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  • Senior Syllabus Business Communication & Technologies 2008
  • ISBN: 978-1-920749-79-8 Business Communication & Technologies Senior Syllabus © The State of Queensland (Queensland Studies Authority) 2008 Queensland Studies Authority, PO Box 307, Spring Hill, Queensland 4004, Australia Phone: (07) 3864 0299 Fax: (07) 3221 2553 Email: office@qsa.qld.edu.au Website: www.qsa.qld.edu.au
  • Contents BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES................................................................................................................... 1 CONTENTS.................................................................................................................................. 1 1. RATIONALE............................................................................................................................ 1 2. GLOBAL AIMS........................................................................................................................ 2 3. GENERAL OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................... 3 3.1 Introduction 3 3.2 Knowledge and understanding 3 3.3 Reasoning processes 3 3.4 Skills and procedures 3 3.5 Attitudes and values 4 4. COURSE ORGANISATION................................................................................................... 5 4.1 Time allocation 5 4.2 Course structure 5 4.3 Topics of study 6 4.4 Business contexts 6 4.5Requirements for delivering the vocational qualification in Business 7 4.6Distinguishing features of competency at Certificate II of the Australian Qualification Framework 7 4.7Units of competency 8 4.8 Composite classes 9 4.9 Work program requirements 9 5. LEARNING EXPERIENCES............................................................................................... 10 5.1 Suggested learning experiences 10 6. TOPICS OF STUDY.............................................................................................................. 12 1. Business and work environments 12 2. International business communication 15 3. Workplace health, safety and sustainability 17 4. Managing workplace information 19 5. Workplace communication 21 6. Workteams 24 7. Organisational skills 26 8. Computer operations 28 9. Financial records 35 7. ASSESSMENT........................................................................................................................ 37 7.1 Principles of exit assessment 37 View slide
  • 7.2 Planning an assessment program 39 7.3 Special consideration 40 7.4 Authentication of student work 40 7.5 Assessment techniques 41 7.6 Requirements for verification folio 45 7.7 Exit criteria and standards 45 7.8 Determining exit levels of achievement 46 8. LANGUAGE EDUCATION.................................................................................................. 49 9. QUANTITATIVE CONCEPTS AND SKILLS................................................................... 51 10. EDUCATIONAL EQUITY................................................................................................. 52 RESOURCES.............................................................................................................................. 53 GLOSSARY................................................................................................................................ 56 APPENDIX: SAMPLE COURSES OF STUDY..................................................................... 60 Sample A: Course organisation 60 Sample A: Assessment plan 61 Sample A: Student profile 62 Sample B: Course organisation for composite class (Year A) 64 Sample B: Course organisation for composite class (Year B) 65 Sample B: Visual representation of composite class 66 Sample B: Sample assessment plan for composite class (Year A) 67 Sample B: Sample assessment plan for composite class (Year B) 67 Sample B: Student profile (Year A) 69 Sample B: Student profile (Year B) 71 View slide
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 1. Rationale Business helps define the way citizens make sense of and operate in society. Contemporary business activities form a complex global web through which goods and services are designed, produced, marketed, delivered and supported. These activities connect all people as producers or consumers across settings where they may be employers, employees or self-employed. It is important that young people have business knowledge, strategies and skills to make informed and reasoned decisions about their role in and contribution to this dynamic global environment. As Business Communication & Technologies allows students to gain a level of achievement and a Certificate II in Business, it offers opportunities to engage with and understand both theoretical and practical aspects of a range of business situations in the private and public sectors. By combining general and vocational educational components, the subject aims to provide students with meaningful learning experiences in real-life and life-like business settings. The general objectives and learning experiences allow for the development of the key competencies1 that are relevant to a course in Business Communication & Technologies. In Business Communication & Technologies students examine the dynamics of different business contexts and the broader social, cultural and environmental implications of business activities. This focus for this study of business provides students with opportunities to successfully carry out a variety of business transactions and to develop the communication skills essential for quality staff and customer relations. Business Communication & Technologies also demands that students engage in learning activities requiring higher-order cognition to analyse, evaluate and propose recommendations from the perspectives of an employer, employee or self-employed individual across a range of business-related situations. The attitudes, knowledge and skills developed across the four-semester course enhance students’ confidence and ability to participate effectively in business and to deal with the impact business issues may have on their lives. 1 KC1: collecting, analysing and organising information; KC2: communicating ideas and information; KC3: planning and organising activities; KC4: working with others and in teams; KC5: using mathematical ideas and techniques; KC6: solving problems; KC7: using technology 1
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 2. Global aims By the end of this course, students should develop the ability to: • communicate effectively and to interact confidently through and within a business environment • use a range of business information technologies • apply a range of individual and group strategies to resolve issues and complete tasks • question existing administrative practices from a variety of viewpoints, for example, financial, technological, social, ethical and cultural • be enterprising in developing solutions to problems within a business environment • participate competently and confidently within sectors of the business industry • appreciate workplace ethics, safety and environmental issues • appreciate the skills and attitudes that enhance employability, enjoyment of life and preparedness for life-long learning. 2
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 3. General objectives 3.1 Introduction The general objectives of this course are organised into four categories: • Knowledge and understanding • Reasoning processes • Skills and procedures • Attitudes and values. The general objectives for each of the categories are detailed below. The first three categories of objectives, Knowledge and understanding, Reasoning processes, and Skills and procedures, are linked to the exit criteria in Section 7.7. 3.2 Knowledge and understanding This criterion requires students to recall knowledge through defining, describing, and explaining previously learned factual information. It also requires students to demonstrate understanding by illustrating, explaining, and applying in familiar situations the key concepts, principles, processes and practices related to business contexts. By the conclusion of the course, students should: • recall, define and describe factual information relating to a range of business contexts • apply and explain business concepts, principles, processes and practices. 3.3 Reasoning processes Reasoning processes refers to the developmental process whereby students analyse and evaluate information to justify conclusions and recommendations in response to a variety of business contexts. It also requires students to communicate information to a business standard. By the conclusion of the course, students should: • interpret, analyse, synthesise and evaluate information from a range of business contexts • develop logically reasoned arguments, draw valid conclusions and make appropriate and justified recommendations to business-related issues and problems • communicate information to a business standard for a variety of purposes and audiences. 3.4 Skills and procedures Skills and procedures requires students to complete a variety of tasks using appropriate technologies and presentation skills, and to record business procedures either manually or electronically. 3
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS By the conclusion of the course, students should: • demonstrate a range of skills and capabilities relevant to business technologies • select and apply appropriate business procedures • presents information manually and electronically to a business standard. 3.5 Attitudes and values The subject aims to develop in students’ ethical and responsible attitudes and values. Attitudes and values are not assessed for the awarding of exit levels of achievement. By the conclusion of the course, students should appreciate the: • need for effective communication within the workplace • views, differences and values of others, nationally and internationally • ethics adopted by businesses in their dealings with clients, government and other firms • ethical, safety and environmental issues in business environments • need for lifelong learning. 4
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 4. Course organisation A course in Business Communication & Technologies provides students with the opportunity to attain a: • level of achievement • BSB20107 Certificate II in Business. To attain a level of achievement, schools must offer students opportunities throughout the course to learn and demonstrate the general objectives (Section 3) and the topics of study (Section 6). To achieve the BSB20107 Certificate II in Business students must have opportunities throughout the course of study to demonstrate the units of competency. 4.1 Time allocation The minimum number of hours of timetabled school time, including assessment, for a course of study developed from this syllabus is 55 hours per semester. A course of study will usually be completed over two years (220 hours). 4.2 Course structure This two-year course is based on the topics of study (Section 6). Embedded within these topics are 12 units of competency, making up the BSB20107 Certificate II in Business. All units of competency are taken from the BSB07 Business Services Training Package, 2007. 4.2.1 Designing a course of study Schools should plan a course of study offering an increasing level of challenge to students and provide opportunities for them to achieve the general objectives throughout the two-year course. When designing a course of study schools should refer to the: • rationale (Section 1) • global aims (Section 2) • general objectives (Section 3) • topics of study (Section 6) • units of competency, if/when appropriate • students’ needs and interests • available resources. The Appendix provides examples of a two-year course organisation, assessment plan and corresponding sample student profiles. 5
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 4.3 Topics of study The recommended subject matter for each topic of study is a guide to the level of detail required in the delivery of each topic of study. The topics of study are listed below, however the order in which the topics are presented does not imply a teaching sequence. The topics of study are: 1. Business and work environments 2. International business communication 3. Workplace health, safety and sustainability 4. Managing workplace information 5. Workplace communication 6. Workteams 7. Organisational skills 8. Computer operations 9. Financial records. There is no prescribed number of topics to be studied in any one semester. 4.3.1 Sequencing topics of study The order of topics listed above is not meant to prescribe a sequence. However, topics 1–4 and components of topic 8 must be spread evenly over the four semesters. Components of topic 9 must be spread evenly over at least two semesters (at least once in Year 12). Schools will determine a sequence of topics, or parts thereof, with the following principles in mind: • the nature of the contexts chosen • the development of the general objectives • coverage of the units of competency embedded in the topics of study. Topics which best suit the contexts selected should be chosen. The selection and sequencing of topics must allow students the opportunity to develop the Knowledge and understanding, Reasoning processes, and Skills and procedures required in the course. Within each semester, students must be given the opportunity to demonstrate their ability in each of the course criteria. (Refer to the sample course organisations in the Appendix.) 4.4 Business contexts The purpose of the business contexts is to provide a focus for learning experiences throughout the course of study, relevant to the topics chosen. In the Business Communication & Technologies course, there are 16 nominated contexts and an optional context. The optional context has been included to allow flexibility. A context once chosen cannot be selected again. At least one, but no more than two contexts per semester may be chosen from the list provided. The contexts are: • Public administration • Legal • Banks and other financial institutions • Tourism and hospitality • Real estate 6
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • Mining • Political • Events management • Technical, e.g. manufacturing, construction, engineering, architecture • Insurance • Health and wellbeing • Retail • Travel • Rural • Media • Entertainment • Optional. Where appropriate, business contexts may be studied from an Indigenous perspective. 4.5 Requirements for delivering the vocational qualification in Business In completing this course of study, students will have the opportunity to achieve BSB20107 Certificate II in Business from the Business Services Training Package. Schools wishing to offer the subject must have BSB20107 Certificate II in Business (linked to subject 63) on their scope of registration as a registered training organisation and must comply with the AQTF2007 Essential Standards for Registration. Information regarding extending a school’s scope of registration is available at <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> P–12 syllabuses and support > Vocational education and training. Schools that are not registered training organisations and wish to offer the subject must inform the VET Branch of the QSA of a partnership agreement with another registered training organisation for the delivery and assessment of the embedded competencies from BSB20107 Certificate II in Business. Students who do not complete a certificate, but do achieve one or more units of competency, must receive a Statement of Attainment listing the units of competency achieved. 4.6 Distinguishing features of competency at Certificate II of the Australian Qualification Framework 4.6.1 Characteristics of learning outcomes for Certificate II Breadth, depth and complexity of knowledge and skills would prepare a person to perform in a range of varied activities or knowledge application where there is a clearly defined range of contexts in which the choice of actions required is usually clear and there is limited complexity in the range of operations to be applied. Performance of a prescribed range of functions involving known routines and procedures and some accountability for the quality of outcomes. Applications may include some complex or non-routine activities involving individual responsibility or autonomy and/or collaboration with others as part of a group or team. 7
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 4.6.2 Distinguishing features of learning outcomes The competencies of this qualification should enable a student to: • demonstrate basic operational knowledge in a moderate range of areas • apply a defined range of skills • apply known solutions to a limited range of predictable problems • perform a range of tasks where choice between a limited range of options is required • assess and record information from varied sources • take limited responsibility for own outputs in work and learning. 4.7 Units of competency BSB20107 Certificate II in Business is embedded in this course. The required content for each unit of competency is covered in the topics of study. The units of competency are outlined in Table 1. Table 1: Units of competency Code Competency name Recommended topic of study BSBOHS201A Participate in OHS processes Workplace health, safety and sustainability (3) BSBWOR202A Organise and complete daily work activities Organisational skills (7) BSBCMM201A Communicate in the workplace Workplace communication (5) BSBWOR203A Work effectively with others Workteams (6) BSBWOR204A Use business technology Computer operations (8) BSBINM201A Process and maintain workplace Computer operations (8) information Managing workplace information (4) FNSICGEN305B Maintain daily financial/business records Financial records (9) BSBITU201A Produce simple word processed Computer operations (8) documents BSBITU202A Create and use spreadsheets Computer operations (8) BSBSUS201A Participate in environmentally sustainable Workplace health, safety and work practices sustainability (3) BSBITU303A Design and produce text documents Computer operations (8) *BSBITU301A Create and use databases Computer operations (8) or *BSBITU302A Create electronic presentations Computer operations (8) * Schools are required to select either BSBITU301A OR BSBITU302A in the planning of the two-year course. 8
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 4.8 Composite classes In some schools, it may be necessary to combine students into a composite Year 11 and 12 class. This syllabus provides teachers with an opportunity to develop a course of study that caters for a variety of circumstances such as combined Year 11 and 12 classes, combined campuses, or modes of delivery involving periods of student-directed study. The multilevel nature of such classes can prove advantageous to the teaching and learning process because: • it allows teachers to maximise the flexibility of the syllabus • it provides opportunities for a mix of multilevel group work, peer teaching, and for independent work on appropriate occasions • learning experiences and assessment can be structured to allow both Year 11 and Year 12 students to consider the key concepts and ideas at the level appropriate to the needs of students within each year level. The following guidelines may prove helpful in designing a course of study for a composite class: • The course of study could be written in a Year A/Year B format, if the school intends to teach the same topic to both cohorts. • Place a topic at the beginning of each year that will allow Year 11 students ease of entry into the course. • Learning experiences and assessment instruments need to cater for both year levels throughout the course. Even though tasks may be similar for both year levels, it is recommended that more extended and/or complex tasks be used with Year 12 students. 4.9 Work program requirements A work program is the school’s plan of how the course will be delivered and assessed based on the school’s interpretation of the syllabus. It allows for the special characteristics of the individual school and its students. The school’s work program must meet all syllabus requirements and must demonstrate that there will be sufficient scope and depth of student learning to meet the general objectives and the exit standards. The requirements for on-line work program approval can be accessed on the Queensland Studies Authority’s website, <www.qsa.qld.edu.au>, under P–12 syllabuses & support > Years 11 and 12. This information should be consulted before writing a work program. Updates of the requirements for work program approval may occur periodically. 9
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 5. Learning experiences The learning experiences involved in Business Communication & Technologies need to reflect the contextual nature of the course, wherever possible. Teachers need to choose learning experiences relevant to the contexts chosen. Students should be given opportunities to integrate different areas of learning. The learning experiences should encourage students to extend their Knowledge and understanding, Reasoning processes and Skills and procedures. For the delivery of the embedded vocational components in Business Communication & Technologies to be effective, it is necessary for the school environment to simulate as closely as possible a workplace environment. While there is no requirement for students to complete on-the- job training in this course, schools are encouraged to offer students the opportunity to consolidate and/or develop units of competency through relevant work experience. Schools should note, however, that irrespective of where assessment for the units of competency occurs, the responsibility for ensuring professional assessment standards are maintained at all times rests with the school as the registered training organisation (RTO). 5.1 Suggested learning experiences A range of suggested learning experiences specific to each topic of study has been given in Section 6. Following is a list of generic learning experiences appropriate to the course of study. Teachers should not feel constrained by this list of learning experiences but should feel free to introduce learning experiences that have not been included in this list: • making spoken/multimodal presentations (using video and/or audio recording for self appraisal wherever possible) • critically appraising the presentations of others • participating in debates and discussions • organising and/or attending seminars • forming electronic links with other schools • conducting research — ranging from small class activities to a major research activity • using computers and other technologies • performing tasks for business organisations and school administration • forming business–school links — “Adopt a Business” • surveying businesses and government agencies — investigate business procedures • participating in work experience, work shadowing or structured workplace learning • compiling a portfolio of completed work • participating in simulated business activities • planning, organising and participating in meetings • participating in peer tutoring and group work 10
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • conducting a media watch — from a local and international perspective and/or through the collection and interpretation of relevant newspaper articles, magazines, journals • using audio and visual aids • participating in visits to industry • inviting guest speakers • evaluating case studies • planning and conducting a Business Communication & Technologies Open Day • participating in competitions, poster displays • producing desktop publishing material and/or word-processed documents for a range of clientele • planning, conducting and evaluating process and outcomes of business activities • evaluating and justifying business procedures to provide valid recommendations • make recommendations following a workplace health and safety audit • collaborating online using virtual teams. In selecting learning experiences, teachers have ample opportunity to incorporate key competencies, which occur naturally in business activities and are essential to the study of Business Communication & Technologies, namely: • collecting, analysing and organising information • communicating ideas and information • planning and organising activities • working with others and in teams • using mathematical ideas and techniques • solving problems • using technology. 11
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 6. Topics of study 1. Business and work environments Summary of content Organisations and their structures Human resources Quality practices Industrial relations Recommended subject matter Organisations and their structures • types of businesses • types of organisational structures • organisational charts • mission statements • work environments − remote − home − open • outsourcing − advantages and disadvantages Human resources • managers/supervisors − roles and responsibilities • valuing employees − work/life balance − workplace surveillance • employment issues − job descriptions − performance appraisals − negotiating salary − nature and purpose of workplace agreements − modes of employment − nature, role and function of unions and employer associations − the process of resolving disputes − grievance procedures − awards 12
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS nature and purpose • dismissal − procedures − unfair dismissal Quality practices • policies and procedures • corporate social responsibility and ethics − inclusive environments • valuing customers • privacy − information − work − surveillance • ethical use of time and resources − copyright Industrial relations • knowledge and application of Commonwealth and/or State legislation relating to − workplace relations − anti-discrimination legislation − other current legislation • Rights and responsibilities of employers and employees − obligation of the employer with regard to: safety non-discrimination legal/ethical requirements inclusive environments − obligation of employee with regard to: attendance following directions confidentiality work performance safety and care. Suggested learning experiences • collaboratively analyse the advantages and disadvantages of the main categories of private sector business ownership • research cases where people have been prosecuted for breaching legislation and understand the penalties as a result • apply knowledge and understanding of effective human resources to role-play a job interview for a manager/supervisor position • evaluate job descriptions (online, newspaper) and their placement in the business environment • apply knowledge of different types of organisational structures and work environments to identify them in a range of case studies • determine the organisational structure of the school and electronically create an organisational chart 13
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • debate the positives and negatives of outsourcing using a specific business as the context • create a mission statement for the school using an excerpt of their OPPM (Operational/Organisational policy and procedures manual) • identify and summarise main points from presentations from guest speakers, suggested speakers include: − various businesses − Commonwealth and State public service unions − private sector unions − Queensland Chamber of Commerce & Industry Ltd (1994) − the Industrial Relations Education Committee (IREC) − the Australian Industrial Relations Commission (AIRC) • investigate and describe the social and economic issues, e.g. unionism, the impact of changes in the workplace legislation, right and responsibilities and agreements and contracts • apply knowledge to a workplace field study to analyse the impact of recent workplace legislation changes on employers, employees and businesses as a whole • analyse local newspapers and websites, e.g. <www.deir.qld.gov.au>, <www.australia.gov.au>, <www.actu.asn.au>, <www.fedcourt.gov.au>, to investigate current industrial relations cases and issues • examine and evaluate examples of a variety of awards and/or workplace agreements specific to the context being studied • construct and apply problem-solving techniques to workplace scenarios in which the parties are attempting to resolve differences. 14
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 2. International business communication Summary of content Business dealings General considerations Support agencies Recommended subject matter Subject matter included in this topic should be explored from a business perspective. Business dealings • power, role and status issues • business decision-making protocols • business etiquette • business meetings • business work ethics • business communication • trade • time differences and working hours General considerations • currency and exchange rates • political and economic climate • language, religion and cultural differences Support agencies • roles • historical development • industry support • political influence Suggested learning experiences • identify and summarise main points from presentations from guest speakers, suggested speakers include: − Foreign embassies and cultural clubs − International business enterprises − School language department − Students internationally • interpret international communication techniques by role playing business situations • examine differences between international and domestic company’s policies and procedures • form a panel to debate and discuss the benefits of other countries’ business procedures • provide recommendations for a company thinking about extending their business internationally (choose a country of choice and justify the choice and recommendations) 15
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • investigate industries aided by a particular support agency (e.g. AUSTRADE, Australian Institute of Export, World Trade Centres, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Trade Facilitators International, Chambers of Commerce and Industry) • create a mock international business exhibition in which students examine a country’s business environment and advertise its business prospects. 16
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 3. Workplace health, safety and sustainability Units of competency associated with this topic • BSBOHS201A – Participate in OHS processes • BSBSUS201A – Participate in environmentally sustainable work practices Summary of content Legislation Workplace health and safety committee Policies and procedures Recommended subject matter Legislation • relevant legislation and codes of practice − State − Commonwealth • workers’ compensation authorities (e.g. WorkCover) Workplace Health and Safety Committee • representation • function • role and responsibilities of Workplace Health and Safety Officer Policies and procedures • legal requirements − employee and employer responsibilities − risk assessment − training and practice of accident and emergency procedures − records − symbols and signs − material safety data sheets • accidents and emergencies − knowledge of relevant personnel − knowledge of workplace procedures fire accidents incidents − first aid role and responsibilities of First Aid Officer − rehabilitation • safe operation of equipment • hazards − identification − reporting/recording − controlling or eliminating hazards/risks 17
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS − personal protective equipment • environmentally sustainable work practices − legislation and regulations − policies and procedures − energy − pollution air land water waste (hazardous substances and signs) − alternatives (e.g. recycling) Suggested learning experiences • complete information kits from WorkCover and the Division of Workplace Health and Safety • identify and summarise main points of an address given by the school WHS officer about WHS issues • explore Queensland’s WHS legislation via the internet • participate in an excursion; to learn how to evaluate different businesses WHS procedures, environmental issues, and clarify procedures for students to follow in certain situations, e.g. bullying, sexual harassment, stress management, the identification of hazards and provide recommendations • examine case studies relating to WorkCover claims • assess required WHS competencies by completing the on-line Safety Sense program http://whs.qld.gov.au/safetysense/ • evaluate WHS policies and procedures within the school environment and participate in the identification of potential hazardous and unsustainable work practices, and provide recommendations • create an accident or incident registrar reporting hazardous and unsustainable work practices. 18
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 4. Managing workplace information Unit of competency associated with this topic • BSBINM201A – Process and maintain workplace information Summary of content Workplace information Establishment and organisation of systems Maintaining integrity of systems Recommended subject matter Workplace information • types of information − explicit (e.g. correspondence, business plans, intellectual property (trademarks, patents), customer lists) − tacit (e.g. corporate knowledge) • accountability − legal requirements − Acts/standards Establishment and organisation of systems • information management systems − electronic and manual − centralised and decentralised − suitability − filing systems • classification of information to suit integrity of the system − vital − active − semiactive − inactive − removing inactive/dead files • security of systems (manual and electronic) − levels of access − confidentiality of information − back-up procedures − disaster recovery − virus protection − firewalls − crime Maintaining the integrity of the system • accessing and tracking information • version control • transferring information from active to secondary storage (e.g. semi-active, inactive, archive) 19
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • legislation − retention − disposal • storage, relocation and disposal methods Suggested learning experiences • identify and summarise main points about information management systems from speakers from state or local government archives, public or private companies or other organisations • evaluate the information management systems used in your school in relation to the information management policy • create a booklet on security measures used by local enterprises to demonstrate effective information management systems for the use of email and other information devices. • create a training manual on information management systems. 20
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 5. Workplace communication Unit of competency associated with this topic • BSBCMM201A – Communicate in the workplace Summary of content Generic communication skills Written communication skills Recommended subject matter Generic communication skills • interpersonal skills − discretion, diplomacy, tact − establishing and maintaining relationships introductions client liaison − dealing with clients cultural considerations personal assumptions legal requirements (e.g. anti-discrimination, ethical principles, codes of practice, privacy laws) − delegation − cooperation − mentoring and networking − grief − negotiation • communication styles − assertive − aggressive − passive • listening skills − paraphrase − clarify − attentiveness • questioning techniques − styles — open, closed, high gain, leading • receiving and relaying information − telephone (e.g. landline, Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP)) − face to face − other technologies (e.g. webinars, webcasts, podcasts) • non-verbal communication − body language (e.g. posture, eye contact, facial expression) − paralinguistics (e.g. use of voice) − personal space − pictorials 21
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • presentation skills − visuals − audience − preparation Written communication skills • receiving and relaying information − electronic (e.g. email, SMS, webpage, wiki) − paper (e.g. standard/form letter, memorandum, facsimile) • purpose of writing − understand the task − identify audience − select type of document − accurately convey message • drafting − enterprise guidelines letter styles and other correspondence formats punctuation styles − conveying intended message or meaning clearly and accurately − organising information − language appropriate to situation, purpose, recipient correct spelling, grammar, sentence construction etiquette and netiquette non-discriminatory − sequencing for logic and effect • proofreading • editing information − self − peer − supervisor Suggested learning experiences • participate in video/web conference • demonstrate through role-playing the differences between effective and non-effective communication • identify and summarise main points from guest speakers discussing communication in the workplace • identify and summarise main points from a visit to enterprises to experience the operation and application of a range of business communication technologies • identify and summarise main points of survey enterprise policies on customer service and communication techniques • apply knowledge and understanding of composition of written business documentation by creating invitation and thank you letters to guest speakers • practise oral communication by welcoming visitors to school functions and acting as hosts • practise learned procedures by role playing workplace situations such as using different communication styles to converse with colleagues and taking on the role of a receptionist by 22
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS using face to face communication and the telephone to practise communication with international and difficult visitors and students • design letterheads, faxes, memos appropriate to the business contexts being studied using your prior knowledge • critically evaluate the latest developments in business communication technologies and determine the appropriateness of these related to the contexts being studied. 23
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 6. Workteams Unit of competency associated with this topic • BSBWOR203A – Work effectively with others Summary of content Quality teams Team personnel Task analysis Team processes Team performance Recommended subject matter Quality teams • types • characteristics • developmental stages Team personnel • qualities (e.g. trust, reliance, initiative) • responsibilities and duties of team members/leaders • differences in personal values and beliefs • styles of leadership Task analysis • job requirements • availability of physical and human resources • defining areas of responsibility • time management • requesting assistance Team processes • meetings − organisation − documentation − types of meetings − roles and responsibilities of team members • decision making − process − tools • technologies • conflict management 24
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Team performance • review process − individual/team • feedback • strategies for improvement Suggested learning experiences • work together in groups to research business-related topics • survey businesses and reading current journal articles to identify different types of teams in business • work with other departments within the school on specific projects (e.g. musical, fete, greening the school) • organise, conduct and evaluate a meeting for a school project • evaluate the effectiveness and running of school camps • attend or participate in a video/web conference or webinar • invite the school IT coordinator to set up video conferencing between two different classrooms • organise and run a meeting; video and evaluate the effectiveness of the team meeting through a discussion or other collaborative learning experience • prepare a booklet, video, or webpage to use as a training session on quality teams including the roles of individual team members and leaders • develop a workteam appraisal form and evaluate the effectiveness of group work undertaken • invite guest speakers to discuss teams in business • participate in team problem solving on school or local issues • role-play effective versus non-effective teams • prepare a seminar on the latest in team communication technologies • create a resource to be used to assist in conducting a training session on quality teams including the roles of individual team members and leaders • create work documents which will assist in running a team, e.g. task analysis form, workteam appraisal forms • survey workteams within the school environment and classify each member into their team roles. 25
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7. Organisational skills Unit of competency associated with this topic • BSBWOR202A – Organise and complete daily work activities Summary of content Goal setting Time management Reviewing and evaluating Recommended subject matter Goal setting • self-motivation − proactive or reactive approach • short-term and long-term goals Time management • establishing timelines • planning and organising own work schedule − realistic expectations − accurate assessment of work time allocations • prioritising tasks − decision-making processes • breakdown of tasks − realistic expectations − accurate assessment of time needed to complete task • selecting resources − availability − suitability • meeting deadlines − reducing and managing stress − eliminating time wasters • Organisational tools − planners − diaries − “to-do” lists Reviewing and evaluating • review of tasks and priorities with a change of instruction • self-assessment 26
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Suggested learning experiences • identify and summarise main points of a speech given by a successful business person, sports person or motivational speaker to recalling important and effective organisational strategies • identify and summarise main points made by a technician talking about a system, hardware, or policy • organise and deliver an information seminar to the class • research the ways in which enterprises protect data and manage information security, and analyse your research by identifying key points and significant findings • create a unique and original electronic or paper diary which is specific to the students’ needs and details a step-by-step plan to enable success • create, prepare and review a personal semester plan showing assessment items, extracurricular activities, leisure time, timeline to manage study; homework and work commitments and “to-do lists” etc. 27
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 8. Computer operations Units of competency associated with this topic • BSBWOR204A – Use business technology • BSBINM201A – Process and maintain workplace information • BSBITU201A – Produce simple word processed documents • BSBITU303A – Design and produce text documents • BSBITU202A – Create and use spreadsheets • BSBITU301A – Create and use databases2 ; or • BSBITU302A – Create electronic presentations† Summary of content Wordprocessing — routine Wordprocessing — advanced Spreadsheets Databases (elective); or Electronic presentations (elective) Note: • schools must elect to undertake a study of either (d) Databases or (e) Electronic presentations in the two-year course • the application of task management procedures to all recommended subject matter is expected • familiarity of system to be used is required (e.g. networks, hardware, software, maintenance, file management, security, ergonomic requirements, latest developments) • the use of keyboard shortcuts is encouraged • the practice of minimising paper wastage is expected. Recommended subject matter Wordprocessing — Routine • task management − safe work practices ergonomics exercises conservation − organisational policies and procedures − on-line help − storage and location of data − meet designated timelines − follow instructions (oral and written) − check for accuracy − selection of appropriate software and hardware − maintain technology 2 Schools are required to select either BSBITU301A OR BSBITU302A. 28
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • documents — these may include − standard or merge letters − memos − facsimile − short reports − one-page fliers − agendas − minutes − tables − email − templates • functions − default settings − page setup − paragraph formatting − text formatting − bullets and numbering − tabs − line spacing − page numbers − headers and footers − auto functions − borders • design and enhancement — these may include − consistency of layout − use of white space − margins − justification − formatting − columns − alignment • print − print preview − appropriate stationery − options (e.g. multiple pages, odd/even, specified) Wordprocessing — Advanced • task management − see Wordprocessing — Routine − speed and accuracy • documents — these may include − multipage − mail merge (including labels) − reports − promotional material brochures calendars flyers schedules 29
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS − newsletters − press releases − complex tables − forms − context specific • functions − template creation − macros − alternate headers and footers − change of orientation within document − table headings (vertical, continuous) − multilevel bullets and numbering − styles − automatic table of contents − importing from other software packages − linking/merging with other software packages − fill in fields, drop-down boxes, tick boxes • design and enhancement − consistency of layout − drawing tools − graphics tools − digital photos − scanning • print − field codes − print merge Spreadsheets • task management − see Wordprocessing — Routine • terminology − rows and columns − cells − cell referencing − range − absolute − active cells − operators • functions − text formatting (e.g. bold, orientation, alignment, autofill) − cell formatting (e.g. text wrap, numbers, currency, merge) − formulae range efficiency of use relative and absolute moving and copying sum, maximum, minimum, average, operations others may include: “if statements”, count, look up − adding/deleting columns/rows 30
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS − sizing columns/rows − headers/footers − linking data within a workbook to another application − comments − show/hide columns • design and enhancement − analysis of a given situation − construction of appropriate design − identification of heading, labels, values − page set-up options margins portrait/landscape headers/footers formatting (e.g. lines, borders, shading, row height) • charts − types — these may include column stacked bar line pie − features — these may include data labels axis title chart title legend gridlines colours/patterns lines/borders • print − with values − with formulae − to fit specific number of pages − to fit on one page − with row and column headings Database • task management − see Wordprocessing — Routine • terminology − files − fields − records − cells − data − queries − forms − reports 31
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS − tables − input masks − primary key • functions − creating relationships between tables − field definitions/attributes − inserting/deleting blank lines and spaces − altering field widths − adding, deleting, moving, relabelling − repeating (if available) − formulae − data protection − table, form and report wizard − linking data to another application • design and enhancement − analysis of a given situation − construction of appropriate design − identification of fields and data types − alignment on page − formatting (e.g. borders, shading) − headers and footers − modification • forms − design − use • reports − text boxes − labels − formula − format data • queries − range − selecting specified data − showing specific fields • print − records − tables − forms − queries − reports Electronic Presentations • task management − see Wordprocessing — Routine • terminology − auto layout − view (e.g. slide, outline, normal, slideshow) − master slide 32
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS − design template • functions − slide sorter − animation preset custom − insert and/or import (e.g. sound, music, video clips, pictures, charts, tables, graphics, objects, illustrations) − hyperlink − agenda slide − custom show − transitions − timing − loop continuously − action buttons • design and enhancement − appropriate use for intended audience − headlines/titles − slide content − logos − colour schemes − visual impact − backgrounds − distractions • print − slides − handouts − notes pages − outline view Suggested learning experiences • apply style guides and/or OPPM for document layout • research the ways in which enterprises protect data and manage information security • collect newspaper articles on latest developments in technology • invite a technician to talk about system, hardware, policy • survey a local community or school organisation (e.g. sporting body or hobby club, P&C) with a view to developing a database or spreadsheet to suit their needs • devise and implement recycling practices for the school • design letterheads, faxes, memos appropriate to the business contexts being studied • organise a competition to develop new documentation for the school’s consideration • compile a folio of documents and exemplar material • prepare subject-specific information for career night or open day • organise and deliver an information seminar • design a range of spreadsheets suitable for business purposes, e.g. payroll, petty cash, tax invoices • evaluate and create an on-line help/manual to solve software package difficulties 33
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • create a range of spreadsheets suitable for business purposes, e.g. payroll, petty cash, tax invoices • create and implement recycling practices to minimise paper wastage • create charts/electronic presentations on: − safe work practices − storage and location of data − efficient use of time − selection of appropriate software and hardware. 34
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 9. Financial records Unit of competency associated with this topic • FNSICGEN305B — Maintain daily financial/business records Summary of content Banking procedures Petty cash Source documents Recommended subject matter Banking procedures • organisational policies and procedures • current developments • preparation and processing of banking documents − withdrawal forms − deposit slips/books − cheques − merchant summaries • banking guidelines − cash bundled − accurate forms − banking summary − banking electronically • validity and authorisation • personnel Petty cash • organisational policies and procedures • imprest system • preparation of vouchers and petty cash book • recording and balancing of petty cash transactions • reimbursement • validation, authorisation • personnel Source documents • organisational policies and procedures • type (order forms, tax invoices, consignment notes, adjustment notes, cheques, receipts) − purpose and function − description − preparation − GST − discounts 35
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS − correct authorisation and payment procedures • importance of correct calculations and checking procedures: − accuracy − irregularities − security − resolution or referral of creditor enquiries • personnel Suggested learning experiences • identify and summarise main points from a speech given by the school business services officer recalling their own experiences with regards to the school petty cash system, banking procedures, bank reconciliation and invoices • use computer packages to carry out petty cash procedures • identify and summarise main points from a speech given by a representative from a financial institution discussing trends in banking, the impact of technology on the banking industry and the effects on their clientele • participate in a simulation of real banking procedures in order to practise a learned procedure using “play money” • organise and participate in a fund-raising venture in order to carry out a learned procedure • identify and summarise main points from a visit to a work place to enhance students’ understanding through allowing them to discuss with personnel how their business prepares source documents and the checking procedures to ensure accuracy, banking procedures and the recording of financial aspects as related to their business • create a company’s financial documents in line with an OPPM • explore issues surrounding identity theft. 36
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7. Assessment Assessment is an integral part of the teaching and learning process. The major purposes of assessment in senior Authority subjects are to: • promote, assist and improve learning • inform programs of teaching and learning • provide information for students, parents and teachers about the progress and achievements of individual students to help them achieve as well as they are able • provide comparable levels of achievement in each Authority subject to be recorded in students’ learning accounts. The comparable levels of achievement may contribute to the awarding of the Queensland Certificate of Education • be used as the base data for tertiary entrance purposes • provide information about how well groups of students are achieving for school authorities and the State Education and Training Minister. 7.1 Principles of exit assessment An assessment program for the four-semester course of study requires consideration of the following principles. These principles of exit assessment are to be considered together and not individually in the development of an assessment program. • Information is gathered through a process of continuous assessment. • Balance of assessment is a balance over the course of study and not necessarily a balance over a semester or between semesters. • Exit achievement levels are devised from student achievement in all areas identified in the syllabus as being mandatory. • Assessment of a student’s achievement is in the significant aspects of the course of study identified in the syllabus and the school’s work program. • Selective updating of a student’s profile of achievement is undertaken over the course of study. • Exit assessment is devised to provide the fullest and latest information on a student’s achievement in the course of study. While most students will exit a course of study after four semesters, some will exit after one, two or three semesters. Continuous assessment Judgments about student achievement made at exit from a course of study must be based on an assessment program of continuous assessment. Continuous assessment involves gathering information on student achievement using assessment instruments administered at suitable intervals over the developmental four-semester course of study. 37
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS In continuous assessment, all assessment instruments have a formative purpose. The major purpose of formative assessment is to help students attain higher levels of performance. When students exit the course of study, teachers make a summative judgment about their levels of achievement in accordance with the standards associated with exit criteria. The process of continuous assessment provides the framework in which the other five principles of exit assessment operate: balance, mandatory aspects of the syllabus, significant aspects of the course, selective updating, and fullest and latest information. Balance Judgments about student achievement made at exit from a course of study must be based on a balance of assessments over the course of study. Balance of assessments is a balance over the course of study and not a balance within a semester or between semesters. Balance of assessment means judgments about students’ achievements of all the assessable general objectives are made a number of times using a variety of assessment techniques and a range of assessment conditions over the developmental four-semester course. See also the section on Requirements for verification folio. Mandatory aspects of the syllabus Judgments about student achievement made at exit from a course of study must be based on mandatory aspects of the syllabus. The mandatory aspects are: • the general objectives of Knowledge and understanding, Reasoning processes, and Skills and procedures and • the nine topics of study, 1. Business and work environments 2. International business communication 3. Workplace health, safety and sustainability 4. Managing workplace information 5. Workplace communication 6. Workteams 7. Organisational skills 8. Computer operations 9. Financial records To make the judgment of student achievement at exit from a four-semester course of study about the mandatory aspects, the standards associated with exit criteria stated in Section 7.8.1 must be used. Significant aspects of the course of study Judgments about student achievement made at exit from a course of study must be based on significant aspects of the course of study. Significant aspects are those areas described in the school’s work program that have been selected from the choices permitted by the syllabus to meet local needs. The significant aspects must be consistent with the general objectives of the syllabus and complement the developmental nature of learning in the course over four semesters. 38
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Selective updating Judgments about student achievement made at exit from a course of study must be selectively updated throughout the course. Selective updating is related to the developmental nature of the course of study and works in conjunction with the principle of fullest and latest information. As subject matter is treated at increasing levels of complexity, assessment information gathered at earlier stages of the course may no longer be representative of student achievement. Therefore, the information should be selectively and continually updated (not averaged) to accurately represent student achievement. Schools may apply the principle of selective updating: • to the whole subject-group A school develops an assessment program so that, in accordance with the developmental nature of the course, later assessment information based on the same groups of objectives replaces earlier assessment information. • to individual students A school determines the assessment folio for verification or exit (post-verification). The student’s assessment folio must be representative of the student’s achievements over the course of study. The assessment folio does not have to be the same for all students, however the folio must conform to the syllabus requirements and the school’s approved work program. Selective updating must not involve students reworking and resubmitting previously graded responses to assessment instruments. Fullest and latest information Judgments about student achievement made at exit from a course of study must be based on the fullest and latest information available. • “Fullest” refers to information about student achievement gathered across the range of general objectives. • “Latest” refers to information about student achievement gathered from the most recent period in which achievement of the general objectives is assessed. As the assessment program is developmental, fullest and latest information will most likely come from Year 12 for those students who complete four semesters of the course. The fullest and latest assessment data on mandatory and significant aspects of the course of study is recorded on a student profile. 7.2 Planning an assessment program To achieve the purposes of assessment listed at the beginning of this section, schools must consider the following when planning an assessment program: • general objectives (see Section 3) • learning experiences (see Section 5) • principles of exit assessment (see Section 7.1) • variety in assessment techniques over the four-semester course (see Section 7.5) • conditions in which assessment instruments are undertaken (see Section 7.5) 39
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • verification folio requirements, that is the range and mix of assessment instruments necessary to reach valid judgments of students’ standards of achievement (see Section 7.6) • post verification assessment (see Section 7.6) • exit criteria and standards (see Section7.7). In keeping with the principle of continuous assessment, students should have opportunities to become familiar with the assessment techniques that will be used to make summative judgments. They should also have knowledge of the criteria to be used in relation to each assessment instrument. Further information can be found at <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> under P–12 syllabuses & support > Years 11 and 12 > Subject areas. 7.3 Special consideration Guidance about the nature and appropriateness of special consideration and special arrangements for particular students may be found in the Authority’s Policy on Special Consideration in School-based Assessments in Senior Certification (2006), available from <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> under Assessment > Senior assessment > Special consideration. This statement provides guidance on responsibilities, principles and strategies that schools may need to consider in their school settings. To enable special consideration to be effective for students, it is important that schools plan and implement strategies in the early stages of an assessment program and not at the point of deciding levels of achievement. The special consideration might involve alternative teaching approaches, assessment plans and learning experiences. 7.4 Authentication of student work It is essential that judgments of student achievement are made on accurate and genuine student assessment responses. Teachers should ensure that students’ work is their own, particularly where students have access to electronic resources and when they are preparing collaborative tasks. The QSA information statement Strategies for authenticating student work for learning and assessment is available from <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> under Publications > Reports & papers > QSA. This statement provides information about various methods teachers can use to monitor students’ work to ensure it is their own. Particular methods outlined include: • students planning production of drafts and final responses • teachers seeing plans and drafts of student work • maintaining documentation of the development of responses • students acknowledging resources used. Teachers must ensure students use consistent accepted conventions of in-text citations and referencing where appropriate. 40
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7.5 Assessment techniques The assessment techniques most suited to the judgment of student achievement in this subject are described below. The criteria to which each technique is best suited are indicated also. Where students undertake assessment in a group or team, instruments must be designed so that teachers can validly assess the work of individual students and not apply a judgment of the group product and processes to all individuals. 7.5.1 Category 1: Short written response What is a short written response? The short written response is an assessment instrument that is written and conducted under supervised conditions to ensure authentication of student work. This technique may draw on the Knowledge and understanding and/or Reasoning processes criteria. Perusal time is recommended. A short written response may be constructed using the following items: 1. Short items • Such as, multiple-choice questions, true/false, sentence or short-paragraph (up to 50 words) responses 2. Paragraph responses • These are used when explanation of greater complexity is required and should be between 50 and 200 words, such as, paragraphs, business letters, memos, emails. For monitoring For verification • Mix of items listed above • Emphasis on paragraph responses What should teachers do when planning and implementing a short written response? The teacher should: • construct questions that are unambiguous • format the paper to allow for ease of reading and responding • consider the language needs of the students • ensure the questions allow the full range of standards to be demonstrated. 41
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7.5.2 Category 2: Extended written response What is an extended written response? The extended written response is an assessment instrument that is developed in response to a question, scenario or issue. Appropriate questions invite a variety of perspectives. They are “open” questions, that is, they have a range of possible answers. They should highlight specific issues rather than broad general topics and could require a response to stimulus materials and/or a deeper understanding of factual knowledge. It may take many forms, for example feature articles, editorial or persuasive, analytical or argumentative essays or reports. The assessable outcome of the extended response task is a written presentation, which may take one of the forms below. This technique may draw on the Knowledge and understanding and/or Reasoning processes criteria. Perusal time is recommended for extended written responses conducted under supervised conditions. Scaffolding (modelling the process and familiarising students with the expectations for the required outcome) must be provided as part of the learning process to help students complete an assessment instrument. Scaffolding must be reduced from Year 11 to Year 12 to allow the student to better demonstrate independence in the process. Research The student • must include in-text referencing, bibliography and/or reference list • may provide a factual response to a specific question/issue or • may make some form of a decision/recommendation regarding the question/issue under investigation and support the decision/recommendation with logical arguments. Responses to seen or unseen stimulus materials These take the form of either paragraph responses or more extended pieces of writing. When supervised conditions are chosen for an extended piece of writing it is best if it is the only item, as this will better allow students to demonstrate the full range of standards. Stimulus materials must be succinct enough to allow students to engage with the material in the time provided under supervised conditions. If the stimulus material is lengthy, it may need to be given to the students before the administration of the task. In these cases, the teacher must only provide the stimulus material, not the question or statement relating to the material. For monitoring For verification Report: 800–1000 words Report: 1200–1800 words Article: 400–600 words Article: 500–800 words Responses to seen or unseen stimulus Responses to seen or unseen stimulus materials under materials under supervised conditions: 300–500 supervised conditions: 500–800 words words What should teachers do when planning and implementing an extended written response? The teacher should: • construct questions that are unambiguous • provide scaffolding for formative assessment • format the paper to allow for ease of reading and responding • consider the language needs of the students • ensure the questions allow the full range of standards to be demonstrated • allow sufficient class time for students to be able to undertake the task effectively. 42
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7.5.3 Category 3: Spoken/Multimodal presentation What is a spoken/multimodal presentation? A spoken/multimodal presentation is an assessment instrument that is spoken/signed (e.g. debate, seminar, lesson, demonstration) or multimodal (e.g. webpage, podcast, video, computer simulation, board game). A multimodal presentation must include an aspect of spoken/signed communication. The spoken/multimodal presentation: • must be supported by explanatory notes (which may include in-text references, bibliography, data and diagrams for clarification of the content of the presentation). • may draw on the Knowledge and understanding and/or Reasoning processes criteria. • Assessment of a spoken/multimodal presentation may be accompanied with documentary evidence such as detailed checklists for each student. • Scaffolding (modelling the process and familiarising students with the expectations for the required outcome) must be provided as part of the learning process to help students complete an assessment instrument. Scaffolding must be reduced from Year 11 to Year 12 to allow the student to better demonstrate independence in the process. For monitoring For verification Directly spoken/signed presentation: 5–8 minutes Directly spoken/signed presentation: 8–10 minutes per per student student Multimodal presentation: minimum of 3 minutes Multimodal presentation: minimum of 5 minutes per per student student What should teachers do when planning and implementing a spoken/multimodal presentation? The teacher should: • provide scaffolding for formative assessment • consider the language needs of the students • ensure the task allows the full range of standards to be demonstrated • allow sufficient class time for students to be able to effectively undertake the task. 43
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7.5.4 Category 4: Practical tasks What is a practical task? A practical task is an assessment instrument that is used to assess business procedures either manually or electronically (e.g. folio of work, computer generated documents, financial documents, diaries). This technique may draw on the Knowledge and understanding and/or Skills and procedures criteria. This technique may require teacher observation of a defined activity, such as: • operating relevant technologies • completing defined tasks within a designated timeline • role playing, group or team situations. Any assessment using teacher observation must be accompanied with documentary evidence such as detailed checklists for each student. Class time must be allocated to observe a practical task, however independent student time may be required to complete the task. What should teachers do when planning and implementing a practical task? The teacher should: • provide OPPM guidelines • model appropriate business standards required • provide access to relevant technologies • construct questions/tasks that are unambiguous • consider the language needs of the students • ensure the questions/tasks suit the relevant context • ensure the questions/tasks allow for the full range of standards to be demonstrated. 7.5.5 Category 5: Integrated project What is an integrated project? An integrated project is an assessment instrument that involves a variety of interrelated tasks completed in groups, individually or a combination of individual and group work. The integrated project should be undertaken over an extended period (e.g. three weeks minimum) and involve the use of students’ own time and class time. An integrated project must include at least: • two topics of study • two criteria • two assessment techniques. Scaffolding (modelling the process and familiarising students with the expectations for the required outcome) must be provided as part of the learning process to help students complete an assessment instrument. Scaffolding must be reduced from Year 11 to Year 12 to allow the student to better demonstrate independence in the process. What should teachers do when planning and implementing an integrated project? The teacher should: • provide detailed guidelines to ensure students have the necessary skills to complete the task, when an integrated project is undertaken for the first time • allow some class time for students to be able to effectively undertake each component of the integrated project • use progressive checks and consult with students to assist them in completing the project in the required time. 44
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7.6 Requirements for verification folio A verification folio is a collection of a student’s responses to assessment instruments on which the level of achievement is based. For students who are to exit with four semesters of credit, each folio must contain the range and mix of assessment techniques for making summative judgments stated below. Students’ verification folios for Business Communication & Technologies must contain: • a minimum of four and a maximum of six assessment instruments from Year 12 • evidence of each criterion being assessed summatively at least twice by verification • assessment instruments that include: • one extended written response completed under supervised conditions which must assess Reasoning processes • one significant assessment instrument of either an extended written response (research) or an integrated project • the latest substantial computer operations’ assessment instrument • a task-specific criteria sheet for each assessment instrument which provides evidence of how students meet standards associated with the exit criteria involved in that instrument. For information about preparing monitoring and verification submissions schools should refer to <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> under Assessment > Senior Assessment > Forms and procedures. 7.6.1 Post-verification assessment Schools must use assessment information gathered after verification in making judgments about exit levels of achievement for those students who are completing the fourth semester of the course of study. For this syllabus students are to respond to at least one instrument which assesses at least one criteria. 7.6.2 Student profile The purpose of the student profile is to record student achievement over the four-semester course of study. Key elements on the profile include: • semester units/themes/topics • assessment instruments in each semester • standard achieved in each criterion for each instrument • instruments used for summative judgments • interim level of achievement at monitoring and verification. Schools may use the sample profile template in the appendix or design their own. 7.7 Exit criteria and standards The purpose of exit criteria and standards is to make judgments about students’ levels of achievement at exit from a course of study. The criteria are stated in the same categories as the assessable general objectives of the syllabus. The standards describe how well students have achieved the general objectives and are stated in the table Standards associated with exit criteria. 45
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS The following criteria must be used: Criterion 1: Knowledge and understanding Criterion 2: Reasoning processes Criterion 3: Skills and procedures Each criterion must be assessed in each semester, and each criterion is to make an equal contribution to the determination of exit levels of achievement. 7.8 Determining exit levels of achievement When students exit the course of study, the school is required to award each student an exit level of achievement from one of the five levels: Very High Achievement High Achievement Sound Achievement Limited Achievement Very Limited Achievement. Exit levels of achievement are summative judgments made when students exit the course of study. For most students this will be after four semesters. For these students, judgments are based on exit folios providing evidence of achievement in relation to all general objectives of the syllabus and in accordance with the criteria and standards. Determining a standard The standard awarded is an on-balance judgment about how the qualities of the student’s work match the standards descriptors overall in each criterion. This means that it is not necessary for the student to have met every descriptor for a particular standard in each criterion. When standards have been determined in each of the criteria for this subject, the following table is used to award exit levels of achievement, where A represents the highest standard and E the lowest. The table indicates the minimum combination of standards across the criteria for each level. Awarding exit levels of achievement VHA Standard A in any two criteria and no less than a B in the remaining criterion HA Standard B in any two criteria and no less than a C in the remaining criterion SA Standard C in any two criteria and no less than a D in the remaining criterion LA At least Standard D in any two criteria VLA Standard E in the three criteria Some students will exit after three, two or one semesters. For these students, judgments are based on folios providing evidence of achievement in relation to the general objectives of the syllabus focused on to that point of time. The particular standards descriptors related to the objectives focused on are used to make the judgment. Further information can be found at <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> under Assessment > Senior Assessment > Forms and procedures (scroll to Additional guidelines and procedures). 46
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 7.8.1 Standards associated with exit criteria Criterion A B C D E The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the Knowledge and understanding following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: • recall, definition and description • recall, definition and • recall, definition and • recall, definition and • recall of factual information of a comprehensive range of description of a substantial description of a range of description of factual factual information range of factual information factual information information • effective and consistent • effective application and • application and explanation of • explanation of basic business • states basic business application and explanation of explanation of business basic business concepts, concepts. concepts. business concepts, principles, concepts, principles, principles, processes and processes and practices. processes and practices. practices. The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the Reasoning processes following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: • effective and consistent • effective interpretation, • basic interpretation, analysis, • basic interpretation, analysis • basic interpretation and interpretation, analysis, synthesis analysis, synthesis and synthesis and evaluation of and organisation of organisation of information and evaluation of information evaluation of information information information • development of logically • development of logically • development of reasoned • provide conclusions and/or • provides basic conclusions reasoned arguments, valid reasoned arguments, valid arguments, conclusions and recommendations to and/or recommendations conclusions, appropriate and conclusions and appropriate recommendations to business-related issues and justified recommendations to recommendations to business-related issues and problems business-related issues and business-related issues and problems problems problems • communicates information • communicates information • communicates information for • communicates information to • communicates information. consistently and effectively to a effectively to a business a variety of purposes and an audience. business standard for a variety standard for a variety of audiences. of purposes and audiences. purposes and audiences. 47
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the The student work has the Skills and procedures following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: following characteristics: • effective and consistent use • effective use of a range of • uses appropriate skills and • uses skills and capabilities • uses technology to achieve of a range of skills and skills and capabilities relevant capabilities relevant to relevant to business an output capabilities relevant to to business technologies to business technologies to technologies to achieve an business technologies to achieve the required output achieve the required output output achieve the required output • selection and application of • selection and application of • selection and application of • selection and application of • produces some information appropriate business appropriate business business procedures to some procedures to produce procedures to consistently procedures to produce produce information information produce accurate information relatively accurate information • presents information • presents information • presents information to a • presents some information to • presents some information. consistently and effectively to effectively to a business business standard. a business standard. a business standard. standard. 48
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 8. Language education Teachers of Senior English have a special responsibility for language education. However, it is the responsibility of all teachers to develop and monitor students’ abilities to use the forms of language appropriate to their own subject areas. Their responsibility entails developing the following skills: • ability in the selection and sequencing of information required in the various forms (such as reports, essays, interviews and seminar presentations) • the use of technical terms and their definitions • the use of correct grammar, spelling, punctuation and layout. Assessment in all subjects needs to take into consideration appropriate use of language. The ability to communicate well is essential to effective participation in the workplace. Students of Business Communication & Technologies will be required to demonstrate the attributes and skills necessary for effective written and non-written communication in a business environment. Such skills are of fundamental importance in attaining knowledge of business, in understanding administration concepts, in analysing and evaluating recommendations in a range of business- related situations, and in handling a variety of business transactions. They are also critical to developing the effective workteam, personal and interpersonal communication skills essential for good staff and customer relations and, ultimately, the successful operation of a business. Students also need to be familiar with differences and subtleties in language when negotiating with overseas business contacts and handling international business communications. In a highly competitive business world and one in which international trade is becoming more frequent, the importance of developing an awareness of national and international cultural sensitivities in both verbal and nonverbal communications is of utmost importance. Students should be encouraged to use language to achieve different purposes in different contexts and for a variety of audiences. Opportunities should be provided for students to access, process and present information in a range of forms and media as suggested in Table 1. 49
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Table 1: Language sources, purposes and formats Drawing upon sources of Using language for the Presenting information in forms information, such as: purposes of: such as: • observations • restating information • formal reports • demonstrations • reporting results • business letters • textbooks • delivering information • memos • handbooks • arguing a proposition • emails • manuals • explaining a relationship • faxes • product brochures • proposing action • telephone messages • computer files • defending a position • reviews • journal articles • justifying a stance • short response • magazines • evaluating an argument • spoken/signed presentations • newspaper articles • developing an idea • audiovisual presentations • advertisements • persuading • seminars • broadcast media • describing a process • discussions • internet • identifying/recognising • expositions • CD-ROMs • listening/responding • demonstrations • videos/films/DVD • collecting • charts • lectures • selecting • graphs • interviews • listening • diagrams • discussions • classifying • brochures • industry speakers. • sequencing • pamphlets • explaining/describing • sketches • analysing • models • solving problems • photographs/captions • making conclusions • conversations • summarising. • electronic media. 50
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 9. Quantitative concepts and skills Success in dealing with issues and situations in life and work depends on the development and integration of a range of abilities, such as being able to: • comprehend basic concepts and terms underpinning the areas of number, space, probability and statistics, measurement and algebra • extract, convert or translate information given in numerical or algebraic forms, diagrams, maps, graphs or tables • calculate, apply algebraic procedures, implement algorithms • make use of calculators and computers • use skills or apply concepts from one problem or one subject domain to another. Some subjects focus on the development and application of numerical and other mathematical concepts and skills. These subjects may provide a basis for the general development of such quantitative skills or have a distinct aim, such as to prepare students to cope with the quantitative demands of their personal lives or to participate in a specific workplace environment. Nevertheless, in all subjects students are to be encouraged to develop their understanding and to learn through the incorporation — to varying degrees — of mathematical strategies and approaches to tasks. Similarly, students should be presented with experiences that stimulate their mathematical interest and hone those quantitative skills that contribute to operating successfully within each of their subject domains. The distinctive nature of Business Communication & Technologies may require that new mathematical concepts be introduced and new skills be developed. In many cases, however, it will be a matter for teachers, in the context of their own subjects, having to encourage the use of quantitative skills and understandings that were developed previously by their students. Within appropriate learning contexts and experiences in the subject, opportunities are to be provided for the revision, maintenance, and extension of such skills and understandings. 51
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS 10. Educational equity Equity means fair treatment of all. In developing work programs from this syllabus, schools should incorporate the following concepts of equity. All young people in Queensland have a right to gain an education that meets their needs, and prepares them for active participation in creating a socially just, equitable and democratic global society. Schools need to provide opportunities for all students to demonstrate what they know and can do. All students, therefore, should have equitable access to educational programs and human and physical resources. Teachers should ensure that particular needs of the following groups of students are met: female students; male students; Aboriginal students; Torres Strait Islander students; students from non–English-speaking backgrounds; students with disabilities; students with gifts and talents; geographically isolated students; and students from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Subject matter chosen should include, whenever possible, the contributions and experiences of all groups of people. Learning contexts and community needs and aspirations should also be considered. In choosing appropriate learning experiences teachers can introduce and reinforce non-racist, non-sexist, culturally sensitive and unprejudiced attitudes and behaviour. Learning experiences should encourage the participation of students with disabilities and accommodate different learning styles. Resource materials used should recognise and value the contributions of both females and males to society and include social experiences of both genders. Resource materials should also reflect cultural diversity within the community and draw from the experiences of the range of cultural groups in the community. To allow students to demonstrate achievement, barriers to equal opportunity need to be identified, investigated and removed. This may involve being proactive in finding the best ways to meet the diverse range of learning and assessment needs of students. The variety of assessment techniques in the work program should allow students of all backgrounds to demonstrate their knowledge and skills related to the criteria and standards stated in this syllabus. The syllabus criteria and standards should be applied in the same way to all students. Teachers should consider equity policies of individual schools and schooling authorities, and may find the following resources useful for devising an inclusive work program: ACACA 1996, Guidelines for Assessment Quality and Equity, available from <www.acaca.org.au> ANTA 2004, A Guide to Equity and the AQTF, available from Australian Training Products Ltd <www.atpl.net.au> QSA 2006, Policy on Special Consideration in School-based Assessments in Senior Certification, available from <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> QSA 2006, Policy Statement: Equity, available from <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> EQ 2005, Inclusive education statement, available from <http://education.qld.gov.au/studentservices/> EQ 2006, Education Policy and Procedures Register: Inclusive education, available from <http://education.qld.gov.au/strategic/eppr/> QSCC 2001, Equity Considerations for the development of curriculum and test material, available from <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> QCEC 2001, Inclusive Practices in Queensland Catholic Schools, available from <www.qcec.qld.catholic.edu.au> 52
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Resources Text and reference books A wide variety of textbooks and resource materials that could be used as sources of information about Business Communication & Technologies are available. Book suppliers provide information regarding current publications. World Wide Web Many interactive and static websites can be used to enhance a course in Business Communication & Technologies and often include useful resources. Some particularly useful sites include: Industrial relations • Australian Council of Trade Unions: <www.actu.asn.au> • Australian Industrial Relations Commission: <www.airc.gov.au> • Department of Employment and Industrial Relations — Industrial Relations Queensland: <www.deir.qld.gov.au> • Department of Employment and Industrial Relations — Queensland Industrial Relations Education Committee (IREC): <www.deir.qld.gov.au/industrial/training/education/schools/index.htm> • Federal Court of Australia: <www.federalcourt.gov.au> • Queensland Chamber of Commerce & Industry Ltd: <www.commerceqld.com.au/www/index.cfm> • Wageline: <www.wageline.qld.gov.au> International business communication • AUSTRADE — Australian Trade commission: <www.austrade.gov.au> • Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry: <www.acci.asn.au> • Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (Smart Traveller): <www.smarttraveller.gov.au> • Australian Institute of Export: <www.aiex.com.au> • Commerce Queensland (International Business): <www.commerceqld.com.au/www/index.cfm? itemid=8&CFID=2747593&CFTOKEN=86700446> • Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade: <www.dfat.gov.au> • Executive Planet: <www.executiveplanet.com/index.php?title=Main_Page> • Lonely Planet: <www.lonelyplanet.com> • United Nations: <www.un.org/english> • World Trade Centres Association: <http://world.wtca.org/portal/site/wtcaonline> • World Trade Organisations: <www.wto.org> 53
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Workplace health, safety and sustainability • Australian Government — Comcare: <www.comcare.gov.au> • Australian Government — Occupation Health & Safety: <www.business.gov.au/Business+Entry+Point/Business+Topics/Occupational+health+and+ safety> • Australian Government (Workplace Health & Safety): <www.australia.gov.au/OHS_(Workplace_Health_&_Safety)> • Department of Employment and Industrial Relations — Workplace Health and Safety: <www.deir.qld.gov.au/workplace/index.htm> • Queensland Department of Industrial Relations — Safetysense: <http://whs.qld.gov.au/safetysense/index.htm> • WorkCover Queensland: <www.workcover.qld.gov.au> • Workplace Health & Safety Act 1995 (Qld): <www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/W/WorkplHSaA95.pdf> • Workplace Health & Safety Diagnostic Quiz: <www.sdi.qld.gov.au/dsdweb/htdocs/ssb/diag/first_page.cfm?surveyType=STWHS> Newspaper reports Many newspapers carry regular pages, columns and features about Business Communication & Technologies. Local newspapers can also be a source of useful data. The compilation of news files on particular topics can broaden the knowledge base of students and provide a valuable source of material for developing assessment instruments. Periodicals Journals and periodicals provide current, relevant information. Journals and periodicals relevant to Business Communication & Technologies may include: • Business Communication Quarterly • Business Education Forum • International Journal of Business and Management Education • The Journal of Business Communication • The Journal of Business Systems, Governance and Ethics School librarians should be able to help identify and locate other useful periodicals. Electronic media and learning technology A wide range of videos, DVDs and television recordings are available on a variety of topics related to Business Communication & Technologies. Various computer software programs and CD-ROMs may be useful for a course in Business Communication & Technologies, as learning tools, to gain access to information presented in a variety of forms and to help students gain ICT skills. Educational program distributors are able to supply updated resource lists. 54
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Organisations and community resources A variety of government and community organisations provide personnel, advice, resources and information to assist in constructing and implementing a course in Business Communication & Technologies. Some of these include: • Australian Bureau of Statistics: <www.abs.gov.au> • Australian Government — Business.gov.au: <www.business.gov.au/Business+Entry+Point/ > • Business Educators Association of Queensland: <www.beaq.org.au/> • Business Studies Teaching & Education Resources: <www.bized.co.uk/> • Commonwealth Government (departments and agencies): <www.australia.gov.au> • Education Queensland — Curriculum Exchange (Learning Place): <http://education.qld.gov.au/learningplace/cx/> • National Training Information Service: <www.ntis.gov.au/ • Office of Fair Trading Queensland: <www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au/> • Queensland Chamber of Commerce & Industry Ltd: <www.commerceqld.com.au/www/index.cfm> • Queensland Government Home Page: <www.qld.gov.au/> • The Learning Federation (business & Enterprise Resources): <www.tlf.edu.au/for_teachers/ sample_learning_materials/tm_-_business_and_enterprise.html> • Victorian Commercial Teachers Association: <www.vcta.asn.au/> 55
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Glossary Accreditation The process by which specific courses are formally recognised by State or Territory Training Authorities to ensure they meet specified quality requirements. Articulation The formal linkage between different levels of qualifications. Articulation arrangements allow for horizontal or vertical movement between qualifications. Assessment Assessment means the process of collecting evidence and making judgments on whether competency has been achieved to confirm that an individual can perform to the standard expected in the workplace, as expressed in the relevant endorsed industry/enterprise competency standards or the learning outcomes of an accredited course. Assessment guidelines Assessment guidelines means an endorsed component of a Training Package which underpins assessment and which sets out the industry approach to valid, reliable, flexible and fair assessment. Assessment guidelines include the assessment system overview, assessor requirements, designing assessment resources, conducting assessment and sources of information on assessment. Assessment instrument Particular methods developed and used by a school to gather information about student achievement, which may be made up of one or more items and may assess more than one criterion. Assessment item An individual question on an assessment instrument or part of an instrument. Assessment materials Optional component of training packages that complement endorsed industry assessment guidelines and could take the form of assessment exemplars or specific assessment tasks and instructions. Assessment technique The methods identified in the syllabus to gather evidence about student achievement. Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) A national framework for all qualifications in post-compulsory education and training. The AQF recognises that the schools sector, the VET sector and the higher education sector have different industry and institutional linkages. It connects the different sectors in a coherent single framework incorporating qualifications, levels and guidelines. The AQF comprises titles and guidelines, which define each qualification, together with principles and protocols covering articulation and issuance of qualifications and Statements of Attainment. Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) The Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) is the national set of standards which assures nationally consistent, high-quality training and assessment services for the clients of Australia’s vocational education and training system. AQTF 2007 is the current version of the framework, effective from 1 July 2007. 56
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS The National Quality Council (NQC) collaboratively developed AQTF 2007 and will continue to monitor it. The NQC includes all State and Territory Governments, the Australian Government, peak industry bodies, peak training organisations and a representative on equity issues. The Ministerial Council of Vocational and Technical Education, which includes all Ministers for Training in Australia, has approved these quality arrangements. Competency-based Assessment Competency-based assessment is the process of collecting evidence and making judgments on whether the student can consistently demonstrate knowledge and skill, and the application of that knowledge and skill to the standard of performance required in the workplace. Competency The broad concept of industry competence concerns the ability to perform particular tasks and duties to the standard of performance expected in the workplace. Competency requires the application of specified skills and knowledge relevant to effective participation in an industry, industry sector, or enterprise. Credit transfer Credit transfer assesses the initial course or subject that an individual is using to claim access to, or the award of credit in, a destination course. The assessment determines the extent to which the client’s initial course or subject is equivalent to the required learning outcomes, competency outcomes, or standards in a qualification. This may include credit transfer based on formal learning that is outside the AQF. Elements of competency Elements of competency are any of the basic building blocks of a unit of competency which describe the key activities or elements of the work covered by the unit. Employability skills Employability skills are skills that apply across a variety of jobs and life contexts. They are sometimes referred to as key skills, core skills, life skills, essential skills, key competencies, necessary skills, and transferable skills. Industry’s preferred term is employability skills. Employability skills are defined as “skills required not only to gain employment, but also to progress within an enterprise so as to achieve one’s potential and contribute successfully to enterprise strategic directions”. Key competencies Employment related general competencies that are essential for effective participation in the workplace. National recognition National recognition is: • Recognition by an RTO of the AQF qualifications and statements of attainment issued by all other RTOs, thereby enabling national recognition of the qualifications and statements of attainment issued to any person. • Recognition by each state and territory’s registering body of the training organisations registered by any other state or territory’s registering body of its registration decisions. • Recognition by all state and territory course-accrediting bodies and registering bodies of the courses accredited by each state or territory’s course-accrediting body and of its accreditation decisions. National Training Framework (NTF) The National Training Framework is made up of the AQF and Training Packages. The NTF is a nationally consistent, industry-led system designed to: 57
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS • provide high-quality skill outcomes to maintain individuals’ employability and increase their productivity • provide for nationally recognised qualifications, and • improve the competitiveness of enterprises and the nation. National Training Information Service (NTIS) The National Training Information Service is the national register for recording information about RTOs, Training Packages and accredited courses. NTIS is part of the National Skills Framework. Performance criteria The part of a competency standard specifying the required level of performance in terms of a set of outcomes which need to be achieved in order to be deemed competent. Qualification Qualification means, in the vocational education and training sector, the formal certification, issued by an RTO under the AQF, that a person has achieved all the requirements for a qualification as specified in an endorsed national Training Package or in an AQF accredited course. Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) An assessment process that assesses an individual’s non-formal and informal learning to determine the extent to which that individual has achieved the required learning outcomes, competency outcomes, or standards for entry to, and/or partial or total completion of, a qualification. Registered training organisation (RTO) A training organisation registered by a state or territory registering body in accordance with the AQTF 2007 Essential Standards for Registration within a defined scope of registration. A training organisation must be registered in order to deliver and assess nationally recognised training and issue nationally recognised qualifications. Registration Formal recognition by a state or territory registering body, in accordance with the AQTF 2007 Standards for State and Territory Registering Bodies, that a training organisation meets the requirements of the AQTF 2007 Essential Standards for Recognition. A training organisation must be registered in order to deliver and assess nationally recognised training and issue nationally recognised qualifications. Seen task Stimulus material provided before the administration of the assessment instrument, not the question or statement relating to the material. Statement of Attainment Statement of Attainment is issued by an RTO when an individual has completed one or more units of competency from nationally recognised qualification(s)/course(s). Training and Assessment Strategy A framework that guides the learning requirements and the teaching, training and assessment arrangements of a vocational education and training qualification. It is the document that outlines the macro-level requirements of the learning process, usually at the qualification level. Training Packages A nationally endorsed, integrated set of competency standards, assessment guidelines and AQF qualifications for a specific industry, industry sector or enterprise. 58
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Units of competency Unit of competency means the specification of industry knowledge and skill and the application of that knowledge and skill to the standard of performance expected in the workplace. Unseen task Neither the stimulus material nor the question or statement relating to the material is provided before the administration of the task. 59
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Appendix: Sample courses of study Sample A: Course organisation3 3 NOTE: These samples are intended as a guide for teachers’ planning only. See <www.qsa.qld.edu.au> for work program requirements. 60
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS TOPIC TOTAL Context: TOPIC TITLE UNIT OF COMPETENCY HOURS NO. HOURS Sport and 8 (a) Computer operations — wordprocessing — routine BSBITU201A 20 YEAR 11 SEM 1 recreation 8 (e) Computer operations — electronic presentations (to be assessed Semester 3) BSBITU302A 3 and/or Other 55 7 Organisational skills (to be assessed Semester 3) BSBWOR202A 3 1 Business and work environments 29 Entertainment 4 Managing workplace information BSBINM201A 20 SEM 2 and/or Other 8 (c) Computer operations — spreadsheets BSBITU202A 17 55 9 (c) Financial records — Source Documents FNSICGEN305B (elements 1 & 4) 8 5 (a) Workplace communication 10 5 (b) Workplace communication BSBCMM201A 15 YEAR 12 SEM 3 2 International business communication 15 Tourism and Hospitality 8 (e) Computer operations — electronic presentations BSBITU302A 5 55 and/or Other 7 Organisational skills BSBWOR202A 5 6 Workteams BSBWOR203A 15 Retail and/or 8 (b) Computer operations — word processing — advanced BSBITU303A, BSBWOR204A 20 SEM 4 Other 3 Workplace health, safety and sustainability BSBOHS201A, BSBSUS201A 20 55 9 (a) Financial records — banking procedures FNSICGEN305B (element 1 & 2) 7 9 (b) Financial records — petty cash FNSICGEN305B (element 1 & 3) 8 Sample A: Assessment plan 61
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Knowledge Reasoni Skills & Topi Approx & ng Se Inst Assessment Procedure c Topic name time/lengt Understand Process m no. technique s no. h ing es F S F S F S Computer operations — 70–100 1 8 (a) Practical tasks  wordprocessing routine mins One Short written response 50–70 mins  2 1 Business and work environments 60–80 mins Extended written 300–500  response wds Spoken/multimodal presentation min. 3 mins 3 4 Managing workplace information   Extended written 3–5 wks response (Research) Computer operations — 8 (c) spreadsheets 70–100 Two 4 Practical tasks  9 (c) Financial records — source mins documents Short written response/ 5 5 (a) Workplace communication Extended written 70–90 mins   response Practical tasks/Short 6 5 (b) Workplace communication 60–90 mins  written response International business Three 2 communication 8 (e) Computer operations — 7 Integrated project 6–8 wks    7 electronic presentations 6 Organisational skills Workteams Computer operations — 70–100 8 8 (b) Practical tasks  wordprocessing advanced mins Short written response 40–60 mins  Workplace health, safety and 60–80 mins 9 3 Extended written sustainability Four 500–800  response wds VERIFICATION 9 (a Financial records — banking 10 Practical tasks 60–90 mins  & b) procedures and petty cash Sample A: Student profile Inst Topic Topic Assessment Sem KU RP SP LOA No No technique Computer operations — 1 8a Practical tasks (F) X wordprocessing — routine 1 Short written response (F) Business and work 2 1 environments Extended written X X response (F) END OF SEMESTER 62
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Spoken/Multimodal Managing workplace presentation (F) 3 4 information Extended written X X response (Research) (F) Computer operations — 2 spreadsheets 4 8c, 9c Practical tasks (F) X Financial records — source documents Short written response (F) 5 5a Workplace communication Extended written X X response (F) END OF SEMESTER MONITORING Practical tasks / Short 6 5b Workplace communication written response (S) X International business 2 communication 3 8e Computer operations — 7 7 Integrated project (S) X X X Electronic presentations 6 Organisational skills Workteams END OF SEMESTER Computer operations — 8 8b wordprocessing — Practical tasks (S) X advanced 4 Short written response (S) Workplace health, safety 9 3 and sustainability Extended written X X response (S) VERIFICATION Financial records — 10 9a, 9b banking procedures Practical task (S) X and petty cash EXIT LEVEL Assessment completed in Year 11 is considered formative. Assessment completed in Year 12 is considered summative. 63
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Sample B: Course organisation for composite class (Year A) Topic Total Sem Context Topic title Unit/s of competency Hours number time 8 (a) Computer operations — word processing BSBITU201A 17 — routine Travel4 3 Workplace health, safety and BSBOHS201A 1 6 sustainability 55 hours BSBSUS201A 7 Workteams 38 BSBWOR203A Organisational skills BSBWOR202A 1 Business and work environments 30 Public 2 9 (b) Financial records — Petty cash FNSICGEN305B (element 1 & 3) 10 55 hours administration§ 8 (c) Computer operations — Spreadsheets BSBITU202A 15 8 (b) Computer operations — word processing BSBITU303A, BSBWOR204A 17 § — advanced 3 Legal 4 Managing workplace information 55 hours BSBINM201A 5 Workplace communication 38 BSBCMM201A 2 International business communication 8 (e) Computer operations — electronic BSBITU302A 38 Health and presentations 4 55 hours Well-being§ 9 (a) Financial records — Banking procedures FNSICGEN305B (element 1 2, & 4) 17 9 (c) Financial records — Source documents 4 Alternative contexts – these may be substituted for any of the contexts in the above course organisation: insurance, banks and other financial institutions, tourism and hospitality, optional. 64
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Sample B: Course organisation for composite class (Year B) Context Topic Total Sem Topic title Unit/s of competency Hours number time 8 (a) Computer operations — word processing BSBITU201A 17 routine 1 Legal5 55 hours 4 Managing workplace information BSBINM201A 38 5 Workplace communication BSBCMM201A 2 International business communication 8 (e) Computer operations — electronic 38 Health and BSBITU302A 2 presentations 55 hours Well-being** 9 (a) Financial records — Banking procedures FNSICGEN305B (element 1 2, & 4) 17 9 (c) Financial records — Source documents 8 (b) Computer operations — word processing BSBITU303A, BSBWOR204A 17 advanced 3 Workplace health, safety and BSBOHS201A 3 Travel** 6 sustainability 55 hours BSBSUS201A 7 Workteams 38 BSBWOR203A Organisational skills BSBWOR202A 1 Business and work environments 30 Public 4 9 (b) Financial records — Petty cash FNSICGEN305B (element 1 & 3) 10 55 hours administration** 8 (c) Computer operations — Spreadsheets BSBITU202A 15 5 Alternative contexts – these may be substituted for any of the contexts in the above course organisation: insurance, banks and other financial institutions, tourism and hospitality, optional. 65
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Sample B: Visual representation of composite class Unit of Topic no. Topic Hrs competency Semester 1 Year A Computer operations — 8 (a) BSBITU201A 17 word processing — routine Workplace health, safety and BSBOHS201A 3 sustainability BSBSUS201A 38 6 Workteams BSBWOR203A 7 Organisational skills BSBWOR202A Total time 55 hours Year A Semester 2 Year A Business and work 1 30 environments Financial records — petty FNSICGEN305B 9 (b) 10 cash (element 1 & 3) Computer operations — 8 (c) BSBITU202A 15 spreadsheets Unit of Total time 55 hours Topic no. Topic Hrs competency Semester 3 Year A Semester 1 Year B Computer operations — BSBITU303A, Computer operations — 8 (b) word processing — 17 8 (a) BSBITU201A 17 BSBWOR204A word processing — routine advanced Managing workplace Managing workplace 4 BSBINM201A 4 BSBINM201A information 38 information 38 5 Workplace communication BSBCMM201A 5 Workplace communication BSBCMM201A Total time 55 hours Total time 55 hours Semester 4 Year A Semester 2 Year B International business International business 2 2 communication communication BSBITU302A 38 BSBITU302A 38 Computer operations — Computer operations — 8 (e) 8 (e) electronic presentations electronic presentations Financial records — banking Financial records — 9 (a) 9 (a) procedures FNSICGEN305B banking procedures FNSICGEN305B 17 17 Financial records — source (element 1, 2 & 4) Financial records — (element 1, 2 & 4) 9 (c) 9 (c) Year B documents source documents Total time 55 hours Total time 55 hours Semester 3 Year B Computer operations — BSBITU303A, 8 (b) word processing — BSBWOR204A advanced BSBOHS201A 17 Workplace health, safety BSBSUS201A 38 3 and sustainability BSBWOR203A 6 Workteams BSBWOR202A Organisatio 7 nal skills Y Y S S Year AS1/ 11Year BS2/11S3/12S1/ 11Year S S Total time 55 hours ASS AS4/12S2/11S3/12S1/ 11Year Semester BS S BS4/12S2/11S3/12S1/ 4 Year B 1S 1 S S S A 11S4/12S2/11S3/12S4/12And so on A 1 Business and work 30 Representation of continuing composite classes. environments Financial records — petty FNSICGEN305B 9 (b) 10 cash (element 1 & 3) Computer operations 8 (c) — spreadshe ets BSBITU202A15Total time55 hours
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Sample B: Sample assessment plan for composite class (Year A) Inst Approx. KU RP SP Sem Topic Topic name Assessment technique no. time/length 1 8 (a) Computer operations — word processing — routine Practical tasks (F) 50–80 mins  3 Workplace health, safety and sustainability 1 2 6 Workteams Integrated project (F) 5–7 weeks   7 Organisational skills 50–70 mins Extended written response (F)  3 (min 300 words) 1 Business and work environments Short written response (F) 50–70 mins  2 4 9 (b) Financial records — Petty cash Practical tasks (F) 50–70 mins  5 8 (c) Computer operations — Spreadsheets Practical tasks (F) 50–70 mins  6 8 (b) Computer operations – word processing – advanced Practical tasks (S) 50–80 mins  50–70 mins 3 4 Managing workplace information Extended written response (S)  7 (min 500 words) 5 Workplace communication Short written response (S) 50–70 mins  2 International business communication 8 Integrated project (S) 5–7 weeks    8 (e) Computer operations — electronic presentations 4 VERIFICATION 9 (a) Financial records — Banking procedures 9 Practical tasks (S) 50–80 mins  9 (c) Financial records — Source documents Sample B: Sample assessment plan for composite class (Year B)
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Inst Approx. KU RP SP Sem Topic Topic name Assessment technique no. time/length 1 8 (b) Computer operations – word processing – advanced Practical tasks (F) 50–80 mins  50–70 mins 1 4 Managing workplace information Extended written response (F)  2 (min 300 words) 5 Workplace communication Short written response (F) 50–70 mins  2 International business communication 3 Integrated project (F) 5–7 weeks    8 (e) Computer operations — electronic presentations 2 9 (a) Financial records — Banking procedures 4 Practical tasks (F) 50–80 mins  9 (c) Financial records — Source documents 5 8 (a) Computer operations — word processing — routine Practical tasks (S) 50–80 mins  3 Workplace health, safety and sustainability 3 6 6 Workteams Integrated project (S) 5–7 weeks   7 Organisational skills 50–70 mins Extended written response (S)  7 (min 500 words) 1 Business and work environments Short written response (S) 60–90 mins  4 8 9 (b) Financial records — Petty cash Practical tasks (S) 50–70 mins  VERIFICATION 9 8 (c) Computer operations — Spreadsheets Practical tasks (S) 50–80 mins 
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Sample B: Student profile (Year A) Reasoning processes understandingKnowledge & Level of achievement Skills and procedures Inst Topic Assessment Sem Topic no. no. technique KU RP SP LOA Computer operations — word 1 8 (a) processing — routine Practical tasks (F)  Workplace health, safety and 3 1 sustainability 2 6 Integrated project (F)   Workteams 7 Organisational skills END OF SEMESTER Extended written response (F)  3 1 Business and work environments Short written response (F)  4 9 (b) Financial records — Petty cash Practical tasks (F)  2 Computer operations — 5 8 (c) Practical tasks (F)  Spreadsheets END OF SEMESTER MONITORING Computer operations — word 6 8 (b) processing — advanced Practical tasks (S)  Extended written response (S)  3 4 Managing workplace information 7 5 Workplace communication Short written response (S)  END OF SEMESTER International business 2 communication 8 8 (e) Computer operations — Integrated project (S)    electronic presentations VERIFICATION 4 9 (a) Financial records — Banking procedures 9 9 (c) Practical tasks (S)  Financial records — Source documents EXIT LEVEL
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS (F) = Formative Assessment (S) = Summative Assessment
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS Sample B: Student profile (Year B) Level of achievement Reasoning processes Skills and procedures understandingKnowledge & Inst Topic Assessment Sem Topic no. no. technique KU RP SP LO A Computer operations — word 1 8 (b) processing — advanced Practical tasks (F)  Extended written response (F)  1 4 Managing workplace information 2 5 Workplace communication Short written response (F)  END OF SEMESTER International business 2 communication 3 8 (e) Computer operations — Integrated project (F)    electronic presentations 9 (a) Financial records — Banking 2 procedures 4 9 (c) Practical tasks (F)  Financial records — Source documents END OF SEMESTER MONITORING Computer operations — word 5 8 (a) processing — routine Practical tasks (S)  Workplace health, safety and 3 3 sustainability 6 6 Integrated project (S)   Workteams 7 Organisational skills END OF SEMESTER Extended written response (S)  7 1 Business and work environments Short written response (S)  8 9 (b) Financial records — Petty cash Practical tasks (S)  4 VERIFICATION Computer operations — 9 8 (c) Practical tasks (S)  Spreadsheets EXIT LEVEL
  • BUSINESS COMMUNICATION & TECHNOLOGIES SENIOR SYLLABUS (F) = Formative Assessment (S) = Summative Assessment