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SEMESTER - 7.doc
SEMESTER - 7.doc
SEMESTER - 7.doc
SEMESTER - 7.doc
SEMESTER - 7.doc
SEMESTER - 7.doc
SEMESTER - 7.doc
SEMESTER - 7.doc
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  • 1. Bachelors of Science in Computer Sciences BS (CS) SEMESTER 7 SEN-520 Advanced Database CSC-480 Advance Design and Analysis of Algorithms CSC-410 Computer Graphics ENG-120 Technical Writing SDW-498 Project (Part-I) CEN-440 Elective-I
  • 2. Course Title: Advance Database Course Code: SEN - 520 Credit Hours: Four (4) Semester: 1st Pre-requisite: SEN-510 Aims & Objectives: To study in detail, some of the more advanced concepts underlying database systems. On completing this course, students should have an in-depth understanding of several recent developments in the database field such as: Object-oriented database systems, extended relational model, distributed databases, and intelligent databases. Also to give them overview of future trends and emerging database technologies and applications. Course Contents: Object-oriented database systems Extended Relational Database Systems Database Integrity Distributed Database: Overview, Principles and Systems Overview of Intelligent Databases Emerging Database Technologies and Applications Database Administration in an Enterprise Environment Transaction Processing, Recovery and Con-currency Control Security and Integrity Constraints Recommended Books: - Hiroshi Ishikawa, Object-Oriented Database System : Design and Implementation for Advanced Applications, Springer Verlag, September 1993. - Eyal Aronoff, Kevin Loney, Noorali Sonawalla, Advanced Oracle Tuning and Administration (Oracle Series), Oracle Pr, November 1, 1996. - A.R. Hurson, M.W. Bright, S.H. Pakzad (Editor), Multidatabase Systems: An Advanced Solution for Global Information Sharing, IEEE Computer Society, August 1993.
  • 3. Course Title: Advance Design and Analysis of Algorithms Course Code: CSC-480 Credit Hours: 4 (3+1) (Three hours theory and one hour lab) Semester: 7th Pre-Requisite: Design and Analysis of Algorithm Aims and Objectives This course builds on the Design and Analysis of Algorithms course and will extend the concepts learned in the Design and Analysis of Algorithms course. The main focus will be on algorithm design, analysis and optimization for more advance problem areas. In particular design and analysis of Geometric, Parallel, Distributed and Genetic algorithms will be discussed in this course. Implementation of the algorithms will also be done using a suitable programming environment. Course Outline Introduction, Average Case Analysis, Probabilistic Analysis, Amortized Analysis Geometric Algorithms, Theory of NP, Approximation Algorithms Introduction to Concurrent Computing Overview, Processing Paradigms, Concurrent Computing Models, Cost vs. Performance Evaluation. Parallel Algorithms The PRAM Model, Design Techniques for Parallel Algorithms, Optimality and Efficiency issues, Basic PRAM algorithms. Distributed Algorithms The Computational Model, Distributed Algorithms (Broadcasting, Leader Election, Message Routing, Event Ordering and Resource Allocation), Complexity Issues. Case Studies: A Client/Server File Reader, Remote Database Access. Genetic Algorithms Biological Background, Major Elements of Genetic Algorithms, Parallel Genetic Algorithms. Case Study: The Travelling Salesperson Problem. References 1. Cormen, Leiseson and Rivest, Introduction to Algorithms, The MIT Press, 1990. 2. Robert Sedgewick, Analysis of Algorithms, Addison Wesley, 1996. 3. Gregory R. Andrews, Foundations of Multithreaded, Parallel and Distributed Programming, Addison Wesley, 2000. 4. Albert Y. H. Zomaya, Parallel and Distributed Computing Handbook, McGraw Hill, 1995.
  • 4. Course Title: Computer Graphics Course Code: CSC - 410 Credit Hours: Three (2+1) (Two hours theory and two hours lab) Semester: 7th Pre-requisite: Linear Algebra (MAT-370), Object Oriented Programming-II (CSC-360) Aims and Objective: Students after the completion of this course would learn an effective means of communicating technical ideas and product display. New techniques of representation of product in two/ three dimension by means matrices and fast algorithms will be the basis of this course. Course Contents: 1. Introduction a. Survey of Computer Graphics and its application 2. Overview of graphics systems 3. Output primitives a. Point and line b. Line drawing Algorithms c. Line function d. Ellipse and other conic generating Algorithms e. Curve functions f. Pixel addressing 4. Two dimensional Geometric Transformation a. Matrix representation of homogeneous coordinate b. Transformation functions c. Transformation between coordinate systems 5. Three dimensional concept a. 3- dimensional display methods b. 3- dimensional graphics packages 6. Three dimensional object representations a. Spline Representation b. Cubic spline interpolation method c. Bezier- curves and surfaces d. Construction of solid geometry methods 7. Three- dimensional Geometric and Modeling transformation a. Translation, rotation and composite transformation 8. Three dimensional Viewing a. Viewing coordinate b. Projections. c. General projection transformation d. Clipping 9. Visible surface detection method a. Classification of visible surface detection algorithms b. Z or Depth buffer method 10. Illumination Models and surfaces rendering methods a. Basic Illumination models b. Ray tracing method 11. Color Models and Color Applications
  • 5. a. RGB, CMY and HSV Color models b. Conversion between models Recommended Books: 1. Computer Graphics by Donald Hearn 2. Fundamentals of Graphics Communication by Bertiline Wiebre Miller Irwin Graphic Series 3. D.F. Rogers and J.A. Adams, Mathematical Elements for Computer Graphics, 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, New York, 1990. 4. Alan Watt, 3D Computer Graphics, Addision-Wesley Pub co, September1, 1993.
  • 6. Course Title: Technical Writing Course Code: ENG-120 Credit Hours: Two (2)(Two hours theory) Semester: 7th Pre-requisite: Aims and Objective: The ability to communicate effectively is a valuable asset to everyone. The person who communicates frequently not only gains from the contribution of others but also clarifies his own thinking, articulating problems or ideas and getting the reactions of the others. The focus of this course will be to familiarize the students with the make up of both oral and written communication in a professional environment and provide a range of opportunities for students to develop and improve their ability to launch their services and products in the market. The students will learn the art of effective business writing with the focus on selling themselves and their products in the competitive world. Course Contents: 1. Organizational plans of business writing 2. Letter writing 3. Forms of Technical writing 4. Memorandum writing 5. Bad news messages 6. Persuasive messages 7. Technical reports a. Short Reports b. Long Reports 8. Job-Search Communication 9. Presentation skills 10. Preparing for interviews Recommended Books 1. Effective Business Communication by Murphy & Hilderbrant 2. Modern Business Letters by L. Gartside 3. Excellence in Business Communication by Bove, Courtland.L and Thil, John V New York: McGraw-Hill 4. Business Communication by Raymond V. Lesikar 5. Communication for Business, A Practical Approach 6. Business Communication Today by Bonce & Thill
  • 7. Course Title: Project (Part-I) Course Code: SDW-498 Credit Hours: Three (3) Semester: 7th Pre-requisite: Software Engineering (SEN-330) Aims and Objectives: The aim of the software project is to develop the students' ability in organizing, documenting and producing a non-trivial piece of software, starting from a brief description of what is wanted and finishing with a fully documented working product, which is demonstrated. Software Projects are assigned to inculcate and evaluate the research abilities of students.

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