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Professional Communication M

  1. 1. 1 Master of Arts in Professional Communication (January 24, 2009) Table of Contents Introduction and Overview page 2 Schematic Diagram of the Proposed page 4 M. A. in Professional Communication Degree Program, Student Learning Outcomes, and Internship Description of Required Core Courses page 5 Description of Courses in Track One page 6 Description of Courses in Track Two pages 6-7 Description of Electives in pages 6-7 Professional Communication Course Outlines for Courses in the pages 9-67 Core, Tracks One and Two, and Electives in Professional Communication
  2. 2. 2 Master of Arts in Professional Communication Proposed Master of Arts in Professional Communication The Department of Communication William Paterson University As communication disciplines and practices constantly evolve, the Department of Communication reviews course and program offerings to ensure our students are prepared to compete in an array of professional and creative fields. This is evidenced by our recent overhaul of our undergraduate program to provide four new major areas, with multiple concentration offerings. The creation of the Master of Arts in Professional Communication addresses industry needs at a more intense and rigorous level than offered in our undergraduate programs. The level of detail and depth of the graduate course offerings provide a more challenging experience of both recent graduates and working professionals who seek a career change or advancement credentials and skills enhancements. A Master of Arts in Professional Communication at William Paterson University places its emphasis on written, oral and visual communication in a professional context. The program curriculum is designed to enhance communication skills and managerial techniques. Students may tailor course work to meet individual career or academic objectives and they will be prepared for work as professional communicators in business, public service or a variety of media industries. Upon completion of the program, students will have gained a fundamental understanding of today’s communication opportunities and will have practical knowledge, strategic and critical thinking ability and technical skills that may be immediately applied to the job market or advanced studies. The Master of Arts in Professional Communication is designed as an applied program of study. The courses cover a range of skills essential to diverse professional communication environments. The program aims to attract students interested in going into public relations management, as well as a range of new media and corporate communication fields. There are two tracks: Track One: Corporate and Strategic Communication is designed for students interested in furthering their studies in corporate communication. The courses would be taken by students interested primarily in public relations, public relations management, and entrepreneurial skills, such as Web marketing and web advertising. Track Two: New Media and Professional Writing is designed for students interested in advancing their skills in new media applications as well as professional writing. Courses cover a range of digital media tools necessary in professional media production, communication writing in the corporate environment and design. The proposed M. A. in Professional Communication with its two tracks takes an integrated approach in its curriculum design. No comparable graduate-level degree program exists in the
  3. 3. 3 tri-state area. In addition, William Paterson University is extremely competitive in its relatively low tuition rates as a public institution. Our mission is to provide communication courses that are aligned to the University’s central mission of preparing students for careers, advanced studies and production citizenship in an increasingly global economy and technological world. Through our undergraduate and graduate programs, the Communication Department offers an integrated approach to the communication arts and technology through a humanistic and practical course of study in concert with introductory and advanced production-oriented classes.
  4. 4. 4 Master of Arts in Professional Communication: 30 Credits Required Core: 12 Credits COMS 510: Integrated Communication (3 credits) COMS 600: Survey in Professional Writing (3 credits) COMS 606: Communication Law & Ethics (3 credits) COMS 730: Master Project (3 Credits) Track One: 9 Credits (Required) Track Two: 9 Credits (Required) Corporate & Strategic Communication New Media & Professional Writing COMS 511: Professional Seminar (3 cr.) COMS 610: Writing for Digital Media (3 cr.) COMS 512: Organization Communication (3 cr.) COMS 615: Digital Comm Applications (3 cr.) COMS 620: Strategic PR Management (3 cr.) COMS 710: Adv Topics in Professional Writing (3 cr.) Electives: 9 Credits Student Learning Outcomes Professional Communication (3 credits each) After completion of this program, students will be able to: COMS 609: Leadership and Teamwork COMS 613: Applications for Website Creation 1. Understand the role of effective writing and digital COMS 621: Global Communication: technology in professional communication and possess COMS 623: Crisis & Reputation Management a working knowledge of both COMS 628: Press & Global Society: COMS 715: Technology & Integrated Communication 2. Effectively express themselves in written, oral, and digital forms, as well as exercise their critical thinking Remarks: skill in diverse professional communication settings  Courses in one track may be taken as Electives by students 3. Create a body of work in writing and digital forms in a in the other track. professional or scholarly portfolio  A maximum of six credits from outside of this program may be 4. Demonstrate management-level interpersonal, accepted toward the partial fulfillment of M. A. in leadership and strategic decision making skills Professional Communication’s degree requirements. 5. Possess a body of applicable knowledge in the legal  A graduate-level internship may be incorporated as part and ethical dimensions of professional communication of Master Project (COMS 730) to enhance the student’s professional preparation.
  5. 5. 5 Required Core Courses: 12 Credits Integrated Communication (COMS 510) -- Effective communication and management in today’s society requires individuals possess a working knowledge of convergence and the tools and techniques used in all forms of communication including oral, written, visual and electronic communication. This course will teach students to understand and apply integrated communication tools for a range of professional environments. Students will develop problem-solving and strategic thinking abilities with an emphasis on the use and language of imagery and design in both print and electronic communication. Through the examination of case studies from Fortune 500 corporations to small businesses, students will explore systematic approaches to management and communication in various corporate structures. Survey in Professional Writing (COMS 600) -- Introduction to the various forms of professional writing with emphasis on purpose, structure and limitations, including television, radio, new media, journalism, public relations, etc. Emphasis will be on purpose, structure, and limitations. Students will create a portfolio of work as a component of the class. Communication Law & Ethics (COMS 606) -- Examines ethical, legal and moral dilemmas found in business including electronic communication, corporate communication/public relations, education and marketing. Issues covered include individual responsibility, government regulation, libel, truthfulness and deception, privacy and confidentiality. Students will analyze real world case studies and review legal guidelines and operating principles for a range of industries. Via theoretical discussion, cases and hands on critical thinking exercises, students develop the ability to recognize, articulate and navigate the legal and ethical aspects of managerial decision making. Master Project (COMS 730) -- The Master Project will illustrate core competencies including a demonstrated proficiency in effectively communicating in a variety of environments through writing, verbalization and technology use. An ability to analyze and solve problems, conduct research and develop and deliver polished presentations in management settings is essential to successful completion in this program. Portfolio project may entail production of professional quality work deliverable for a client in the professional world (approved by the organization); project portfolio with proposal, journal, paper, deliverables, client letter, etc.; critical study and paper of an issue relevant to professional communication. A graduate-level professional internship may be incorporated as part of the Master Project to enhance the student’s professional preparation.
  6. 6. 6 Track ONE (of two): 9 Credits Corporate & Strategic Communication Professional Seminar (COMS 511) -- A series of lectures and seminars led by professional industry leaders in the public relations, media and communication fields. Senior executives from major corporations and firms will discuss topics and present cases relevant to the global public relations and integrated corporate communication industry. Students will complete a research study in a related communication area as part of their participation in this course. Organizational Communication (COMS 512) -- This course provides a framework for analyzing organizational structures and processes, and a consideration of how they influence and are influenced by organizational communication activities. Students will be prepared to understand, analyze, and effectively participate in organizational life. Special emphasis will be given to the role that communication plays in the management of organizational change today. Strategic Public Relations Management (COMS 620) -- Corporate communication and Public relations professionals create programming against business objectives as well as communication objectives within an organization. Students will learn how to successfully work within the increasingly blurred lines of the marketing mix (advertising, marketing, promotion, sales, public relations, public affairs, investor relations, etc.). Students will learn to effectively create, present, and lead integrated public relations and marketing programming. They will learn how to manage accounts, employees, C-suite executives, members of the media, marketing partners, finances, clients and business leaders within a professional organization. Case studies, guest speakers and many role-play scenarios contribute to the strategic and critical thinking development in this course. Track TWO (of two): 9 Credits New Media & Professional Writing Writing for Digital Media (COMS 610) -- Examines the art and craft of writing for digital media, including forms and limitations of the online environment. The course will examine how the evolution of digital media has changed both the structure and marketplace of “traditional” media. Students will write for digital media outlets created for the class.
  7. 7. 7 Digital Communication Applications (COMS 615) -- This course gives graduate-level introduction to digital media tools necessary in professional media production, communication and design. The course will cover file creation and editing, compression, and content transmission. Over the semester, students will explore professional tools as well as the production possibilities with consumer applications and freeware. Advanced Topics in Professional Writing (COMS 710) -- Explores selected topics in greater detail, determined by current events or faculty interest, such as, but not limited to, international media, grant writing, public relations, feature writing, technical writing, etc. Electives in Professional Communication: 9 Credits In addition to completing the 12-credit Core Requirement and one of the nine-credit Tracks, degree candidates are also required to complete nine elective credits (three courses). They may complete this requirement by taking courses in Electives in Professional Communication (see below for course descriptions). Courses in one track may be taken as Electives by students in the other track. A maximum of six credits from other disciplines may be accepted toward the partial fulfillment of M. A. in Professional Communication’s degree requirements. Electives in Professional Communication Leadership and Teamwork (COMS 609) -- This course enables students to acquire advanced theoretical knowledge and applied skills in the areas of teamwork and leadership. The course provides a dual focus with a theoretical survey of, and practical experience in, both team processes and leadership theories/practice. Specifically, the course will examine the factors that affect team performance and leadership, and prepare students to acquire and practice effective team and leadership skills. The course is also designed to provide students with opportunities to understand and refine their ability to work in teams (including interpersonal communication, agenda management, problem- solving and decision-making, and conflict resolution) and to acquire and practice leadership skills in the workplace Applications for Website Creation (COMS 613) -- This course will introduce students to basic tools used for creating web content such as Dreamweaver, Flash and Photoshop, as well as to social networking sites, online production tools, and distribution systems. Global Communication (COMS 621) -- This course uses a comparative analysis to examine broadcasting in America and other countries. World broadcasting is viewed as a social, political and economic force. Crisis & Reputation Management (COMS 623) -- Crisis, reputation and risk management issues are explored. The integral roles of a public relations or corporate communication professional within an organization as part of a crisis team are discussed. Topics include crisis planning and preparedness, reputation and risk management assessment and responses, techniques and tools for communication professionals to
  8. 8. 8 utilize before, during and after a crisis situation. The role of stakeholders in forming and influencing corporate reputation and image also is explored. Case studies of real corporate crisis and scenario planning round out the curriculum. The Press & Global Society (COMS 628) -- This course provides an overview of the role of the press in a global society from historical and contemporary perspectives. Students study philosophical and legal issues pertaining to journalism, analyze the content and design of newspapers, and gain experience in the principles of journalistic reporting, writing, and editing. Technology and Integrated Communication (COMS 715) -- Course focus is on the social implications of technological tools as they are used in integrated marketing techniques. Students will explore the dynamics of such areas as viral marketing in the context of social interaction, the evolution of social websites such Myspace.com and Facebook.com, and other channels of integrated marketing from music downloads and distribution, to matchmaking as big business.
  9. 9. 9 Proposed Master of Arts in Professional Communication Department of Communication Course Outline Drafts: Required Core Courses Track One & Track Two Courses
  10. 10. 10 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 510 INTEGRATED COMMUNICATION 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 510: Integrated Communication (3 credits) 2) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: Effective communication and management in today’s society requires individuals possess a working knowledge of convergence and the tools and techniques used in all forms of communication including oral, written, visual and electronic communication. This course will teach students to understand and apply integrated communication tools for a range of professional environments. Students will develop problem-solving and strategic thinking abilities with an emphasis on the use and language of imagery and design in both print and electronic communication. Through the examination of case studies from Fortune 500 corporations to small businesses, students will explore systematic approaches to management and communication in various corporate structures. 3) COURSE PREREQUISITES: NONE 4) COURSE OBJECTIVES: a) Analyze case studies from global corporations to small business to explore various management and communication approaches of senior executives b) Teach management and professional communication applications of print and electronic c) communication elements d) Provide students with an understanding of convergence from strategic and technological perspectives e) Showcase tools and techniques are used in integrated communication (electronic, oral, written) be it a speech to local union representations or a global online marketing campaign f) Develop student skills and abilities in the areas of written, oral and visual literacy for a range professional communication scenarios 5) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES. Upon completion of this course students will a) Understand the history, theory and role of communication in a professional setting with particular focus on management communication within and organization b) Learn conceptual applications and how to manage technological tools and resources in place today (Internet, presentations, broadcasting, vendors, etc.) c) Understand the need and uses for integrated communication tools from an organizational management perspective d) Illustrate the ability to apply various communication skills across a range of marketing communication disciplines (marketing, promotion, advertising, sales, public relations, journalism, publishing, etc.) and distribution channels (oral/written, print, online, broadcast, etc.) e) Apply case study analyses lessons to their professional management style
  11. 11. 11 6) TOPICAL OUTLINES OF COURSE CONTENT: a) The role of communication in professional settings b) Integrated communication: history, theoretical foundations, contemporary society c) Models of communication in business and management i) Professional Cases: Best and worst practices of professional communication (1) Fortune 500 (2) Mid-size (3) Small business d) Determining and evaluating the marketing communication mix i) Consumer and constituent behavior, audiences, outcomes ii) Managing the process across marketing communication disciplines iii) Managing human, technological and financial resources (internal and external) e) Applying and integrating communication methods i) The use of technology and digital mediums (1) Writing for digital mediums (2) Presentations, memos, proposals, sales and marketing, human resources, risk and crisis management (3) Planning broadcasts (TV, radio, web), writing, scripting, preparation, purpose, strategic planning, evaluation (4) Writing for the web, utilizing web resources (5) Conferencing, web, meetings, intranets/extranets, podcasting, texting, presentations, video/digital 7) GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Lectures b) Seminars and guest speakers c) Student led discussions and presentations d) Case analysis e) Oral, written and digital presentations/projects f) Readings, texts g) Group work, exercises 8) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): a) Research paper b) Oral presentation including leading a discussion about an integrated communication topic c) Project d) Group work e) Participation in discussions f) Case analysis
  12. 12. 12 9) SUGGESTED TEXTS AND MATERIALS: Buckingham M. & Coffman, C. First Break all the Rules: What the World’s Great Managers Do Differently. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1999. Dewdney, A. & Ride, P. The New Media Handbook. New York: Routledge, 2006. Goldstein, N. The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law. Cambridge: Perseus Publishing, 2000. Hilliard, R. Writing for Television, Radio, New Media. 9th Edition. Boston: Thomson Wadsworth, 2008. Ogden, J. Developing A Creative and Innovative Integrated Marketing Communication Plan. New York: Prentice Hall, 1998. 10) BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS: Argenti, P. Corporate Communication, 2nd Edition, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998. Barrett, D. Leadership Communication. New York: McGraw Hill, 2006. Belch G. & Belch, M. Advertising & Promotion: An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective. 7th Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2007. Bourhis, J., Adams, C. & Titsworth, S. The Style Manual for Communication Studies. New York: McGraw Hill, 2006. Curran, J. The Alternative Media Handbook. London: Routledge, 2007. Goodman, M. Write to the Point: Effective Communication in the Workplace. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1984 Harris, T. Value Added Public Relations. New York: McGraw Hill, 2000. Hattersley, M. & McJannet, L. Management Communication. 2nd Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2005. Maki P., Schilling C. Writing in Organizations: Purposes, Strategies & Processes. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc. 1987. Meeske, M. Copywriting for the Electronic Media: A Practical Guide. 6th Edition, Boston: Thomson
  13. 13. 13 Wadsworth, 2009. PR News: Guide to Best Practices in PR Measurement, http://www.prnewsonline.com, April 2008. Sylvi, G., Wicks, J., Hollifield, A., Lacy, S. & Broadrick, A. Media Management: A Casebook Approach. 4th Edition. New York: Routledge, 2007. Whittaker, J. Web Production for Writers & Journalists. 2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 2002. Wood. Marketing Plan: A Handbook with Marketing PlanPro. New York: Prentice Hall, 2003. 11) PREPARER'S NAME AND DATE: Lorra M. Brown April 19, 2008 12) DEPARTMENT APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  14. 14. 14 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 600 Survey in Professional Writing 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 600: Survey in Professional Writing (3 credits) 2) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: An introduction to the various forms of professional writing with emphasis on purpose, structure and limitations, including television, radio, new media, journalism, public relations, etc. Students will create a portfolio of work as a component of the class. The course refines students’ research and writing skills to help them advance scholarly or professional aspirations. 3) COURSE PREREQUISITES: NONE 4) COURSE OBJECTIVES: a) Cultivate and polish professional and scholarly writing skills b) Teach students about the importance of research and theory as foundations of as the basis for developing professional and academic level critical thinking abilities and writing skills c) Acquaint students with the skills to systematically examine topics methodically using a range of resources and research venues d) Generate an understanding of the purpose, strategies, styles and structures, writing for various venues including television, radio, Internet, journalism, public relations, corporate communication and other academic or professional settings. e) To provide ample opportunities for students to apply their writing skills to a wide range of professional scenarios f) Help students develop a body of work to advance professional aspirations g) Expose students to various forms of professional writing and provide relevant examples of writing in organizations 5) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES. AT THE END OF THE COURSE STUDENTS WILL: a) Have a body of written work to use in a professional portfolio b) Understand various forms and limitations of professional writing c) Apply technical writing skills across a variety of settings d) Become proficient editors of their work with consideration for structure, content, clarity and purpose of their written body of work e) Utilize research to produce professional and scholarly level written work including selection and refinement of topics 6) TOPICAL OUTLINES OF COURSE CONTENT: a) The changing business environment i) History, philosophies, technology ii) Impact on business and professional writing style, content
  15. 15. 15 iii) Keeping current b) Writing purposes, strategies and processes i) Research strategies, sources, critical studies ii) Understanding fundamental research elements: abstracts, literature reviews, problem statements, data analysis iii) Principles of business communication iv) Professional writing styles c) Strategies for writing in organizations i) Management, authority, internal/external audiences ii) Objective setting d) Editing and revising e) Applications of purposes, audiences, strategies, content, design i) Corporate identity, branding, reputation management, promotion, marketing, public relations, journalism, news, human resources, legal (1) News releases, news & feature articles, writing for the web, annual reports, white papers, proposals, grant writing, speeches, strategy documents, newsletters, legal briefs, broadcast scripts, technical reports, general correspondence, email, memos, letters, PowerPoint, OP-EDs, etc. 7) GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Porfolio development – culmination of research, written and edited materials b) Exercises / Field work – using real world cases, students must utilize professional writing skills to develop strategic responses/documents for various business scenarios c) Journal article critiques – designed for students to practice reading and dissecting articles d) Internet source summaries/critiques – students develop a proficiency in reviewing and culling pertinent information while evaluating credibility of sources e) Lectures/ Guest Speakers – participation in discussions of topics relevant to professional communication and writing f) Literature review / research paper – Review of existing research / writing about topic of relevance to support or disprove their hypothesis regarding a professional communication/writing topic. Paper should provide a solid foundation for future research or professional endeavors 8) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): a) Portfolio of body of work generated over the course of the class b) Editing skills tests – of peers, cases provided by instructor and own work c) Critical analysis papers / exams relating to communication topic(s) d) Writing exercises and assignments e) Literature review / research paper f) Oral and written presentation
  16. 16. 16 9) SUGGESTED TEXTS AND MATERIALS: Handouts, case studies The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, local dailies Goldstein, N. The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law. Cambridge: Perseus Publishing, 2000. Bourhis, J., Adams, C. & Titsworth, S. The Style Manual for Communication Studies. New York: McGraw Hill, 2006. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 4th Edition. Washington: American Psychological Association 10) BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS: Dewdney, A. & Ride, P. The New Media Handbook. New York: Routledge, 2006. Diggs-Brown, B. The PR Styleguide: Formats for Public Relations Practice. 2nd Edition. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007. Effective Writing And Editing: A Guidebook for Newspapers. Reston, VA: American Press Institute, 1985. Frey, L.R., Botan, C.H., & Kreps, G.L. Investigating communication: An introduction to research methods, 2nd Edition, Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2000. Goodman, M. Write to the Point: Effective Communication in the Workplace. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1984 Harris. Prentice Hall Reference Guide for Professional Writing. New York: Prentice Hall, 2007. Hattersley, M. & McJannet, L. Management Communication. 2nd Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2005. Keeble, R. Print Journalism: A Critical Introduction. New York: Routledge, 2005. Maki P., Schilling C. Writing in Organizations: Purposes, Strategies & Processes. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc. 1987.
  17. 17. 17 th Meeske, M. Copywriting for the Electronic Media: A Practical Guide. 6 Edition, Boston: Thomson Wadsworth, 2009. Ramage, Bean & Johnson. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing. 4th Edition. New York: Longman, 2006. Reinking & von der Osten. Strategies for Successful Writing: A Rhetoric, Research Guide, Reader and Handbook. 8th Edition. New York: Prentice Hall, 2007. Rosen. The Academic Writer’s Handbook. New York: Pearson, 2006. Stein, M.L. The Newswriter's Handbook: An Introduction To Journalism. Iowa State University Press, 2000. Strunk, Williams, and e.b.White. The Elements of Style. 3rd Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 1980. Thompson, R. Writing for Broadcast Journalists. 2nd Edition. New York: Routledge, 2004. Van Riel, C. & Fombrun, C. Essentials of Corporate Communication. New York: Routledge, 2007. Whittaker, J. Web Production for Writers & Journalists. 2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 2002. 11) PREPARER'S NAME AND DATE: Lorra M. Brown, April 21, 2008 12) DEPARTMENT APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  18. 18. 18 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 606 COMMUNICATION LAW & ETHICS 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 606: Communication Law & Ethics (3 credits) 2) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: Examines ethical, legal and moral dilemmas found in business including electronic communication, corporate communication/public relations, education and marketing. Issues covered include individual responsibility, government regulation, libel, truthfulness and deception, privacy and confidentiality. Students will analyze real world case studies and review legal guidelines and operating principles for a range of industries. Via theoretical discussion, cases and hands on critical thinking exercises, students develop the ability to recognize, articulate and navigate the legal and ethical aspects of managerial decision making. 3) COURSE PREREQUISITES: NONE 4) COURSE OBJECTIVES: a) Provide a thorough examination of ethical, legal and moral issues in communication- related businesses b) Explore the systemic causes and consequences of unethical or illegal professional conduct c) Explore communication law and regulation, and technology policy, with particular focus on implications of the digital age and global business d) Educate students about legislation, regulation and ethical considerations that could impact how a senior executive manages a contemporary business e) Underscore the role and responsibilities of a corporation beyond generating profit f) Showcase a mix of theoretical and real-world cases to expose students to a variety of arguments and issues g) Examine the impact of wireless communication: Internet, cell phones, etc. 5) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES. BY THE END OF THE SEMESTER STUDENTS WILL: a) Develop the ability to recognize and articulate the legal and ethical aspects of managerial decisions b) Assess the impact of particular rules and policies, as well as to suggest policy reform c) Engage in intelligent debate about values and application of judgment in a variety of situations relevant to the communication industry d) Explain legal rights and duties of the media, communication professionals and business leaders e) Demonstrate an understanding of complex rules and regulation affecting integration between content and distribution of mass media entities (FCC, digital transition – TV/radio, media ownership and control, marketing communication holding companies) f) Present complex concepts orally and in written form
  19. 19. 19 6) TOPICAL OUTLINES OF COURSE CONTENT: a) Survey of Communication Fields b) History of communication law and ethics c) Current Issues i) Communication & Media Law (1) First Amendment, Privacy, Trademark & Copyright, Sarbanes-Oxley, Regulation, Fairness, Privacy, Defamation, Internet, Intellectual Property, etc. (2) Case Studies ii) Ethics (1) History & theory (2) Ethical principles, Ethical guidelines (business and trade group codes of ethics) (3) Case Studies iii) The present and future: impact and implications (1) Technology of communication channels (a) Internet, wireless technology (2) Media ownership and control (3) Globalization 7) GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Case analyses and readings b) Lectures and discussions c) Films d) News outlets e) Exercises and group projects f) Research paper / critical study 8) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): a) Case analyses b) Journal article critiques c) Research paper d) Oral presentations e) Exams 9) SUGGESTED TEXTS AND MATERIALS: Nelson, B. Law & Ethics in Global Business. New York: Routledge, 2005. Hindery, L. It Takes a CEO: It’s Time to Lead with Integrity. New York: Free Press, 2005. Seigel. Communication Law in America. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2002. Zelezny, J. Cases in Communication Law. 5th Edition. Boston: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007.
  20. 20. 20 10) BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS: Bobbitt, R. Exploring Communication Law: A Socratic Approach, Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2008. Christians, C., Rotzoll, K., Fackler, M, McKee, K. & Woods, R. Media Ethics: Cases & Moral Reasoning. 7th Edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. 2005. Creech, K. Electronic Media Law and Regulation. Boston: Focal Press. 1996 Dobkin, B., & Pace, R. Communication in a Changing World. New York: McGraw Hill, 2003. Kiernan, M. Media Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Greenwood Publishing, 1997. Moore, R. Mass Communication Law and Ethics. 2nd Edition. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1999. Richards, J. & Murphy, J. Economic Censorship and Free Speech: The Circle of Communication Between Advertisers, Media and Consumers. Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising, 18(1), 21-34. 1996. Wilkie, S. A Modest Proposal for Spectrum Reform. USC Center for Communication Law & Policy. Los Angeles, 2008. Zelezny, J. Communcation Law: Liberties, Restraints and Modern Media. 5th Edition. Boston: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007 Institute of Communication Ethics. www.communicationethics.net Public Relations Society of America Code of Ethics. www.prsa.org. RedHawk Communications. www.redhawethics.com Media Ethics Magazine. www.mediaethicsmagazine.com 11) PREPARER'S NAME AND DATE: Lorra M. Brown, April 23, 2008. 12) DEPARTMENT APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  21. 21. 21 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 730: Master Project 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 730: Master Project (3 credits) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: The Master Project will illustrate core competencies including a demonstrated proficiency in effectively communicating a variety of environments through writing, verbalization and technology use. An ability to analyze and solve problems, conduct research and develop and deliver polished presentations in management settings is essential to successful completion in this program. Portfolio project may entail production of professional quality work deliverable for a client in the professional world (approved by the department and the host organization); project portfolio with proposal, journal, literature review, paper, deliverables, client letter, etc.; critical study and paper of an issue relevant to professional communication. A graduate- level professional internship may be incorporated as part of a student’s Master Project. 2) COURSE PREREQUISITES: Completion of core graduate credits and at least 50 percent of total graduate program credits. Permission of graduate director. 3) COURSE OBJECTIVE: a) To create a project suitable as a master's degree project / thesis. 4) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: a) Search scholarly and other appropriate resources and carry out a thorough and detailed literature review b) Complete a research study (professional or academic based) c) Discuss implications of the findings d) Follow an academic style manual, including proper documenting of all source material e) Create and execute a research-based comprehensive professional communication program including strategic and creative elements f) Provide a critical assessment of body of work including tangible measures for success of a communication program 5) TOPICAL OUTLINES OF COURSE CONTENT: It will provide the guidance and support necessary to carry out the Master Project research study or project including a literature review, original research, execution, analysis of success and business implications. The study or project may have a creative component and may be carried out in various professional settings, but it must contain a substantial research component to support the program. The Master Project supervisor will work with the student to make sure the Master Project is being carried out. On an individual basis, as needed, the supervisor will make sure the student knows:
  22. 22. 22 a) Research including criteria for quantitative and qualitative methodologies and analysis b) Original research study components (design, collection, analysis) c) Program development including research, audience targets, objectives, strategies, tactical execution, evaluation, budgeting, etc. 6) GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Discussions or individualized coaching where necessary b) Lectures where necessary c) Critiquing research or program designs d) Master Project presentations e) Discussion of strategic direction (for professional communication programs) f) Review of creative materials g) Professional assessment from host organization h) On-site professional visits as appropriate 7) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES MEASURED BY: a) Evaluation/critiques of sections of the Master Project Study i) Introduction, Literature Review, Research (Methodology and Procedures, Data Analysis), Program Development, Program Elements, Program Execution, Evaluation/Conclusions. b) Evaluation/critiques of Master Project Program (Portfolio) i) Research, audience analysis and targeting, objectives, strategies, tactical elements, execution, budgeting, organization, project management, professional assessment, project success, follow up 8) SUGGESTED TEXTS AND MATERIALS: Bourhis, J., Adams, C. & Titsworth, S. The Style Manual for Communication Studies. New York: McGraw Hill, 2006. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association Goldstein, N. The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law. Cambridge: Perseus Publishing, 2000. 9) BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS: Argenti, P. Corporate Communication, 2nd Edition, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998. Barrett, D. Leadership Communication. New York: McGraw Hill, 2006. Dewdney, A. & Ride, P. The New Media Handbook. New York: Routledge, 2006. Diggs-Brown, B. The PR Styleguide: Formats for Public Relations Practice. 2nd Edition. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007.
  23. 23. 23 Frey, L.R., Botan, C.H., & Kreps, G.L. Investigating communication: An introduction to research methods, 2nd Edition, Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2000. Harris, T. Value Added Public Relations. New York: McGraw Hill, 2000. Maki P., Schilling C. Writing in Organizations: Purposes, Strategies & Processes. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc. 1987. Ogden, J. Developing A Creative and Innovative Integrated Marketing Communication Plan. New York: Prentice Hall, 1998. PR News: Guide to Best Practices in PR Measurement, http://www.prnewsonline.com, April 2008. Radford, M. L. Barnes, S.B., & Barr, L. R. Web Research: Selecting, evaluating and citing. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2002. Seitel, F. The Practice of Public Relations. Tenth Edition. Upper Saddle River: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2007. Sylvi, G., Wicks, J., Hollifield, A., Lacy, S. & Broadrick, A. Media Management: A Casebook Approach. 4th Edition. New York: Routledge, 2007. Wood. Marketing Plan: A Handbook with Marketing PlanPro. New York: Prentice Hall, 2003. 10) PREPARER'S NAME AND DATE: Lorra M. Brown, April 28, 2008 11) DEPARTMENT APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  24. 24. 24 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 511 Professional Seminar 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 511: Professional Seminar (3 credits) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: A series of lectures and seminars led by professional industry leaders in the public relations, media and communication fields. Senior executives from major corporations and firms will discuss topics and present cases relevant to the global public relations and integrated corporate communication industry. Students will complete a research study in a related communication area as part of their participation in this course. 2) COURSE PREREQUISITES: None 3) COURSE OBJECTIVES: a) Provide a venue for students to learn from senior industry leaders about opportunities, challenges and best practices in communication fields b) Illustrate the depth and breadth of global communication industries c) Present the opportunity for students to conduct a research study relevant to their career aspirations with the guidance of senior working professionals outside of academia 4) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES. STUDENTS WILL: a) Demonstrate an understanding of the scope of challenges and opportunities facing communication industries b) Be able to analyze and dissect case studies of major communication issues c) Produce a scholarly level research paper about a topic relevant to a professional communication industry d) Fine tune managerial and strategic thinking skills by interacting with senior level professionals 5) TOPICAL OUTLINES OF COURSE CONTENT: a) Guest speakers from range of communication industries will present case studies, discuss topics of relevance to the field, share best/worst practices in business, provide mentoring and networking opportunities to students i) Potential speakers include senior level professional communication executives from organizations including Fortune 500 corporations, network television, public relations firms, non-profit organizations, publishing, entertainment fields, financial institutions, sporting organizations, utility companies, transportation industry, etc. b) Research paper including comprehensive literature and original research regarding a professional communication issue / topic. Full outline of research requirements under separate cover. 6) GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Lectures / discussions
  25. 25. 25 b) Summaries and reviews of guest speakers including case analyses of various lecture topics c) Research paper 7) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): a) Case analyses of lecture topics B) Research Paper 8) SUGGESTED TEXTS AND MATERIALS: Handouts and cases from lecturers Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 4th Edition. Washington: American Psychological Association 9) BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS: Professional biographies of lecturers forthcoming. 10) PREPARER'S NAME AND DATE: Lorra M. Brown, April 22, 2008 11) DEPARTMENT APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  26. 26. 26 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 512 Organizational Communication 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 512: Organization Communication (3 credits) 2) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: This course provides a framework for analyzing organizational structures and processes, and a consideration of how they influence and are influenced by organizational communication activities. This course also prepares students to understand, analyze, and effectively participate in organizational life. Special emphasis in this summer course will be given to the role that communication plays in the management of organizational change in today’s organizations. 3) COURSE PREREQUISITES: COMS INTEGRATED COMMUNICATION 4) COURSE OBJECTIVES: Course objectives will be realized through the following student learning outcomes. Students will be: a) Familiar with literature that provides perspective on organization theory, organizational communication, and organizational change; b) Able to analyze an organization’s strategic, structural, and managerial responses to various environmental circumstances (e.g., dramatic changes in communication and technology) and the incongruencies in those aspects of organization that impinge on its ability to operate effectively; and c) Aware of the complexity and dynamism involved knowledge of computer-mediated communication’s role in small groups. 5) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES. By the end of the semester, students will be able to do the following: a) To evaluate the importance of theories in the development of knowledge about organizational communication b) Locate and evaluate original research about organization communication. c) Critically evaluate organizational theories in terms of strength, weakness, and contribution to the discipline d) Apply organizational theories to a critical analysis of their own organization e) Write a scholarly paper demonstrating an understanding of organizational theory and/or practice f) Locate and manage information in the library and the internet. g) Apply oral and presentational skills through an individual presentation. h) Demonstrate the ability to work with others i) Exercise interpersonal skills through discussions and collaborative work with peers. 6) TOPICAL OUTLINE OF COURSE CONTENT a) Introduction to Organizational Communication b) Organizations and organization theory
  27. 27. 27 c) Thinking creatively about organizational metaphors d) Strategy, organizational design and effectiveness i) Organizational purpose and structural design ii) Fundamentals of org’l structure iii) External environment e) Open System Design Elements i) Inter-organizational relationships ii) Designing organizations for the international environment f) Internal Design Elements i) Manufacturing and service technologies ii) Organization, size, life cycle, and decline g) Managing Dynamic Processes i) Organizational culture and ethical values ii) Innovation and change iii) Decision-making processes iv) Conflict, power and politics 7) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENTS LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Lectures and discussions will be supplemented with experiential learning activities and collaborative work. b) Readings and exercises c) Papers 8) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES) a) Participation in lectures and discussions b) Readings, assignments c) Case study paper (s) exploring an organizational communication challenge i) Literature review ii) Case analysis and integration iii) Organization analysis paper d) Portfolio 9) SUGGESTED READINGS, TEXTS, OBJECTS OF STUDY: Daft, R. L. (2006). Organization Theory and Design (8th Ed). Mason, Ohio: Thomson South- Western. Other readings, all available from journals in online databases: Cramton, C. D. (2002). Finding common ground in dispersed collaboration. Organizational Dynamics, 30(4), 356-367.
  28. 28. 28 Daft, R. L. (1983). Learning the craft of organizational research. Academy of Management Review, 8(4), 539-546. Grosse, C. U. (2002). Managing communication within virtual intercultural teams. Business Communication Quarterly, 65 (4), 22-38. Madsen. A. (2001). Management metaphors. Available online at http://www.strategic.innovation.dk/Engelsk/E-metaph.html 10) PREPARER’S NAME AND DATE: Sharmila Pixy Ferris, May 2001 11) ORIGINAL DEPARTMENTAL APPROVAL DATE: May 2001 12) REVISER’S NAME AND DATE: Sharmila Pixy Ferris, April 2008 13) DEPARTMENTAL REVISION APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  29. 29. 29 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 620 Strategic Public Relations Management 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 620: Strategic Public Relations Management (3 credits) 2) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: Corporate communication and public relations professionals create programming against business objectives as well as communication objectives within an organization. Students will learn how to successfully work within the increasingly blurred lines of the marketing mix (advertising, marketing, promotion, sales, public relations, public affairs, investor relations, etc.). Students will learn to effectively create, present and lead integrated public relations and marketing programming. They will learn how to manage accounts, employees, C-suite executives (Chief Executive Officers, Chief Marketing Officers, Chief Financial Officers, Chief Operating Officers), members of the media, marketing partners, finances, clients and business leaders within a professional organization. Case studies, guest speakers and many role-play scenarios will contribute to the strategic and critical thinking development in this course. 3) COURSE PREREQUISITES: COM Integrated Communication 4) COURSE OBJECTIVES: a) Generate an understanding beyond tactical components of public relations to a more strategic approach of public relations and corporate communication management b) To allow graduate level students to develop strategic public relations skills in high level areas of crisis and issues management, programming, internal and external communication c) To strengthen writing skills, especially in the areas of research based programming and proposal development d) To use case studies as a discussion bases for determining proper public relations strategies in a variety of situations e) To illustrate the importance of public relations and corporate communication as part of the overall integrated marketing mix 5) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES. UPON COMPLETION OF THE COURSE STUDENTS WILL: a) Understand how to effectively manage people: clients, peers, bosses, subordinates, prospects b) Improve management techniques in key public relations areas as reputation management, integrated marketing and crisis communications c) Employ a skillful use of primary and secondary research including audience and business analysis and targeting to drive development of strategic integrated marketing communication planning
  30. 30. 30 d) Effectively create, present and lead integrated public relations and marketing programming for a major organization e) Develop tools needed for developing and presenting comprehensive, effective and measureable plans that incorporate all marketing disciplines and distribution channels 6) TOPICAL OUTLINES OF COURSE CONTENT: a) Managing in contemporary organizations i) Managerial communication processes ii) Impact of technology on managing iii) Management and leadership functions of public relations iv) Managing and motivating from entry level to the C-Suite v) Client service b) Public relations and corporate communications within an organization i) Strategic planning and research (1) Creating the framework: Objectives, Audiences, Strategies, Tactical Execution, Budgeting, Metrics/Measurement, Timelines and Staffing Models ii) Employee & Internal relations iii) Community relations iv) Investor relations v) Public affairs vi) Crisis and issues management vii) Consumer relations and marketing communication viii) Global public relations management ix) Ethics and laws c) Business development & presentations d) Budget and account management 7) GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Lectures b) Guest speakers c) Case analyses d) Group and individual project work e) Written and oral program project, including research element f) Exercises and role play scenarios 8) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): a) Quizzes / Tests b) Group and individual project work c) Program including research elements, written and oral presentation d) Case analyses e) Participation and leadership in discussions 9) SUGGESTED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:
  31. 31. 31 Austin E., & Pinkleton, B. Strategic Public Relations Management: Planning and Managing Effective Communication Programs. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2001. Chappel, T. Managing Upside Down: The Seven Intentions of Value Centered Leadership. New York: Morrow, 1999. Goldstein, N. The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law. Cambridge: Perseus Publishing, 2000. Harris, T. Value Added Public Relations. New York: McGraw Hill, 2000. Marriott, J.W. & Brown, K. The Spirit to Serve: Marriott’s Way. New York: Harper Collins, 1997. Smith, R. Strategic Planning for Public Relations Management, 2nd Edition, New York: Routledge, 2004. Handouts, articles and cases from PRSA.org, Holmes Report, PR News, PR Tactics, PR Strategist, Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, etc. 10) BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS: Barrett, D. Leadership Communication. New York: McGraw Hill, 2006. Belch G. & Belch, M. Advertising & Promotion: An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective. 7th Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2007. Buckingham M. & Coffman, C. First Break all the Rules: What the World’s Great Managers Do Differently. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1999. Bullmore, J. Behind the Scenes in Advertising (Mark III): Brands, Business & Beyond. 3rd Edition. United Kingdom: World Advertising Research Center, 2003. Diggs-Brown, B. The PR Styleguide: Formats for Public Relations Practice. 2nd Edition. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2007. Doorley J. & Garcia, F. Reputation Management: The Key to Successful Public Relations and Corporate Communication. New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2007. Goodman, M. Write to the Point: Effective Communication in the Workplace. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1984 Hansen-Horn, T. & Neff, B. Public Relations from Theory to Practice. Boston: Pearson, 2008.
  32. 32. 32 nd Hattersley, M. & McJannet, L. Management Communication. 2 Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2005. Hynes, G. Managerial Communication. 3rd Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2005 L’Etang, J. & Pieczka, M. Public Relations: Critical Debates & Contemporary Practice. London: Routledge, 2006. Ogden, J. Developing A Creative and Innovative Integrated Marketing Communication Plan. New York: Prentice Hall, 1998. Peter, P. & Donnelly, J. Marketing Management. 8th Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2007. PR News: Guide to Best Practices in PR Measurement, http://www.prnewsonline.com, April 2008. Seitel, F. The Practice of Public Relations, Tenth Edition. Upper Saddle River: Pearson, 2007. Swann, P. Cases in Public Relations Management. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008 Sylvi, G., Wicks, J., Hollifield, A., Lacy, S. & Broadrick, A. Media Management: A Casebook Approach. 4th Edition. New York: Routledge, 2007. Van Riel, C. & Fombrun, C. Essentials of Corporate Communication. New York: Routledge, 2007. Van Ruler, B., Vercic, A, & Vercic, D. Public Relations Metrics: Research & Evaluation. Amsterdam: Routledge, 2008. 11) PREPARER’S NAME AND DATE: Lorra M. Brown, April 20, 2008 12) DEPARTMENT APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  33. 33. 33 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 610 Writing for Digital Media 1) TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 610: Writing for Digital Media (3 credits) 2) DESCRIPTION OF COURSE: Examines the art and craft of writing for digital media, including forms and limitations of the online and broadcast environment. The course will examine how the evolution of digital media has changed both the structure and marketplace of traditional media. Students will write for digital media outlets created for the class. 3) COURSE PREREQUISITES: Survey in Professional Writing 4) COURSE OBJECTIVES: a) Systematically examine digital media topics and venues to expose students to the range of the online and broadcast environment including content and context in a global marketplace b) Explore the history and evolution of digital media and its relevance to contemporary society c) Teach theory as foundations of as the basis for developing professional and academic level critical thinking abilities and writing skills across all technological areas d) Generate an understanding of the purpose, strategies, styles and structures, writing for various digital media venues including television, radio, Internet e) Help students develop a body of written work to advance professional aspirations f) Expose students to case studies and real-world examples of digital writing 5) STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES. AT THE END OF THE COURSE STUDENTS WILL: a) Understand and articulate historical foundations, technological advancements and business milestones that have led to contemporary digital media in a global marketplace b) Be able to dissect and analyze various forms of digital media for content, purpose, audience, writing style and structure c) Provide comprehensive written critiques, evaluations and recommendations for improvement of cases and real-world examples of digital media writing d) Understand various forms and limitations of writing for digital media e) Apply technical writing skills across a variety of digital media venues including production of a body of work to use in a professional portfolio f) Become proficient editors of digital media writing with consideration for structure, content, clarity and purpose 6) TOPICAL OUTLINES OF COURSE CONTENT: a) The changing news & business environment i) Context: History, philosophies, technology ii) Impact on business
  34. 34. 34 (1) Professional writing style, content (2) Social and cultural iii) Keeping current in a global society (1) International & global media systems b) Review of writing styles and purposes i) Media problems and pressures ii) What makes news now? iii) Convergence iv) News, marketing, mass communication professions and writing c) Management and resource allocation i) Multi-media applications, approaches: beyond the basics (1) Print, radio, television, web, text news, podcasting, etc. (2) Fundamentals of writing (3) Digital writing: implications and applications beyond news media (business, marketing, education) (4) Analyzing existing digital writing and venues: case studies d) The Web i) Analysis of sources, sites, databases ii) Applications of styles, content purpose, audiences, strategies, content, design iii) Self-editing iv) Ethics and law v) Web best practices and cases 7) GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES: a) Lectures / discussions b) Exercises / Field work – using real world cases, students must utilize professional quality digital writing skills for various business scenarios c) Case summaries/critiques – students develop a proficiency in reviewing and culling pertinent information while evaluating credibility, audiences, purpose and effectiveness of digital writing in various settings d) Literature review / research paper – Review of existing research / writing about topic of interest relating to digital media. Paper should provide a solid foundation for future research or professional endeavors e) Portfolio development – culmination of research, written and edited materials 8) GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): a) Exams b) Critical analysis papers c) Writing exercises and assignments d) Literature review / research paper e) Oral and written presentation f) Portfolio of written work
  35. 35. 35 9) SUGGESTED TEXTS AND MATERIALS: Handouts, case studies Dewdney, A. & Ride, P. The New Media Handbook. New York: Routledge, 2006. Goldstein, N. The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law. Cambridge: Perseus Publishing, 2000. Ryan, M. & Tankard, J. Writing for Print & Digital Media. New York: McGraw Hill, 2005. Whittaker, J. Web Production for Writers & Journalists. 2nd Edition. London: Routledge, 2002. 10) BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS: Dominkick, J. The Dynamics of Mass Communication: Media in a Digital Age. Tenth Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2009. Hanson, J. & Maxcy, D. Sources: Notable Selections in Mass Media. New York: McGraw Hill, 1999. Harris. Prentice Hall Reference Guide for Professional Writing. New York: Prentice Hall, 2007. Hattersley, M. & McJannet, L. Management Communication. 2nd Edition. New York: McGraw Hill, 2005. Meeske, M. Copywriting for the Electronic Media: A Practical Guide. 6th Edition, Boston: Thomson Wadsworth, 2009. Ramage, Bean & Johnson. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing. 4th Edition. New York: Longman, 2006. Reinking & von der Osten. Strategies for Successful Writing: A Rhetoric, Research Guide, Reader and Handbook. 8th Edition. New York: Prentice Hall, 2007. Strunk, Williams, and e.b.White. The Elements of Style. 3rd Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 1980. Thompson, R. Writing for Broadcast Journalists. 2nd Edition. New York: Routledge, 2004. 11) PREPARER'S NAME AND DATE: Lorra M. Brown, April 28, 2008 12) DEPARTMENT APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  36. 36. 36 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 615 Digital Communication Applications 1. TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 615: Digital Communication Applications (3 credits) 2. DESCRIPTION OF COURSE CONSISTENT WITH THE WPU CATALOG: This course introduces students to the tools and terminology necessary for communication in an increasingly digitized professional environment. Students are prepared to create, edit and archive digital video, text and audio documents. 3. COURSE PREEQUISITES: NONE 4. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this course is to introduce students to digital communication applications. Student will: a) understand the intersection of professional communication and document design b) survey a range of professional digital communication projects c) evaluate the effectiveness of digital communication projects in the professional environment 5. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: By the end of the course students will be able to do the following: a) identify standard tools used in digital communication b) recognize and effectively use terms relevant for digital communication c) effectively produce and edit digital still images d) effectively produce and edit digital video images e) effectively produce and edit digital audio f) understand fundamental aspects of producing a website and blog 6. TOPICAL OUTLINE OF COURSE CONTENT Week 1 Introduction to the course Week 2 Digital Images / Sounds – Image Resolution Sample Rate File Formats Compression Principals of Communication Design
  37. 37. 37 Readings: Paul Rand – Excerpts from Design Form and Chaos Richard Saul Wurman – Excerpts from Information Design Lev Manovich – Excerpt from The Language of New Media Week 3 Photoshop: Still Image editing Week 4 Photoshop: Still Image Editing Review Key Imaging Terms Week 5 Exercise 1 Due Pro Tools: Audio Editing Week 6 Audacity: Audio Editing Review Key Audio Terms Week 7 Exercise 2 Due Final Cut Pro Video Editing Week 8 iMovie: Video Editing Exercise 3 Due Week 9 Dreamweaver: HTML/ Web Tools Week 10 Coding in Microsoft Word HTML/ Web Tools
  38. 38. 38 Week 11 Exercise 4 Due Final Project Development Week 12 Final Project Development Week 13 Final Project Development Week 14 Final Project Development Week 15 Final Project Presentation 7. GUIDELIINE/ SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES This course will use a combination of lectures and collaborative production assignments. 8. GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES) Key Terms Students will be given a list of key terms relevant for each mode of production. These terms could include file formats, current software titles and emerging compact media. Students will be periodically quizzed on the key terms. Production Exercises Students will be assigned production exercises focusing on specific areas of production. The production project will be demonstrated in class and later developed outside of class time. The semester will end with a large-scale project incorporating a combination of techniques developed and concepts developed during the semester. The production exercises will be graded based on technical execution and conceptual integration. Essay and Interview Readings Students will be assigned a series of essays written by and interviews with information designers. These texts will be used to inform the choices made when using digital communication applications. Students will be expected to discuss these ideas in the context of their own production work.
  39. 39. 39 9. SUGGESTED READINGS, TEXTS, OBJECTS OF STUDY Required Texts: Multimedia: Making It Work (2007), Mc Graw-Hill Osborne, 7th edition, Tay Vaughn Document Design: A Guide for Technical Communicators (2008), Bedford/ St. Martin’s, First Edition, Miles A. Kimball and Ann R. Hawkins Information Design Website < http://www.informationdesign.org > 10. BIBILIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS 11. PREPARER’S NAME AND DATE: Keith Obadike , 4/28/2008 12. DEPARTMENTAL APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  40. 40. 40 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 710 Advanced Topics in Professional Writing 1. TITLE OR COURSE, AND NUMBER: COMS 710: Advanced Topics in Professional Writing 2. CREDITS: 3 3. DESCRIPTION: Explores selected topics in greater detail, determined by current events or faculty interest, such as, but not limited to, international media, public relations, feature writing, technical writing, writing for radio and television, etc. 4. COURSE PREREQUISITE; None 5. COURSE OBJECTIVES: a. Study form and function of professionally written articles, public relations material, radio and television news, etc. b. Examine the legal and ethical responsibilities of the writers in these settings. c. Study the importance of deadlines, accuracy and clarity. d. Study the use of electronic news gathering tools. e. Examine the settings and conditions under which professionals in these areas work. 6. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of the semester a student will: a. Write in the style of a professional journalist, public relations practitioner, radio or television writer, etc. b. Produce professional material specific to the semester’s topic, sucb as news articles, a press packet, a radio or television news report. c. Discuss pertinent and current issues specific to the semester’s topic. d. Understand the role of ethics and law specific to the semester’s topic e. Edit and copy edit the material according to the professional standards specific to the semester’s topic 7. TOPICAL OUTLINES OR COURSE CONTENT: Depending on the semester’s topic: a. Media law and ethics b. Editing c. Interviewing d. News gathering e. Online research and reporting f. Format and structure g. Action plans in public relations
  41. 41. 41 h. Professional roles and responsibilities i. 8. GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT: Assessment activities will include writing assignments, tests, quizzes, oral presentations and projects. 9. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Bivins, Thomas H. Public Relations Writing: The Essentials of Style. New York: McGraw Hill, 2007. Block, Mervin, Writing Broadcast News: Shorter, Sharper, Stronger. Bonus Books, 1997. (JMSC) Christians, Clifford G., Mark Fackler, Kim B. Rotzoll, and Kathy Brittain McKee. Media Ethics: Cases & Moral Reasoning 6th edition. New York: Longman, 2001. Friedlander, Edward; John Lee. Feature Writing for Newspapers and Magazines., 5th edition. Allyn & Bacon, 2003. Hilliard, Robert L. Writing for Television and Radio. 9th edition, 2008. Parsons, Patricia J. Ethics in Public Relations. Kogan, 2008. Rystrom, Kenneth. The Why, Who and How of the Editorial Page. 4th Ed., State College, PA: Strata Publishing, 2004. Smith, Ronald D. Becoming a Public Relations Writer: A Writing Process Workbook for the Profession, 2007. Swann, Patricia. Cases in Public Relations Management. McGraw- Hill, 2007. Tuggle, C.A., Forrest Carr and Suzanne Huffman. Broadcast News Handbook: Writing, Reporting, Producing in a Converging Media World, 3rd edition. McGraw Hill Publishing Co., 2007. Wilcox, Dennis L. Pubic Relations Strategies and Tactics: New Jersey: Pearson, 2007. Zelezney, John. Communications Law. New York: Cengage Learning, 2006. 10. PREPARER’S NAME AND DATE: Elizabeth Birge, Oct. 16, 2008 11. DEPARTMENTAL APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  42. 42. 42 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 609 Leadership and Teamwork 1. TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 609: Leadership and Teamwork 2. CREDITS: 3 3. DESCRIPTION OF COURSE CONSISTENT WITH THE WPU CATALOG: This course enables students to acquire advanced theoretical knowledge and applied skills in the areas of teamwork and leadership. The course provides a dual focus with a theoretical survey of, and practical experience in, both team processes and leadership theories and practice. Specifically, the course will examine the factors that affect team performance and leadership, and prepare students to acquire and practice effective team and leadership skills. The course is also designed to provide students with opportunities to understand and refine their ability to work in teams (including interpersonal communication, agenda management, problem- solving and decision-making, and conflict resolution) and to acquire and practice leadership skills in the workplace 4. COURSE PREREQUISITES: None 5. COURSE OBJECTIVES This course will enable students to acquire advanced theoretical knowledge and applied skills in the area of group communication and leadership. Specifically, the goals of this course are: • To understand the history of leadership and small group theory and practice. • To teach the importance of theories in the development of knowledge about small group communication and leadership. • To better appreciate the roles of leadership and group communication in society. • To provide realistic situations in which students can develop skill at participation in problem- solving and decision-making groups. • To provide students with opportunities to acquire the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to small groups, including, but not limited to problem-solving and decision-making, conflict management and effective participation. • To provide students with opportunities to acquire the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to leadership, including, but not limited to competent leadership communication, task, maintenance and socio-emotional functions, conflict management and effective participation. • To provide students with opportunities to learn and practice skills at selecting appropriate responses to various colleague behaviors in task groups. • To provide students with opportunities to acquire theoretical knowledge of computer-mediated communication’s role in small groups. 6. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the semester, students will be able to do the following: • To evaluate the importance of theories in the development of knowledge about communication
  43. 43. 43 • Locate and evaluate original research about leadership and small group communication. • Critically evaluate leadership and group theories in terms of strength, weakness, and contribution to the discipline, as demonstrated in an Applied Analysis paper. • Write a scholarly paper demonstrating an understanding of group and leadership theory. • Locate and manage information in the library and the internet. • Apply oral and presentational skills as a Discussion Leader and through an individual presentation. • To demonstrate the ability to work with others in an ongoing group problem-solving project. • To exercise interpersonal skills through class discussions and collaborative work with peers. • To develop the ability to critically evaluate group and leadership theories in terms of their strengths, weaknesses, and contributions to the discipline, as demonstrated by the selection and presentation of a primary research article. 7. TOPICAL OUTLINE OF COURSE CONTENT Week 1: Introduction to the course & Introduction to each other. Leadership and teamwork. Sign up for dates for Study guides and articles Teamwork: Theory and practice Week 2: The nature of teams and team communication Week 3: Introduction to group theory. Week 4: Team development Week 5: Conflict Management Week 6: Decision making and problem-solving Week 7: Begin group problem-solving project Week 8: Leadership in teams Group theory and Leadership theory Week 10: Introduction to leadership Week 11: Traditional views of leadership Week 12:Leadership skills Week 13: Theories of leadership + Time for review and work on problem-solving project Tying it all up: Applications Week 14:: Presentation of Applied analysis papers + Exam review Due: Applied analysis papers Week 15:: Exam Week 16: Grades reviewed and exams returned.
  44. 44. 44 Group project report due 8. GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENTS LEARNING ACTIVITIES Lectures and discussions will be supplemented with experiential learning activities and collaborative work. 9. GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): Assignments are described briefly below. More detailed descriptions of assignments will be provided in class. Please note that this course presumes that students have both writing and research competency. All papers must be written in APA format1 . It is expected that students can meet the commonly accepted standards of good writing. These not only include clear and appropriate language, and correct grammar, punctuation and spelling, but also include clarity, cohesion, and appropriate use of scholarly research to support opinions. Students' writing should also be clear and focused, organized logically, and clearly reasoned. Poor writing will affect students' grades. Students who need help with their writing should regularly visit WPUNJ's excellent Writing Center, in the Atrium. a. Group project To provide an opportunity to apply leadership and group theories, the major assignment in this course is a group problem-solving project culminating in a written report. Because of the time constraints of the class, a To expedite the process, a choice of one of two case studies will be provided in class so that the group can focus on the solving the problem. Format for the report is attached. While the group report receives one grade, to ensure equity, individual grades may be affected by students’ evaluation of each others performance. This assignment is worth 30% of the course grade. b. Applied analysis. This assignment allows students to reflect critically on a selected group or leadership theory by conducting an applied analysis of a film. Students may select any suitable 1 Brief Overview of APA format APA format is covered in the APA manual, which students are advised to buy and use. For the purposes of written assignments, please keep the following in mind. • Every page, including title page, must contain a Running Head and consecutive page number. • All text must be double-spaced (throughout the paper). • Every page should have at least a one inch margin all around. • Only one side of the page should be used. • Material from outside sources must be acknowledged using APA format. In brief, this means citing the author(s) name(s) and date of publication in the text, and adding a Reference page to your paper. The Reference page should be arranged alphabetically, and must provide complete bibliographic information according to APA format. To avoid possibilities of error, please refer to the APA style manual before submitting your papers.
  45. 45. 45 theory to the critical analysis of a film viewed in class. (Some possibilities are The Breakfast Club, Apollo 13, 12 Angry Men, and 13 Days.) The 3-10 page paper should be a focused analysis which clearly develops a central thesis that is a critical reflection of the selected theory. This assignment is worth 25% of the course grade c. Discussion Leader Students will sign up to serve as Discussion Leader for one chapter. Discussion Leaders’ responsibilities include the following: a) Preparation of a Study Guide for the chapter (modeled on the Study Guides provided by the professor in the first half of the class). Copies should be provided for all classmates. b) Location of a (primary) scholarly research article on their selected chapter (the article must be obtained from the library rather than the Internet). ). Copies should be provided for all classmates. c) Guiding the discussion (after the lecture portion of the class, which will be led by your professor. Students are in no way responsible for teaching course material). Discussion Leaders should have the knowledge to answer their prepared questions, but should focus primarily to encourage discussion. This assignment is worth 20% of the course grade Grade breakdown Group Project: 30% Discussion Leader: 20% Applied analysis : 25% Exam : 25% [ Note that participation is expected. Failure to participate will result in a lowered final grade, at the discretion of the instructor.] 10. SUGGESTED READINGS, TEXTS, OBJECTS OF STUDY Hirokawa, R. H., & Poole, M. S. (1996). Communication and group decision making. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Barge, J. K. (1994). Leadership: Communication skills for organizations and groups. New York: St. Martin’s Press. 11. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS AND OTHER MATERIALS Burns, J. M. (2002). Transforming Leadership: A New Pursuit of Happiness. Grove Press. Conger, J. A. (1992). Learning to Lead: The Art of Transforming Managers into Leaders. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Fisher, B. Aubrey. (1990). Small Group Decision Making: Communication and the Group Process. New York: McGraw Hill.
  46. 46. 46 Gardenswartz, L.,& Rowe, A. (1994). Diverse Teams at Work: Capitalizing on the Power of Diversity. Chicago, IL: Irwin Professional Publishing. Glacel, B. P. & Robert, Jr., E. A. (1996). Light Bulbs for Leaders: A Guidebook for Team Learning. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Hamlin, J. (1990). The Small Group Leaders Training Course: Trainer’s Manual and Participant"s Manual. Colorado Springs, Colo.: NavPress, Hart, P. T. (1994). Groupthink in Government: A Study of Small Groups and Policy Failure. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. Hofstede, G.(1996). Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. Kotter, J. P. (1996). Leading Change. Boston: Harvard School Press. Kouzes, J. M., & Posner, B. Z. (2003). The Leadership Challenge, Credibility, Encouraging the Heart (3rd Ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Lencionia, P. (2002). The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Morrison, A. M. (1992). The New Leaders: Guidelines on Leadership Diversity in America. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Scholtes, P. R. (1998). The Leader's Handbook. New York: McGraw Hill. Simons, G. F., Vasquez, C., & Harris, P. R. (1993). Transcultural Leadership: Empowering the Diverse Workforce. Houston, TX: Gulf Publishing. Kenwyn, S., & Berg, D. (1990). Paradoxes of Group Life: Understanding Conflict, Paralysis, and Movement in Group Dynamics. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Tropman, J. E. (). Making Meetings Work: Achieving High Quality Group Decisions. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Uhlfelder, H. F. (1995). Group Dynamics and Group Process. Atlanta, GA: Miller Howard Consulting Group. Wilke, H.A.M. (1994). Group Performance. New York: Routledge. Williams, D.(1991). Seven Myths About Small Groups. Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press. 12. PREPARER’S NAME AND DATE: Sharmila Pixy Ferris, April 2008
  47. 47. 47 13. ORIGINAL DEPARTMENTAL APPROVAL DATE: April 2008 14. REVISER’S NAME AND DATE: Sharmila Pixy Ferris, April 2008 15. DEPARTMENTAL REVISION APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  48. 48. 48 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 613 Applications for Website Creation 1. TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 613: Applications for Website Creation 2. DESCRIPTION OF COURSE CONSISTENT WITH THE WPU CATALOG: This course introduces students to the tools and terminology necessary for communication in an increasingly digitized professional environment. Students are prepared to create and edit web sites as well as to make use of current online social networking applications. 3. COURSE PREEQUISITES: NONE 4. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this course is to introduce students to web design techniques and applications. Students will: a. understand the intersection of professional communication and web design b. survey a range of professional web design projects c. evaluate the effectiveness of web design projects in the professional environment 5. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: By the end of the course students will be able to do the following: a. identify standard tools used in web design and online social networking b. recognize and effectively use terms relevant for web design c. effectively produce and edit web sites d. effectively use online social networking applications in a professional environment 6. TOPICAL OUTLINE OF COURSE CONTENT Week 1 Introduction to the course History of the Internet Site Review 1 Week 2 Function and Design in Web 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 Introduction to HTML and XHTML Text, Color, Size and Links
  49. 49. 49 Week 3 Introduction to Photoshop Image Editing and Placement File Types Creating Animated GIFs Site Review Student Guided Tour Week 4 CSS Page Layout Tables Layers Week 5 Working in Dreamweaver Organizing Work Flow PHP Student Guided Tour Week 6 Adding Audio Ogg Vorbis MP3 Quicktime Windows Media Flash Site Review Week 7 Adding Video Quicktime Windows Media Flash Student Guided Tour Week 8 Roll Over images FTP
  50. 50. 50 Frames Flash Programming Continued Week 9 Working with Wikis RSS Site Review Student Guided Tour Week 10 Social Networking Applications Myspace Facebook imeem Twitter LinkedIn Flickr Goodreads LastFM Publr Wordpress Xanga Seesmic tumblr Site Review Week 11 Lifestreaming Swurl Sweetcron Soup.io Social Book marking Delicious Digg Reddit Webcasting/Media Sharing Google Video Blip.tv Youtube Daily Motion
  51. 51. 51 Veoh Vimeo Week 12 Site Review Final Project Development Week 13 Site Review Final Project Development Week 14 Site Review Final Project Development Week 15 Final Project Presentation 7. GUIDELIINE/ SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES This course will use a combination of lectures, site tours/demonstrations, and collaborative production assignments. 8. GUIDELINES / SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES) Guided Tours Students will lead in-class guided tours of self-selected sites related to specific production techniques and class discussions. Production Exercises Students will be assigned exercises focusing on specific areas of production. The production project will be demonstrated in class and later developed outside of class time. The semester will end with a large-scale project incorporating a combination of techniques and concepts developed during the semester. The production exercises will be graded based on technical execution and conceptual integration. 9. SUGGESTED READINGS, TEXTS, OBJECTS OF STUDY Required Texts: Castro, E. (2006). HTML, XHTML, and CSS. Berkeley: Peachpit Press.
  52. 52. 52 Negrino, T & Smith, D. (2007) Dreamweaver CS3 for Windows and Macintosh. Berkeley: Peachpit Press. 10. BIBILIOGRAPHY OF SUPPORTIVE TEXTS Gantenbein, D. (2008) Web 2.0 marketing for businesses: What it can do for You. Retrieved from http://www.microsoft.com/midsizebusiness/web-v2-marketing-for- businesses.mspx Richards, J. (2007, October 24). Web 3.0 and beyond: The next 20 years of the Internet. Times Online. Retrieved from <http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/the_web/article2726 190.ece> Shuen, A. (2008) Web 2.0: A strategy guide: Business thinking and strategies behind successful Web 2.0 implementations. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reily Media, Inc. Weber, L. (2007). Marketing to the social web: How digital customer communities build your business. Hoboken: Wiley Press. 11. PREPARER’S NAME AND DATE: Keith Obadike , October 15, 2008 12. DEPARTMENTAL APPROVAL DATE: November 4, 2008
  53. 53. 53 COURSE OUTLINE: COMS 621 Global Communication 1. TITLE OF COURSE AND COURSE NUMBER: COMS 621: Global Communication 2. CREDITS: 3 3. DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSE: This course examines media content, structure, and regulation globally in comparison to U.S. media, as well as the social and political effects of media in international settings. 4. COURSE PREREQUISITES: None. 5. COURSE OBJECTIVES: After successful completion of this course, students should be able to: a. Describe and analyze different political economies of the press and how they affect regulation, ownership, and content of the media around the world b. Describe and analyze various types of media ownership and regulation in different blocs of nations c. Describe and analyze issues pertaining to the flow of news, information, and media products activities around the world d. Compare and analyze the behaviors of multinational media corporations e. Compare and analyze the uses and social, economic, political, and cultural ramifications of cross-national media content and technology f. Apply knowledge of the above as communication professionals in international settings g. Outline and discuss general current and future global media trends in the context of professional communication 6. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: After successful completion of this course, students will be able to: a. effectively express in written and oral forms their academic and applied understanding of theories, issues, and case studies in comparative political economy of media, media globalization and international relations, and international professional communication; b. develop and conduct their own case studies and professional communication projects in international settings;
  54. 54. 54 c. analyze and use corporate, journalistic, and academic research materials pertaining to professional communication in the global environment; d. relate some aspects of their work in this course to comparable aspects of their work in professional communication and or further graduate studies in this area. 7. TOPICAL OUTLINE OF THE COURSE CONTENT: Different sections of this course may differ in the amount of time spent in studying the various aspects of mass communication. However, all sections of this course will include the following broad areas to be discussed as follows: a. a analytical survey of comparative political economy of media and how they affect regulation, ownership, and content of the media around the world b. a analytical survey of various types of media ownership and regulation in different blocs of nations c. a critical analysis of issues pertaining to the flow of news, information, and media products or activities around the world d. a critical analysis of the behaviors of multinational media corporations e. a critical analysis of the uses and social, economic, political, and cultural ramifications of cross-national media content and technology f. application of knowledge of the above as communication professionals in international settings 8. GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING METHODS AND STUDENTS LEARNING ACTIVITIES: A combination of teaching methods will be employed: Lectures and class discussions will be regularly supplemented by required readings, supervised case studies, written assignments that include international communication project development, in-class group work or collaborative learning exercises, oral presentations, and the use of multiple media forms. 9. GUIDELINES/SUGGESTIONS FOR METHODS OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT (STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES): Assessment of student learning should be multi-pronged. Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) may be used on a regular basis to assess in-class learning. Major assignments addressing the topical areas outlined in section 6 should contribute significantly to the course grade. In-class examinations do not establish the sole measure of learning. A sample grade distribution follows: Attendance/class discussions and contribution to required in-class exercises .... 20 %

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