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COM 7600 Communication and Technology Seminar

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  • 1. KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE COURSE PROPOSAL OR REVISION, Cover Sheet (10/02/2002) Course Number/Program Name COM 7600 COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR M.A. IN INTEGRATED GLOBAL COMMUNICATION Department COMMUNICATION Degree Title (if applicable) Proposed Effective Date FALL 2010 (PROGRAM) MAY 2011 (COURSE) Check one or more of the following and complete the appropriate sections: Sections to be Completed New Course Proposal II, III, IV, V, VII Course Title Change I, II, III Course Number Change I, II, III Course Credit Change I, II, III Course Prerequisite Change I, II, III Course Description Change I, II, III Notes: If proposed changes to an existing course are substantial (credit hours, title, and description), a new course with a new number should be proposed. A new Course Proposal (Sections II, III, IV, V, VII) is required for each new course proposed as part of a new program. Current catalog information (Section I) is required for each existing course incorporated into the program. Minor changes to a course can use the simplified E-Z Course Change Form. Submitted by: _____ Faculty Member Date Approved Not Approved Department Curriculum Committee Date Approved Not Approved Department Chair Date Approved Not Approved College Curriculum Committee Date Approved Not Approved
  • 2. College Dean Date Approved Not Approved GPCC Chair Date Approved Not Approved Dean, Graduate College Date Approved Not Approved Vice President for Academic Affairs Date Approved Not Approved President Date
  • 3. KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE COURSE/CONCENTRATION/PROGRAM CHANGE II. Proposed Information (Fill in for changes and new courses) Course Prefix and Number COM 7600 Course Title Communication and Technology Seminar Credit Hours 3,0.3 Prerequisites COM 7300 Description (or Proposed Degree Requirements) This course continues what IGC students began learning in the global communication theory seminar. This course focuses on how technology impacts the communication process in five specific areas: public relations, advertising, political communication, citizen media, and law. It will look at the legal, social, and economic implications of technology in each of these areas. Students will be able to examine and critique technology’s role in the communication field. Specifically, they will examine the role technology has on public communication. III. Justification Understanding the various channels of communication is essential for planning and implementing effective global communication programs. Global media systems, media regulations and new media technology are concerns that must be addressed by today’s global communication professional. This course will provide for students a thorough knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of existing media technologies and how new media technology is offering new opportunities for professional communicators to reach heretofore unreachable markets and publics.
  • 4. IV. Additional Information (for New Courses only) Instructor: Text: Communication Technology and Social Change: Theory and Implications by Lin, Carolyn A. and Atkin, David J. (edited) (2006) Prerequisites: COM 7300 Objectives: This course will provide for students a firm foundation of knowledge concerning traditional media and media systems found around the world, how these systems are regulated and/ or constrained and how new media are changing the media landscape. Students will explore how public relations professionals, advertising media planners, government leaders and their diplomats, and private citizens work with existing and emerging media technologies around the globe to effect change or maintain the status quo, and how all forms of media technology shapes our cultures. Instructional Method Traditional classroom setting that includes lectures, discussions, student presentations and student research projects. Method of Evaluation Assignments: Take Home Mid-Term Exam: 30% Class Presentation: 25% Term Paper: 30% Participation: 15% Grading Scale: 90-100% A 80-89% B 70-79% C 60-69% D 59% and less F
  • 5. V. Resources and Funding Required (New Courses only) Resource Amount Faculty existing Other Personnel 0 Equipment existing classroom technologies Supplies 0 Travel 0 New Books existing KSU Library holdings New Journals existing KSU Library holdings Other (Specify) 0 TOTAL 0 Funding Required Beyond Normal Departmental Growth 0
  • 6. VII Attach Syllabus COM 7600 Seminar in Communication and Technology Joshua Azriel, PhD Office: SO 5092 Office Phone: 770-423-6779 Office Hours: TBA E-Mail: jazriel@kennesaw.edu [I will only be using your KSU e-mails to communicate with you] KSU’s Mission: “…A learning centered institution emphasizing creativity, diversity, global awareness, leadership, ethics, teaching excellence, digital literacy, technological competence, and community engagement.” Global learning for Engaged Citizenship is an educational process that enhances one’s competencies for participating productively and responsively in the diverse, international, intercultural, and interdependent world. Course Description: This course continues what IGC students began learning in the global communication theory seminar. This course focuses on how technology impacts the communication process in five specific areas: public relations, advertising, political communication, citizen media, and law. It will look at the legal, social, and economic implications of technology in each of these areas. Students will be able to examine and critique technology’s role in the communication field. Specifically, they will examine the role technology has on public communication. The role of technology in how we communicate personally and professionally is rapidly changing. This course will examine the latest communication tools such as Facebook, Twitter, blogging, wikis etc. Course Prerequisites: COM 7300 Course Objectives: This course will provide for students • a firm foundation of knowledge concerning traditional media and media systems found around the world • how these systems are regulated and/or constrained • how new media are changing the media landscape. • how all forms of media technology shapes our cultures. Students will explore how public relations professionals, advertising media planners, government leaders and their diplomats, and private citizens work with existing and emerging media technologies around the globe to effect change or maintain the status quo. Participation: Success in this course will depend on student participation. Class contribution is vital. This course will include once a week online discussion of a topic through a class wiki.
  • 7. Textbook: Communication Technology and Social Change: Theory and Implications by Lin, Carolyn A. and Atkin, David J. (edited) (2006) Required course packet available in the bookstore. The course packet is composed of the following articles divided by concentration: Public Relations: Somerville, I. and Wood E. (2007). Public relations and the free organizational publication: Practitioner perspectives on the brave new (media) world. Journal of Communication Management, 11(3). Argenti, P.A. (2006). How technology has influenced the field of Corporate Communication. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 20(3). Galloway, C. (2005). Cyber-PR and “dynamic touch.” Public Relations Review, 31(4). Jardan, Y. and Jardan A.C. (2004). Communicating the protection of information privacy. Communicare 23(1). Berger, B.K., Dong-Jin P. (2003). Public Relation(ship)s or private controls? Practitioner Perspectives on the uses and benefits of new technologies. New Jersey Journal of Communication 11(1). Advertising: Aguado, J.M. and Martinez I.J. (2007). The Construction of the Mobile Experience: The role of advertising campaigns in the appropriation of mobile phone technologies. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 21(2). ChangHyun, J. and Jongwoo, J. (2007). Consumer responses to creative platform of the internet advertising. Web Journal of Mass Communication Research, (9). Susanne, G. (2007). Laptops and lipsticks: Feminising Technology. Learning, Media & Technology, 32(1). Sahar, I. et al. (2008) Enhancing mobile advertising via Bluetooth technology, International Journal of Mobile Communications 6(5). Jing Z. (2008) Understanding the acceptance of mobile SMS advertising among young Chinese consumers, Psychology and Marketing, 25(8). Political Communication: Shah, N. (2008). From global village to global marketplace: Metaphorical descriptions of the global internet. International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, 4(1).
  • 8. Sullenger, W. (2007) Silencing the blogosphere: A First Amendment caution to legislators considering using blogs to communicate directly with constituents. Richmond Journal of Law and Technology, 13. Kaid, L.L. (2002). Political advertising and information seeking: Comparing exposure via traditional and internet channels. Journal of Advertising, 31(1). Jackson, N.A. and Lilleker D.G. (2007). Seeking unmediated political information in a mediated environment: The uses and gratifications of political parties’ e- newsletters. Information, Communication, and Society, 10(2). Livingston, S. and Bennett W.L. (2003). Gatekeeping, indexing, and live-event news: Is technology altering the construction of news? Political Communication, 20(4). Citizen Media: Kuhn, M. (2007). Interactivity and prioritizing the human: A code of blogging ethics. Journal of Mass Media Ethics, 22(1). Rabinovitch, E. (2008). WEB 2.0 is here and ready for use. IEEE Communications Magazine, 46(3). Jackson, M.H. (2007). Fluidity, promiscuity, and mash-ups: New Concepts for the study of mobility and communication. Communication Monographs, 74(3). Stafford, N. (2007). Lose the Distinction: Internet Bloggers and First Amendment Protection of Libel Defendants - Citizen Journalism and the Supreme Court's Murky Jurisprudence Blur the Line Between Media and Non-Media Speakers University of Detroit Law Review, 84. Law: Heller, B. (2007). Responding to internet harassment: Of legal right and moral wrongs: A case study of internet defamation. Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, 19. Azriel, J. (2007). The California Supreme Court’s decision in Barrett v. Rosenthal: How the court’s decision could further hamper efforts to restrict defamation on the internet. Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal, 30(1). Frese, M. (2005) Rolling the Dice: Are Online Gambling Advertisers "Aiding and Abetting" Criminal Activity or Exercising First Amendment-Protected Commercial Speech? Fordham Intellectual Property Media & Entertainment Law Journal, 15. May. R. (2007). Net Neutrality Mandates: Neutering the First Amendment in the Digital Age. Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society, Spring.
  • 9. Assignments: Take Home Mid-Term Exam: 30% Class Presentation: 25% Term Paper: 30% Participation: 15% Grading Scale: 90-100% A 80-89% B 70-79% C 60-69% D 59% and less F Class Presentation: Weekly readings will be split up among the students. Each student will present the readings in class and turn in a written summary and critique of the article. Midterm Exam: Students will be given two essay questions based on the readings. They will have one week to complete the exam and turn it in. Term Paper: Students will select one of the following five areas: public relations, advertising, political communication, citizen media, or law and write a 20-25 page research paper that explores a contemporary issue related to their chosen field and technology. The paper will explore how a specific use of technology affects the communication aspect of this field. Participation: Students will take part in both in-class and an online discussion of topics proposed by the professor. Once a week the professor will post a topic on the class wiki related to the weekly readings. Students will respond and begin a weekly discussion that will continue in class. Academic Integrity: Every Kennesaw State student is responsible for upholding the provisions of the Student Code of Conduct, as published in the undergraduate and graduate Catalogs. Section II of the Student Code of Conduct addresses the university’s policy on academic honesty, including provisions regarding plagiarism and cheating; unauthorized access to university materials; misrepresentation/falsification of university records or academic work; malicious removal, retention, or destruction of library materials; malicious/intentional misuse of computer facilities and/or services; and misuse of student identification cards. Incidents of alleged academic misconduct will be handled through the established procedures of the University Judiciary Program, which includes either an “informal” resolution by a faculty member, resulting in a grade adjustment, or a
  • 10. formal hearing procedure, which may subject a student to the Code of Conduct’s minimum one semester suspension requirement. Students with disabilities: If you have a visible or invisible disability and will require academic accommodations in this course, I would be happy to discuss your needs. Accommodations are coordinated through Disabled Student Support Services. Please contact Carol Pope at cpope@kennesaw.edu or call 770-423-6443. Tentative Course Schedule (subject to change) Week One: Course Introduction/Expectations Technology and Communication Overview Divide Up Semester Readings Introduce Course Wiki site Week Two: Technology and Social Change Present Readings: Chapters 1-4 in Lin and Atkin Week Three: Technology and Global Change Present Readings: Chapters 5-8 in Lin and Atkin Week Four: Technology Impacts PR **Guest: Dr. Buddy Mayo** Present Readings : Somerville, I. and Wood E. (2007). Public relations and the free organizational publication: Practitioner perspectives on the brave new (media) world. Journal of Communication Management, 11(3). Argenti, P.A. (2006). How technology has influenced the field of Corporate Communication. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 20(3). Galloway, C. (2005). Cyber-PR and “dynamic touch.” Public Relations Review, 31(4). Week Five: Technology and PR Present Readings:
  • 11. Jardan, Y. and Jardan A.C. (2004). Communicating the protection of information privacy. Communicare 23(1). Berger, B.K., Dong-Jin P. (2003). Public Relation(ship)s or private controls? Practitioner Perspectives on the uses and benefits of new technologies. New Jersey Journal of Communication 11(1). Week Six: Technology Effects on Advertising **Guest: Dr. Birgit Wassmuth** Present Readings: Aguado, J.M. and Martinez I.J. (2007). The Construction of the Mobile Experience: The role of advertising campaigns in the appropriation of mobile phone technologies. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 21(2). ChangHyun, J. and Jongwoo, J. (2007). Consumer responses to creative platform of the internet advertising. Web Journal of Mass Communication Research, (9). Susanne, G. (2007). Laptops and lipsticks: Feminising Technology. Learning, Media & Technology, 32(1). Week Seven: Present Readings: Sahar, I. et al. (2008) Enhancing mobile advertising via Bluetooth technology, International Journal of Mobile Communications 6(5). Jing Z. (2008) Understanding the acceptance of mobile SMS advertising among young Chinese consumers, Psychology and Marketing, 25(8). **Take Home Midterm on Crossroads of Technology and PR/Advertising** Week Eight: **Midterms Due** Technology’s Impact on Political Communication Present Readings on: Shah, N. (2008). From global village to global marketplace: Metaphorical descriptions of the global internet. International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, 4(1). Sullenger, W. (2007) Silencing the blogosphere: A First Amendment caution to legislators considering using blogs to communicate directly with constituents. Richmond Journal of Law and Technology, 13. Kaid, L.L. (2002). Political advertising and information seeking: Comparing exposure via traditional and internet channels. Journal of Advertising, 31(1).
  • 12. Week Nine: **Guest: Dr. Jeff Dewitt** Present Readings on: Jackson, N.A. and Lilleker D.G. (2007). Seeking unmediated political information in a mediated environment: The uses and gratifications of political parties’ e- newsletters. Information, Communication, and Society, 10(2). Livingston, S. and Bennett W.L. (2003). Gatekeeping, indexing, and live-event news: Is technology altering the construction of news? Political Communication, 20(4). Week Ten: Citizen Media Revolution: Placing the Power of Communication in Everyone’s Hands **Guest Len Witt** Executive Director, Center for Sustainable Journalism Present Readings on: Kuhn, M. (2007). Interactivity and prioritizing the human: A code of blogging ethics. Journal of Mass Media Ethics, 22(1). Rabinovitch, E. (2008). WEB 2.0 is here and ready for use. IEEE Communications Magazine, 46(3). Week Eleven: Future of Citizen Media Present Readings on: Jackson, M.H. (2007). Fluidity, promiscuity, and mash-ups: New Concepts for the study of mobility and communication. Communication Monographs, 74(3). Stafford, N. (2007). Lose the Distinction: Internet Bloggers and First Amendment Protection of Libel Defendants - Citizen Journalism and the Supreme Court's Murky Jurisprudence Blur the Line Between Media and Non-Media Speakers University of Detroit Law Review, 84. Week Twelve: The First Amendment Intersects with Technology Present Readings on: Chapters 13 and 14 in Lin and Atkin **Propose Final Research Paper Topics: Technology on the “Cutting Edge” of Law, Politics, Commerce or Citizen Media** Week Thirteen: Defamation on the Internet: Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube Present Readings on:
  • 13. Heller, B. (2007). Responding to internet harassment: Of legal right and moral wrongs: A case study of internet defamation. Yale Journal of Law and Feminism, 19. Azriel, J. (2007). The California Supreme Court’s decision in Barrett v. Rosenthal: How the court’s decision could further hamper efforts to restrict defamation on the internet. Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal, 30(1). Week Fourteen: Law, Technology, and Commerce **Updates on Research Papers** Present Readings on: Frese, M. (2005) Rolling the Dice: Are Online Gambling Advertisers "Aiding and Abetting" Criminal Activity or Exercising First Amendment-Protected Commercial Speech? Fordham Intellectual Property Media & Entertainment Law Journal, 15. Chapter 11 in Lin and Atkin Week Fifteen: Future of Technology and Communication: Is Summing Up Possible? Present Readings on: May. R. (2007). Net Neutrality Mandates: Neutering the First Amendment in the Digital Age. Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society, Spring. Chapter 15 in Lin and Atkin Week Sixteen: **Turn in Research Papers and Presentations on Topics**