 31 5.2 Course Management and Course Team 31 5.3 Terms of Reference 31 5.3.1 Course Management 31 5.3.2 Course Team 32 5.3.3 The Projects Committee 32 5.3.4 The Industrial Liaison Group 33 5.3.5 Student Liaison 33 6 UNIT SYLLABUSES 35 Business Systems Environment 37 Business Information Systems 1 41 Software Development 45 Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Bournemouth University 1998
    • Multimedia Computer Architecture 49 Communications Systems 53 Database Systems 57 Group Project 61 Business Information Systems 2 65 Client / Server Systems Development 69 Distributed System Management 73 Computer Networks 77 Distributed Multimedia Systems 81 Corporate Business Information 85 Individual Project 89 Advanced Network Systems 93 7 ELECTIVES 97 Advanced Databases 99 Business Development 103 Business Process Modelling 107 New Advances in Human-Computer Interaction 111 Image Processing 114 Multimedia Application Development 116 Multimedia Systems and Networks 120 Network Applications Development 124 People and Computers in Business Organisations 126 Systems Development Methods 130 Object Oriented Programming 134 Web Application Development 137 Windows Application Programming 142 Ditigal Communication Systems 144 8 APPENDIX A Final Year Project Documentation 146 9 APPENDIX B How is the University Organised 156 10 APPENDIX C Programme Profile 159 Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Bournemouth University 1998
    • BASIC PROGRAMME DATA Originating institution/s Design, Engineering & Computing Awards and programme title(s) CertHE, DipHE, BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Place of delivery Bournemouth University Mode(s) of delivery Sandwich Duration 4 years Date of original approval September 1998 Date of first intake September 1998 Target intake 30 40 weeks of supervised work experience Placements between Level 2 and Level 3 Professional accreditations or exemptions None Partner institutions None Partnership model None Version number of this document – Version 4 This Programme Specification was revised in September 2003 following the approval of programme modifications by Academic Standards Committee. It takes effect from September 2003. It replaces all earlier versions of this document. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 1 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 2 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 1. INTRODUCTION The Course Definition Document for the BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Course has two aims:- • to define the structure and content of the course; • to set out the regulations governing the course. It should be read in conjunction with the Briefing (volume 1) and the Resources (volume 3) documents. It should be noted that the volumes will sometimes be used as discrete documents, and some material is consequently repeated in them for the sake of clarity and integrity of each volume. The course definition may be amended in the light of conditions and recommendations made by the evaluation panel and will be revised as a result of experience of delivery identified through the University’s course monitoring procedures. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 3 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 4 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 2. OVERVIEW OF THE COURSE 2.1 Course Aims and Objectives Aim To focus and develop student understanding of the potential of communication systems in an organisation and critical issues associated with the design, development, implementation and evaluation of such systems to support business operations. Objectives The student will be able to: 1 analyse and evaluate the business communications needs and synthesise viable solutions while justifying the approach taken in the design of communications systems; 2 use state-of-the-art knowledge of communication systems and computer networks to draw up specifications for a communication system to support business; 3 contribute to the planning of an organisational communication system, at both tactical and strategic levels; 4 significantly contribute to the design and implementation of communication systems using state-of-the-art tools and techniques; 5 enhance their personal and professional skills in career development, self motivation, and team working; 6 effectively manage complexity, uncertainty and diversity in individual and group projects with consideration of the business environment. Level Objectives Level 1 At the end of the year, the student will be able to: 1 understand the business environment, its operations and structure; 2 make a contribution to the definition of the organisational communication infrastructure; 3 demonstrate understanding of fundamental principles of computing and communication systems; Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 5 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 4 select and configure a small computer network and associated software to set up a small network for an organisation; 5 develop self awareness and understanding of the issues associated with team and individual work. Level 2 At the end of the year, the student will be able to: 1 analyse and evaluate organisational needs for communication systems; 2 draw up specifications and contribute to the planning, design and implementation of a multimedia distributed system for an organisation; 3 evaluate the technologies available to arrive at an appropriate solution to business needs; 4 use appropriate tools and techniques to simulate the operation of corporate networks; 5 apply management techniques to group projects to achieve milestones. Level 3 At the end of the year, the student will be able to: 1 carry out an individual piece of work which would enable the student to critically evaluate and support planning, design and implementation of a complete communication system to match organisational objectives and generate a report; 2 evaluate and propose solutions to improve communication systems for business effectiveness; 3 contribute significantly to the organisation’s strategic plan for improved business communication; 4 demonstrate the ability to apply and synthesise the knowledge and skills established throughout the course; 5 demonstrate the ability to analyse and synthesise the knowledge and skills acquired from their elected subjects. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 6 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 2.2 Course Structure The proposed structure of the programme is summarised in the following course diagram. Business Business Software Multimedia Communications Database Level Systems Information Development Computer Systems Systems 1 Environment Systems 1 Architecture 20 20 20 20 20 20 120 credits Level Group Business Client/Server Distributed Computer Distributed 2 Project Information Systems Systems Networks Multimedia Systems 2 Development Management Systems 20 20 20 20 20 120 20 credits Industrial Placement 40 weeks Level Corporate Individual Advanced Elective 1 Elective 2 3 Business Project Network Information Systems 20 40 20 20 20 120 credits Typical Electives Advanced Databases Multimedia Systems and Network Business Development Network Applications Development Business Process Modelling People and Computers in Organisations Human Computer Interaction Systems Development Methods Image Processing Object Oriented Programming Multimedia Application Development Internet Application Development 2.3 The Course Themes The course has two broad themes: • Communication systems • Business environment/operation Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 7 Bournemouth University 1998
    • These can be clearly seen in the units of Level 1 and Level 2. At Level 3 they are integrated within the compulsory units. These themes are themselves interwoven to improve business operations through the application of appropriate communication systems. They are, moreover, developed through unit material at each Level so that their relationships are made evident to students. The business theme is developed through the business units and by using business-related examples, case studies and assignments in the technical units. The technical units in Levels 1, 2 and 3, in particular the Communications Systems, Distributed Systems Management, Computer Networks and Advanced Network Systems develop the communication systems’ theme. The Group Project in Level 2 and the Individual Project in Level 3 provide a practical environment for integration. 2.4 Key Skills Development The following is an outline of the main key skills to be developed at each Level of the course. These skills will be developed amongst all the units, but those units, which contribute most to the development of the skills, are identified in the table below. Skills Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Managing and BSE GP IP developing self Logical thinking SD, MCA, CS, GP, DSM, CN, IP, CBI, ANS BIS1, DB DMA, BIS2 Team Working BSE GP CBI Applying and managing MCA, SD, CS, BIS2, CSSD, CBI, IP, ANS technology BIS1, DB DSM, CN, DMS Communication BSE GP CBI, IP Design and creativity SD, MCA, CS, CSSD, DSM, CN, IP, ANS DB, BIS1 DMS, BIS2 Managing tasks and SD, MCA, CS, All units IP solving problems DB, BIS1 Business entrepreneurial BSE, BIS1 GP, BIS2 IP, CBI 2.5 The Student Learning Experience and Workload The programme seeks to provide learning opportunities through a combination of subject delivery and integrative experience, which in turn afford scope for reflection and critical review. Given the clear end-of-Level objectives, each Level starts with a focus on the experiences and targets for the level, and introduces the problem-set in an exploration exercise. Each Level then develops its own mechanisms for students to experience and evaluate the problems and issues involved in the integration of its material, ideas, Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 8 Bournemouth University 1998
    • concepts and frameworks. The Course Team believes it is more effective to include Mathematics as an integral part of each unit. In this connection, areas of Mathematics relevant to any unit will be covered within that unit. For example, Boolean algebra and binary arithmetic will be taught in the Multimedia Computer Architecture unit. Level 1 commences with an induction programme. The Business Systems Environment unit introduces students to business environments, other units discuss the application of appropriate technology, to improve business operations and efficiency. The students will be tasked to evaluate the effectiveness of typical business systems, and suggest, by using appropriate technologies to improve their operations. The Multimedia Computer Architecture, Communications Systems and Database Systems units take the students through the fundamental components and concepts of computers, databases and communication systems. Through their practical sessions, students will have the opportunity to experience systems capabilities and limitations. The Software Development unit develops students programming knowledge and skills in the context of business communication systems. During the Simulated Business Experience Week (SBE Week) in Level 1, which will be held after terminal examinations, students will develop a communication system for a typical organisation. This will be a challenging process, which will take them beyond their Level 1 objectives and will encourage them to extend their vision in preparation for Level 2. By the end of this Level, the students will have confidence to evaluate computer architectures and systems to support business communication requirements. Level 2 commences with a brief induction programme, where students a) address the Level and its study patterns, and b) reflect on the experience and evaluate their performance and learning. The business theme in Level 2 will be covered throughout this Level in an integrated approach in each unit, by using business related case studies, course work, practical work and assignments. The student will become actively involved in the application of communication systems and related technologies to solve business communications problems. The Group Project, by developing students’ management and team working skills, will provide them with the opportunity to work in groups, analyse network requirements and propose recommendations for communication systems. At this Level the students will acquire an in-depth knowledge and experience of network systems and components. In addition, the Group Projects will be carefully selected to integrate the units of both Levels 1 and 2. Professional development, ethical and legal issues, particularly in the context of multimedia, the Internet and professional bodies such as the British Computer Society will be addressed in several units across the course. However, these issues will specifically be discussed in the Business Systems Environment, Group Project and Distributed Multimedia Systems units. The placement year affords students the opportunity for experientially based learning of the real world to improve their perception and understanding of business, communication systems and the place to further develop their personal and management skills. It provides a set of business and system experiences for them to bring back and enrich their Level 3 study. A set of brief exercises, carried out at points through the year, tasks them to evaluate their placement organisation in terms of frameworks they have learned, both to ensure that they use and evaluate such frameworks and so that they perceive the Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 9 Bournemouth University 1998
    • relevance of their studies to the world of work. Part-way through the placement year they return to the University to discuss Level 3, the Individual Project and their elective units. Level 3 commences with an induction programme. It re-orientates the students to the University culture and the programme. It provides input on the latest technological developments, principles, practical and strategic issues concerning corporate business for, and conduct of, their Level 3 Projects. The core units further enhance the core themes of business environment/operation and communication systems. The Level 3 electives allow the students in-depth study of their chosen specialist areas. 2.5.1 Research Weeks Delivery includes a Research Week during term 2 of Levels 1 and 2 of the course. The purpose of this week is to afford students the opportunity for wider reading and reflection on and around the issues raised over the delivery of the course. The weeks are organised to require students to read more widely, and to address and reflect on the research techniques appropriate to the course and Level of study. The Research Week is used as a means to integrate the knowledge gained by the students up to this point. Students have an assigned task for the week, but are permitted to vary the task within given parameters. The tasks set for this week in Levels 1 and 2 will be assessed within the Business Systems Environment and the Group Project respectively. 2.5.2 Reading Week The Reading Week provides students with the opportunity to reflect on the topics taught up to that point and also to consolidate on the findings of their Individual Projects. It enables students to catch up with their course learning and to put it into practice in their projects. Students will be required to meet their supervisors for final consolidation of their projects and to review their learning contract. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 10 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 2.5.3 Delivery Diagrams Level 1 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Business Systems Environment R I E N Business Information Systems 1 S S D E B Software Development A W U R C C T Multimedia Computer Architecture W H E I O Communications Systems W E N E K Database Systems E K Level 2 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Business Information Systems 2 R Group Project E S I E N Client/Server Systems Development A D R U C C Computer Networks H T I W O Distributed Systems Management E N E K Distributed Multimedia Systems Level 3 Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 11 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Corporate Business Information R E I Advanced Network Systems A N D D I U Individual Project N C G T I Elective 1 W O E N E Elective 2 K 2.6 Project and Electives Level 3 contains considerable flexibility and optionality for the student. The Individual Project affords considerable scope for the students to identify what they most wish to study and the manner of study. It gives them the opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge and skills they acquired from Level 1, Level 2 and the industrial placement, to solve real business problems. The majority of students should have identified projects from their placement company, as they would be encouraged prior to their placement. Students who have not identified projects from their placement will be encouraged and helped to obtain projects from other organisations. Projects will be based on learning contracts. Students will be required, under the supervision of their supervisors, to develop a learning contract prior to the commencement of their projects. The learning contract will include project title, aim, objectives and the time scale/milestones. An example of a typical learning contract may be found in Appendix A. Students can determine their own combination of option units in their honours profile. Each student must take two electives, two compulsory units and the Individual Project. A student may take any two electives, which may be offered for that academic year. The electives offer students the opportunity to explore topics of major importance within and around the business and technology domain, and focused study, at suitable levels of depth and complexity. Units from other courses will be considered for inclusion in the set of electives over time. The school and the University are focused on a strategy of developing electives from Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 12 Bournemouth University 1998
    • research directions. The set of electives is therefore potentially subject to some change each year. The mechanisms for evaluation of electives, which are set in and operate within the Bournemouth University quality assurance framework, involves: • evaluating the adequacy of the underpinning within the BCS degree • assessing their appropriateness to this course 2.7 Integration of Business and Communication Systems The business aspects within the programme are not only present in the units devoted formally. The programme draws upon problems set in business contexts, so the technological units develop student business thinking by solving business-based problems through the application of appropriate technology. For example, the Level 1 unit of Business Systems Environment investigates such problems as trading, through addressing computerised-based sales, purchasing and stock control systems. In this way, the programme develops and explores the integration of its subject material and builds perception of the inter-relationships between business and communication systems. Through the involvement of students in the application of communication systems to business effectiveness, they will be confronted with the need to learn about technology and business. This will immerse them in the overall aim of the programme: to focus and develop the students’ understanding of the potentials of communication systems in an organisation and critical issues associated with the design, development, implementation and evaluation of such systems to support business operations. Assessment due to the integrated nature of the unit delivery, problem-set and in-course assessment provides an intrinsic means of integration. In particular, the Group Project in Level 2 and the Individual Project in Level 3 provide the opportunity for further integration. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 13 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 2.8 Indicative Hours for Units The number of hours shown in the course diagram below indicate the weekly contact hours for each unit. The diagram also shows the utilisation of these hours for private study, the assessment balance and credit rating. Unit Lecture Seminar/ Private Credit Assessment Workshop Study Coursework / Exam Level 1 Business Systems Environment 1 1 4 20 Portfolio/SBE Business Information System 1 1 1 4 20 2 Ass/ Exam Software Development 1 2 3 20 2 Ass/ Exam Multimedia Computer Architecture 1 1 4 20 2 Ass/ Exam Communications Systems 1 2 3 20 2 Ass/ Exam Database Systems 1 2 4 20 2 Ass/ Exam Total Student Hours 6 9 22 Level 2 Business Information Systems 2 1 1 4 20 1 Ass/ Exam Group Project 0.5 2* 5 20 Reports Client Server Systems 1 1 4 20 1 Ass/ Exam Development Computer Networks 1 2 3 20 1 Ass/ Exam Distributed Systems Management 1 1 4 20 1 Ass/ Exam Distributed Multimedia Systems 1 2 3 20 1 Ass/ Exam Total Student Hours 5.5 9 23 Level 3 Corporate Business Information 1 1 4 20 1 Ass/ Exam Advanced Network Systems 1 2 3 20 1 Ass/ Exam Individual Project 0.5 11.5 40 Dissertation Elective 1 1 1 4 20 1 Ass/ Exam Elective 2 1 1 4 20 1 Ass/ Exam Total Student Hours 4.5 5 26.5 Key: * – Only 1 hour staffed Ass – Coursework Assessment Exam – Terminal Examination for the duration of 3 hours Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 14 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 2.9 Supervised Work Experience (Placement) Students on this course will spend a minimum of 40 weeks in supervised work experience, or placement. The inclusion of the placement is particularly appropriate in view of the emphasis in the course on the application of communication systems in a business environment, and the development of personal and management skills. This approach is addressed throughout the course, but it is believed that practical experience in industry/commerce provides effective and beneficial development for students. The company should be of sufficient size, or breadth of activity, to involve the student in the necessary experiences appropriate to the placement period. 2.9.1 Placement Management Management and organisation of the Supervised Work Experience is the responsibility of the student, together with the support of the Placement Administrator who maintains records of past and potential placement companies. A Placement Tutor provides guidance and academic support for the student. The Placement Administrator is also responsible for: • locating and advertising suitable placements during Level 2 • co-ordinating interviews with companies where appropriate The Placement Tutor is also responsible for locating suitable placements and for approving placements where the placement has been found and secured by the student. Visiting activity is handled centrally by the university. Students are visited pastorally by the Placements Visitor, to check that • adequate supervision is taking place • the student is being employed in relevant activities • the placement is progressing appropriately 2.9.2 Student Responsibilities During their placement, students are required to carry out a series of brief exercises, evaluating their company in terms of the frameworks that they have learned on the course. The exercises will provide opportunities to: • gain practical experience within a real business environment • keep a logbook of their findings • apply skills and knowledge gained during the first two years of the course • enrich Level 3 by bringing back industrial experience associated with operation, design and implementation of communication systems in organisations • develop personal responsibility and maturity Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 15 Bournemouth University 1998
    • • develop a professional work ethic and appreciate quality issues Students are encouraged to formulate their projects from their placement for a development project at Level 3. Placement Assessment The School of Design, Engineering and Computing is currently reviewing the assessment criteria for placements. Any criteria agreed will be adopted for this course. The assessment criteria, however, will be in force prior to students commencing their placements. Normally, to progress to Level 3 of the course, students must successfully complete their placements and satisfy the assessment criteria. Securing Placements The University provides students with opportunities to secure a placement with a company, by ensuring that opportunities are advertised and interviews are co-ordinated. It is the responsibility of the student to succeed at the interview, and since other universities and courses pursue the same placement opportunities, there is no guarantee that an individual student will secure a particular placement. Failure to Secure a Placement If a student has not obtained a placement three weeks before the start of the academic year following Level 2, they will be offered the option of proceeding directly to Level 3 without the Supervised Work Experience. In this case, they will be considered for the award of a full-time degree rather than a sandwich one. 2.9.3 Exemption from Placement A student may apply for exemption from the Supervised Work Experience, based on prior experience. In such a case the experience will be assessed in terms of its relevance to the course, its depth and appropriateness to the activities carried out. Exemption should normally be sought during the recruitment process. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 16 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3. ASSESSMENT 3.1 Assessment Philosophy The purpose of assessment is four fold: • to assess the student attainment of the units’ learning outcomes • to provide students with feedback and motivation • to use as an indicator to monitor a student’s development and provide guidance for the student in their choice of study programme and • to provide the course team with both a quality control mechanism and an indicator of the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process Units are normally assessed by a combination of in-course assessment and the end of year examination. In-course assessment could be based on developmental work, research, case study or a combination of these. The pattern of assessment for each unit has been identified within the unit. 3.1.1 Quality Assurance • Each assignment for in-course assessment is quality assured according to the School Quality Handbook • Assignment schedules will be arranged to give spread of students work load 3.1.2 Design Principles The overall pattern of assessment is based on the following principles: • students should not be over assessed • students should only be specifically assessed for each identifiable learning outcome • a variety of assessment types should be adopted • the student should be able to complete each in-course assessment satisfactorily within the allotted time and • each element of assessment is considered within a global strategy and not simply within a local context Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 17 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3.2 Contribution of Coursework Where units have adopted an approach to assessment involving both coursework and examination, the ratio of coursework to examination contribution will be 30:70 for all the Levels. The best approach to assessment for certain units, however, does not fit this simple model, and in such cases different vehicles are used to test the learning outcomes of the unit in question. For example, the Group Project which is assessed by 100% coursework involves practical implementation of a system over a period of weeks. However, only the marks from Levels 2 and 3 will contribute to honours. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 18 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3.3 Assessment Regulations 3.3.1 Principles 3.3.1.1 These regulations conform to the principles set out in the University's Academic Policies, Regulations and Procedures (1996). 3.3.2 Period of registration 3.3.2.1 The maximum and minimum times which a student may take to complete the course, from first registration, are normally as follows: Full-time, Full-time, Part-time, maximum minimum maximum (years) (years) (years) • CertHE 2 1 4 • DipHE 4 2 6 • BSc/BA 6 3 8 3.3.2.2 Periods of registration may be formally adjusted if a student moves from a PT to a FT route, or vice versa. Minimum and maximum periods of registration may be set for students who enter with specific credit. 3.3.2.3 Provision for designating the mode of the award Candidates who meet the criteria for the award of honours degree or of degree, and who have satisfactorily completed the supervised work experience, or have been awarded specific credit for the supervised work experience, will normally receive an award in the sandwich mode. 3.3.3 Pass mark 3.3.3.1 The pass mark for each unit will be 40%. Where the unit is assessed by a combination of coursework and examination, a pass will be awarded where the total unit mark is at least 40% and the mark in each separate component of the unit assessment is not less than 36% Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 19 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3.3.4 Compensation 3.3.4.1 When the total mark for a unit is less than 40%, but not normally less than 38%, and providing that no component contributing to the unit assessment mark is less than 36%, the Board of Examiners may exceptionally and at its discretion, compensate for this result and award a pass provided that it is justified by an appraisal of the student's overall performance on the course to date, including satisfactory performance in other units assessed in the same level as the unit considered for compensation. In this case the mark recorded for the unit in question will be 40%. Such compensation may not normally apply to a unit or units with a total value of more than 40 credits. Where compensation has taken place the pre-compensation unit mark will be recorded. 3.3.5 Progression 3.3.5.1 Progression through the course requires that the student has attained the appropriate level of performance in the assessment for the course. 3.3.5.2 To proceed to Level 2, students must normally achieve 120 Level 1 credits. 3.3.5.3 To proceed to Level 3, students must normally achieve 120 Level 2 credits. Supervised Work Experience: to proceed to Level 3, students must normally complete the Supervised Work Experience successfully. 3.3.6 Submission of coursework 3.3.6.1 Failure to submit a piece of coursework by the required deadline will result in a maximum mark of 40% being awarded for the coursework submitted within two weeks after the deadline. A mark of zero will be recorded for coursework submitted after this time and will be considered by the Board of Examiners at their meeting. 3.3.6.2 In cases of illness or genuine mitigating personal circumstances, and on the submission of written evidence of the above, the procedure outlined below must be followed. 3.3.6.3 Extensions may be allowed provided the application is made before the due date, there is good supporting evidence and the application is made in writing on the form provided, signed by the Course Leader, or a designated representative. The form should be submitted on or before the due date in place of the piece of coursework. 3.3.6.4 Normally students must have completed the required coursework prior to sitting the terminal examinations. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 20 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3.3.7 Attendance 3.3.7.1 Students are normally expected to attend lectures, seminars, fieldwork and other sessions, and to undertake such work as may be required of them. 3.3.8 Determination of honours classification 3.3.8.1 Level 3 units will have a weighting of 70% towards final degree classification, with 30% weighting for Level 2 units 3.3.8.2 In calculating overall marks for Levels 2 and 3, unit marks will be weighted in proportion to their credit values. 3.3.8.3 A candidate's marks will be related to the following table for the guidance of the Board of Examiners: First Class 70% or more Second Class, Upper Division 60-69% Second Class, Lower Division 50-59% Third Class 40-49% 3.3.8.4 Where a candidate achieves a higher class than that determined under 3.3.8.2 in units with a total value of 70 credits or more at Level 3 then the Board of Examiners may recommend that a higher class shall be awarded. 3.3.8.5 The honours classification shall generally be based on a combination (weighted as in 3.3.8.1) of Level 2 and Level 3 units. However, honours classification shall be based on Level 3 units only, in the case of candidates with advanced standing admitted directly to Level 3. 3.3.9 Provision for intermediate awards 3.3.9.1 Certificate in Higher Education 3.3.9.1.1 To be eligible for the award of a Certificate in Higher Education students must successfully complete or be credited with 120 Level 1 credits. 3.3.9.1.2 A student who has satisfied the above requirement and who does not intend to Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 21 Bournemouth University 1998
    • proceed directly to Level 2 will be recommended for the award of a Certificate in Higher Education. 3.3.9.2 Diploma in Higher Education 3.3.9.2.1 To be eligible for the award of a Diploma in Higher Education students must successfully complete or be credited with 120 Level 1 and 120 Level 2 credits. 3.3.9.2.2 A student who has satisfied the above requirements and who does not intend to proceed directly to Level 3 will be recommended for the award of a Diploma in Higher Education. 3.3.9.3 Degree 3.3.9.3.1 A student who has successfully completed or been credited with all Level 1 and Level 2 units, and who achieves 80 credits at Level 3, may be recommended for the award of a Degree. This comprises 320 credits, with 120 credits at each of Level 1 and Level 2 and 80 at Level 3. 3.3.10 Provision for failed candidates 3.3.10.1 Normally students will be required to make good a failure prior to the commencement of the next stage of the course, in one of the following ways. 3.3.10.1.1 Failure in a unit at Level 1 or Level 2 The Board of Examiners will permit a student who fails in unit(s) carrying a total of no more than 40 credits to make good the failure, on one occasion only, in one or other of the following ways: • resit the examination; • resit the examination and resubmit coursework; • resubmit the coursework only. A unit mark of 40% will be used where a resit has taken place, and/or where coursework or any other component of a unit assessment has been resubmitted, or where units have been repeated. Where an entire level is repeated, unit marks will not be capped. A part-time student may not normally resit or resubmit units with a credit value of more than one third of the total taken in the year concerned. 3.3.10.1.2 Failure in Level 1 or 2 Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 22 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Where a student fails unit(s) carrying a total of more than 40 credits in Level 1 or 2 the Board of Examiners will either require the student to repeat the level, or to withdraw from the course. A student will not be allowed to repeat the level more than once. Exceptionally and as an alternative to either of these outcomes, the Board of Examiners may recommend that a student who has failed unit(s) carrying a total of more than 40 credits should be permitted to make good the failure in those units only. 3.3.10.1.3 Failure at Level 3 To be recommended for the award of a degree with honours, a student must normally pass all the course units at the first attempt. Where a student fails in unit(s) up to the value of 20 credits, the Board of Examiners may at its discretion award an Honours degree providing that this is justified by consideration of the overall results achieved. The Board of Examiners may recommend the award of a pass degree to candidates who, having achieved 120 Level 1 credits and 120 Level 2 credits, have successfully completed Level 3 units totalling 80 credits. Where the Board has so ruled, students must refuse the alternative of being re-examined for an honours degree, and signify acceptance of the pass degree, before the recommendation is forwarded to the Senate of the University. 3.3.10.1.4 Reassessment for an award Candidates who have failed in their first attempt to satisfy the Board of Examiners in the assessment for the award may be reassessed for the award at the discretion of the Board of Examiners on one occasion only and within the planned maximum length of the course. 3.3.11 Provision for candidates with valid reasons for poor performance 3.3.11.1 If it is established to the satisfaction of the Board of Examiners that a student's absence, failure to submit work or poor performance in all or part of an assessment for an award was due to illness, or other cause found valid on production of acceptable evidence, the Board shall act under 3.3.11.2 to 3.3.11.5 below: 3.3.11.2 A student deemed by the Board to have valid reasons for poor performance has the right to be reassessed as if for the first time in any or all of the elements of assessment, as specified by the Board of Examiners. At Level 1 or 2, if an assessment affected by illness was itself a second attempt, the student shall be permitted to resit as if for the second time. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 23 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3.3.11.3 Where the Board of Examiners is satisfied that there is sufficient evidence of the student's achievement to determine honours classification, or where this evidence is subsequently obtained, the student may be recommended on the basis of the available evidence for the award for which he or she is a candidate, or for a lower award specified in the course regulations. In order to reach a decision a Board of Examiners may assess the candidate by whatever means it considers appropriate. 3.3.11.4 An Aegrotat award may be recommended, when the Board of Examiners does not have enough evidence of the student’s performance to recommend the award for which the student was a candidate or a lower award specified in the course regulations, but is satisfied that but for illness or other valid case the student would have reached the standard required. 3.3.11.5 Before a recommendation under 3.3.11.3 or 3.3.11.4 is submitted to Senate, the student must have signified that he or she is willing to accept the award and understands that this implies waiving the right to be reassessed under 3.3.10.1.4. 3.3.12 Appeals procedure 3.3.12.1 Appeals are considered by an Appeals Committee constituted annually by the Academic Standards Committee of the University. Details are given in the University's Academic Policies, Regulations and Procedures (1996). 3.3.13 The Board of Examiners 3.3.13.1 The Board of Examiners derives its authority from the University Senate. Functions of the Board are as detailed in the University's Academic, Policies, Regulations and Procedures (1996). 3.3.14 External Examiners and their Terms of Reference 3.3.14.1 Details are given in the University's Academic Policies, Regulations and Procedures (1996). 4. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES 4.1 General Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 24 Bournemouth University 1998
    • These regulations are governed by Bournemouth University Academic Policies, Regulations and Procedures. It is implicit in the Bournemouth University Curriculum Framework that units are credit- oriented, and that applicants are therefore assessed in terms of their prior learning, and prior experiential learning, and the following is set in this context. 4.1.1 Entry Requirements Level 1 The most important attribute of the applicant will be their determination to succeed on this course. Evidence of having successfully followed a course at 'A' level or its equivalent, will be required. An interest in and an acceptance of the need to acquire skills in Business Communication Systems is also required. Applicants should normally be 18 years of age by 31 December in the year of entry. Applicants should have the following basic knowledge and skills required to fulfil the demands of the course: 1 an ability to express themselves in written English; 2 numeracy sufficient to cope with the technical aspects of the course, which may be evidenced at interview or by a GCSE or equivalent mathematics pass, as below. These skills should be demonstrated at a level equivalent to GCSE grades A to C. To this end applicants may offer: 1 GCSE, or GCE, or CSE results in relevant subjects; 2 results of appropriate BTEC or Access courses; 3 relevant certificated competences at an appropriate level, for example NVQs; 4 an accredited record of using these skills in employment. Where other evidence is not available applicants may be asked to complete short tests, for example of numeracy or writing skills, or language aptitude, at interview. Applicants should demonstrate evidence of their ability to study at undergraduate level. Typically this evidence might be in the form of: 1 achievement at A-level, or AS-level, or in GNVQ (or equivalent UK or overseas qualifications). Candidates applying for entry direct from school will normally be required to have at least two A-level passes. 2 learning through experience, demonstrated in portfolios or records of achievement, Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 25 Bournemouth University 1998
    • and/or by tasks set at interview, and confirmed by employer reference(s); 3 a combination of academic and experiential qualifications, to be considered on its individual merits. Applicants should have sufficient motivation to benefit from the course, based on an understanding of what it involves. Typically this might be illustrated through: 1 experience/work in computer networking, telecommunications or business; 2 discussion at interview or written statement on reasons for wishing to undertake the course. 4.1.2 Exceptional Entry Applicants whose qualifications do not conform to the standard entry requirement and/or are applying on the basis of joining the course with ‘Academic Credit’ may be admitted on the presentation of evidence which, in the opinion of the Course Leader and a member of the Course Management Team, indicates the capacity and attainment to/or pursue the course of study and to derive benefit from it. 4.1.3 Mature Students Applications from older individuals, especially those with relevant work experience, will be encouraged. In considering such applications, a wide range of indicators will be assessed, including evidence of previous study and educational attainment, referees’ reports, and reasons for wanting to join the course. All mature applicants will be interviewed. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 26 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 4.2 Entry with Credit to Levels 2 and 3 Where students seeking to transfer in can demonstrate that they fulfil the progression and assessment requirements of the programme, and are equipped to meet the remaining demands of the course to attain the award, they will be admitted at an appropriate point in the programme. Relevant credit points, or appropriate experience, will be required to support a candidate seeking such transfer. The decision concerning direct entry to Level 2 or Level 3 will be taken by the Course Management Team. 4.3 Selection Process Students will be selected from those applicants who suggest an ability to cope with the intellectual and practical demands of the course. Selection will be made on the basis of a wide range of indicators, in particular, evidence of: (i) academic qualifications and evidence of intellectual capacity generally; (ii) personal qualities, suggestive of their ability to complete the demands of the course; (iii) evidence that the student has carefully thought through their course selection and has a strong commitment to succeed in their chosen career. 4.3.1 Open Days All applicants will be invited to an Open Day (several being organised at appropriate intervals during each year). The Open Day will enable applicants to see the University and its facilities and discuss the content of the course with staff. It will, more importantly, provide the opportunity to state quite clearly what the aims of the course are and to explain in detail the demands of the course. This should enable applicants to make a clear decision regarding their application and allow less committed students to withdraw at this stage. Applicants will have the opportunity to meet students across the School and obtain information about the Students Union activities, and the general quality of life at the University. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 27 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 28 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 5. COURSE MANAGEMENT AND QUALITY ASSURANCE The following is an extract from the School Quality Handbook and will be adapted as the Handbook evolves. There are many aspects of course management associated with the running of a successful and effective course. These include resource scheduling and allocation, pastoral care of students, course monitoring, quality assurance of the assessment process, staff development and development of teaching and learning methods. The following course management structure ensures that responsibility for all of these important aspects is undertaken. The responsibility for the course ultimately lies with the Senate of the University. However within the School, it lies with the School Committee. There are three complementary structures to manage the course: the Course Team, which is concerned with establishing the general academic principles of the course, maintaining and monitoring the quality of the course and ensuring its healthy development; the Course Management which is responsible for the implementation of the general principles established by the Course Team and for the day to day running of the course; and the Projects Committee which is responsible for the Project proposal approval process, the preparation of the students to undertake projects and the assessment of projects. 5.1 Academic Responsibility for the Course 5.1.1 The Course Leader Is appointed by the Head of the School of Design, Engineering and Computing and is responsible to the School Committee for the implementation of the course policy, with executive responsibility for: • course publicity other than that by advertisement, and student recruitment • management of recruitment and subsequent enrolment • liaison with the school resource manager for time-tabling, staffing and accommodation for the course in accordance with the approved scheme and for the academic and personal welfare of the students enrolled on the course • co-ordinating all assessment arrangements and arranging for the implementation of all appropriate assessment quality assurance mechanisms dictated by the Course Team • maintaining suitable academic records • liaising with external examiners • liaising through the Academic Secretary with external bodies such as the IEE and BCS Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 29 Bournemouth University 1998
    • In the above duties the Course Leader will be assisted by other members of the Course Team to whom day to day responsibility will be delegated. The Course Leader will meet with the senior management of the School at monthly intervals to review progress. 5.1.2 The Academic Tutor Will assist the Course Leader generally but with a specific brief for: • maintaining the academic quality of the course and ensuring that quality monitoring requirements are met with respect to in-course assessment and examinations • production of the assessment timetables • obtaining examples of in-course assessments for the External Examiners • liaising with the School Research and Staff Development Group in the identification of appropriate staff development programmes to support the course • stimulating the development of teaching and learning materials and approaches appropriate to the course • co-ordinating the year’s teaching team and teaching schemes 5.1.3 The Projects Co-ordinator The Projects Co-ordinator is responsible for implementing the procedures defined by the Projects Committee and in particular the proposal approval process, the preparation of the students to undertake projects and the assessment of projects. This involves: • the organisation and the oversight of activities designed to help students decide on viable areas of investigation • the provision of a counselling facility for students in difficulty • co-ordination of the allocation of supervisors for Projects • briefing of supervisors on points of procedure and regulations • liaison with supervisors and External Examiners on the feasibility, acceptability and resource implications of project proposals, reporting where necessary to the Course Team • the co-ordination of procedures for assessment of the project, including the arrangement of the calendar with the Course Leader and the Academic Tutor • the convening of the Projects Committee to approve the final arrangements for the selection, supervision, and assessment of projects and to consider any cases causing concern • through the Course Team ensuring that the necessary project underpinning is established in the earlier stages of the course 5.1.4 The Placements Tutor and Placement Administrator The Placement Tutor with the support of the Placement Administrator: Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 30 Bournemouth University 1998
    • • canvasses firms and maintains contacts with companies who have agreed in principle to provide Supervised Work Experience places for students • maintains records of past, present and potential future placements • co-ordinates interviews with companies where appropriate • co-ordinates the activities of the supervising tutors during the industrial period • provides a register of suitable companies, together with the names of contacts, to assist students in obtaining placements • is jointly responsible with the Projects Tutor for the organisation and management of the Project Day, when placement students visit the University 5.2 Course Management and Course Team The responsibility for the management of the course lies with the Course Management, working in conjunction with the Course Team, and subject to the general responsibility of the School Committee. 5.3 Terms of Reference 5.3.1 This group shall normally meet once per month. It shall be responsible to the School Committee for the day-to-day management of the course and in particular for: a) arrangements for recruitment to the course; b) arrangements for the delivery of the course and evaluating the quality of teaching and learning; c) the programme of assessment and project work; d) the annual course monitoring cycle, including maintaining a record of actions taken; e) the preparation of an annual report on the course; f) convening Course Team meetings as appropriate; g) submitting regular reports to the School Committee; h) reviewing and acting upon other matters affecting the course, as required from time to time by the School Committee or Senate; and i) advising on staff development and teaching and learning initiatives related to the course. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 31 Bournemouth University 1998
    • The Course Management shall establish and maintain effective communications with the Course Team, and in particular shall: i) meet the Course Team in the preparation of the annual report; ii) meet the Course Team when the course is due to be reviewed and at other times when major modifications to course structure, content and assessment are proposed; iii) consult the Course Team on other matters appropriate to maintaining and enhancing the quality of the course. 5.3.1.1 Membership Course Management Head of School of Design, Engineering and Computing (Ex-officio) Head(s) of Department Course Leader (Chairman) Academic Tutor Projects Co-ordinator Placements Tutor Placement Administrator Programme Administrator 5.3.2 Course Team Head of School of Design, Engineering and Computing (Ex-officio) Head(s) of Department Course Leader (Chairman) Academic Tutor Projects Co-ordinator Placements Tutor Members of the teaching team Tutor Librarians 1 full-time Student Representative for each stage of the course Programme Administrator 5.3.3 The Projects Committee The Projects Committee consists of the Course Management and representatives of the University Central Services units. Its responsibility is to oversee all aspects of the Level 3 projects, including: i) the formulation and compilation of a Projects Handbook given to all students in the academic year preceding their project; ii) approve the terms of reference (learning contract) for proposed projects received Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 32 Bournemouth University 1998
    • from students; iii) recommendation to the Board of Examiners assessment procedures for all projects. 5.3.4 The Industrial Liaison Group Head of School of Design, Engineering and Computing (Ex-officio) Head(s) of Department Placements Tutor Course Leader Academic Tutor Projects Co-ordinator Placement Administrator Nominees of the Schools At least four representatives from industry A student representative The Industrial Liaison Group will normally meet twice a year; its purpose is to advise and assist the Course Management in the further development of the course. The Group is also expected to be invaluable in assisting the placement of students, acquisition of guest lecturers and the arrangement and assessment of projects. 5.3.5 Student Liaison The Course Team will meet at least termly with representatives of the student group. These meetings will be organised by the Academic Tutor. There will be one student representative for each 15 students on the course. Each year group will elect one of these to represent them on the Course Team. Student representatives are responsible for: • consulting students on the course as to their views and comments • production of summary reports of students’ comments for Course Committee meetings. The Academic Tutor will provide advice, if requested, with these responsibilities. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 33 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 34 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 6. UNIT SYLLABUSES Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 35 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 36 Bournemouth University 1998
    • BUSINESS SYSTEMS ENVIRONMENT LEVEL 1 UNIT BCS 1/01 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE This unit develops an understanding of organisations, the information technology and the relationship between them. It introduces knowledge of the organisations, their structure and functioning, the impact of IT upon them, and the way organisations change and develop. The unit develops the necessary skills that enable individuals confidently to manage, lead and develop both themselves and others. It encourages a pro-active attitude and approach to management and execution of activities. The overall aim is to create a greater degree of capability and understanding, leading to increased job satisfaction, which will deliver both personal and organisational benefits. The skills developed will contribute to the enrichment of the student and the ability to integrate the material presented in other units. LINKAGES Year 1 all units. Year 2 Group Project primarily but integrated into all units. AIMS 1 To introduce basic organisation structure and function concepts and principles, with emphasis on the differences that Business Communications can offer to organisations. 2 To develop a range of personal skills relevant to the Business Communications professional. 3 To provide opportunities for individuals to improve their effectiveness in teamwork and in self-directed, self-managed learning. 4 To provide experience of the customer-provider relationship and examine its effects upon task execution and problem formulation and solution. 5 To encourage a pro-active attitude and approach to problem-solving. 6 To develop an understanding of the legal issues relating to Business Communication industry. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 37 Bournemouth University 1998
    • LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 understand organisational concepts as might be demonstrated by describing the advantages and disadvantages of a different organisation structure for a given organisation; 2 discuss the impact of IT upon organisation structure and/or function as might be demonstrated by identifying and understanding the organisation issues arising from a change in IT within a given organisation; 3 develop their personal skills as might be demonstrated by reflecting on the effectiveness of a given approach to a particular task such as a presentation or a simple negotiation; 4 contribute effectively to a team task, as might be demonstrated by ensuring the achievement of a group objective through participation in joint planning and execution; 5 understand the context and effects of a simple customer-provider relationship on supply of a service or product, as might be demonstrated by the achievement of a simple, multi-day group objective for an individual, in customer role, external to the group; 6 understand legal issues which are central to the workings of the computer industry, as might be demonstrated by identifying how and where intellectual property rights arise, and explaining contractual transactions; 7 apply basic legal concepts to new situations in the information and communication technologies field, including the ability to research some law, and to seek further information from appropriate professional sources. INDICATIVE CONTENT Organisations & IT Fundamentals of Organising, Formal and Informal Structure, Organisation Design, People at work, How Organisations Develop, Managerial Decision Making, Business Communications and Organisations, Principles of Control, Managing Groups, Entrepreneurship & Innovation. Personal Skills and Professional Development Managing time, Presentation skills, Introduction to Research, Team working, Communicating, Negotiating, Motivating, Leading, Professionalism. Legal English legal system, contract law, negligence, employment & consultancy law, intellectual property, data protection, computer crimes. Activity Groups These are student led groups responsible for leading and organising activities to enrich the course and personal development. Examples of Activity Groups include the Guest Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 38 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Lecture Group who invites individuals from industry to provide a lecture. Another example would be the Open Day Group who support the course tutor in the organising of Open Days provide a detail “tour” for new recruits to the course. All the Activity Groups provide an additional opportunity for students to get involved in meetings, motivating other students and in achieving success. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Material will be presented through lectures. Seminar time will a) explore case studies and similar materials and b) afford time for personal skills development, assessment and feedback. Beside the lecture/seminar programme there are two student-managed activities. Firstly there are independently operating Activity Groups to which students are allocated and which they themselves structure, organise and manage to achieve specified goals; this activity involves learning through reflection and participate in action learning. Secondly, a post-examination end-of-year Simulated Business Experience comprises a week where students are set an integrative exercise in a customer-provider context within a simulated business setting. The week is conducted on a 9-to-5 working day. Students operate in groups, as Business Communications consultants, to achieve a specified target. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed in two parts: firstly by means of a portfolio of written and secondly through assessment of their performance during the Simulated Business Experience Week. Assessment of student-managed elements includes assessment of their management of the activity as well as assessment of their achievements; in addition individual marks combine the group mark for achievement with a factor for individual attendance / effort / involvement. Portfolio 50% Simulated Business Week 50% Students must achieve the minimum pass-mark in both the elements above. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 39 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE READING LIST Cole GA (1993), “Management Theory & Practice”, DPP. Daft R (1997), “Management”, Dryden. Shigekawa, M (1988),“Succeeding in High-Tech”, Wiley. Phyllis C, Mary R (1997), “Writing at University: A Guide for Students”, The Open University Press. Blaxter L, Hughes C, Tight M (1996), “How to Research”, The Open University Press. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 40 Bournemouth University 1998
    • BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1 LEVEL 1 UNIT BCS 1/02 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Provision of effective IT based systems to improve business process requires a systems perspective on business operations, and an understanding of the processes involved in developing systems, such as systems analysis, design and development. This systems- oriented unit combines these areas of study and affords students the opportunity to gain understanding of systems methodologies. LINKAGES The unit links with these Level 1 units: a) Database Systems, b) Software Development. AIMS 1 To examine systems analysis and design techniques with particular emphasis on business problems. 2 To examine the System Development Life Cycle in relation to the development of application systems. 3 To examine the relationship between information systems and business process. LEARNING OUTCOMES To enable the student to: 1 apply systems analysis and design concepts, as might be demonstrated by using formal modelling concepts in the logical analysis of business process; 2 develop a computer-based system to manage the information for a small organisation, as might be demonstrated by developing an operating information system for a given small business; 3 propose a suitable system development process for a given business situation; 4 demonstrate understanding of the growing dependency of organisations on information, being able to distinguish between both well and poorly-organised information systems, as might be demonstrated by assessing the suitability of a simple information system for a given business. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 41 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT Themes User involvement, Feasibility (including cost benefits, analysis using discounted cash flow), Document and Standards - Communication, Quality, Project Management. Business Systems Introduction, systems development life cycle. Types of system Batch, online; file types - master, transaction etc; systems flowcharts. People in Systems Development and their Roles Users & the IT/IS department, user involvement - link to the quality and success of systems development. System Development Approaches Methodologies - SSADM, DSDM, Rapid Application Development. Requirements Analysis Investigation methods; analysis and modelling of information (matrices, DFDs, LDS, decision tables); feasibility assessment. System Design Systems architecture, interface style, input/output design, overview of data design. Project Management and Quality Assurance Link to systems development life cycle - milestones, planning tools & techniques, walkthroughs and quality assurance reviews. Communication in Systems Development Recording and presenting information. Documentation and standards, data dictionaries and systems libraries, use of CASE tools. Written and oral communication: report writing and oral presentations. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Material is presented through lectures, and laboratory work provides practical learning opportunities, where actual operating systems can be used in conjunction with case studies or experiments conducted, with evaluation and discussion of outcomes. The unit has two lectures per week: the material on business operations is presented through one lecture per week, supported by a structured reading list from a main text. The seminars/ workshops draw on operations as the context of systems work, and focus principally on the systems issues. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 42 Bournemouth University 1998
    • examination (70%). For in-course assessment, students will analyse a simple business case study to ascertain the information and communication requirements. In groups, the students will ascertain specification for the design and development of a small computer network, together with its associated software, to provide the business information and communication requirements and demonstrate the system in a role play situation to the client/business owner. INDICATIVE READING LIST Yeates D, Shields M & Helmy D (1994), “Systems Analysis and Design”, Pitman. Waters, D (1996), “Operations Management”, Addison-Wesley. Goodland M, Slater C D (1995), “SSADM V4: a practical Approach”, McGraw-Hill. Supplementary Text Curtis G (1998), “Business Information Systems”, Addison-Wesley. Haffer J A, Valacich J S, George J F (1996), “Modern Systems and Analysis Design”, Benjamin Cummings. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 43 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 44 Bournemouth University 1998
    • SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT LEVEL 1 UNIT BCS 1/03 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE It is now accepted that all graduates require the ability and skills necessary to develop computer programs. The application of computing techniques is no longer the sole concern of the computer scientist but is pervasive throughout the industrial, commercial and domestic environments. A limiting factor is the graduate’s ability to correctly specify, design and implement the software for a particular business application. It is these topics, together with quality control, that form the basis of the software development module. This unit develops the students understanding and practical skills in designing and implementing computer programs in a commercial environment. It provides the framework within which students can organise the planning and production of programs and ensure quality control procedures are followed. LINKAGES This unit provides a general underpinning in software development principles, which are required for the foundation of any technological degree. AIMS 1 To develop an understanding of the selection and application of appropriate techniques to solve a range of software problems. 2 To provide awareness of software tools employed in program development and implementation. 3 To examine the processes of program design, implementation and testing. 4 To introduce and promote confidence in the use of a commercial programming language and appropriate software development tools. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 understand and explain the principles of program design; 2 determine the requirements of a software system; 3 write programs using design techniques which minimise the effort of program writing, testing and maintenance; 4 apply techniques for selecting the most appropriate data structure during the software design phase; Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 45 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 5 implement small software designs using an appropriate high-level language; 6 understand the role of programming in business systems & its implications; 7 examine the importance of planning and control during the production of programs; 8 understand the basic concepts of Object Oriented programming. INDICATIVE CONTENT Software development life cycle Introduction to the program development process, development phases, tasks & problems, the program as a product, the development team environment. Software errors Rigorous software testing, debugging techniques, use of standards, software maintenance. Design and implementation of algorithms and data structures Stages in the development of an algorithm , bubblesort, shufflesort, mergesort, within the context of the programming environment. Program development techniques Principles of program translation, compilation and linking software history, structured programming, limits of structured programming, modular programming, limits of modular programming, features of high-level programming languages. Principles of object-oriented programming A history, objects, messaging, inheritance, polymorphism, diagramming techniques. Commercial programming constructs Use of language components: sequence, selection, iteration, program modules, control flow and data structures. Representation in a commercial programming language. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The unit will be delivered through a mix of lectures and laboratories. The lectures will develop the theoretical aspects of software development, while laboratories will allow the students to carry out practical software development. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by coursework (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The coursework will consist of a series of programs contributing to a profile of work. These programs will be submitted by the student at regular intervals during the first term in order to provide regular feedback and activities which will build the confidence of the student. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 46 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE READING LIST Pressman R S (1992), “Software Engineering A Practitioner’s Approach”, McGraw-Hill. Horton I, (1997) “Beginning Java”, WROX Press Ltd. Flanagan D (1997), “JAVA in Nutshell: a desktop quick reference”, 2nd Edition, O’Reilly & Associates. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 47 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 48 Bournemouth University 1998
    • MULTIMEDIA COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE LEVEL 1 UNIT BCS 1/04 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE In view of the convergence of computing and communications and the evolution of the multimedia technologies, this unit initiates the student to the principles, components and sub-systems of computers leading to the development of multimedia PCs. The configuration and utilisation of the PC, especially as a communications unit, is important in this course and the unit facilitates this notion. This unit concentrates upon the hardware component and sub-system level of multimedia PCs, the software to support the efficient operation of the PC as a multimedia system, and the PC as a multimedia communications system to the outside world. LINKAGES Links to and supports the following Year 2 units: Computer Networks, Client/Server Systems Development and the Group Project. AIMS 1 To develop an understanding of the fundamentals of multimedia computer components and architectures. 2 To examine the relationships between hardware components and operating systems. 3 To develop an understanding of multimedia systems interfaces. 4 To develop technical and practical skills in setting up, configuring and managing multimedia PCs operating in a distributed environment. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 understand the operation of a multimedia PC in terms of its hardware and software components; 2 specify PCs for multimedia communications and networked applications for businesses; Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 49 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT Hardware elements of a Multimedia Computer: Integrated Circuits. Boolean algebra. Binary arithmetic. Microprocessors. Memory systems (RAM, ROM Disk, CD, Tape storage). I/O systems (VDU, audio, keyboard, printer I/O mechanisms). Computer buses. Characteristics of Software and Programming Languages: Software programming languages and tools ( Assembly, High level, editors, debuggers). Supporting Software Environments: MCI for audio visual control, TAPI for telecommunications, API for videoconferencing. Operating System Functions and Types Batch Processing, Multiprogramming, Time Sharing. Real-Time Operating Systems. Memory management, I/O control. DOS, Unix, QuickTime, Windows multimedia extensions. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS A series of lectures to underpin the fundamentals of computer architecture will be given. Lectures will be supported by experiments to set up special PC configurations, install special cards, and load software and configure the system to demonstrate the use of the PC in various modes. Invited speakers will give talks about the latest developments and trends in new multimedia PCs. Case studies to consider appropriate PC set up for distributed multimedia applications. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally include two practical assignments/case study. INDICATIVE READING LIST Chapman and Hall (1996), “Foundation of Computer Technology”, ISBN 0-412-59810-8. Englander I (1996), “The Architecture of Computer Hardware & Systems Software”, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN 0-471-31037-9. Anderson A J (1994), “Foundations of Computer Technology”, Chapman and Hall, ISBN 0-412-59810-8. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 50 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Heath S (1996), “Multimedia Communications Technology”, Focal Press, ISBN 0-240-51460-2. Norton P (1997), “Inside the PC”, 7th Edition, SAMS Premier, ISBN 0-672-31041-4. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 51 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 52 Bournemouth University 1998
    • COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS LEVEL 1 UNIT BCS 1/05 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Because of the increasing data processing capability introduced in the office, data communications products and services have assumed increasing importance. The technological developments and the widespread acceptance of standards are transforming the ways in which information is used to support the business function. In addition to the traditional communications requirements for voice and data there is now the need to deal with images and video information. These four types of information are essential to the survival of any business in today’s competitive international environment. What is needed is a treatment in communications systems in a business environment. LINKAGES This unit underpins Year 2 units of Computer Networks, Distributed Systems Management and Distributed Multimedia Systems. AIMS 1 To develop an understanding of categories of business information types and communication systems. 2 To acquire fundamental knowledge in communication techniques as applied to systems and networks. 3 To understand and evaluate the capabilities and limitations of network components and communication channels. 4 To apply fundamental knowledge in designing communication systems. 5 To develop technoeconomic skills for evaluating various communication system options. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 identify business data types; 2 evaluate the components of communication systems; 3 evaluate performance of various communication links; 4 discuss characteristics, operation and application of network components; 5 classify different communication systems and their limitations; 6 design and implement a small computer network. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 53 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT Introduction Information and communication, nature of business information requirements, distributed data processing, transmission of information, networks, communication software, standards, Internet resources. Mathematics for communication Basic algebra, calculus, probability, basic Fourier analysis. Business Information Voice, data, image, video, response time. Distributed data processing Distributed versus centralised data processing, forms of distributed data processing, network implications of distributed data processing. Data transmission and transmission media Signals, spectra, channels, channel capacity, transmission media, wireless transmission. Communication fundamentals Analogue and digital data communications, modulation techniques, AM, FM, ASK, FSK, MSK, bit error rate, data encoding techniques, asynchronous and synchronous transmission, interfacing flow control error detection error correction data link control. Transmission efficiency The need for transmission efficiency, FDM, Synchronous TDM, statistical TDM, Data compression. Systems studies Modems, fax, mobile communications, microwave and satellite communication, fibre optic communication. Network Systems Introduction to Local Area Network (LAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN). TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The unit will be delivered through a mix of lectures and laboratory based practical work and case studies. There will be invited speakers from industry to discuss specialised areas. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 54 Bournemouth University 1998
    • ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally consist of two laboratory- based assignments, which include design exercises. INDICATIVE READING LIST Beyda W J (1996), “Data Communications from Basic to Broadband”, 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-241571-2. Stallings W, “Business and data communications”, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13 761230-3. Frenzel, “Communication Electronics”, McGraw Hill, ISBN 0-07-113317-8. Halsall F (1996), “Data Communications, Computer Networks”, 4th Edition, Addison Wesley, ISBN 0-201-42293-X. Goldman (1997), “Local Area Network”, John Wiley, ISBN 0-471-14162-3. Goldman (1998), “Applied Data Communications”, 2nd Edition, John Wiley, ISBN 0-471-5917-X. JOURNALS IEEE Transaction on Communications ACM Computer Communication Review Data Communications International Communications of the ACM Journal of Information Systems Computer Security Information Systems Management Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 55 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 56 Bournemouth University 1998
    • DATABASE SYSTEMS LEVEL 1 UNIT BCS 1/06 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Database Systems provides the student with the foundation for the understanding of data, data structure and associated processing in business. It deals with the storage of data: files, records, and indexing methods. Database modelling is introduced including entity- relationships, the relational model, normalisation, relational calculus/algebra and SQL. Practical application is reinforced by database workshops. LINKAGES The unit supports the Level 1 Business Information Systems 1. It provides the foundations of the Level 2 unit Client/Server System Development and the Level 3 unit. AIMS 1 To examine and develop a working knowledge of principal computer-based file and record structures and access methods. 2 To develop a framework via data analysis and modelling for robust database design and implementation. 3 To develop formal logic and develop understanding of relational calculus and algebra. 4 To develop the use of computer software to support model building and application. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of this unit the student will be able to: 1 understand the data storage structures used in modern database management systems as might be demonstrated by proposing alternative physical layouts for data in a typical system; 2 understand the different data access and manipulation techniques available to the database designer and system builder as might be demonstrated by the efficient design of a database system; 3 understand the physical design of databases as might be demonstrated by the appropriate use of indexing tools; 4 understand the conceptual design of databases as might be demonstrated by the design of a database system using entity-relationship modelling and normalisation processes; Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 57 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 5 understand database manipulation and management as might be demonstrated by using the SQL language and database tools. INDICATIVE CONTENT Data and Storage Data storage methods, bits, bytes, fields, records, files, databases. Critique of physical layout of data. Data Processing The need for structure in storage; the need for different data access methods and techniques. The use of main memory and disc memory. The time factor of data processing. Files and File Access The use of indexing and hashing in file structure and file access; sequential, indexed- sequential, index-non-sequential and other index structures. Critique of physical layout of database structures. Data Modelling The differences between physical, logical and conceptual design. The Relational Data Model: relational algebra/calculus. Data modelling techniques: entity-relationship diagrams, functional analysis, normalisation. Data Structures and Manipulation Using SQL and database interfaces to build and manage database systems. Access to database systems through SQL. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS This unit will be delivered using a combination of lectures and workshops/seminars. The seminars will focus on the practical aspects of this unit, for example, data modelling techniques and developing understanding of and familiarity with SQL and its relevance to business problems. ASSESSMENT Assessment will be based on an in-course assignment, which will typically consist of a data analysis and database implementation (30%), and the end of year examination (70%). Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 58 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE READING LIST Kroenke D (1995), “Database Processing : Fundamentals, Design and Implementation”, Prentice Hall. Curtis G (1995), “Business Information Systems: Analysis, Design and Practice”, 2nd Edition, Addison-Wesley. Down E, Clare P, Coe I (1992), “Structured Systems Analysis and Design Method : Application and Context”, Prentice Hall. Eva M (1994), “SSADM Version 4 : A User’s Guide”, McGraw-Hill. Hanson O (1988), “Essentials of Computer Data Files”, Pitman. Loomis, M, “Data Management and File Processing”, Englewood Cliffs (N J). McFadden F R, Hoffer J A (1994), “Modern Database Management”, Addison-Wesley 4th Edition. Stamper D, Price W (1990), “Database Design and Management : An Applied Approach”, McGraw-Hill. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 59 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 60 Bournemouth University 1998
    • GROUP PROJECT LEVEL 2 UNIT BCS 2/01 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE This unit develops students' skills in systems development, problem solving, time management and co-operative working. This is a practical unit requiring the student to participate in a substantial project involving the analysis of a business need and the development of a networked computing solution to that need, from feasibility study through specification, design and implementation to testing and acceptance. The group project will consolidate material covered in level 1 and will synthesise much of the level 2 material. Project management techniques will be taught as part of this unit. Students are able to experience the relationships between different members of a project team and are encouraged to understand the importance of working as a group in developing complex business communication systems. LINKAGES This unit builds on concepts and skills learned in Level 1 and synthesises material from all other Level 2 units. AIMS 1 To provide the student with in-depth experience of the specification, design and implementation of a major networked system. 2 To give the student a practical understanding of the relationship between the various technologies, tools and techniques introduced in other units. 3 To develop the students' ability to contribute effectively to a systems development team. 4 To introduce students to project management concepts and provide students with an insight into the practical application of these concepts. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 work with others to achieve a common objective; 2 identify, estimate and plan activities within a business communications systems project; 3 make a significant contribution to the development of a business communications Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 61 Bournemouth University 1998
    • system; 4 take responsibility for determining their own course of action in resolving practical problems. INDICATIVE CONTENT There will be group assignments covering the following areas: a) analysis of business communications needs; b) evaluation of implementation options; c) implementation, evaluation of business communications systems; d) management of all aspects of assignment work. Example of a typical group project: to design and implement a networked business information system for a SME. The taught Project Management element of the unit will cover: Project Management Techniques Work breakdown structure; task scheduling; critical path analysis; Gantt and resource charts; monitoring and control; quality plans; configuration management and change control; project management tools. Project evaluation Feasibility study; estimation; cost appraisal; risk assessment. Professional and ethical issues Role of Professional Bodies; BCS Code of Conduct; professional development. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Students will work in groups to demonstrate the application of specific skills in solving business problems and their abilities to work collaboratively. The Project Management material will be presented through a balanced mix of lectures and seminars. The seminars will involve practical exercises to enable students to develop skills in the practice of project management techniques. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 62 Bournemouth University 1998
    • ASSESSMENT There will typically be two group assignments. Assignment 1 will typically require the groups to a) analyse business communications needs and b) evaluate and propose implementation options. Assignment 2 will typically require the groups to a) implement and evaluate a business communications system and b) manage all aspects of that work. INDICATIVE READING LIST Main Text Meredith J R & Mantel S J (1995), “Project Management: A Managerial Approach”, (3rd.Ed.), John Wiley. Supplementary Reading Langford D (1995), “Practical Computer Ethics”, McGraw-Hill. Compton S B & Conner G R (1994), “Configuration Management for Software”, Van Nostrand Reinhold. Ince D, Sharp H & Woodman M (1993), “Introduction to Software Project Management and Quality Assurance”, McGraw-Hill. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 63 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 64 Bournemouth University 1998
    • BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS 2 LEVEL 2 UNIT BCS 2/02 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE This unit provides the students with a detailed understanding of the concepts of object- oriented analysis and design techniques as applied to the development of a solution to business problems. The unit will encompass the design and development of business system and the skills, techniques and attitudes needed to plan and control systems development projects. LINKAGES The unit links vertically (Year 1) with Business Information Systems 1 and Software Development and horizontally (Year 2) with Client/Server Systems Development and Group Project. The unit provides the underpinning for the final year Individual Projects unit and possible options AIMS 1 To highlight the problems associated with traditional systems development and examine briefly other approaches and frameworks. 2 To provide a framework for the analysis and design of object oriented systems. 3 To examine different development environments and the integration of both CASE tools and prototyping in the development process. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit, the student will be able to: 1 understand the need for a variety of methodologies to suit varying environments and applications; 2 implement and evaluate the various concepts and tools of Object Oriented Analysis (OOA) and Object Oriented Design (OOD); 3 apply tools to a given environment and critically evaluate the benefits to be gained from their use; 4 apply and evaluate the business perspective of the process of managing systems development, implementation and induction. INDICATIVE CONTENT Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 65 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Modelling the software development process SSADM - tools & techniques, Soft Systems Methodologies (SSM), Object-Oriented Analysis & Design. Object-Oriented Analysis & Design (OOA/OOD) Current industry standard framework (UML). Object-Oriented Concepts Classes, inheritance, encapsulation & polymorphism, issues on reuse. Evaluation & selection of development methodologies using CASE tools. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The material will be presented by one lecture and a one-hour workshop per week. Students will perform exercises based on analysis and breakdown of problems, case studies and environments applied to business requirements and extensive use of School resources. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). For in-course assessment students will analyse a business case study to ascertain the information and communication requirements using object oriented analysis and design techniques supported by use of a CASE tool. In groups, the students will analyse and model the information and communication required for a computer to solve the business information and communication problems. Part of the design will be implemented in an object oriented programming environment to demonstrate understanding of the process design and its implementation. Students will reflect on the use of the object-oriented approach in comparison to alternative approaches introduced in Year 1. INDICATIVE READING LIST Fowler M (1997), “UML Distilled”, Addison Wesley. Scott K, “Rational Organisation Web-site” www.rational.com Khoshafian & Abnous (1995), “Object Orientation”, 2nd edition, Wiley. Graham I, Hewelyn-Jones P (1998), “Requirements Engineering and Rapid Development”, Addison Wesley. Erikrron H, Penber M (1998), “UML Toolkit”, Wiley. Fitzgerald G, Arison D E (1995), “Information Systems Development”, McGraw Hill. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 66 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 67 Bournemouth University 1998
    • CLIENT/SERVER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT LEVEL 2 UNIT BCS 2/03 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Many real-world distributed applications operate over heterogeneous computer networks, utilising a client/server paradigm. The design and implementation, plus the underlying software architecture of these applications, are the main concerns of this unit. The client/ server paradigm will be explored both through user interfaces, and databases design issues. An important aspect of the unit is to provide students with the necessary skills and understanding to interact with more than one complex. Application Programming Interface (API), hence to expose the students to object oriented programming concepts and reusable software components. LINKAGES Direct linkages exist to the Level 1 units of Database Systems and Software Development. The unit horizontally supports Distributed Systems Management, Computer Network in Level 2 and the Level 3 units. AIMS 1 To develop understanding of the issues relevant to the design and implementation of distributed applications utilising a client/server paradigm. 2 To develop an understanding of the issues related to designing client/server databases. 3 To study the concepts of object orientation and to develop an awareness of the techniques and software technology relevant to reusable software components. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 design and implement a client/server application using object-oriented technology 2 demonstrate competence in the use of a user interface API; 3 demonstrate competence in the use of a database API; 4 demonstrate understanding of a client/server software architecture. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 68 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT Client/Server Software Development Design methods, notations, and techniques. Reusability. Software issues relevant to heterogeneous software platforms. Client/Server Software Architecture Software architecture: layers, and approaches. History and development. Virtual machines. Communication mechanisms: client/server; client/client. Resource management. Relevant operating system issues. Case Study: User Interfaces Component models: low-level, high-level. Event handling approaches. Inter-component communication mechanisms. Component/GUI manager communication mechanisms. Design notations. Testing. OO concepts applied to program development. Case Study: Databases Design: entity-relationship modelling. Implementation techniques. Implementation technology: database connectivity. SQL. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Understanding the issues relevant to designing and implementing applications which are distributed over heterogeneous hardware and software platforms emerging from immersion with the relevant software technologies. Hence this will be a highly practical unit, in which students will work individually and in small groups to design either complete systems, or enhancements to existing applications, using appropriate tools. The detailed knowledge of the technologies used in the practical work will be put into a wider context through the lecture programme and directed reading. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally be two pieces of practical work focusing on the main aspects of client/server systems. At least one assignment will be individual. Normally, the students will tackle the shared assignment in pairs. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 69 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE READING LIST Rice J C, Salisbury III I (1997), “Advanced Java 1.1 Programming”, McGraw-Hill. Flanagan D (1997), “Java in a Nutshell: a desktop quick reference”, 2nd Edition, O’Reilly & Associates. Asente P J, Swick R R (1990), “X Window System Toolkit: the complete programmer's guide and specification”, Newton, MA: Digital Press. Gamma, Helm, Johnson (1997), “Vissides, Design Patterns”, Addison-Wesley. Elmasri R, Navathe S (1994), “Fundamentals of Database Systems “,Addison-Wesley. Stamper D, Price W (1990), “Database Design and Management”, McGraw-Hill. O’Lafi, Harkey, Edward (1996), “The Essential Client/Server Survival Guide”, Wiley. Renaud, Paul (1996), “Introduction to Client/Server Systems – A Practical Guide for Systems Performance”, Wiley. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 70 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 71 Bournemouth University 1998
    • DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT LEVEL 2 UNIT BCS 2/04 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Distributed System Management discusses the technology and management issues for multi-process and multimedia in operating systems. It provides the student with an understanding of the foundations of the management of distributed systems. It deals with the management of machine resources: processes, memory and network management and the interface between these resources and various communication protocols. LINKAGES The unit develops from the Level 1 Multimedia Computer Architecture and Communications Systems units. The unit links with the Level 2 Client/Server Systems Development, Computer Networks and Distributed Multimedia Systems units and supports the Level 3 unit of Advanced Network Systems. AIMS 1 Develop understanding of the management of multi-user operating system principles, architectures and functions. 2 Understand and compare different computer hardware architectures and their relationship with multi-user and multimedia workloads. 3 Explore and contrast different approaches to access control and security. 4 Evaluate a range of approaches to operating system tuning and performance. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 understand principles of multi-user operating systems as resource managers and service providers; 2 understand how computer hardware architecture features are used in and support multi-user and multimedia; 3 understand the relationship between access and security in a multi-user operating system; 4 understand the range of tasks involved in managing and installing backup systems and associated disaster recovery plans for a multi-user, multi-application system; 5 appreciate the implications of a range of operating systems features that affect performance. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 72 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT Systems Multi-User Operating Systems Principles, functions, purposes, resource management, service provision. Queues, tasks, threads, deadlock. File systems, sharing, performance, users, access control. Computer Hardware Bus architectures, interrupts, task contexts and switching. Input and output, device controllers and drivers, direct memory access. SISD and MIMD computer architectures, SMP computers, architecture and performance. Network Architectures and protocols Interaction between operating systems and protocols such as TCP, UDP, PPP, PPTP, TCP ports. Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). Influence of the network architecture on the management and performance of a multi-user operating system. Operating systems and distributed multimedia applications. Distributed Operating Systems Communications within operating systems, synchronisation, processes, file systems. Management Management and administration, users and resources, system and software configuration. Client/server and enterprise network management. Security and recovery Threats, design principles, protection mechanisms, user authentication, domains, user groups, access control lists, contingency planning, recovery methods and management. Performance Management Hardware and software issues: caches, buffers, time-slices, priority strategies, performance parameters. Performance measurement and improvement. Benchmarks and demand simulation. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 73 Bournemouth University 1998
    • TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Material will be presented through lectures. Laboratory work will provide practical learning opportunities, where actual operating systems can be used in conjunction with case studies or experiments conducted, with evaluation and discussion of outcomes. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally include a practical assignment/case study. INDICATIVE READING LIST Ault M R (1995), “UNIX System Administrator’s Companion”, Wiley. Tanenbaum A (1992), “Modern Operating Systems”, Prentice-Hall. Goldman (1998), “Applied Data Communications”, 2nd Edition, John Wiley. Englander I (1996), “The Architecture of Computer Hardware and System Software”. Wiley. Silberschatz A, Galvin P (1994), “Operating System Concepts”, 4th Edition, Addison- Wesley. Stallings W (1995), “Computer Organisation and Architecture”, MacMillan. Baron & Higbie (1992), “Computer Architecture”, Addison. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 74 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 75 Bournemouth University 1998
    • COMPUTER NETWORKS LEVEL 2 UNIT BCS 2/05 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Data communication and computer networking are essential components for the effective operation of any organisation today. This unit will provide an understanding of the fundamentals of data communication and computer networking for both local area and wide area networks. It will examine issues involved in the design and implementation and management of local area networks, and their interconnections locally and through the wide area networks. LINKAGES This unit develops from the Level 1 Communications Systems unit. It links to Distributed Systems management, Client/Server Systems Development and Distributed Multimedia Systems units. The unit supports the Advanced Network Systems and the Individual Projects units in Level 3. AIMS 1 To evaluate the requirement specifications for a network to support organisational activities. 2 To examine and evaluate network architectures, topologies, standards and protocols for the design of a proposed network. 3 To plan, design and implement network systems within the framework of a corporate organisation. 4 To evaluate the management and security aspects of a network and provide measures for improved security. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of this unit, the students will be able to: 1 evaluate and provide a major contribution towards the development of requirement specifications for a network system; 2 evaluate alternative network components and architectures and determine the most appropriate for a given application; 3 use suitable tools and techniques for the design and implementation of a computer network; 4 evaluate the performance of existing networks by applying appropriate tools and techniques and propose modifications to improve performance; Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 76 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 5 contribute to the management and security aspects of a network. INDICATIVE CONTENTS The context of networked systems Centralised verses distributed, sharing facilities, public and private networks. Network architectures The OSI reference model, TCP/IP, propriety architectures. Technology of distributed system LAN characteristics and concepts: client-server architecture, benefits. Medium Access Control CSMA/CD, token ring, token bus. Transmission media standards: 10 Base 2, 10 Base 5 and 10 Base T, 100 Base T, 100 Base FX, wireless LANs, structured wiring. LAN types Basic and fast Ethernet, token ring, token bus. LAN components and interfaces: servers, workstations, cabling, Network Interface Card (NIC), Medium Access Unit (MAU), repeaters, operating systems. Campus Wide Network Internetworking: interfaces, repeaters, repeater hubs, bridges, routers, brouters and gateways. Backbones: FDDI, CDDI, 100 VG-Any LAN, ATM supported. Network design Requirement specification, traffic analysis, component evaluation, cost analysis, topology, planning, design, implementation, future expansion. Network management LAN operating systems, security. Wide Area Networks (WANs) WAN characteristics and concepts: why and when to use a WAN, objectives and services of WANs; ISDN, Message switching (X.400) and Packet switching (X.25); Internet: concept, applications. Introduction to high speed communication Frame-relay, ATM. Management Issues: Principles and practices of installation and configuration of a network, organising and distributing network resources, performance management, compatibility between systems, problems, levels of solutions, loss of functionality, cost. Security Access to system, data security, encryption, accidental loss, data back-up management and Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 77 Bournemouth University 1998
    • recovery. Integration and Applications Network operating systems, workgroup computing, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), electronic mail, workgroup software, multimedia, the concept of distributed database servers, management issues. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The material will be presented through a variety of lectures, seminars and workshops. Practical exercises will be carried out in purpose built communication laboratories using appropriate software and hardware. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will include a practical assignment and a case study. INDICATIVE READING LIST Halsall F (1996), “Data Communications, Computer Networks”, 4th Edition, Addison Wesley, ISBN 0-201-42293-X. Goldman (1997), “Local Area Network”, John Wiley, ISBN 0-471-14162-3. Goldman (1998), “Applied Data Communications”, 2nd Edition, John Wiley, ISBN 0-471-5917-X. Stallings W & Van Slyke R (1994), “Business Data Communications”, 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-348483-1. Douglas E Comer (1995), “Internetworking with TCP/IP”, 3rd Edition, Volume 1, Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-216987-8. Smythe, “Internetworking”, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-56536-6. Stalling W (1995), “ISDN and Broadband ISDN with Frame Relay & ATM”, Prentice- Hall, ISBN 0-02-415513-6. JOURNALS IEEE Transaction on Communications ACM Computer Communication Review Data Communications International Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 78 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Communications of the ACM Journal of Information Systems Computer Security Information Systems Management Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 79 Bournemouth University 1998
    • DISTRIBUTED MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS LEVEL 2 UNIT BCS 2/06 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE The integration of the various media into multimedia applications is taking place at an exponential rate in stand alone computer environments. It is becoming apparent that the huge amount of data generated and the differing requirements posed by the different media will be a challenging problem in communication using multimedia information via networks. The understanding of issues of efficient data compression of multimedia information both for storage and transmission is important for current and future communication systems and networks. Critical analysis of the techniques, together with capabilities, limitations and future trends of communication systems and networks are essential for designing Multimedia Communications Systems. LINKAGES This unit builds upon knowledge of Communications Systems, Database Systems, Business Information Systems1 and Multimedia Computer Architectures of Level 1, Computer Networks and Distributed Multimedia Systems in Level 2. It will feed into the Advanced Network Systems unit in Level 3. AIMS 1 To understand the issues involved in the use of various media for communication and the quality of service required supporting multimedia applications. 2 To develop an understanding of the impact of multimedia quality of service requirements on network design. 3 To develop student knowledge and skills to critically appraise existing networks and offer solutions for future network requirements to support distributed multimedia applications. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 critically analyse, evaluate system requirements of audio, video, image and graphics of multimedia systems; 2 use and specify the various compression methods required to store and transmit the information; 3 critically appraise the performance, design existing and future computer, Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 80 Bournemouth University 1998
    • communications systems and networks supporting multimedia, on the basis of technical merit , quality of service, and business criteria; 4 analyse, evaluate and appraise future wireless multimedia networks; 5 understand various user interface strategies for multimedia applications; 6 critically evaluate and offer solutions to problems relating to quality transmission of information via multimedia systems and networks; 7 understand, evaluate and offer solutions to security problems of Internet transactions; 8 apply knowledge of multimedia applications and user interfaces for the design of appropriate systems which meet the requirements of businesses. INDICATIVE CONTENT Multimedia: Media and Data Streams, Sound/Audio, Images and Graphics, Video and Animation. Examine the requirements of the various media on networks. Examine the requirements of combining media in documents, synchronisation. Optical Storage Media. Documents, Hypertext and MHEG Networks (LANs, ATM, MANs, WANs, Internet, WWW), review existing networks and their suitability for multimedia applications. Multimedia Communication Systems (QoS, Application and transport subsystem) The requirements imposed on future networks for multimedia communications. Introduction to Data Compression, Standards for Data Compression: the need for, understanding of techniques, and standards for data compression. The Physical Layer: Fibre Optics as a solution to the bandwidth requirements of quality of service. Wireless Multimedia Communications: the issues, trends and solutions. Multimedia Applications: User Interfaces. Practice the designing of effective multimedia Interfaces. Security in Networks: The need for network security, the methods for secure communications and cryptographic schemes. Security and E-business Virtual Reality and Communications Future Directions TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS A series of lectures to underpin the fundamentals, supplemented by practical sessions, invited speakers from industry on specialised areas, and case studies ASSESSMENT Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 81 Bournemouth University 1998
    • This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally consist of two laboratory- based assignments, which include integrating design exercises between multimedia and communications. INDICATIVE READING LIST Fluckinger F. (1995) "Understanding networked multimedia" Prentice Hall ISBN 0-13-190992-4 Chapman&Chapman (2000) "Digital Multimedia" Wiley ISBN 0-471-98386-1 Steinmetz R (1995), “Multimedia: Computing Communications and Applications”, Prentice Hall. Minoli D (1993), “Distributed Multimedia through broadband communications services”, Artech House. Heath S (1996), “Multimedia Communications Technology”, Focal Press. Stallings W (1997), “Local and Metropolitan Area Networks”, Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13253733-8 Stallings W. (2000) "Data and Computer Communications" prentice Hall ISBN 0-13-086388-2 Stein L. (1998) 'Web Security" Addison-Wesley ISBN 0-201-63489-9 JOURNALS Multimedia Systems ACM Press IEEE Transactions on Networking IEEE Multimedia IEEE Internet IEEE Computer Magazine Communication of the ACM IEE Transactions on Communication Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 82 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 83 Bournemouth University 1998
    • CORPORATE BUSINESS INFORMATION LEVEL 3/H UNIT BCS 3/01 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Information and communication technology is facilitating new and innovative ways of structuring business to improve the flow of activity and support effective decision making. The new nature of business competition demands rapid and effective decision making. Technology has been exploited to facilitate data and information processing. However, the nature of competition demands information systems to facilitate business processes in an innovative way to support an integrated information structure. This unit will focus on the implications of e-Business technologies on the organisation’s information flow, communication strategy and business activities. LINKAGES This unit will reflect on the components covered in Business Information Systems Level 1, Business Information Systems Level 2 and Computer Networks, Client/Server Systems Development and Distributed Multimedia Systems of Level 2. The unit will provide the core principles in corporate decision making and the facilitating information systems. AIMS To explore the processes and practises associated with e-Business operations with the aim of being able to assess the problems likely in all phases of their implementation and operation and so select and apply technologies and approaches appropriate to the issues being addressed. To examine the issues and opportunities presented by e-Business and develop an understanding of legal, ethical and social issues and possible outcomes created by this rapidly changing environment. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to: 1. Contrast and compare different business and trading models for e-Business. 2. Identify and define requirements of an e-Business site. 3. Select and critically evaluate appropriate e-Business solutions. 4. Design and develop an e-Commerce site to satisfy the requirements of a specific business and trading model. 5. Critically evaluate the impact upon the organisation, management, employees and stakeholders of adopting or including e-Commerce as a trading model. 6. Identify and evaluate the issues involved in managing an e-Business. 7. To understand the legal, ethical and social issues deriving from e-Business operations. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 84 Bournemouth University 1998
    • LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS Intellectual, Cognitive and Operational Development The context involves the progress of a business transaction process, which is normally unconstrained by geography, time or technology. The process is usually initiated at the customer’s request and often operates concurrently with other customer processes in real- time. Many of these processes are aiming to achieve the paradigm shift expected from New Economy organisations. The unit is taught using a variety of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, case studies and student centred learning. Practical work culminates in the development of an e-Commerce site. Indicative Styles • Learners carry out exercises individually and in groups to develop integrated elements of an e-Business infrastructure, allowing learners to apply conceptual knowledge together with the application of design and development skills. The underpinning skills and knowledge are largely developed in preceding and concurrent units. The focus is upon integrating these in an e-Business context in order to achieve the objectives sought by paradigm shift strategies. The learner will develop their conceptual thinking from data and process-centric analysis towards the user centred viewpoint required to support a successful trading model. • Case studies are analysed by learners as individuals and as members of a group, enabling them to discuss and compare various approaches to solving business problems and developing business opportunities through applying e-Business technologies. • Seminars will lead learners through the research, development and evaluation of business processes, enabling learners to select them for their suitability in differing contexts. • Learners are expected to maintain a current awareness of trends and developments in the rapidly changing field and can expect to undertake both directed and independent research to achieve this. Feedback on Progress Feedback on the learner’s progress towards Learning Outcomes will take place through- out the course, using seminar discussions, individual and group work and case studies. ASSESSMENT METHODS Learning Outcomes 1 through 7 Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 will be assessed by formal examination, part of which will be an in-depth analysis of a case study, giving the learner the opportunity to undertake preparatory research and fundamental analysis appropriate to the context. Learning Outcome 4 Learning Outcome 4 will largely be assessed by the learner developing a working e- Commerce site. Formal Assessment: Weighting The weighting of in-course assessment to final assessment is 30:70 Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 85 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT e-Business Models Trading models in the business to consumer (B2C) and business to business (B2B) markets. The telco, ISP and ASP service provider models. Development Methodologies The user-centred design approach to development and the use of Web Site Design Methodology (WSDM) for the design of trading sites. Trading Systems The development of systems for such things as e-Tailing, e-Info, e-Commerce and m- Commerce. Traffic monitoring. Integration issues with legacy systems. Internationalisation issues. Logistics The distribution of electronic and physical goods. The delivery of virtual, electronic and physical services. Advertising and Marketing The advertising and marketing of e-commerce sites, integration issues for established organisations. Segmentation, intercultural and international issues in the virtual marketplace. Registering sites/pages and the use of metadata. Portal sites, search engines and agents. Payment Systems Debit and Credit cards, e-Cash, wallets, smart cards and telco charging. Settlement systems including BACS and credit accounts. Implications for the organisation of cash flow in differing payment and settlement systems. Security Risks to e-Business of Security risks and attacks, maintaining a current awareness of security information. Security models for e-Business. The use of encryption techniques and public key-based encryption. Identification and certificates, authentication and non- repudiation. Legal, Ethical and Social Issues Legal aspects of trading within the UK, the European Union and internationally. Intellectual property; patents, trademarks, designs and copyright. Individual rights, censorship and privacy. Technology Infrastructure Infrastructure technologies to underpin e-Business and m-Commerce, technology convergence and the implications for client, server and middleware Environments. INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 86 Bournemouth University 1998
    • LITERATURE BASED Gibson, R. (Editor), Rethinking the Future, 1997, Nicholas Brealey Publishing Ltd, London, ISBN 1-85788-103-6 Hammer, M. and Champy, J., Reengineering the Corporation, 1994, Nicholas Brealey Publishing Ltd, London, ISBN 1-85788-056-0 Schneier, B., Secrets & Lies, 2000, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN 0-471-25311-1 Friedlein, A., Web Project Management, 2001, Morgan Kaufman Publishers, ISBN 1-55860-678-5 Lawrence, E. et al, Internet Commerce 2nd Edition, 2000, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN 0-471-34167-3 Tapscott, D., The Digital Economy, 1996, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-063342-8 Gloor, P., Making the e-Business Transformation, 2000, Springer, ISBN 1-85233-265-4 Kalakota, R. & Whinston, A.B., Electronic Commerce, A Manager’s Guide, 1997, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-88067-9 Journals Internet Works Internet World .Net Wired WEB-BASED ACM Transactions on Information systems, http://www.ingenta.com/journals/browse/mcb/046 Information Management and Computer Security, http://www.ingenta.com/journals/browse/mcb/046 Interactive Marketing, http://www.ingenta.com/journals/browse/idm/im Journal of Intellectual Capital, http://www.ingenta.com/journals/browse/mcb/250 Logistics Information Management, http://www.ingenta.com/journals/browse/mcb/088 Managing Service Quality, http://www.ingenta.com/journals/browse/mcb/108 Mobile Networks and Applications, http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/monet/ Pricing Strategy and Practise, http://www.ingenta.com/journals/browse/mcb/034 Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, http://www.catchword.com/rpsv/catchword/carfax/09537325/contp1-1.htm Wireless Networks, http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/journals/wireless/ Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 87 Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDIVIDUAL PROJECT LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3/02 CREDITS 40 RATIONALE The project provides students with the opportunity to develop and demonstrate their ability to study independently at honours level, and to address complex, unstructured problems. It further provides them with the opportunity to apply their learning to a developmentally-based project and then to critically evaluate their work. It is a double- weighted unit since it forms a culminating experience involving and extending their critical evaluation and synthesis learning. It is primarily an independent piece of work; for though allowance is made to address a large problem as a team, in such circumstances the team must demonstrate the individuality of their contributions and set out a convincing assessment strategy that enables individual assessment independent of the success or otherwise of other team members. LINKAGES The unit potentially links to all and any unit in the course. AIMS 1 To provide a context for honours level research and development activity. 2 To provide a context for critical evaluation and/or design of a communication system to support business activities. 3 To enable students to apply and critically evaluate their project management and learning. 4 To develop the student’s capability to present coherently the results of individual project work. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 identify an acceptable project topic in the field of communication systems; 2 identify an appropriate methodology for the proposed project activity; 3 execute their project activity within the constraints of a methodology; 4 analyse and critically review their process and product(s); 5 present a report on their project. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 88 Bournemouth University 1998
    • TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Operation 1 Before Level 3 commences, typically early in their mid-placement year, students will be given project procedures and guidelines in a Project Handbook. 2 Later, but still before Level 3 commences, typically during the mid-placement preparation event at the University, students will attend a two-day workshop on the Project, focusing on its principles and processes, and aimed at fostering their selection of project. Staff will be available for discussion of research and student interests. 3 Before the end of the summer term prior to commencement of Level 3 students must submit a proposal, in the form of a draft learning contract, which includes • identification of their project • a title • a statement of aims • appropriate methodology • an assessment of the tasks involved with timescales • a statement of the deliverables 1 The Projects committee meets to approve/request modifications to individual proposals, and confirm supervision arrangements. 2 At the start of Level 3 projects formally commence. 3 During Level 3 students meet their supervisors regularly, individually or in small tutorial groups of normally four students. Progress forms are used to monitor and record progress. 4 All deliverables are to be submitted by the end of the spring term. Normally projects are executed individually. The principles of assessment are individual. However, it can exceptionally be possible for students to undertake a project together: in such a case the project remains fundamentally a collection of individual projects under a common umbrella and is covered by the following. Where a group of students wish to undertake a development project, and can show that it is too large for one individual, they may formally request to undertake it as a group, subject to the conditions set out immediately below. They must include in their request material that shows how they intend to meet these conditions. The Projects Committee will then consider their request and accept or refuse the request. If the request is refused the student must make alternative proposals, which can be of either an individual nature or a group nature; they must, however, meet the timetable for projects. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 89 Bournemouth University 1998
    • The conditions are: 1 They must identify the separation of tasks so that it is possible to assess the contribution of each member of the group. 2 They must show that it will be possible for each member of the group to complete their tasks (or possibly an alternative but equivalent set, operating under a contingency plan) should other member(s) of the group be unable, for whatever reason, to complete their tasks. 3 They must identify the individual learning: the learning contracts remain individual even in group operation. Supervision Students receive on average 15 minutes per week supervision. Tutorials are timetabled to be during the same period of hours for all staff. ASSESSMENT A project will result in the deliverables agreed in the learning contract, which must include a critical review of the project, the methodology and the final outcome. Assessment will consider the project complexity and achievement, student management of the project and the quality of the deliverables. Copies of all projects will be available to the External Examiners. Group-operated projects (by exception) Where more than one student is working on a group-operated project and students’ work overlaps, no more than 15% of total individual marks can be allocated to the overlapping part of the project. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 90 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 91 Bournemouth University 1998
    • ADVANCED NETWORK SYSTEMS LEVEL: 3 UNIT BCS 3/03 CREDITS: 20 RATIONALE Computer communication systems have been evolving at a considerable rate. Advances in this area have made it possible for corporate organisations to utilise network systems to support their activities locally, nationally and world-wide. This unit will discuss the latest developments in high speed communication technology, both in local and wide area networks. It will explore issues relating to the performance of existing and future global communication infrastructure and systems. LINKAGES This unit develops from the Level 2 Computer Networks, Distributed Multimedia, Client/Server Systems Development and Distributed Systems Management units. It links horizontally to Corporate Business Information and the Individual Project units. AIMS 1 To examine and critically evaluate high-speed computer communication technology and its required infrastructures. 2 To critically evaluate client/server computing to support distributed interactive multimedia services. 3 To critically evaluate the planning, design and implementation of network systems within the framework of corporate organisations. 4 To critically evaluate management issues and assess security mechanisms. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of this unit, the students will be able to: 1 make a significant contribution towards the development of requirement specifications for a corporate communication system; 2 critically evaluate and select appropriate communication technology; 3 make a significant contribute to the design and implementation of a network system for a corporate organisation; 4 examine and evaluate an existing network and propose modifications to improve performance; 5 significantly contribute to system configuration, management and improvement of Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 92 Bournemouth University 1998
    • security. INDICATIVE CONTENTS Review of Networking Fundamentals The OSI reference model, TCP/IP and proprietary models. Connectionless and connection-oriented services. Ethernet, token ring, token bus, FDDI and CDDI networks; message and packet switching networks; ISDN. High-speed Networks Fast Ethernet, 100 VG AnyLan, switched network, workgroup and network switches; standards: 100 Base TX, 100 Base FX. Management LAN operating systems, performance, security, network management software, remote monitoring. TCP/IP Transmission Control Protocol, call establishment, delivery, error recovery, call termination. Internet Protocol, datagram, address classes, segmentation, encapsulation, routing. Dynamic hierarchical Control Protocol (DHCP) and Domain Name Server (DNS). The Internet Bandwidth, traffic load, intermediate nodes, management, security. Multimedia application through the Internet: Reservation Protocol (RSVP). High-speed WANs Frame relay, Switched Multimegabite Data Service (SMDS), Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH), Synchronous Optical Network (SONET). Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Call set-up, cell format, virtual channel, virtual path, cell delivery, priority, quality of service, adaptation layers (ALLs), concept of virtual LANs, LAN Emulation (LANE), LEC, LES, BUS. Broadband ISDN. Global Infrastructure Support National and intercontinental optical fibre link, geo-stationary and low earth orbit satellite links. Future Developments and Applications The Information Superhighway, distributed database systems, interactive multimedia communication, commercial potentials. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The Unit will be presented through a variety of lectures, laboratory-based practical Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 93 Bournemouth University 1998
    • sessions or seminars. Practical design and implementation exercises will be organised in communication laboratories using appropriate software and hardware. In case of large network designs for typical corporate organisations, design simulation software will be used. The students will be requested to carry out research in relevant disciplines using academic papers. Case studies will be used to support lectures and seminars. Students will be encouraged to discuss possible network problems and shortcomings they have during their placements. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will be based on a case study. INDICATIVE READING LIST Halsall, F (1996), “Data Communications, Computer Networks and Open Systems”, (4th Edition), Addison-Wesley. Stamper, D (1994), “Local Area Networks”, Benjamin/Cummings. Stallings, W (1995), “ISDN and Broadband ISDN with Frame Relay and ATM”, (3rd Edition), Prentice Hall. Boisseau, M, Demange, M, Munier, J (1995), “An Introduction to ATM Technology”, International Thomson Publishing. Comer, D E (1995), “Internetworking with TCP/IP”, (3rd Edition), Prentice Hall. Comer, D E (1995), “Internetworking with TCP/IP: (Volume 1): Principles, Protocols and Architecture”, Prentice-Hall. Goldman J E (1997), ”Local Area Network”, John Wiley. Goldman J E (1998), “Applied Data Communications”, 2nd Edition, John Wiley. Stallings W & Van Slyke R (1994), “Business Data Communications”, 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall. Dorling (1996), “Internetworking Over ATM Introduction”, Prentice Hall. JOURNALS IEEE Transactions on Communications ACM Computer Communication Review Data Communications International Communications of the ACM Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 94 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Information Systems Management Computer Security Journal of Information Systems Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 95 Bournemouth University 1998
    • 7. ELECTIVES Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 96 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 97 Bournemouth University 1998
    • ADVANCED DATABASES LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/01 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Database systems develops further the concepts and application of databases to business problems and proceeds to evaluate the issues of database operations and management. It moves into organisational database issues such as corporate information provision and distributed databases. Database development experience is gained in a multi-user environment. AIMS 1 Critically appraise alternative database models. 2 Evaluate database technologies and their applicability to the IS-supported organisation. 3 Develop critical and analytical abilities in the planning, development implementation and management of database systems. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 compare and contrast different database management systems/database models and evaluate against alternative requirements specifications; 2 evaluate the development and implementation issues associated with distributed databases; 3 effectively apply database development tools and techniques; 4 use and apply an industry standard dbms such as ORACLE; 5 evaluate the issues in database administration. INDICATIVE CONTENT Distributed databases Structure, design issues, fragmentation, replication, co-ordination and management of transactions. Update and recovery issues; commit protocols, concurrency and deadlock management. Advanced database models Object oriented, extended relational, deductive and knowledged-based systems. A comparison of requirements, features, structure, architecture and applications. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 98 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Corporate data provision Data storage for end-user computing; data warehouses, Internet, and Intranet connections. Information processing and retrieval developments; data mining, analytical processing. Data Modelling Conceptual modelling, higher normal forms, implementation issues. Database Design and Implementation Database design and implementation issues. Physical design issues including access methods and indexes. Database development tools and techniques, prototyping. Management issues and Database Administration Security, recovery, audit, performance and optimisation. Data and data database administration, data dictionaries. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS This unit will be delivered using a combination of lectures and seminars/workshops. The latter will be used for wider discussion of the subject and to explore issues in practical areas, for example, database systems development. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will be based on a case study. INDICATIVE READING LIST Bell and Grimson J (1992), “Distributed Database Systems”, Addison Wesley. Bertino E and Martino L, “Object-oriented Database systems, Concepts and architecture”. Connolly, Begg and Strachan (1995), “Database systems. A practical approach to design, implementation and management”, Addison Wesley. Koch and Loney (1995), “Oracle - the complete reference”, 3rd Edition, Osborne. Elmasri and Navathe (1998), “Fundamentals of Database Systems”, Addison Wesley. Silberschatz, Korth and Sudarshan (1997), “Concepts of Database Systems”, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill. Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 99 Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 100 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/02 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE This final year module is intended to establish within the student a professional competence in managing the business development process and in developing professional business plans. The emphasis of the module will be upon strategic management and how it interacts with the business development process. One failure of companies is the development of strategic options which allows the company to compete against international competition. On the contrary, most companies would fail owing to the lack of appreciation by the management of strategic issues in the development of IT, systems, products and business development. It is considered that the graduates from this course will become the future managers and their strength will be in their knowledge of IT strategies and the business development process and their ability to analyse problems and conceive strategies to overcome the weaknesses and threats which exist for industry within the world economy. They will have an understanding of how they can identify and exploit the company's strengths and evaluate those external opportunities. The need to evaluate the unknown and the unperceived, to analyse situations from all aspects and to make valued decisions on the exploitation of IT, technology and markets to allow a company to achieve a competitive edge. AIM To cultivate in the student an ability to approach Business Development, utilising new developments of systems and/or products in the context of the inherent strengths and weaknesses of the organisation and with the full knowledge of the opportunities and threats presented by the external environment. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this unit, the student will be able to: 1 appreciate the variety of strategic issues to be taken into account in planning and managing systems and business development process; 2 apply the knowledge gained to the preparation and implementation of Business Plans in their later working life; 3 analyse situations with respect to strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats and develop ways and means to counteract or exploit such aspects. Definition 101 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT Strategic planning. The external & internal environment, strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the organisation and its systems and products. Competition from the European Community and International Trade. Recognising and developing the organisational strengths and weaknesses. Products and systems and how they affect the profitability of a company. Corporate and financial analysis; corporate social responsibility and ethics. Strategic funds management, long-term programming, venture capital use and exploitation. Project management, managing IT development. Market and product strategies; the international and European marketplace, assessing the environment and competitive edge. The negative cashflow situation and competitive advantage of short development cycle. Research and development strategies. Quality as a strategic option. Technology Transfer. Change Management. Technological environment and strategy; obsolescence and performance measurement, life cycle costing and its influence on future systems and technological development. Responding to technological change. The issue of outsourcing or sub-contract supply through the international market. Business development strategy; the cost of business development; the location and distribution networks for business start-ups or company expansion; the consumer and their influence upon the business development process. The influence and incorporation of strategic planning and management upon and within the Business Plan. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS This module will, as far as is possible, simulate real life situations in order that the student confronts those issues, both strategic and short-term, with which they will be faced. To this end, teaching methods will concentrate upon near-to-reality techniques, such as case studies, discussions and evaluation of business development problems. These less formal techniques will be supported, but not led, by traditional teaching methods of lectures and seminars. The student will be encouraged to develop their own styles in analysing strategic issues to allow them to have confidence in their ability to assess both potential and risk in today's modern economic climate. They will be encouraged to examine failure as well as success to achieve valid judgements in the development and application of strategic aspects within Business Plans. ASSESSMENT Definition 102 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • The assessment of this module will be by means of an end-of-year examination (70%) and by an assignment (30%). The assignment will be a practical exercise in developing financial analysis of a business start-up situation. Students will then be expected to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the proposal and develop the boundary conditions through sensitivity analysis. The examination will develop differing business development scenario’s that would have to be dealt with in real life. It tests the students understanding of the principles of business development. INDICATIVE READING LIST Rowe, Mason, Dickel (1996), “Strategic Management & Business Policy”, Addison Wesley. Engle & Blackwell (1996), “Consumer Behaviour”, Holt Saunders. Slatter, et al (1997 ), “Cases in Strategic Management for the Smaller Business”, Blackwell. Sizer, Coulthurst (1995), “Casebook of British Management Accounting”, ICAEW. Hogarth & Pretty (1996), “Guide to Preparing a Business Plan”, Bournemouth University. Definition 103 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 104 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • BUSINESS PROCESS MODELLING LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/03 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE This unit provides students with an overview of methods, tools, and techniques used to model business processes. The unit also examines the relationship between business modelling and systems development. Of particular note are recent initiatives in Systems Engineering for Business Process Change, and the impact of business process modelling on systems requirements and analysis. AIMS 1 To evaluate the methods, tools and techniques available to the process modeller. 2 To examine different notational capabilities, and discuss how to choose techniques appropriate to different usage. 3 To provide a methodological framework for a process modelling programme, without prescribing a particular notational approach. 4 To investigate the relationship between the business process support system, and the process which it supports it. 5 To examine the interaction between business process modelling and the systems development process. LEARNING OUTCOMES The student should be able to: 1 model processes in a variety of notations; 2 apply appropriate techniques to a given context and modelling purpose; 3 identify weaknesses in models of business processes; 4 compare business models using both heuristics and quantitative techniques; 5 restructure business processes to increase their effectiveness; 6 discuss the main issues in producing Systems for Business Process Support. Definition 105 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT Context Who uses Business Modelling (why, where, when). Purposes of Modelling & different kinds of process modelling. Business Modelling, BPR, Strategic Modelling. Historical context for process modelling movement. • E.g., IPSEs and specifically IPSE 2.5. Software Process Workshops. • The IOPT programme. Strategic Modelling. Links to analysis. An Overview of Modelling Approaches Categories of Modelling Approaches. Curtis: Perspectives, Cumulative and Individual Models. Levels of Automation (and link to purpose). Levels of Formality. Further Categories. Audiences for Models. User facing models and analysis models. POSD. Implications for Methods. The CAP breakdown of modelling phases. Capture Models Procedural Approaches. Desirable properties for a business process modelling. Behavioural Approaches. E.g., Role Activity Diagrams. Analysis Models Introducing Rigour. Heuristics, measures, formal approaches and enaction. Guidelines for Models. Heuristics for models. Quantifying Heuristics. Measurement. CHASM. Validation of Measures Formal Approaches. Using formal models, e.g., CSP or RolEnact. Enaction in models. Overview of approaches. E.g., PWB simulations. Systems Dynamics - a brief tour. RolEnact. Enactable Models of Business Processes. Links to Requirements. Presentation and Validation Presenting Findings: POSD Method. Implementing Process Modelling Process Elicitation. What the Methods Say. E.g., GUIDE. Issues in a Process Modelling Programme. Lessons Learned from Best Practice. Models as a Framework in Procedures. On-line and static process guidance. Impact on Systems Business Process and Legacy. Mapping. Definition 106 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Business Models and OO. Cultural and Notational Similarities. Roles and Objects. Systems Engineering for Business Process Change. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS One lecture and one seminar/practical session per week. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally include two equally weighted assignments. The first assignment assessing their ability to produce a simple business model from a given scenario. The second requiring analysis of a given business process (or model). INDICATIVE READING LIST A great deal of the reading will be directed during the course since it relies on material in conferences and journals. However, the following give a flavour of the kinds of models that will be used for some of the business modelling. Ould M (1995), “Business Process Modelling”, Wiley. Coulson-Thomas C (1994), “Business Process Re-engineering: myth and reality”, Kogan-Page. Definition 107 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 108 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • NEW ADVANCES IN HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION Level H Credits 20 Pre-requisite units None AIMS In this unit, students begin explore contemporary HCI paradigms in order to develop a wide-ranging knowledge of potential approaches/directions. The unit takes the student beyond the ‘desktop’ metaphor and allows them to critically assess alternatives for human-technology interactions. The unit is concerned with the analysis of theoretical foundations for user-centered interface design. Integration of psychological principles with advanced technological developments gives the students a broad exposure to 21st century interface potential. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES Having completed this unit the student is expected to demonstrate: 1 an appreciation of contemporary and future potential in HCI. 2 the ability to critically evaluate HCI issues, both theoretical and applied 3 a wide knowledge of contemporary research on interfaces, visual, auditory and kinesthetic 4 conceptual understanding that enables the student to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research and developments in HCI making use of scholarly reviews and primary resources (e.g. appropriate refereed research articles). 5 an ability to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions clearly and accurately. LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS In this unit students will attend a weekly lecture and seminar (where they will present individual HCI topics to the class. mandatory, but not formally assessed. Many of these include practical demonstrations, dependent on available resources). ASSESSMENT Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 are assessed by A written report 25% and a three hour unseen examination 75% INDICATIVE CONTENT Metaphorical paradigms in HCI Model world metaphors The Cinematographic paradigm Representation and manipulation of natural motion pictures in multimedia Anthropomorphic implications of Agent technologies HCI issues of virtual reality interactions HCI and experiential interactions Avatars INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES BOOKS Definition 109 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Bradshaw J.M (2003). Software Agents. MIT press. Landauer,Landauer, Thomas K. (1995). The Trouble with Computers: Usefulness, Usability, and Productivity. MIT Press. Carroll J, M (2001). Human Computer Interaction in the new millenium. Barnes Noble. Faulkner C. (1998). The essence of Human-Computer Interaction. Prentice Hall Faulkner X. (2000). Usability Engineering. Macmillan Press Ltd Shneiderman B. (1998). Designing the user interface. 3rd Edition. Addison Wesley Preece, J, Rogers, Y and Sharp H. (2002). Interaction Design. John Wiley Eysenck and Keene (1995). Cognitive psychology. 3rd edition. LEA publishing. Baber and Noyes (1993). Interactive speech technology. Taylor and Francis Laurel, B. (1993). Computers as theatre. Addison Wesley Snyder. C., (2003). Paper Prototyping: The Fast and Easy Way to Define and Refine User Interfaces Morgan Kaufmann JOURNALS Human Factors Human-Computer Interaction International Journal of human-computer studies Behaviour and information technology Also, the ACM and SIG reviews, CHI conference papers, BT journals and many others we stock. The WWW has very many sites now devoted to HCI and useful material can often be found in many different types of scientific and commercial media. Definition 110 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 111 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • IMAGE PROCESSING LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/05 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE To build an understanding of low-level image representation and the basic techniques required to process digital images. To investigate the techniques required developing image processing algorithms for machine vision tasks. To investigate the complexities of image processing hardware and software. LINKAGES Provides specialist knowledge of image processing techniques and systems. AIMS 1 To provide an understanding of the principles of image acquisition and representation. 2 To enable the student to design and develop image processing algorithms. 3 To give the student an appreciation of the design trade-offs within image processing systems. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 develop image processing systems; 2 design, simulate and test image processing algorithms; 3 partition image processing systems into major hardware/software components. INDICATIVE CONTENT Image Sensors: CCD, laser, TV, human vision system Image acquisition: sampling, quantisation, colour, image geometry, the camera model Definition 112 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Spatial and frequency domain methods Image restoration, enhancement, segmentation; histogram analysis, edge detection Motion detection Frame difference, optical flow, correlation Object representation and description Shape descriptors, size descriptors Image compression LZW, Freeman chain codes, run-length encoding, quad-trees, fractals, Waveletts High-level vision Image processing hardware and software considerations TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The course will be delivered through a mix of lectures and laboratories. The lectures will develop the theoretical aspects, while the laboratories will allow students to carry out practical work. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally include two practically based assignments. INDICATIVE READING LIST Sonka, Hlavac & Boyle (1993), “Image Processing, Analysis and Machine Vision”, Chapman & Hall. Jain, Kasturi (1994), “Machine Vision”, McGraw Hill. Low A (1991), “Introductory Computer Vision and Image Processing”, McGraw Hill. Nalwa V S (1993), “A Guide Tour of Computer Vision”, Addison Wesley. Oculos A D (1995), “Digital Image Processing”, International Thomson Publishing. Definition 113 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • MULTIMEDIA APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/06 CREDIT 20 RATIONALE This unit is concerned with the development of multimedia applications. A number of programming languages will be considered as well as methods of design and implementation. Sample applications will be demonstrated. LINKAGES This unit links to the Multimedia Computer Architecture and Distributed Multimedia Systems units in Levels 1 and 2. AIMS 1 To develop a critical awareness of the software used in multimedia applications. 2 To identify the principles applicable to the choice of a methodology for multimedia development. 3 To examine the concept of performance measurement as it applies to multimedia systems. 4 To provide student with in-depth knowledge of one specialist language suitable for the production of advanced multimedia interfaces. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this unit, the student will be able to: 1 critically evaluate the software infrastructure required to support applications using a multimedia user interface; 2 apply software development techniques, tools and components available in the design of multimedia applications; 3 critically evaluate performance indicators for multimedia systems and make appropriate selections of such indicators for specific systems; 4 generate ideas for entrepreneurial activity based on the application of multimedia interfaces. Definition 114 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE CONTENT MM programming languages Software architectures; Automated presentation systems. Sample applications. Browser based OOP languages such as JAVA. Full visual programming environments such as Delphi. Concepts of OOP and event driven programming. Multimedia authoring tools Overview of multimedia authoring tools, an in-depth study of a typical authoring tool such as Director. System design Implementation of MM interface applications, techniques, design methods. Rapid application development tools. Virtual Reality Use of a 3D representation and manipulation language such as VRML in the production of virtual reality systems. Business applications of MM systems Implications for a typical company. Advantages of MM interfaces over previous systems. Comparison of the Internet (Web) and CD-ROM based systems, applications, and limitations. Application of multimedia interfaces in Computer Based Training (CBT), distance learning, kiosks, etc. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The material will be presented using lectures, practical sessions and guided reading. The student will be expected to undertake a design exercise to demonstrate an understanding of the techniques and apply principles from both the common core and specialist units. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally be based on a practical assignment, including the design of a multimedia interface. READING LIST Pfaffenberger B (1997), “The Elements of Hypertext Style”, Academic Press. Steinmetz R, Nahrstedt K (1995), “Multimedia: computing, communications & applications”, Prentice-Hall. Beekman G (1997), “Computer Confluence, Exploring Tomorrow’s Technology”, 2nd Edition, Benjamin Cummings. Definition 115 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Gibbs, S J, “Multimedia Programming: Objects”, Addison-Wesley. Tsichritzis, D C (1994), “Environments and Frameworks”. Maybury, M T (1993), “Intelligent Multimedia Interfaces”, MIT Press. Hodges M E, “Multimedia Computing: Case Studies”, Addison-Wesley. Sasnett R M (1993), “From MIT Project Athena”. Blattner M M, “Multimedia Interface Design”, ACM Press, Weber , Ford and Weber, (1996), “Deleloping with Delphi”, Prentice-Hall. Borland (1996), “Library Reference manual v2”, Borland. Borland (1996), “Object Pascal language guide v2”. JOURNALS The X Resource, O’Reilly & Associates SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics, ACM Press SIGCHI Bulletin, ACM Press Multimedia Systems, ACM Press Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), ACM Press User Modelling and User-Adapted Interaction Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Conference/workshop proceedings User Interface Software Technology. CHI and INTERCHI. IMMI-1 (First International Workshop on Intelligence and Multimodality in Multimedia Interfaces, July 1995). Definition 116 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 117 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/07 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE The integration of the various media into multimedia applications is taking place at an exponential rate in stand alone computer environments. It is becoming apparent that the huge amount of data generated and the differing requirements posed by the different media will be a challenging problem in communication using multimedia information via networks. The understanding of issues of efficient data compression of multimedia information both for storage and transmission is important for current and future communication systems and networks. Critical analysis of the techniques, together with capabilities, limitations and future trends of communication systems and networks are essential for designing Business Multimedia Communications Systems. LINKAGES This unit builds upon knowledge of Communications Systems, Database Systems, Business Information Systems1 and Multimedia Computer Architectures of Level 1, Computer Networks and Distributed Multimedia Systems in Level 2, and Advanced Network Systems in Level 3. AIMS 1 To critically analyse, evaluate system requirements of audio video, image and graphics of multimedia systems. 2 To develop a critical understanding of the implications of using and capable of specifying the various compression methods required to store and transmit the information. 3 To critically appraise and design existing and future computer, communications systems and networks supporting multimedia, on the basis of technical merit , quality of service, and business criteria. 4 To analyse, evaluate and appraise future wireless multimedia networks. 5 To develop student understanding of various user interface strategies for multimedia applications. Definition 118 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 have an in-depth technical knowledge on the various media and computer technology used in multimedia communications; 2 critically evaluate and offer solutions to problems relating to quality transmission of information via multimedia systems and networks; 3 apply knowledge of multimedia applications and user interfaces for the design of appropriate systems which meet the requirements of businesses. INDICATIVE CONTENT Introduction Multimedia: Media and Data Streams Sound/Audio Images and Graphics Video and Animation Introduction to Data Compression Standards for Data Compression Optical Storage Media Networks (LANs, ATM, MANs, WANs, Internet, WWW) Multimedia Communication Systems (QoS, Application and transport subsystem) Documents, Hypertext and MHEG User Interfaces Synchronisation Multimedia Applications Wireless Multimedia Communications Virtual Reality and Communications Future Directions TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS A series of lectures to underpin the fundamentals, supplemented by practical sessions, invited speakers from industry on specialised areas, and case studies ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally consist of one or two laboratory-based assignments, which include design exercises. Definition 119 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE READING LIST Steinmetz R (1995), “Multimedia: Computing Communications and Applications”, Prentice Hall. Minoli D (1993), “Distributed Multimedia through broadband communications services”, Artech House. Heath S (1996), “Multimedia Communications Technology”, Focal Press. Stallings W (1997), “Local and Metropolitan Area Networks”, Prentice Hall. JOURNALS Multimedia Systems ACM Press IEEE Transactions on Networking IEEE Multimedia IEEE Internet IEEE Computer Magazine Communication of the ACM IEE Transactions on Communication Definition 120 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 121 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • NETWORK APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/08 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE This final year module enables students to build upon the theory and practical skills of software development and software systems they have acquired during the first three years of the course. Particular emphasis is given to object-oriented analysis and design, with software systems being implemented in a networked environment. LINKAGES This unit provides a software development environment for supporting a number of the third year units. AIMS 1 To develop object-oriented analysis and design skills. 2 To develop network software systems using the Java programming language. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 apply an object-oriented analysis and design methodology for the development of network software systems; 2 program network applications using a language such as JAVA. INDICATIVE CONTENT Object-oriented analysis and design methodologies. Object-oriented CASE tools. Classes and objects. Software quality issues. Human interface design considerations. Exception handling. Threads. HCI & Java. Network access using JAVA. Security restrictions in a network environment. Definition 122 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS The course will be delivered through a mix of lectures and laboratories. The lectures will develop theoretical aspects of software development using object-oriented techniques. The laboratories will allow the students to carry out the practical aspects of developing software for networks using Java. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will normally include two practical assignments. INDICATIVE READING LIST Cooling J E (1997), “Real-Time Software systems an introduction to structured and object-oriented design”, Thomson Computer Press. Horton I (1997), “Beginning Java”, WROX Press Ltd. Rice J C, Salisbury (1997), “Advanced JAVA 1.1 Programming”, McGraw Hill. Buchanan W (1996), “Software Development for Engineers”, Arnold. Ince D, Freeman A (1996), “Programming the Internet with JAVA, Addison Wesley. Definition 123 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • PEOPLE and COMPUTERS in BUSINESS ORGANISATIONS (PaCiBO) LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/09 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Within this course, people and computers are characterised as performing tasks, to achieve work in an application domain and in the case of this course, as business communications applications. People are influenced by systems, that include computers, in many ways, apart from, and as well as, being direct end users. People and their relationship to business communication applications will be considered within this broad perspective and how this relates to software engineering. Within this interdisciplinary remit the course will concentrate first on business stand-alone systems and secondly on Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) and groupware systems. LINKAGES The course will build on previous work on Levels 1 and 2 and the whole degree's emphasis on business systems. AIMS 1 To locate the many types of people, individually and collectively, within a broad context of software engineering for business communication systems. 2 To provide an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of HCI and its relationship to software engineering. 3 To review the HCI approach to the design and evaluation of single user business IT applications. 4 To examine the special requirements of CSCW as an interdisciplinary field and how these impact on the design of business groupware. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 appreciate the scope of the anthropocentric issues associated with business computer networking; 2 locate where HCI considerations are critical to the software engineering of business communication systems; Definition 124 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • 3 critically evaluate the HCI and CSCW issues associated with developing single user and groupware IT systems; 4 select appropriate methods and solution strategies to HCI and CSCW problems. INDICATIVE CONTENT The course naturally divides into two parts. First, the HCI of single user business IT applications. Second, CSCW and groupware. HCI as an interdisciplinary subject. User Interface Design (UID). HCI and software engineering. Life cycle models and structured methods. User Centred Design. Morals, ethics and social norms. Requirements analysis. Evaluation. Task analysis. Command line, text and WIMP interfaces. Metaphors and virtual reality. Guidelines and style guides. CSCW and groupware. Business Process Re-engineering. Mobile and Teleworking. People affected by groupware. The characteristics in CSCW of: groups, work, organisations, artefacts and language. Design issues associated with groupware e.g. synchrony. co-ordination, co-operation, socialisation, awareness, access, floor control, locking, ownership, security and privacy. Groupware acceptability, its scalability and integration with other software. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS This unit will be delivered using a combination of lectures and seminars/workshops. The latter will be used for wider discussion of the subject in the context of selected journal articles and other published materials. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and the end of year examination (70%). The in-course assessment will be based on a case study. INDICATIVE READING LIST There are many individual books on both: HCI and UID; and CSCW and groupware. Much of the primary material for seminars will be taken from three sources: 1 Interacting with Computers: The Interdisciplinary journal of Human-Computer Interaction. Elsevier Science. 2 People and Computers (proceedings of the annual British HCI Group conference) 3 The Computer Supported Cooperative Work series. Springer-Verlag. Definition 125 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • 4 Use will also be made on the ACM's on-line journal: SIGCHI Bulletin. Definition 126 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 127 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT METHODS LEVEL 3 UNIT BCS 3E/10 CREDITS 20 RATIONALE Choosing an appropriate method and toolset for systems development is a major element in corporate strategy today. Failure to make the right choices has a serious and expensive impact on company profitability. This unit is designed to extend the student’s knowledge and understanding of the different methods and automatic toolsets currently available to organisations for this work. A range of methodologies, (such as HOOD, YOURDON, INFORMATION ENGINEERING, STRUCTURED REQUIREMENTS DEFINITION), exemplifying differing philosophical approaches to systems development, and a variety of proposed frameworks for evaluating and comparing methodologies (such as WOOD- HARPER/FITZGERALD, OLLE, NIMSAD), will be examined. Students will use a variety of methods on a selected case study application. A number of CASE toolsets, (such as SELECT SSADM Professional, SELECT Enterprise, ADW, EXCELERATOR), will be utilised in a workshop environment. AIMS 1 To impart an understanding of the concepts, principles and symbology of object- oriented, process-oriented, data-oriented, and output-oriented approaches to systems development. 2 To provide practice in the use of a variety of commercially available systems development methods. 3 To give students experience in the use of a number of automatic systems development toolsets. 4 To enable students to critically evaluate and compare methodologies and automatic toolsets for a variety of applications. Definition 128 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the student will be able to: 1 critically evaluate a range of system development methodologies for their suitability in a given business process context; 2 assess an automated tool for systems development using an appropriate framework and evaluate its effectiveness in a given methodology environment; 3 place new methodological ideas and concepts in to a rigorous theoretical framework. INDICATIVE CONTENT Approaches to systems development Basic concepts and philosophies of systems and systems development; mapping problem domain to solution space; method orientation; principles and practice of differing methods; symbologies; advantages and disadvantages of various methods; using particular methods. Use of CASE toolsets Automation principles; comparative features; tools and toolsets; development environments; using a number of toolsets. Comparative and feature analysis of systems development methods Proposed evaluation frameworks; conceptual and practical difficulties; application specificity; towards valid metrics; case study experience. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Lectures and Workshops Initial workshop sessions will be employed by students to acquire individual skills in the use of a number of CASE tools. Then, working in small groups, they will apply a range of methodologies and tools to a selected case study. The pedagogic approach in this unit lays strong emphasis upon student-centred learning. Workgroups will be encouraged to make full use of lecture materials, manuals, books and journals to solve problems with methodologies and toolsets by their own efforts. ASSESSMENT This unit will be assessed by in-course assessment (30%) and end the of year examination (70%). For in-course assessment students will undertake an academic essay in which they critically evaluate and compare methodologies and/or automatic toolsets, illustrating their discussion with examples from a business case study and supporting their arguments with references to the literature. Guide on essay length about 3,000 words. Definition 129 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • INDICATIVE READING LIST Avison D E , Fitzgerald A F (1995), “Information Systems Development”, McGraw Hill. Eriksson H, Penker M (1998), “UML Toolkit”, Wiley. Fowler M (1997), “UML Distilled”, Addison-Wesley. Goodland M, Ashworth C (1995), “SSADM V4: a practical approach”, McGraw Hill. Graham I (1995), “Object-Oriented Methods”, Addison Wesley. Waring A (1992), “Systems for Managers”, Wiley. Jacobson I, Griss M, Jonsson P (1997), “Software Re-use”, Addison Wesley. Definition 130 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 131 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING Level H Credits 20 LINKAGES None. AIMS Object-oriented software development is becoming more popular for the development of software systems. This final year software unit further develops object-oriented analysis and design skills by the application of the Unified Modelling Language and the Java Programming language. 1. to develop skills in the use of the latest software tools used for object-oriented analysis and design of software systems; 2. to develop network based software applications using the Java programming language. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES Having completed this unit the student is expected to demonstrate: 1. analytic thinking in the specification of the requirements for a software system in a comprehensive and unambiguous manner, using the latest object-oriented techniques; 2. the ability to correctly implement a software design using the Java programming language; 3. critical appraisal of the most effective CASE tool set for a particular project; 4. analytical and critical thinking with respect to the analysis, design and implementation of a network based application; 5. the ability to correctly implement a network based software design using UML and the Java programming language. LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS In this unit the student will undertake a combination of: • lectures, to highlight important techniques and set other methods in a structured context. • tutorial sessions, to practice the implementation of design solutions. • case study analysis, to promote deeper understanding of software systems through the entire software development cycle. • independent reading and research, to explore advanced topic areas. ASSESSMENT Two laboratory workshops and a laboratory book will assess this unit. The first Definition 132 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • laboratory workshop is worth 35% of the total marks for this unit. The second laboratory workshop will be worth 35% of the total marks for the unit. Each laboratory workshop will have an oral presentation, demonstration and viva. The laboratory book will be worth 30% of the total marks for this unit Learning Outcomes 1-2 will be tested in laboratory workshop 1. Learning Outcomes 3-4-5 will be tested in laboratory workshop 2. Learning Outcomes 1-2-3-4-5 will be tested in the laboratory book. INDICATIVE CONTENT • Review of Object-oriented principles. Object-oriented concepts, classes, identifying objects, inheritance, object-orient programming, problems with object-oriented techniques. • Object-oriented analysis and design using the Unified Modelling Language. UML tools, UML and the development process, Object-oriented analysis, the Requirements Architecture, scope model, system usage model, system modes model, system constraints model. Object-oriented design, the Solution Architecture, object Architecture, object model, interaction model, Dynamic model, Software Architecture, concurrency model, persistence model, System Architecture, implementation strategies incremental development . • Network programming using Java. The Java development environment, debugging Java programs, classes and objects, Applications and Applets, abstract and interface classes, standard libraries, threads, exceptions, AWT, network programming, clients, servers. INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES Books I. Pohl & C. McDowell (2000), “Java by Dissection”, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-61248-8. J. Lewis & W. Loftus (2001), “Java Software Solutions”, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-72597-5. J. Adams & L. Nyhoff & J. Nyhoff (2001), “Java An Introduction To Computing”, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-014251-4. E. Lervil & V.B. Havdal (2002), “Java the UML Way”, Wiley, ISBN 0-470-84386-1 Y. Daniel Liang (2002), “Rapid Java application development using JBuilder 4/5/6”, ISBN 0-13-066550-9. P. Stevens & R. Pooley (2000), “Using UML, Software Engineering With Objects And Components, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-64860-1. M. Priestley (2000), “Practical Object-Oriented Design with UML”, McGraw Hill, 0-07-709599-5. K. Lunn (2003), “Software Development with UML”, Pelgrave, ISBN 0-333-98595-8. Journals ACM transactions on software engineering and methodology: - New York: Association for Computing Machinery. - 1049-331x Definition 133 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Journal of object-oriented programming: - New York: SIGS Publications Inc. - 0896-8438 IEEE transactions on software engineering: - New York: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. - 0098-5589 Web-based sources The Unified Modelling Language Home pages. Available from http://www.uml.org/ The Source for Java Technology http://java.sun.com/ Definition 134 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT Level H Credits 20 LINKAGES None. AIMS: 1. to provide an understanding of the critical issues relevant to the software development process when applied to systems distributed over the World Wide Web. 2. to facilitate critical evaluation of the relevant client-side, server-side, and communications technologies. 3. to provide the learner with an understanding of selecting and applying those technologies in the development of software systems. 4. to foster critical appraisal of the necessary knowledge and skills associated with using environments which support the development of internet-based software solutions. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the unit the learner is expected to be able to: 1. demonstrate understanding of the issues relating to the development of effective Web-based software solutions; 2. design and build user interfaces using an event-based model; 3. design and implement server-based software elements; 4. design and build appropriate data models, using relational databases and description languages; 5. demonstrate understanding of the use of Internet-based technologies in facilitating interoperability between computer systems. LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS Intellectual, Cognitive, and Operational Development This unit focuses on three areas of cognitive development: consideration of the relevance of Internet-based technologies to modern businesses; the analysis and synthesis of solutions to given problems, and the reflection by the learner on those analytical and synthetic processes. Indicative Styles o Seminars exploring the nature of the Internet applications, and the delineation of elements within those applications, will provide the learners with opportunities to acquire the necessary cognitive perspectives appropriate to this style of problem solution. o Seminars focussing on the techniques and technologies relating to the realisation of effective client-side designs will allow discussion of the comparative qualities of those techniques and technologies. The techniques and technologies present additional constraints on the solutions, and the seminars will also consider these. o Practical exercises developing complete but small solutions, will provide opportunities for the learners to experience the problems of constructing solutions in Definition 135 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • constraint-rich environments. Even in simple scenarios, multiple solutions are possible, and these set of issues will be considered in seminars. o Self-study of learning materials relating to the techniques, technologies and issues of developing Internet-based solutions. These learning materials will be a combination of prescribed learning materials and discovery and exploration of additional materials by the learner. o Lectures at the start of the unit will delineate a context for the learning experience and will explore the learners preconceived notions and prior experiences. o Lectures within the body of the unit will provide a context within which there will be consideration of the issues raised in the learning materials. ASSESSMENT METHODS Informal Assessment In a unit with a practical element, the learners will have many opportunities for self- assessment. Each workshop will involve at least one practical task, the issues arising from which will be discussed both in the workshop, and in seminars. The seminars will also focus on the wider issues of applications within business, with discussion generally taking place in small groups. Formal Assessment Learning Outcome 1 This is concerned with an overview of the development process for Internet-based applications, and lends itself to assessment within the final examination, in questions which ask the learner to select and evaluate relevant development techniques and technologies. Learning Outcomes 2, 3, 4 Each of these has two facets: synthetic and reflective. The synthetic elements are more effectively assessed via in-course assessments involving the construction of designs or solutions to given problems. The reflective elements will benefit from the learners experience with the synthetic elements, and are more appropriately assessed via questions in the final examination. Learning Outcome 5 Appraisal of the applications of these techniques and technologies within the wider community is more effectively assessed within the final examination . Formal Assessment: Weighting The weighting of in-course assessment, to final assessment is 50:50. INDICATIVE CONTENT Web Application Development Solution components: user interface, communications, server-based logic, databases. Development process issues: performance, tool support User Interfaces User interface documents – defining look and feel User interface technologies: markup, scripting languages. Animation technologies. Behavioural elements: event-driven processing Definition 136 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Server-based Logic and databases Server-based documents – defining static and dynamic content Alternatives for realisation of server-based logic Server-side scripting, applications Database issues: models (relational, hierarchical), performance, connections Communications technologies Principles of Internet-based protocols, including TCP/IP. FTP, HTTP Messaging documents: use of description languages, including XML XML vocabularies for eBusiness, messaging Applications of Internet Technologies Models: Business to business (B2B), business to consumer (B2C), application to application (A2A) Interoperability: message brokers; using schemas to facilitate interoperability Tools Client-side document and scripting languages (e.g., Dynamic HTML, JavaScript). Server-side scripting languages and databases (e.g., PHP, JSP, servlets engine, Oracle) INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES COMPUTER BASED Networked workstations will the following software available or installed: Browser which supports dynamic HTML Web server with scripting engines and capabilities for stand-alone applications Hierarchical and relational databases LITERATURE BASED Castagnetto, J., Rawat, H., Schumann, S., Scollo, C., Veliath, D., (1999). Professional PHP Programming, Wrox. ISBN: 1-861002-96-3. Flanagan, D. (1999), Java Foundation Classes in a Nutshell. O'Reilly & Associates. Flanagan, D. (1999), Java in a Nutshell. 3rd Edition. O'Reilly & Associates. Gamma, E et al. (1995). Design Patterns: Reusable OO Software. Addison-Wesley Gruber, M. (1993). SQL Instant Reference, Sybex. ISBN: 0-7821-2539-5. Litwak, K. (2000). Pure Java 2. SAMS. Meloni, J.L. (2000). PHP Essentials, Prima Tech. ISBN: 0-7615-2729-X. Mohler, J.L. (2001). Flash 5: Graphics, Animation, & Interactivity, Onward Press. ISBN: 0-7668-2909-X Powell, T.A. (1998). HTML: The Complete Reference, Osborne McGraw-Hill. ISBN: 0-07-882397-8. Ratschiller, T., Gerken, T., (2000), Web Application Development with PHP 4.0, New Riders. ISBN: 0-7357-0997-1. Wyke, R.A., Gilliam, J.D., Ting, C., (1999), Pure JavaScript, SAMS. ISBN: 0-672-31547-5. Journals Journal of Object-Oriented Programming ACM Transactions on Programming Languages Definition 137 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • ACM SIGPLAN Notices ACM Transactions on Software Engineering WEB-BASED Web servers Apache server project: http://www.apache.org Client-side technologies JavaScript: JScript: HTML: Macromedia Flash: http://www.macromedia.com Server-side technologies PHP scripting engine: http://www.php.net Java Tomcat servlet engine: Microsoft Internet development technologies Reference site: Relational databases MySQL relational database for Windows, Linux: http://www.mysql.com XML Reference site: http://www.xml.org Saxon XSLT: Microsoft XML parser IBM XML Java parser IBM XML C++ parser eBusiness Technologies Electronic business: http://www.ebxml.org Definition 138 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 139 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • WINDOWS APPLICATION PROGRAMMING Level H Credits 20 LINKAGES None. AIMS With the increasing popularity of PC’s, there is an increased demand for rapid development of software based applications. This final year unit builds on the techniques and systems that have been developed over the past two years and focuses on developing advanced programming abilities for the implementation of robust software using rapid development technologies. 1. To give the student an appreciation of programming techniques required for improving the quality of software applications. 2. To develop skills in the use of the latest software tools used in the development of windows based software. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES Having completed this unit the student is expected to demonstrate: 1. analytical and critical thinking with respect to the analysis, design and implementation of a rapid based application; 2. an ability in the use of the latest software tools used for rapid based applications; 3. independent appraisement and argument of alternative approaches employed in the development of rapid based applications; 4. the ability to develop rapid based software applications using a high-level programming language. LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS In this unit the student will undertake a combination of: • lectures, to highlight important techniques and set other methods in a structured context. • tutorial sessions, to practice the implementation of design solutions. • case study analysis, to promote deeper understanding of windows based applications through the entire software development cycle. • independent reading and research, to explore advanced topic areas. ASSESSMENT Two laboratory workshops and a laboratory book will assess this unit. The first laboratory workshop is worth 35% of the total marks for this unit. The second laboratory workshop will be worth 35% of the total marks for the unit. Each laboratory workshop will have an oral presentation, demonstration and viva. The laboratory book will be worth 30% of the total marks for this unit Learning Outcomes 1-2 will be tested in laboratory workshop 1. Learning Outcomes 3-4 will be tested in laboratory workshop 2. Definition 140 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Learning Outcomes 1-2-3-4 will be tested in the laboratory book. INDICATIVE CONTENT • Concepts and Tools. Windows concepts, windows executable format, DLL’s, layout, windows tools, project files, resources, development environments, COM, DCOM. • Windows programming using visual studio. The visual studio development environment, debugging programs, classes and objects, standard libraries, threads, exceptions, graphics, network programming, clients, servers. • Building Windows User Interface. Controls, Forms, labels, user requirements, components. • Rapid application Analysis and Design Methodologies. Overview of analysis and design methodologies, Introduction to Incremental development and DSDM, Controlled approaches to DSDM, overview of UML requirements modelling, UML and the development process, object models, interaction models. INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES Books P. Stevens & R. Pooley (2000), “Using UML, Software Engineering With Objects And Components, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-64860-1. M. Priestley (2000), “Practical Object-Oriented Design with UML”, McGraw Hill, 0-07-709599-5. I. Pohl (2003), “C# by Dissection”, Addison Wesley, ISBN 0-201-87667-1. Deitel & Deital (2002), ”C# How To Program”, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-062221-4. T. Combs (2003),”Programming with C#.net”, Thomson, ISBN 0-7668-5008-0. Journals ACM transactions on software engineering and methodology: - New York: Association for Computing Machinery. - 1049-331x Dr. Dobb's journal: software tools for the professional programmer. - San Mateo, CA: Miller Freeman. - 1044-789x IEEE transactions on software engineering: - New York: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. - 0098-5589 Web-based sources The Unified Modelling Language Home pages. Available from http://www.uml.org/ The Microsoft Home pages. Available from http://www.microsoft.com/ The DSDM Consortium. Available from http://www.dsdm.org/ Definition 141 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS Level H Credits 20 LINKAGES None. AIMS As we move into the new millennium, most technology disciplines particularly communication, radio and television are becoming digital. This unit presents an introduction to digital communication techniques and systems. Emphasis will be on the practical support for the underlying theory necessary to understand the basic principles of digital communications. 1. to develop skills in the use of the latest software tools used for the analysis and design of digital communication systems; 2. to design and develop a digital communication system. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES Having completed this unit the student is expected to demonstrate: 1. an understanding of digital communication principles; 2. the ability to specify the requirements of a digital communication system in a comprehensive and unambiguous manner; 3. a capability to partition a digital communication system into its major hardware / software sub-systems; 4. analytical and critical thinking with respect to the analysis, design and implementation of a digital communication system; 5. the ability to correctly implement a digital communication system, using software simulation tools and techniques. LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS In this unit the student will undertake a combination of: • Lectures, to highlight important techniques and set other methods in a structured context. • Tutorial and laboratory sessions, to practice the implementation of design solutions. • Independent reading and research, to explore advanced topic areas. ASSESSMENT There will be a 3-hour end-of-year written examination, accounting for 70% of the mark for this unit. The practical will be assessed by a series of two laboratory workshops, each of which will be worth 15% of the total marks for this unit. Each laboratory workshop will have an oral presentation, demonstration and viva. Learning Outcomes 1-2-3 will be tested in laboratory workshop 1. Learning Outcomes 4-5 will be tested in laboratory workshop 2. Learning Outcomes 1-3-4 will be tested by a three hour unseen examination. INDICATIVE CONTENT: Definition 142 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • • Introduction and overview of digital communications. Model of a digital communication system, probability, stochastic processes, characterisation of signals and systems, TDM. • Information Theory. Average, redundancy, coding theory, linear & cyclic codes, convolution & burst- error codes, Huffman & Hamming codes error detection & correction. • Noise. Thermal noise, shot noise, receiver noise figure, noise power, antenna noise, system noise temperature and noise power. • Baseband Digital Communication and Modulation. M-ary baseband signals, M-ary rectangular based signals, detection, bit-error probability, bit-error performance, power spectra, Inter-symbol interference, BPSK, QPSK, OK-QPSK, MSK, PSK, QAM, Spread Spectrum. • Digital Communication System Case Studies. Satellite communication systems, wireless communication systems. INDICATIVE KEY LEARNING RESOURCES Books H. Kolimbiris, (2000), “ Digital Communication Systems, With Satellite and Fibre Optics Applications”, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-081543-8. B. P. Lathi, (1998), “Modern Digital and Analog Communication Systems Third Edition”, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-511009-9. J. G. Proakis & M. Salehi, (1998), “Contemporary Communication Systems Using MATLAB”, PWS, ISBN 0-534-93804-3. R. Pratap, (2002), “Getting Started with MATLAB A Quick Introduction for Scientists and Engineers”, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-515014-7. Journals IEE proceedings: - Part I: Communications, speech and vision. - Stevenage: Institution of Electrical Engineers. - 0956-3776. IEE proceedings: Communications. - Stevenage: Institution of Electrical Engineers. - 1350-2425. IEEE signal processing letters. - New York: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. - 1070-9908. IEEE transactions on signal processing. - New York: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. - 1053-587x. Web-based sources A MATLAB tutorial at: http://www.math.ufl.edu/help/matlab-tutorial/ 2001 Lecture Notes for the "Communications" at: http://phys.strath.ac.uk/12-444/lecture_notes.html Radio Communication Systems, 2E1435 Advanced Communication Theory, at: http://www.s3.kth.se/radio/COURSES/ADCOM_2E1435_2002/2E1435_downloads.html 8. APPENDIX A Definition 143 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems PROJECT LEARNING CONTRACT Supervisor 1 Student Name Name Supervisor 2 Date of this Name Version Version (1, 2, 3 etc) TITLE METHOD KNOWLEDGE TO BE GAINED SKILLS TO BE GAINED MAJOR SOURCES OF INFORMATION RESOURCES REQUIRED No DELIVERABLES ESTIMATED ACTUAL (Written unless otherwise stated) DELIVERY DELIVERY DATE DATE Definition 144 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 BCS LEVEL 3 PROJECT ASSESSMENT MARKS SUPERVISOR 1 FINAL PROJECT MARK THIS SUPERVISOR A% CONFLATION OF MARKS B AND C Definition 145 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • ASSESSMENT CRITERIA WEIGHT MARK % % 1 Methodology 2 References to other work / Literature Review 3 Critical Appraisal 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 TOTAL MARK ON CRITERIA 100% B% Definition 146 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • OVERALL EVALUATION OF PROCESS TOTAL MARK FOR OVERALL EVALUATION OF PROCESS C% Definition 147 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • BCS LEVEL 3 PROJECT ASSESSMENT MARKS SUPERVISOR 2 FINAL PROJECT MARK THIS SUPERVISOR D% CONFLATION OF MARKS E AND F ASSESSMENT CRITERIA WEIGHT MARK % % 1 Methodology 2 References to other work / Literature Review 3 Critical Appraisal 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 TOTAL MARK ON CRITERIA 100% E% Definition 148 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • OVERALL EVALUATION OF PROCESS TOTAL MARK FOR OVERALL EVALUATION OF PROCESS F% Definition 149 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • FINAL PROJECT MARK AGREED BY BOTH SUPERVISORS, BASED ON MARKS A AND D. G% NB. IF SUPERVISOR MARKS ARE MORE THAN 7 APART THIS SECTION MUST BE USED TO RECORD THE RATIONALE FOR THE FINAL MARK, INCLUDING NAME(S) OF OTHER LECTURER(S) INVOLVED. Definition 150 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Supervisor 1 Meetings Record Week Attended Comments 1 (12/10) 2 3 4 5 2nd Supervisor 6 7 8 9 10 11 2nd Supervisor 12 13 14 15 16 2nd Supervisor 17 18 19 Definition 151 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Supervisor 2 Meetings Record W/c Attended Comments 1 (12/10) 1st Supervisor 2 1st Supervisor 3 1st Supervisor 4 1st Supervisor 5 6 1st Supervisor 7 1st Supervisor 8 1st Supervisor 9 1st Supervisor 10 1st Supervisor 11 12 1st Supervisor 13 1st Supervisor 14 1 SUPERVISOR ST 15 1st Supervisor 16 17 1st Supervisor 18 1st Supervisor 19 1st Supervisor Definition 152 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • Definition 153 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • 8. APPENDIX A 9. Appendix B HOW THE UNIVERSITY IS ORGANISED As in any large organisation, many day-to-day decisions in the University are made by its management, which includes the Vice-Chancellor, the two Pro-Chancellors, the Director of Personnel and the Heads of Schools* and administrative departments. However, matters of policy affecting the academic work of the University and the working environment and welfare of its students are decided through a system of Committees. Academic policies are defined in the University's Academic Policies, Regulations and Procedures (1998), which is available in the library. Students are represented at every level in the Committee structure. Senate Standing Orders include details of the membership and responsibilities of all the main Committees. The current Standing Orders remain in operation and can be consulted in the library. The composition and responsibilities of the principal University committees are summarised as follows: The Senate is the University’s major decision-making committee, responsible for matters of research, scholarship, teaching, courses, the curriculum, assessment and awards. The Senate is chaired by the Vice-Chancellor and includes the Heads of Schools, elected representatives of the teaching and non-teaching staff of the University, and two students elected by the student body. At every meeting the Senate receives reports from its Standing Committees, each of which also includes student representatives. The Senate has a number of Standing Committees: The Academic Standards Committee is responsible for considering the approval of new courses and the regular monitoring and review of existing courses to maintain and enhance their quality. This Committee deals with policies on the admission and assessment of students and with matters of educational quality. One of its terms of reference is “to promote, review and monitor teaching and learning”. The Academic Standards Committee is the main University-wide forum for considering academic issues affecting students throughout the university - such as, for example, assessment regulations or modifications to courses. The Committee is Chaired by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic) and includes two student representatives nominated by the Students’ Union. The Academic Development Committee deals with academic policy and planning concerning local, regional and national developments. This Committee gives initial approval for the development of new courses and collaborative links with the University. It receives reports from a Academic Services Committee representing Definition 154 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • the users of the library and information services and the users of the Unversity's computer services. It is chaired by the Vice-Chancellor and includes one student representative nominated by the Students’ Union. The Student Affairs Committee considers a wide range of services and facilities for student welfare, including for example the Accommodation Service, the Sports Centre and the Medical and Counselling services. This Committee currently has two student representatives nominated by the Students’ Union. Course and School Committees: The Committees described above all have responsibilities which concern the University as a whole. In addition, there are committees responsible for matters of policy at course and School level : For every course there is a Course Management and a Course Team which includes up to four student members normally representing each year of the course. Course Team meetings are one forum for discussion between staff and students about an individual course - whether on matters of detail and trouble-shooting or on longer term policy matters such as a substantial change planned for the course. Quite a large number of students, including first year students, are involved in the decision making structure of the University at this level. There are always other opportunities for student participation in the organisation of their own course - for example through systems of seminar group representatives, or regular meetings with the course management, or regular questionnaires: the methods used vary but are described in the handbook for each course. Every course is based in a School. Each School in the University has a School Committee, which includes two students elected from and by the student representatives on the course teams of all the courses in the School. The Committee receives reports from course teams, so that the views of student course representatives are regularly reported. Students are also represented, through the President of the Students’ Union, on the governing body, the University Board. Definition 155 BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page Bournemouth University 1998
    • 10. APPENDIX C - PROGRAMME PROFILE SCHOOL Partner institution (where Programme Mode(s) of study DEC applicable) BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Full-time sandwich Unit identification Cost Centre(s) Assessment *** Unit no. Unit name Prog Core / HESA CC 1 % CC2 % No of Leve Element Weightings (given by year * option Subject credits l Exam C/Work C/Work School) Code ** 1 1 2 Business Systems Environment 1 Core G5 25 100 20 C 50% 50% Business Information Systems 1 1 Core G5 39 100 20 C 70% 30% Software Development 1 Core G5 39 100 20 C 70% 30% Multimedia Computer Architecture 1 Core H6 20 100 20 C 70% 30% Communication Systems 1 Core H6 20 100 20 C 70% 30% Database Systems 1 Core G5 39 100 20 C 70% 30% Group Project 2 Core H6 20 50 39 50 20 I 100% Business Information Systems 2 2 Core G5 39 100 20 I 70% 30% Client/Server Systems Development 2 Core G5 39 100 20 I 70% 30% Distributed Systems Management 2 Core H6 20 100 20 I 70% 30% Computer Networks 2 Core G5 39 100 20 I 70% 30% Distributed Multimedia Systems 2 Core G5 39 100 20 I 70% 30% Corporate Business Information 4 Core G5 25 100 20 H 70% 30% Individual Project 4 Core H6 20 50 39 50 40 H 100% Advanced Network Systems 4 Core H6 20 100 20 H 70% 30% Advanced Databases 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 70% 30% Business Development 4 Option N1 27 100 20 H 70% 30% Business Process Modelling 4 Option G5 25 100 20 H 70% 30% New Advances in Human Computer Interaction 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 75% 25% Image Processing 4 Option H6 20 100 20 H 70% 30% Multimedia Application Development 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 70% 30% Multimedia Systems and Networks 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 70% 30% Network Applications Development 4 Option H6 20 100 20 H 70% 30% People and Computers in Organisations 4 Option G5 25 100 20 H 70% 30% Systems Development Methods 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 70% 30% Object Oriented Programming 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 100% Web Application Development 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 50% 50% Windows Application Programming 4 Option G5 39 100 20 H 100% Digital Communication Systems 4 Option H6 20 100 20 H 70% 30% Definition BSc (Hons) Business Communication Systems Page 156 Bournemouth University 1998