GRIFFITH BUSINESS SCHOOL DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT
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    GRIFFITH BUSINESS SCHOOL DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT GRIFFITH BUSINESS SCHOOL DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT Document Transcript

    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 GRIFFITH BUSINESS SCHOOL DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills Campus on which Course is offered Nathan Program/s for which Course is Designed: Bachelor of Commerce Status of Course within Program/s or Elective: Human Resource Management Major Academic Plan/s General elective: Bachelor of Commerce Credit Point Value: 10CP Year and Semester of Offer: Semester 2, 2004 Pre-requisites: 1016MGT Business Communication or an equivalent course. However, students may study Business Communication and HR Training and Development concurrently Prior Assumed: Incompatible Courses FF13H60, FF12H40, OBH3004, MGT3014 Group Facilitation and Training Offered: Night – even years / Day – odd years Course Convenor: Arthur Poropat Building: N50 (Business) Room: 0.12 Telephone: (07) 3875 7757 Arthur.Poropat@Griffith.edu.au Teaching Team: To be advised Date Course Outline was last modified: July 2004 Page 1
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 1. Objectives Training and development is a core activity of the human resource function, and the Karpin Report (Karpin, 1995) identified the need for management skills in training and development as an important factor that needs to be addressed to ensure the future economic growth in Australia. The effectiveness of employees and organisations is to a large extent dependent upon having well-targeted and high quality training. This becomes more important as job requirements change, especially in response to globalisation and economic restructuring, requiring an upgrading of knowledge and skills for large numbers of the workforce. Indeed, staff training and development is currently undergoing rapid growth in Australia, in part because of these ongoing pressures. This course, therefore, is intended to provide future managers and human resource practitioners with the ability to effectively contribute to this key aspect of our society. The technologies of providing training are relatively complex, and extensive. This course will provide initial learning in this important human resource activity. The central questions to be addressed in this course are: a) What are the major theories relating to adult learning and training? b) What are the processes which assist and hinder the effectiveness of training? c) Which training methods lead to effective individual and organisational learning? In order to address these questions, this course will develop students’ theoretical understandings and practical skills in training and development processes. The course covers practical application of key concepts in training and development, adult learning theories and principles, and individual development, while focusing on the critical issues of training and skills development faced by today's organisations as they strive to meet the changing needs of their competitive environments. Overall Aim The overall aim of this course is for students to learn how to practically apply relevant concepts and research findings to training and development processes. Specific Objectives By the end of this course, students should be able to effectively: 1. Explain how concepts derived from theories and research on learning and development, can be practically linked to training methods and techniques 2. Conduct training needs analyses and learning assessments that are consistent with the Australian Training System, and with best practice in training and development generally 3. Apply a range of methods and techniques for training 4. Plan and implement training activities, with sufficient preparation and flexibility to be able to respond to unforeseen occurrences during training 5. Evaluate their own, and others’, training exercises, by providing accurate and detailed observation of training processes, and appropriate application of relevant literature and research 6. Reflect on their own experiences of learning and training, and identify practical approaches for improving their own effectiveness as learners and trainers Page 2
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 2. Interrelationship of the Course with Other Course/s and Program/s This course provides a developmental link between two other courses, Business Communication and Organisational Change and Development. It is also linked to the course Organisational Process, which has a component which focuses on learning processes. Business Communication teaches the theories and skills of one-to-one interaction within an organisational setting, many of which will be built upon in this course. Organisational Change and Development addresses issues and teaches skills related to intervening in organisations, often through training and development activities. 3. Brief Description This course develops theoretical understandings and practical skills in training and development processes. It covers the principles and practice training, adult learning theories and principles, and individual and organisational development. The course focus is on the critical issues of training and skills development faced by today's organisations as they strive to meet the changing needs of their competitive environments. 4. Content Week Information Presentation Readings Workshop Activity 1 Course Overview Smith (1998) – Chapter 1 2 Theories of Learning and Smith (1998) – Chapter 3 Personality & Learning Development Styles 3 The Australian Training Smith (1998) – Chapter 2 Group Formation System 4 Training Needs Analysis Smith (1998) – Chapter 5 Training Needs Analysis 5 Assessment of Learning Smith (1998) – Chapter 8 Use of training equipment & resources 6 Training Methods I: Smith (1998) – Chapters 6 & 7 Designing learning Introduction, Overview, & workshops General Principles 7 Training Methods II: Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, F. P. Presentation Skills Experiential Learning (2000). Experiential Learning. In D. W. Johnson, & F. P. Johnson, Joining together: Group theory and group skills. 7th ed. Boston : Allyn and Bacon. Ch. 2. Experiential Learning: pp. 48-71. 8 Training Methods III: Feinstein, A. H., Mann, S., & Experiential Learning Drama-based Learning 1 – Corsun, D. L. (2002). Charting the Role-plays experiential territory: Clarifying definitions and uses of computer simulation, games, and role plays. Journal of Management Development,21(10), 732-744. 9 Critiquing Training Smith (1998) – Chapter 8 Preparation for Presentations workshops Page 3
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 10 Training Methods IV: Kellerman, P. F. (1998). Group Presentations Drama-based Learning 2 – Treadwell, T. W. (1998). Action Methods Sociometry: Tools for research and practice; The International Journal of Action Methods, 51(1), 23-40. 11 Training Methods V: Smith (1998) – pp 168-174 & Group Presentations Coaching, Mentoring & On- Chapter 11 the-Job Training 12 Training Methods VI: Action Koo, L. C. (1999). Learning action Group Presentations Methods of Learning: learning. Journal of Workplace Applications to the Final Learning, 11(3): 89-94. Essay 13 Evaluation of Training Smith (1998) – Chapter 8 Integrating Feedback & Workshop Redesign Topics covered in this course are designed to support the learning and assessment processes for students. Typically, topics covered in workshops provide guidance for students about key learnings, and how to undertake relevant aspects of the assessment. Information presentations are, in turn, intended to establish a background, of key concepts based on the most recent research, for both workshops and assessment activities. Students who effectively participate in information presentations and workshops, and complete course assessments, should at the end of the course feel confident to develop, present, and evaluate training workshops. 5.0 Generic Skills Development This course will assist students in developing a broad range of the generic skills, which have been identified as key learnings for the Griffith Graduate. Section 8 below, which discusses assessment strategies for this course, explains how each aspect of the course assessment is linked to the key Griffith Graduate generic skills. However, the following diagram highlights the more important aspects of the Griffith Graduate generic skills which are addressed by this course. The Griffith Graduate Resource Directory for Generic Skills Development The Griffith Graduate Personal Professional Effectiveness Effectiveness Organisational Community & Career & Membership Citizenship Vocational Skills Skills Skills Oral Written Information Team Work Communication Communication Skills Self Problem Solving Interpersonal Adaptability & Conceptual & Management & Decision Skills Learning Skills Analytical Skills Skills Making “Building Blocks of Personal and Professional Success” Page 4
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 6. Flexible Learning Griffith University aims to provide a flexible learning environment for students, responding to their individual circumstances and requirements. However, the nature of the content of this course requires direct feedback and coaching of students, which makes it difficult for students to successfully complete the course assessment without regular participation in formal course activities. This is especially so with regards to each of the items of assessment, apart from the first individual essay (the Learning Analysis). All written course materials, including information presentation notes, will be placed on the course web-site, and wherever possible, descriptions of activities undertaken during information presentations and workshops, will also be posted. For a range of reasons, students may find that alternative approaches to assessment are desirable. In such cases, students are encouraged to negotiate alternative assessment arrangements with the course convenor as early as possible, but in any case, before the end of week 7. As a general rule, no requests for re-negotiations of assessment will be considered after that time, apart from in exceptional circumstances. 7. Organisation and Teaching Methods Training and Development is an interactive process, and the design of this course reflects this. Consequently, a wide range of teaching approaches have been incorporated into this course. Information presentations within this course provide both theoretical background and model key training methodologies. Workshops within this course are designed to provide practical guidance on basic training techniques, as well as the opportunity to practice training skills, and provide and receive feedback on these skills. Both information presentations and workshops are designed assist students with the key learning activities within this course, namely the course assessment items. Consequently, students are strongly encouraged to attend these formal activities within the course. Teaching Activity Contact Hours Lectures 1.5 hour lectures in weeks 1 to 13 Workshops 1.5 hour tutorial in weeks 2 to 13 8. Assessment The assessment for this course is designed to both bench-mark student learning progress and to enhance the learning process. The individual items of assessment are scheduled to reflect key topics, and the overall approach to training and development presented in this course. Type % Length Due date Learning Analysis (individual assignment) 25 1,500 words COB Friday Week 6 Training Workshop Presentation (group 30 minute As allocated: either Week 20 assignment) presentation 10/11/12 Page 5
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 First workshop critique (individual One week after participation 10 500 words assignment) in allocated presentation Second workshop critique One week after participation 10 500 words (individual assignment) in allocated presentation Presentation review and redesign including revised session plan (individual 35 2,000 word COB Friday Week 14 assignment) Rationale Assessment in this subject is designed to reflect the process of learning described by Kolb (1984) and others, namely the learning cycle of reflection, conceptualisation, planning, and experience. Learning Analysis The Learning Analysis will allow students the opportunity to develop their understanding of the training and learning process from a personal perspective. Students will be required to identify a significant incident of personal learning which is relevant to the course. Incidents which occur during information presentations or workshops are particularly apt. In analysing this incident the students will need to apply concepts and theories from the course, text book and other sources in order to develop their understanding of the learning process. This piece of assessment is intended to reflect Objective 1, described in the Objectives section above. Training Workshop Presentation Students will present a training workshop relevant to the needs of the student group during tutorial workshop times. This presentation allows students to apply their understanding of the principles of training and development to a practical activity. The workshops will be marked by teaching staff on the extent to which they coherently reflect all aspects of training and development from needs analysis through to evaluation. Each student group will receive specific feedback from teaching staff on specific aspects fn their Training Workshop Presentations which worked well, or could be improved. Each student will also receive copies of the critiques of their workshops which have been completed by their fellow students. This piece of assessment is intended to reflect Objectives 2, 3, and 4, described in the Objectives section above. Workshop Critiques The Workshop Critiques involve each student in critiquing the Training Workshops presented by other students. These Workshop Critiques serve a dual function. Firstly, by critiquing the presentations of others, students will develop their skills in recognising effective application of training and development principles. Secondly, students will receive additional feedback on their performance in the Training Workshop Presentations, in addition to the feedback they receive directly from their teachers. This piece of assessment is intended to reflect Objective 5, described in the Objectives section above. Page 6
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 Presentation Review and Redesign The final aspect of the assessment requires students to integrate all of their learnings from the previous assessment activities. In reviewing their performance students apply and extend the feedback they have received, both from their teaching staff, and from other students in the form of Workshop Critiques. By redesigning their workshop students have the opportunity to complete their learning cycle with respect to training and development skills, and to demonstrate what new insights they have gained. This piece of assessment is intended to reflect Objectives 4, 5, and 6, described in the Objectives section above. Skill Development: Each Assessment Item will contribute to the development of the core skills of the Griffith Graduate as indicated in the following table. Presentation Learning Workshop Workshop Review & Skill Area Analysis Presentation Critiques Redesign Teamwork Information Technology Interpersonal Skills Self-Mgt Skills Adaptability & Learning Skills Problem Solving & Decision Making Analytical & Conceptual Skills Written Communication Oral Communication 9. Text and Supporting Materials The prescribed text for this course is available from the campus bookshop. All recommended readings are available from the Griffith library, many of them through the library’s online services. Prescribed Text: Smith, A. (1998). Training and Development in Australia. Chatswood, NSW: Butterworths. Additional Readings: Al-Khayyat, R. M., & Elgamal, M. A. (1997). A macro model of training and development: Validation. Journal of European Industrial Training, 21(3), 87-101. Anderson, (1994). A proactive model for training needs analysis. Journal of European Industrial Training, 18(3), 23-28. Argyris, C., & Schön, D. (1978). Organizational Learning: A Theory of Action Perspective. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley. Page 7
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 Benton, D. (1995). Applied human relations: An organizational approach. NJ: Prentice Hall. Berger, M. (1993). A market-led training needs analysis - Is the training needs analysis outmoded? Industrial and Commercial Training, 25(1), 27-31. Bonn, I. and Christodoulou, C. (1996). From strategic planning to strategic management. Long Range Planning, 29(4), 543-51. Bova, B., & Kroth, M. (2001). Workplace learning and generation X. Journal of Workplace Learning, 13(2), pp 57-65. Buckley, F., & Monks, K. (2000). Learning as change and change as learning: Re- educating the HR manager for the future. In Sheehan, M., Ramsay, S. & Patrick, J. (Eds.) Transcending boundaries: Proceedings of the 2000 Conference, Brisbane, pp. 90-97). Buckley, R., & Caple, J. (1990). The theory and practice of training. London: Kogan Page. Busby, J. S. (1999). The Effectiveness of Collective Retrospection as a Mechanism of Organizational Learning. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 35(1), 109-129. Camp, R.R., Blanchard, P.N., & Huszczo, G.E. (1986). Toward a more organizationally effective training strategy and practice. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. Care, W. D., & Scanlan, J. M. (2001). Planning and Managing the Development of Courses for Distance Delivery. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 4(2). Crossan, M. M., & Lane, H. W., & White, R. E. (1999). An Organizational Learning Framework: From Intuition to Institution. Academy of Management Review, 24(3), 522-537. Dale, M. (1994). Learning organizations. In C. Mabey & P. Iles (Eds.) Managing learning. London: The Open University, pp. 22-33. Delahaye, B., & Smith, B. (1998) How to be an Effective Trainer: Skills for Managers and New Trainers. Wiley: New York. Dick, B. (1990), Design for learning. Chapel Hill, Brisbane: Interchange. Dick, B. (1996). Helping groups to be effective. Chapel Hill, Brisbane: Interchange. Douglas, C. A., & McCauley, C. D. (1999). Formal Developmental Relationships: A Survey of Organizational Practices. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 10(3), 203-221. Engleberg, I., & Wynn, D. (1997). Working in groups: Communication principles and strategies. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Etington, J. (1996). The Winning Trainer: Winning Ways to Involve People in Learning, 3rd edition. Houston: Gulf. Feinstein, A. H., Mann, S., & Corsun, D. L. (2002). Charting the experiential territory: Clarifying definitions and uses of computer simulation, games, and role plays. Journal of Management Development,21(10), 732-744. Fine, L. M., & Pullins, E. B. (1998). Peer Mentoring in the Industrial Sales Force: An Exploratory Investigation of Men and Women in Developmental Relationships. Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management, 18(4) 89-103. Fletcher, C. (1994). The effects of performance review in appraisal: evidence and implications. In C. Mabey & P. Iles (Eds.) Managing learning. London: The Open University, pp. 118-122. Freedman, A. M. (1978). Types of Process Intervention. The Annual Handbook for Group Facilitators, 163-169. Gaw, B. A. (1979). Processing Questions: An Aid to Completing the Learning Cycle. The Annual Handbook for Group Facilitators, 147-153. Hussey, D. E. (1996). Management training: A key tool for strategy implementation. Strategic Change, 5(5), 264. Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, F. P. (2000). Experiential Learning. In D. W. Johnson, & F. P. Johnson, Joining together: Group theory and group skills. 7th ed. Boston : Allyn and Bacon. Ch. 2. Experiential Learning: pp. 48-71. Johnson, W. B. (2002). The Intentional Mentor: Strategies and Guidelines for the Practice of Mentoring. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 33(1), 88–96. Karp, H.B. (2000). A Pragmatic Primer for Mentoring. The Annual, 201-210. Page 8
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 Karpin, D. (1995) Enterprising Nation: Renewing Australia’s Managers to Meet Challenges of the Asia-Pacific Century: Report of the Industry Taskforce on Leadership and Management Skills. Canberra: AGPS. Kaufman, R. (1997). Needs assessment basics. In R. Kaufman, S. Thiagarajan, & P. MacGillis (eds.), The guidebook for performance improvement: Working with individuals and organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. pp 107-129. Kay, C. R., Peyton, S. K., & Pike, R. (1987). Diagnosing the Training Situation: Matching Instructional Techniques with Learning Outcomes and Environment. The Annual: Developing Human Resources, 203-212. Kellerman, P. F. (1998). Treadwell, T. W. (1998). Sociometry: Tools for research and practice; The International Journal of Action Methods, 51(1), 23-40. Kirpatrick, D. L. (1994). Evaluating training programs: The four levels. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler. Koo, L. C. (1999). Learning action learning. Journal of Workplace Learning, 11(3): 89-94. Kram, K. E. (1985). Creating Conditions that Encourage Mentoring. The Annual: Developing Human Resources, 239-258. Leopold, J., Harris, L., & Watson, T. (1999). Strategic Human Resourcing: Principles, Perspectives & Practices. London: Pitman Publishing. Levitt, B., & March, J. G. (1988). Organizational Learning. Annual Review of Sociology, 14, 383-397. Mailick, S., & Stumpf, S. (1998). Learning theory in the practice of management development: Evolution and applications. London: Quorum. Malouf, D. (1994). How to Teach Adults in a Fun and Exciting Way. Warriewood, B&PP. Marsick, V. J., & O’Neil, J. (1999). The Many Faces of Action Learning. Management Learning, 30(2), 159-176. McGettigan, T. (1999). Virtually educated: Student perspectives on the distance learning experience. Radical Pedagogy, 1(2). McGill, I., & Beaty, L. (1995). Action Learning: A Guide for Professional, Management and Educational Development (2nd Ed). London: Kogan Page. Meister, J. C. (1998). Corporate Universities: Lessons in Building a World-Class Work Force. New York: McGraw-Hill. Minter, R. L., & Thomas, E. G. (2000). Employee Development through Coaching, Mentoring & Counselling: A Multidimensional Approach. Review of Business, Summer, 43- 47. Mueller, N. (1999). The Professional Pairing Program: A New Way to Mentor. The Annual, 187-196. Noe, R. A. (2002). Employee Training and Development (2nd Ed). New York: McGraw-Hill. Popper, M., & Lipshitz, R. (2000). Organizational Learning: Mechanisms, Culture and Feasibility. Management Learning, 31(2), 191-196. Raelin, J. (2000) Work-Based Learning: The New Frontier of Management development. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Rhoades, L. & Eisenberger, R. (2000). Perceived organizational support: A review of the literature. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(4), 698-714. Salaman, G., & Bultler, J. Why managers won’t learn. In C. Mabey & P. Iles (Eds.) Managing learning. London: The Open University, pp. 34-42. Senge, P. (1990). The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization. New York: Doubleday/Currency. Simpson, D. T. (1983). A Model of Training Design: Selecting Appropriate Methods. The Annual for Facilitators, Trainers, and Consultants, 223-230. Smith, E.A. (2000). Applying knowledge-enabling methods in the classroom and in the workplace. Journal of Workplace Learning, 12(6), pp 236-244. Stone, R. J. (1998). Human Resource Management. Sydney: Jacaranda-Wiley. Page 9
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 Stonyer, H. & Marshall, L. (2002). Moving to problem-based learning in the NZ engineering workplace. Journal of Workplace Learning, 14(5), pp 190-197. Stufflebeam, D. L. (1983). The CIPP model for program evaluation. In G. Madaus, M. Scriven, & D. L. Stufflebeam (Eds.), Evaluation models: Viewpoints on educational and human service evaluation. Boston: Kluwer-Nijhoff. Taylor, P. J., O’Driscoll, M. P., & Binning, J. F. (1998). A new integrated framework for training needs analysis. Human Resource Management Journal, 8(2), 29-50. Tovey, M. D. (1997). Training in Australia: Design, Delivery, Evaluation and Management. Sydney: Prentice-Hall. Tsang, E. W. K. (1997). Organizational learning and the learning organization: A dichotomy between descriptive and prescriptive research. Human Relations, 50(1), 73-89. Tyson, T. (1998) Working with Groups. South Yarra: MacMillan Education Australia Pty Ltd. Verduin, J. R. and Clark, T. A. (1991). Distance education: The foundations of effective practice. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Willis, B. (2002). Distance Education: An Overview. University of Idaho. Willmore, J. (1999). Four HRD scenarios of the future. Training & Development, 53(12), 38-41. Zuber-Skerritt, O. (2002). A Model for designing Action Learning and Action Research Programs. The Learning Organization, 9(4), 143-149. 10. Scope of Course Evaluation Being a course on training and development, it is important that this course should reflect best practice in course design. As part of this commitment, a mid-semester, formative evaluation will be conducted, to allow students to provide feedback, and suggest approaches for enhancing their learning experience. This course will also be evaluated through independent (summative) surveys to be conducted by the Department of Management in accordance with University’s policy. 11. Administration Any additions or variations to the material in this course outline will be discussed in information presentations, and posted in the notices on the course web-site, within Learning@griffith This will include detailed guidance on how to complete each item of assessment. Although this course makes substantial use of the web-site, it is important to remember that attendance at information presentations and workshops is necessary to satisfactorily complete the requirements of this course. Several parts of the assessment are directly based on class activities, and demonstrations, as well as substantial guidance on assessment, will be provided in class times. It is particularly important for students to note that groups for the training presentation will be organised within workshops in week 3. Students, who for any reason are unable to attend in week 3, should contact their tutor and/or the course convenor as soon as possible. Page 10
    • Course Catalogue No: 2012MGT Course Title: HR Training and Development Skills 086/04/MGT (Revised 047/03/MGT) Semester 2, 2004 12. Course Communications Students should feel free to contact their tutors, and the course convenor, by email, telephone, or face-to-face during staff consultation times, and at other times as agreed between students and staff. Notices about key changes to the course, and general advice, will be placed on the course web-site, so student should regularly check the web-site for information. 13. University Policies 13.1 Late Submission of Assessment Items Please refer to “6.2.3 Penalties for Late Submission” at the following web address for guidelines on Late Submission of Assessment Items: http://www62.gu.edu.au/policylibrary.nsf/mainsearch/65e95921348eb64c4a256bdd0062f3b0 ?opendocument 13.2 Plagiarism / Academic Misconduct Please refer to the following web address for guidelines on Plagiarism/Academic Misconduct: http://www62.gu.edu.au/policylibrary.nsf/mainsearch/352f26aa1a1011e64a256bbb0062fd5f? opendocument 13.3 Assessment Policy Please refer to the following web address for guidelines on Assessment Policy: http://www62.gu.edu.au/policylibrary.nsf/mainsearch/65e95921348eb64c4a256bdd0062f3b0 ?opendocument 13.4 Student Grievances and Appeals Policy Please refer to the following web address for guidelines on Student Appeals and Grievances Policy: http://www62.gu.edu.au/policylibrary.nsf/mainsearch/be52c10d0ae50bdd4a256bb400633184 ?opendocument 13.5 Policy on Cancellation and Deletion of Courses The University reserves the right to cancel any course with enrolments less than twelve. Please refer to Section 2.0 Cancellations Arising from Low Enrolments of the policy: http://www62.gu.edu.au/policylibrary.nsf/mainsearch/6b25879789dffda14a256c8a0063de9e? opendocument#cacelarisinglowenrol Page 11