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UNIT INFORMATION.doc

  1. 1. Curtin Business School School of Information Systems Technological Infrastructure 502 (TI502) Unit Outline Semester 1, 2008 Unit Index Number:- 309858 Hours per Week:- 3 - Prerequisites:- Co-requisites:- - 307778 (v.1) Technological Infrastructure 501; Enterprise Anti-requisites:- Network Infrastructure 501 or any previous version Credits 25 Running Intensive “7 & 8 March, 18 & 19 April, 9& 10 Weekly Tuition Pattern May” Contact Telephone Numbers 9266 7682 for Tomayess Issa’s Office (402.3012) School Telephone & Fax Numbers 9266 7685 (tel) or 9266 3076 (fax) World Wide Web http://elearn.cbs.curtin.edu.au/ Electronic Mail Services Tomayess.Issa@cbs.curtin.edu.au Please consult the file on the School Office counter at Lecturer’s Consultation Times 408:3009 or the Staff Information available on the Blackboard site. IMPORTANT NOTICE The Unit Outline (this document) gives the student important information about the unit, aims, outcomes, syllabus, materials, timetable, program and assessment. Note that important information relating to policies, expectations, examinations, copyright, referencing, academic misconduct, plagiarism, assistance with communication skills, guidelines for assessment, and CV development is contained in the CBS Yellow Pages/CBS Student Handbook. This document is available for collection from CBS Student Services or can be accessed at http://www.cbs.curtin.edu.au/students. You are required to be aware of, and fulfill, your responsibilities under the University's statutes, rules, policies and procedures so it is important that you review the content in CBS Yellow Pages/CBS Student Handbook in detail. CRICOS provider code 00301J School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 1 of 22
  2. 2. UNIT INFORMATION.............................................................................................................3 1. Aims.....................................................................................................................................................................3 2. Learning Outcomes..............................................................................................................................................3 3. Syllabus................................................................................................................................................................4 4. Materials...............................................................................................................................................................4 5. Timetable of Classes............................................................................................................................................6 6. Program................................................................................................................................................................7 7. Assessment...........................................................................................................................................................9 8. General Information...........................................................................................................................................20 9. Supplementary Instructions and Materials.........................................................................................................20 School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 2 of 22
  3. 3. UNIT INFORMATION 1. Aims The aims of this unit are to: 1. Provide students with an understanding of issues relevant to designing enterprise networks. 2. Provide students with practical skills in network design 2. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this unit, students can: 1. Ability to design and recommend appropriate IT infrastructure for a range of organization types and circumstances. 2. Ability to provide technical infrastructure advice to a client 3. Ability to communicate network design information 2.1 Graduate Attributes and Professional Skills Outcomes Employers worldwide want graduates who have developed effective professional skills. The CBS professional skills program includes communication (writing, interpersonal interactions and cultural awareness, and presenting), critical and creative thinking (problem solving and decision making), team work, IT literacy and information literacy. The following skills are relevant to business graduates and are part of the CBS professional skills program. On successful completion of this unit, you will have: Communication - Presentation All graduates should be able to deliver a presentation on a topic familiar to them or which they have researched. Effective presentation involves, above all, a sound understanding of purpose and audience; it also involves facility in the use of supporting materials/aids and technology. In developing this skill, students will be assisted by:  Having access to written and/or visual information on presentation techniques;  Being given a specific list of assessment criteria for the presentation tasks required in their unit ;  Having the opportunity to probe and discuss such assessment criteria;  Undertaking peer assessment tasks using such assessment criteria;  Having the opportunity to practice presentations in a non-threatening atmosphere. • Examples of presentation outcomes Successful students can:  prepare a talk, clearly outlining its purpose and theme;  structure the talk to suit the purpose and audience;  ensure a logical sequence of ideas;  speak clearly;  demonstrate sensitivity to culturally diverse audiences;  use a variety of aids/media appropriately to enhance their presentation;  Some useful site for Presentation: o Presentations http://www.cbs.curtin.edu.au/business/current-students/writing-and-study- skills-support/interpersonal-communication-guide/presentations School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 3 of 22
  4. 4. Communication - Writing  All graduates should be able to write competently in various forms, including business letters, reports and scholarly essays and dissertations. In developing this skill, students will be greatly assisted by:  Written information about the writing tasks and expected standards required by each school;  A gradual introduction and increase in the amount of writing they are required to do;  Receiving precise instructions about assignment requirements and assessment criteria;  Having access to exemplars of the writing tasks they are required to complete. • Examples of writing outcomes Successful students can:  Use the formats appropriate for different types of texts;  Ensure accuracy of expression and content;  Ensure logical development of ideas in a written text;  Reference sources accurately.  Some useful sites for writing different types of reports are as follows: o http://www.cbs.curtin.edu.au/business/current-students/writing-and-study-skills- support/academic-writing-guide/reports o Curtin’s Study Skills Report Writing guide site. This is a comprehensive and user- friendly guide. o http://www.cbs.curtin.edu.au/files/HIGH_FLYER_6_05.doc o Report Writing: Structure and Content Note: “Look for the professional skill icon in your assessment tasks and in the semester program to find out their mark allocation and when they will be taught”. 3. Syllabus Network design, including structured cabling, wireless networks, protocols, servers, security, network management, advanced topics 4. Materials 4.1 Texts You should purchase from the Curtin University Bookshop: Cisco Networking Academy Program CCNA1 and 2 Companion Guide Revised Third Edition Cisco Systems, Inc. Cisco Networking Academy Program Ciscopress.com Copyright @ 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. ISBN: 1-58713-150-1 4.2 References In addition to the set textbook(s) the following references will be useful: (Most of these references are available in the Library. (You should always use the latest edition of any text). 1. Buckwalter, J.T. (2000) Frame Relay: Technology and Practice, Addison Wesley Longman, Inc., MA, USA. 2. Burgess, M. (2000) Principles of Network and System Administration, John Wiley and Sons, New York, USA. School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 4 of 22
  5. 5. 3. Carr, H.H. & Snyder, C.A. (2003) The Management of Telecommunications (2nd edn), McGraw-Hill Irwin, Boston, MA, USA. 4. Chappell, L.A. & Tittel, E. (2002) Guide to TCP/IP, Course Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. 5. Ciampa, M. (2002) Guide to Wireless Communications, Course Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. 6. Comer, D.E. (2001) Computer Networks and Internets (3rd edn), Prentice Hall, New Jersey. 7. Dean, T. (2002) Network+ Guide to Networks (2nd edn), Course Technology, MA, USA. 8. Dean, T. (2003) Guide to Telecommunications Technology, Course Technology, MA, USA. 9. DiMarzio, J.F. (2001) Network Architecture and Design: A Field Guide for IT Consultants, SAMS, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. 10. Forouzan, B.A. (2003) TCP/IP Protocol Suite (2nd edn), McGraw Hill, Boston, MA, USA. 11. Goncalves, M. & Niles, K. (1998) IPv6 Networks, McGraw Hill, Boston, MA, USA. 12. Hudson, K & Cannon, K. (2000) CCNA Guide to Cisco Networking Fundamentals, Course Technology, MA, USA. 13. Hudson, K & Caudle, K. (2000) CCNA Guide to Cisco Routing, Course Technology, MA, USA. 14. Marcus, J.S. (1999) Designing Wide Area Networks and Internetworks: A Practical Guide, Addison- Wesley, Reading, MA, USA. 15. McQuerry, S. (2004) CCNA Self-Study: Introduction to Cisco Networking Technologies (INTRO), Cisco Press. 16. Palmer, M. & Sinclair, R.B. (2003) Designing and Implementing Local and Wide Area Networks (2nd edn), Course Technology, Canada. 17. Salvagno, M. (2000) Cisco Network Design Handbook, M&T Books, Foster City, CA, USA. 18. Tanenbaum, A.S. (2003) Computer Networks (4th Edition), Prentice Hall, New Jersey, USA. 4.3 Other Resources Networking http://webopedia.internet.com/TERM/l/local_area_network_LAN.html http://www.lantronix.com/learning/tutorials/index.html http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/lan/trsrb/glossary.htm#35659 http://www.ralphb.net/IPSubnet/ http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/535/4.html http://compnetworking.about.com/od/workingwithipaddresses/l/blip.htm http://www.ipv6.com/ http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6553/products_ios_technology_home.html http://www.inetdaemon.com/tutorials/internet/ip/routing/routing_vs_routed.shtml http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/ito_doc/routing.htm http://www.cypressindustries.com/networking_cables.html Periodocials Wired http://www.wired.com/ Technology Review http://www.technologyreview.com/ Scientific American http://www.scientificamerican.com PC word http://www.pcworld.com PC Magazine http://www.pcmag.com Macworld http://www.macaddict.com Inforworld http://www.inforworld.com School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 5 of 22
  6. 6. 5. Timetable of Classes Day Location Time 7 March 08 407.205/402.30 2.00 – 7.30 5 8 March 08 407.205/402.30 9.30 – 3.00 5 18 April 08 407.205/402.30 2.00 – 7.30 5 19 April 08 407.205/402.30 9.30 – 3.00 5 9 May 08 407.205/402.30 2.00 – 7.30 5 10 May 08 407.205/402.30 9.30 – 3.00 5 School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 6 of 22
  7. 7. 6. Program 7 Semester one March 08 Introduction to Networks; Networking 8 Hours Learning Outcomes : 1 2008 weekly Networking Fundamentals Fundamentals & Educational Estimated calendar & TCP/IP Protocol suite Lecture - Topics TCP/IP Protocol activities and student Reading Chapters: 1 & 2 Assessment/ Learning Include and IP Addressing assessment suite and IP work time Outcomes teaching free preparation in hours  Network Types Addressing weeks etc  Standards/protocols  Familiarizatio  Packet & Circuit n Switching  Case Studies  Introduction to OSI and  Binary to TCP/IP Decimal  Internet  Network Topologies  Protocol Layering  Routing Basics 8 March 08 Networking Media & Networking 10 Hours Learning Outcomes: 1 & 2 Network Interface Cards Media &  Digital and Analogue Network Reading Chapters: 2 & 3 Transmission Interface Cards  Copper cable types  Case Studies  Optical fibre  Wireless  Structured Cabling  Modems  Data Link Layer concepts  Ethernet  WAN Technologies  VAN 18 April 08 Cabling LANs and WANs; Cabling LANs 10 Hours Learning Outcomes: 1 & 2 Ethernet Fundamentals & and WANs; Due First Presentation Routing Fundamentals and Ethernet Subnets Fundamentals & Reading Chapters: 3, 5, 9  Hubs and switches Routing  Token Ring Fundamentals  Less common network and Subnets technologies  Wireless LANs  Case Studies  Protocols used at higher  Due First layers Presentation  IPX/SPX  TCP/IP  NetBIOS, NetBEUI  AppleTalk School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 7 of 22
  8. 8. Semester one 2008 weekly Educational Estimated calendar activities and student Assessment/ Learning Lecture - Topics Include assessment work time Outcomes teaching free preparation in hours weeks etc 19 April 08 Guide to Networking TCP/IP 15 Hours Learning Outcomes: 1, 2, 3 essentials & Backbone Transport and Due 2nd Presentation Networks Application  Choosing the right Layers Reading Chapters: 10 switch  Case Studies  Choosing the right router  Due 2nd  VLANs Presentation  Choosing a server vendor  Directory servers  DNS  Storage Area Networks (SANs)  Unix 9 May 08 TCP/IP Transport and Guide to 13 Hours Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3 Application Layers Networking Due 3rd Presentation  What are some functions essentials & of the TCP/IP transport Backbone Reading Chapters: 11 Layer? Networks  How does flow control  Case Studies affect data transmission?  Due 3rd  What are some of the Presentation processes of establishing a connection between peer systems?  How does windowing affect data transmission?  How does acknowledgement affect data transmission?  What are the transport layer protocols, and what purpose do they serve?  What are the major protocols of the TCP/IP application layer? What are some well-known TCP/IP applications? 10 May 08 Solving Network Problems; Solving Network 20 Hours Learning Outcomes: 1,2,3, SNA & DECnet & Review Problems; SNA Mid Semester Test  RAS & DECnet  Backup  Case Studies  Security Policies  Mid-  Network Management Semester  Standards Test  Standard Operating Environment  Documentation  SNA  DECnet  Miscellaneous 12-23 June 06 Examinations This should be taken as a guide only as the order of presentation or topics may be varied as the course progresses. You should attempt to read the relevant chapters of the textbook before attending the lecture. Additional readings may be prescribed. School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 8 of 22
  9. 9. 7. Assessment 7.1 Summary To pass this unit you must: a) Receive an overall grade of 50, AND b) Submit all assessment activities AND c) Pass all assessment activities including a pass in the exam No. Assessment Activity Percentage % Due 1 Mid Semester Test 20% 10 May 08 2 Presentations:  Presentation 1 – Planning Stage 5% 18 April 08  Presentation 2–Research Findings 10% 19 April 08  Presentation 3– Final Recommendations 10% 9 May 08 and Evaluations 15%  Writing Report 26 May 08 3 Exam 40% 9 June – 20 June 08 Total 100% The assessments are due as per the Program above. 7.2 Assessment Details 7.2.1 Mid Semester Test - (20%) The Mid Semester Test will consist of a combination of short answer questions and case studies. The paper will deal with the material covered in topics 1 - 4 inclusive in lectures. The test will be of one hour and 30 min duration and will be held in lecture time – 12 May 07 If you cannot attend the Mid Semester Test (with a medical certificate) you must make an appointment (ASAP) with the Unit Leader (Tomayess Issa) to discuss alternative arrangements. 7.2.3 Presentation & writing report - (40%) Writing Report (15%) Writing Report – this will include a) Describe the implications of the Question for the planning stage b) the research findings c) Summary of key findings, with recommendations and evaluation; Date Due: By Monday 26 May 08 (Week 14) – 1.00 a.m. (In my office building 408:3012). Submit: Submit your completed report to the unit leader – building 408:3012. Your report should be A4 size and stapled in the Top Left Corner. Please submit your report in soft and hard copy • N.B.: Soft Copy assignment should be emailed to the unit leader by 26 May 08 (week 14) before 1.00 a.m. • : Please email the assignment to Tomayess.Issa@cbs.curtin.edu.au with the following specification: o Subject title: TI502 – Writing Report o In the email please add your name and your Curtin ID number Worth: this assessment is worth 15% of your final grade. Unless you have specific approval for an extension overdue assignment will have, 5% deducted per day. No Extensions will be approved without a medical certificate Presentation Standard School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 9 of 22
  10. 10. • Times New Roman • 12 pt for normal text • 14 pt bold for major headings, 12 pt bold for minor headings • 1.5 line spacing • Page numbering (centered at the bottom of each page - footer) • If a header is used, it is to be written in the following format:- 8pt, italics, right-aligned. • 3cm margin left of page, 2.5cm margin top, bottom and right of page • Printed on one side of the page only • Assignment should be word-processed, spell and grammar checked. • Be approximately 2,000 to 2,500 words in length, excluding diagrams; appendices; and references. • The assignment should contain no less than two academic journal1 references and textbooks, which are dated 2001 or later. • Whenever you need to quote ideas and/or the quotes of any other author you should acknowledge this, using the Chicago referencing method. (http://library.curtin.edu.au/referencing/chicago.pdf) • N.B.: The use of WIKIPEDIA online encyclopaedia is not allowed From the Policy on Plagiarism (check section 8.6 under the Unit outline) • The majority (95%) of your written work should be in your own words. • Cutting and pasting large sections of text from the Internet or a book (even with referencing) is an example of plagiarism and will automatically incur a zero grade. • Direct quotes should be in quotation marks with a page number & Year reference to the original. • Each sentence or paragraph that has been written from researching sources should contain a reference. • If you are unsure of what constitutes plagiarism, check with the Unit Leader (Tomayess Issa) before submitting work for assessment. • Resubmission of a plagiarized assignment will not be permitted. • Plagiarism monitoring o Some assignments in this unit will be monitored for plagiarism using Turnitin plagiarism detection service (see <http://www.Turnitin.com>). o Students, who do not want assignments to be retained in the Turnitin database, must lodge a special request using the form available at http://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/local/docs/nonretentionform.doc o This form must be submitted along with your assignment. For further advice see http://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/turnitintrial.html Turnitin at Curtin University of Technology This document briefly explains how Turnitin works and why it is currently being trialed at Curtin University. What is Turnitin? Turnitin (www.turnitin.com) is an electronic text matching system that compares text in a student assignment against electronic text on the Internet, in published works, on commercial databases, and in 1 Academic Journal: can be found in the Scholarly Electronic Databases in the Curtin Library Website. http://library.curtin.edu.au/electronic/index.html School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 10 of 22
  11. 11. assignments previously submitted to Turnitin by students in universities all over the world, including assignments obtained from ‘paper mills’ (Internet sites which sell papers). The Turnitin system operates through a web site and is accessed using standard web browsers. Turnitin supports the implementation of the University’s mission and values (strategic.curtin.edu.au/vmv.html) and its policy on plagiarism (www.policies.curtin.edu.au/documents/plagiarism.doc). It is one of many resources that can assist in ensuring academic integrity is maintained Why is Turnitin being trialed at Curtin? Turnitin is being trialed during 2007 so that academic staff can better assess its use and effectiveness. Currently, Curtin degrees have prestige with employers and the wider community but this can be threatened by breaches of academic integrity (including plagiarism). Academic integrity is essential to the operation and reputation of Curtin University courses. Turnitin has been designed to assist lecturers to identify instances of plagiarism and thus support the maintenance of fair assessment standards for all students. This trial of Turnitin will help the University determine whether Turnitin will be fully implemented in 2008 and beyond. For further information on the trial of Turnitin at Curtin please visit http://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/turnitintrial.html Guidelines for Report Writing Report writing uses similar principles and skills to those used when writing essays; however, the key differences are that reports include a formal summary, a numbering system, and a set of recommendations. Increasingly popular is substituting an Executive Summary in place of the Abstract. An Executive Summary encompasses all the major issues within the report. In business many readers will not read beyond the Executive Summary, hence this component must be written carefully to ensure it embodies the intent of the report. Some useful sites for writing different types of reports are as follows: http://www.cbs.curtin.edu.au/business/current-students/writing-and-study-skills-support/academic- writing-guide/reports Curtin’s Study Skills Report Writing guide site. This is a comprehensive and user-friendly guide. http://www.cbs.curtin.edu.au/files/HIGH_FLYER_6_05.doc Report Writing: Structure and Content Information about EnglishHelp! EnglishHelp! is a tool for students to use to learn about their English language strengths and weaknesses. It is an instrument to analyse their English language knowledge and skills - their reading skills, their listening skills, their vocabulary, grammar and general use of English. It is not intended to assess their academic study skills or interpersonal communication skills. The main function of EnglishHelp! is to provide students with advice on whether they are likely to require English support, and provide information on where they can obtain it. It is also intended to raise awareness at Curtin of the value that is placed on high levels of English language proficiency within a tertiary context. School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 11 of 22
  12. 12. EnglishHelp! is free of charge. It is a pilot service available to all students who are new to the Curtin campus at Bentley. It is aimed at students who come from backgrounds where English is not the language of communication, but it is open to any student on the main campus. It is completely voluntary, but it is hoped that staff will encourage their students to participate. EnglishHelp! is not a test, and no record of the result will appear on students’ academic transcript. Only the student and the members of the English Language Proficiency Project marking team will have access to an individual’s results. Students who are identified as needing support will be encouraged to follow up on the available options. EnglishHelp! is quick to complete, and the results are instantly available online. There are two parts to the main instrument. The first part is a quick diagnosis that will provide students with computer-generated feedback on their results. The second part is a writing task, which will be marked individually, and which will provide a more detailed analysis of language development needs. The total process should take up to one hour, but the actual duration will depend on students’ language levels. EnglishHelp! is available online in WebCT, with hard copy versions available to those without access to computers who wish to participate. Students can take it at home if they have online access, or in a computer laboratory at Curtin. Students will be able to access EnglishHelp! through OASIS from 11th February for a period of four weeks. Presentations (25%) Presentation 1 – Planning Stage (5%) Introduction - Outline the Question to your audience Body - Describe the implications for the role you are playing in the Question (for example - What would the security officer’s duties be to protect his/her company from unauthorized access, espionage etc? What expectations would the management have on you in this role?) Conclusion - What would be the key issues you need to investigate in your Question? Presentation 2–Research Findings (10%) Introduction - Following your initial research, outline the aspects that you have investigated Body - What are the initial findings in terms of your Question? Conclusion – What are the proposed implications of the findings? Presentation 3– Final Recommendations and Evaluations (10%) Introduction – Outline the major recommendations for the company in relation to the issue identified in your Question Body - Provide your rationale (reasons) for the recommendations Conclusion – Evaluate the best solution(s) for the company and justify this solution in terms of the specific issues in your Question School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 12 of 22
  13. 13. PRESENTATION SKILL TABLE Skill Description. The presenter should be neat and tidy showing respect for the 1. The Presenter’s Personal audience. It has been described as “Dressing one level above your Appearance Was Appropriate audience”. 2. The Presenter Made a The presenter must gain the attention of the group and should Successful Introduction introduce themselves and the topic. The presenter should use a narrative mode ie. as if telling a story, being fairly informal and personal. Eye contact is used to involve but not threaten the audience. The presenter must not wander 3. The Presenter Confidently around or rock on their heels. Good presenters don’t let their eyes Proceeded With the Presentation wander either, they focus on something. Breathe; don’t rush the presentation as if you were trying to finish. A presenter should appear pleased to be here, sharing time with their audience. They show an enthusiastic interest in the topic. A good overhead has impact. It is clear, colourful and can include a 4. The Presenter Made and suitable clip art picture. The presenter must be familiar with the Suitably Used the Overhead content of the overhead. Presenters must know how the overhead Transparencies (max. of 2) projector works and operate it correctly. The handout must not simple be a copy of the transparencies nor a 5. The Presenter Made and copy of the speakers notes. The presenter should understand the Suitably Used a Handout Sheet role of the handout as an aid to the presentation. The presenter must speak loudly and clearly. Good presenters use a range of simple techniques such as “signposts” e.g. “I want to deal briefly with… Firstly I want to outline the …, second, its… and third to 6. The Presenter’s Address to the examine the …”. And “frames” which are statements indicating the Audience was Effective beginning and ending of subtopics e.g. "So that ends my discussion of…. Lets now look at the rule of….. So the main point is …” etc. The presenter must identify the key points. 7. The Presenter’s Address, the An important part of the presentation skill is to ensure that the Handout and the Overhead Were material, visual aids and talk are organised so that each part follows Integrated and Smoothly Worked through from the previous part. Together The question must be answered with strict attention to the relevant law and cases. The presenter should deal with the topic at an 8. The Content Was Satisfactory appropriate level for the audience and must appear confident with the content. 9. The Presenter Had a Good A presentation must come to a good end, usually with a summary Conclusion that brings the points together. The presentation should take a minimum of ten minutes and a maximum of fifteen minutes. The presenter must be ready to start when called upon, use time efficiently and finish within the time 10. The Presentation Was Well allotted. Marks will be deducted for taking too long or not taking Timed long enough. Following the presentation the presenter should invite questions and be prepared to respond to them. A further five minutes is allocated for this, i.e. additional to the fifteen minute presentation. School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 13 of 22
  14. 14. Guidelines for Student Presentations Do: 1. Keep things simple – pitch it to an appropriate level for your audience. 2. Include a clear and motivating introduction – outline the structure of your talk. 3. Ensure your presentation has a logical sequence. 4. Ensure that your talk and visual resources are well organized. Ensure slides/powerpoint are brief and legible (min. font size 18pt). Check equipment. 5. Include some audience interaction (if possible – increases interest) 6. Rehearse your talk at least 2 or 3 times. It will go much more smoothly if you do. Check your timing and be prepared to edit. Get feedback on distracting mannerisms and attempt to overcome these. 7. Engage your audience - make eye contact with everyone in the audience. 8. Speak clearly and not too quickly. 9. Ensure your conclusion is brief and outlines your main argument/case. Anticipate and prepare for likely questions. 10. Relax and practice your breathing (take 3 deep breaths to commence). Do not: 1. Read long parts of your slides - this is boring for the audience. 2. Panic if you lose your place or go blank. Pause and appeal to the audience while you regain your composure and then continue. 3. Look at your slides or notes instead of the audience. 4. Do not use jargon or acronyms without explanation – this alienates the audience. School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 14 of 22
  15. 15. Presentation Marking Guide (Self and peer Evaluation) Rating of Competence Comments Presentation Skills Criteria 1 2 3 4 5 (tick the appropriate box) Audience Contact Audience awareness - kept things simple – the talk was pitched to an appropriate level for the audience Engagement with audience - eye contact was established with the audience. Was there sufficient variety of contact (was it just with 1 person or was there distribution)? Presentation Introduction – Was clear and motivating to audience – the structure of the talk was clearly outlined. Interest was aroused and maintained - audience interaction was included. Logical sequence of argument – the talk was easy to follow/understand. Links were made between different points. Conclusion – Was there a suitable conclusion? Did the speaker summarise the key points? Was it brief? Did the speaker anticipate and prepare for likely questions? Organisational Skills Preparation– evidence of sound preparation. The speaker knew his/her topic, explained difficult concepts clearly. Organisation - visual resources were present, well organised. Eg., slides/ppt were brief and legible (min. font size 18pt). Equipment had been checked. Evidence of rehearsal/practice – Timing was appropriate. Was there distracting mannerisms and/or attempts to overcome these? Presenter Qualities Voice & Language elements – Pitch – did the speakers pitch the voice to the appropriate level? Pace – was it too fast, too slow, hesitant? Or was it appropriate? Power – did the speaker’s voice carry sufficiently so the audience at the back could hear? Was the speaker too loud? Was the language fluent? Was there correct use of terms? Poise and Presentation – Did the speaker appear relaxed and confident? Was the speaker dressed appropriately? Explanation of Ratings 1 Not Applicable - this outcome did not apply 2 Not yet Demonstrated – You did not demonstrate this criteria 3 Developing – You achieved this criteria sometimes (but possibly not consistently or to an acceptable standard) 4 Competent - You demonstrated you have achieved this criteria (consistently and/or to an acceptable standard) 5 Highly Competent – You demonstrated you have achieved this criteria (consistently and to an acceptable or outstanding standard) School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 15 of 22
  16. 16. Writing Report Marking Guide – S1 2008 Technological Infrastructure 502 Given Names:- Surname:- Student Number:- Assessed by: _________________________ Date: _____________________ Executive Summary (_______/1 marks) Objectives of the report “NO” Objectives of the report Scope of the report “NO” Scope of the report Source of information and their “NO” Source of information and their limitations Findings, Recommendations, Conclusions “NO” Findings, Recommendations, Conclusions Structure & Quality of Writing (_______/1 mark) Well structured (e.g. paragraphing, sentence structure, Poorly structured spacing Above average standard of expression Needs improvement - but overall expression and and presentation presentation adequate, and proof reading Excellent overall expression and Very poor English and /or spelling and little/or presentation no care in document layout Clear Introduction (_______/1 mark) The introduction is present but does not serve the A clear introduction is provided purpose well Well written and logically presented Lacks a clear or adequate introduction Content and Argument Construction (_______/5 marks) Topic sufficiently covered Superficial treatment of topic (breadth and depth are in balance) (neither breadth nor depth) Accurate content Inaccurate content Adequate analysis of subject Descriptive account of subject Logically developed argument Rambles & lacks continuity Little evidence of originality on evaluation Your personal critique and/or /critical thought evaluation of the argument School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 16 of 22
  17. 17. Conclusions Drawn (________/4 marks) (is a summary – should not introduce new information) The conclusion does not summaries the issues Sound and appropriate conclusion (s) is drawn well No logical conclusion is drawn A full and well written conclusion is provided Conclusion (s) based upon information not based upon the foundation in the argument previously covered in Content and Argument construction section Construction section (________/2 marks) Recommendations Evaluation and recommendations Insufficient Evaluation and Recommendations The recommendations are not well supported? Are the recommendations well supported? Recommendations are not realistic? Are the recommendations realistic? All the solutions are recommended? Not all the solutions are recommended? How should the recommendations (i.e. for Missing how the recommendations (ie for action) action) be carried out? should be carried out? (________/1 mark) Sources and their Use Effective use of credible sources Insufficient use of credible sources (e.g. databases, journals, texts, (not just Internet)) Inaccurate format or missing Accurate acknowledgement of sources acknowledgment of sources/references (e.g. Harvard ref guide (refer to website in assignment instructions) Currency of references (up-to-date) Currency (out of date) Unit Leader Comments ................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................................................................. Overall Grade …………………………./15 School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 17 of 22
  18. 18. When you fully understand the information above, you should proceed to the assessment questions themselves. You should complete one of the Questions below for the three presentations and the report. Scenario 1 Internet “a network of networks in which users at any one computer can, if they have permission, get information from any other computer2”. The current internet facility has few limitations to meet user requirements; therefore, the new Internet (Internet2) approach should be replaced the current internet to enhance the facility to the science, business and education sectors. You need to submit the following: 1. What is the problem with today's Internet? 2. Why Internet2 has not been widely adopted? 3. What is Internet2 accomplishing for the research community it serves? 4. What do you expect the average consumer would want from an advanced Internet? 5. What do you predict will be possible in the future? Scenario 2 If you are trying to get internet access in your home there are many options available including broadband, satellite, cable, wireless and fiber to the home connections? You need to submit the following: 1. How does each service work? 2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each service? 3. What type of software and hardware are required? 4. In addition, discuss “how the broadband does more than make movie downloads easier, it can help save the planet” (Eckermann3 2008) Scenario 3 John Williams is excited about installing a new LAN as a key element of the new International Services Division4. He wants you to assist him in developing a plan and proposal for a departmental LAN. You see this as an opportunity to build a model LAN within ABC5. You can start from the beginning with new equipment and procedures. ABC is committed to moving strongly into the international arena. A successful LAN (or for that matter, an unsuccessful one) in his department will get a great deal of attention at ABC. Now you need to revisit the issue of LAN protocols and configurations so that you can make a final recommendation. Other issues that need to be considered at this time include the LAN’s cabling, installation, security, anticipated growth, and access – who or which remote offices can access that LAN. You also need to consider the operational and managerial procedures that will have to be adopted to ensure successful operation of the department LAN. In addition, of course, there are cost considerations. You need to submit the following:  Which is best for the International Services Division, a dedicated-server network or peer-to-peer LAN? Explain your choice;  Draw a network plan that includes the general layout of the LAN (computers, servers, cables, hubs/switches) and recommend what type LAN cables to install. Justify your recommendation; 2 Internet: http://searchwindevelopment.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid8_gci212370,00.html 3 Eckermann, R ., 2008 “Broadband for a sustained environment” Information Age December2007/Jan2008 4 International Services Division is located in floor 2. 5 ABC Office Location: 3 floors in South Perth – WA, each floor has 10 rooms. School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 18 of 22
  19. 19.  John Williams has heard horror stories about LAN bottlenecks6. Prepare a brief discussion of LAN bottlenecks and what can be done to improve LAN performance;  What safeguards do you recommend for ABC to control the use of illegal copies of software on the LANs? 7.2.4 Examination The final exam will be for 2 hours, plus 10 minutes reading time. The final exam will be worth 40% of your final mark. The Final Exam will be held during the formal examination period. It is your responsibility to check the date and time of the Final Exam. The date and the time of the final exam will be announced during lecture sessions. Also, University policy disallows information regarding the exam timetable to be given over the telephone. No final results are available prior to the Board of Examiners meeting held after the exam. Results for this unit are published on the WWW. You will be officially notified in writing by the University of your Final Result. 7.3 Assessment Compliance Information Due dates will be strictly adhered to. Extensions will be granted only in cases of demonstrated urgent need. It is your responsibility to check the due date. The Final Exam will be held during the formal examination period. It is the student’s responsibility to check the date and time of the Final Exam on the Curtin website. Official release results for this unit are published on Oasis on the Curtin website. https://prodweb3.curtin.edu.au/exrprd/results.search 7.4 Penalty for Late Submission of Assessments If assignments are not submitted by the due date, a penalty of 5% per day will be deducted from the assessment mark and after ten (10) days a zero mark will be recorded. • After this unit outline has been released to students, the Unit Leader may only alter due dates, assessment requirements, compulsory attendance and submission requirements, as stated in the Unit Outline, with the consent of the majority of students enrolled in the unit. (THIS IS POLICY - C13, page 2/6, 3. end para + C13, page 2/6, 3(d)(ii)). • All students are STRONGLY ADVISED to keep appropriate copies/backups of every assignment submitted. To apply for an extension on assignment work, please complete the Assignment Extension Form (available on Blackboard) and submit it to your Unit Leader for approval. Weighting: Team Working Assignment is worth 30% of your final grade. Late penalties will be applied at 5% per day unless the Unit Leader has approved an extension. 6 A bottleneck, in a communications context, is a point in the enterprise where the flow of data is impaired or stopped entirely. Effectively, there isn't enough data handling capacity to handle the current volume of traffic. A bottleneck can occur in the user network or storage fabric or within servers where there is excessive contention for internal server resources, such as CPU processing power, memory, or I/ O (input/output). As a result, data flow slows down to the speed of the slowest point in the data path. This slow down affects application performance, especially for databases and other heavy transactional applications, and can even cause some applications to crash. (Access 22 Jan 08 - http://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid7_gci540507,00.html) School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 19 of 22
  20. 20. 7.5 Relationship of Assessment Activities to Learning Outcomes and Professional Skills This table illustrates how the assessment activities relate to the assessment of the learning outcomes and professional skills. Learning Outcomes Item 1 Item 2 Exam 1. Ability to design and recommend Presentation Mid Semester Exam appropriate IT infrastructure for a Test range of organization types and circumstances. 2. Ability to provide technical Presentation Mid Semester Exam infrastructure advice to a client Test 3. Ability to communicate network Presentation design information Professional Skills Communication – Presentation Presentation Mid Semester Exam Test Communication – Writing Presentation Mid Semester Exam Test 8. General Information Please see the CBS Student Handbook as described on Page 1 of this document for important general information. 9. Supplementary Instructions and Materials Undergraduate Supplementary and Deferred Examinations For more detailed information on Policies and Procedures relating to Examinations, students should refer to the web at: http://www.policies.curtin.edu.au/documents/examinations.doc Or http://www.policies.curtin.edu.au/documents/deferment_final_exams_appeals.doc Note - It is a student’s responsibility to obtain all relevant information regarding these examinations and to be present at the correct time and venue. A student who does not sit for a scheduled deferred examination in a unit has no claim to a further examination and therefore will receive a FAIL GRADE in this unit. For more details on Policies and Procedures relating to Examinations, students should refer to the http://policies.curtin.edu.au/documents/assessment_policy.doc http://www.policies.curtin.edu.au/documents/assessment_appeals.doc 10. Improvements and Student Feedback The CBS values student feedback as one of the many ways to continuously inform improvements to this Unit. Recent improvements have included: 1. Some changes to the Assignment structure 2. Some changes to the Assessments in general and to the lab exercises Recent student feedback on this Unit is available at: http://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/reports/ END OF UNIT INFORMATION School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 20 of 22
  21. 21. Curtin Business School Communication Skills Centre STUDENT WORKSHOPS Curtin Business School Curtin Business School SEMESTER ONE 2006 Communication Skills Centre Communication Skills Centre STUDENT WORKSHOPS STUDENT WORKSHOPS SEMESTER ONE 2007 SEMESTER ONE 2008 students, take advantage of these FREE workshops to improve your academic study skills and communication skills and maximise your potential! Date Time Topic Week Mon 3 March 2.00 – 4.00 High Flyer: How to be a successful student at University 2 (including time management) Tues 4 March 10.00 – 12.00 Taking effective notes from lectures and tutorials Wed 5 March 2.00 – 4.00 Reading skills for university study Thurs 6 March 10.00 – 12.00 Quick search for research: easy ways of locating research resources for your assignments Mon 10 March 2.00 – 4.00 Australian ways of speaking: understanding Australian English 3 Tues 11 March 11.00 – 1.00 Polishing up your written language skills -for English as a second language (ESL) students Wed 12 March 2.00 – 4.00 Class participation: speaking out with confidence in classes & tutorials Thurs 13 March 10.00 – 12.00 How to give a confident oral presentation Mon 17 March 1.00 – 3.00 Analysing the question and planning and structuring your assignment 4 Tues 18 March 11.00 – 1.00 Better marks for better writing: qualities of good academic writing Wed 19 March 2.00 – 4.00 How to reference and quote sources in academic writing Thurs 20 March 11.00 – 1.00 Expressing ideas in your own words and avoiding plagiarism Tues 1 April 10.00 – 12.00 Reading skills for university study (Repeat) 6 Wed 2 April 2.00 – 4.00 How to give a confident oral presentation (Repeat) Thurs 3 April 10.00 – 12.00 Taking effective notes from lectures and tutorials (Repeat) Mon 7 April 2.00 – 4.00 How to analyse and write about case studies Tues 8 April 10.00 – 12.00 Producing polished writing –important techniques for editing 7 Wed 9 April 2.00 - 4.00 Structuring and writing a professional report Thurs 10 April 11.00 – 1.00 Analysing the question and planning and structuring your assignment (Repeat) Mon 14 April 1.00 – 3.00 How to reference and quote sources in academic writing (Repeat) 8 Tues 15 April 10.00 – 12.00 Expressing ideas in your own words and avoiding plagiarism (Repeat) Wed 16 April 2.00 – 4.00 Better marks for better writing: qualities of good academic writing (Repeat) Tues 29 April 11.00 – 1.00 How to write a professional CV/resume 10 Wed 30 April 2.00 – 4.00 Applying for a job: addressing selection criteria and cover letters Thurs 1 May 11.00 – 1.00 How to be successful in a job interview Mon 5 May 2.00 – 4.00 Writing a thesis proposal (**For PG students) 11 Tues 6 May 10.00 - 12.00 Critical analysis: evaluating & synthesising ideas (**For PG students) Wed 7 May 1.00 - 3.00 Sharpen your writing skills for thesis writing (**For PG students) Mon 26 May 1.00 – 3.00 Improve your exam techniques and get better marks 14 Tues 27 May 10.00 – 12.00 Improve your exam techniques and get better marks (Repeat) School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 21 of 22
  22. 22. General information The venue for all workshops and seminars is Room 407.312 (unless otherwise stated) Note special workshops for Postgraduate (PG) students in Week 11 Workshops are repeated only where indicated in the schedule Workshops cover 4 areas:  Academic study skills  Academic writing  Interpersonal communication  Professional communication Workshops run for 2 hours. Please note: Students must register for workshops and seminars. They can do this by: - writing their name on lists outside the Communication Skills Centre (407.202) OR - telephoning OR - emailing one of the lecturers below. ALSO Weekly conversation class Mondays 11.00 -12.00, Room 407.213, Bentley campus Starting Monday 3 March 2008 Weekly academic writing and grammar class Mondays 5.00 – 6.00 pm OR Tuesdays 2.00 – 3.00 pm in Room 407.312 OR 407.213, Bentley campus Starting Monday 3 March 2008 (See Seminar Program for details) NB All workshops in room 407.312 at the Bentley campus unless otherwise stated See our website for study resources and tips at www.cbs.curtin.edu.au/communication Further information Communication Skills Centre Room 407.202, Bentley campus Dr Carmela Briguglio, Manager 9266 3079 C.briguglio@curtin.edu.au Julie Howe 9266 7773 J.A.howe@curtin.edu.au Rose van Son 9266 3504 R.vanson@curtin.edu.au Robina Smith 9266 3504 Robi.smith@curtin.edu.au School of Information Systems (S1 2008) TI502 Page 22 of 22

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