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COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
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COM 480G SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

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  • 1. COM 480 SENIOR SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION SPRING, 2004 INSTRUCTOR Dr. Greg H. Gardner 146 Cornell Social Sciences • 407.646.2394 (office) • 407.767.0791 (home) • 407.646.1566 (fax) • ggardner@rollins.edu (office e-mail) COURSE PHILOSOPHY AND PURPOSE This course is a capstone experience that provides an end-of-the-major opportunity for you to conceptualize and more fully understand the theories, skills, methods, and applications of organizational communication and to shape them into a working body of knowledge that will enhance your life-long learning. The purposes of this senior-level seminar are two-fold: • To understand how knowledge of organizational communication will be useful to you in your personal and career lives and for the rest of your life; and • To demonstrate the abilities you have learned as a student of organizational communication
  • 2. including the abilities to write clearly, speak well, listen proficiently, and think lucidly. TEXTS • Wood, Julie T. But I Thought You Meant: Misunderstandings in Human Communication. Mountain View, CA. Mayfield Publishing Company. 1998. • Dues, Michael and Mary Brown. Boxing Plato’s Shadow: An Introduction to the Study of Human Communication. New York City, NY. McGraw-Hill. 2004. We will discuss selected chapters from the Wood textbook and the entirety of the Dues and Brown book. You must read all of these carefully and be prepared for a spirited discussion. In addition, you will select one question from the “Reflecting on This Chapter” section of each chapter of the Wood text and write a one page, double spaced, response to the question. GRADING This course is graded credit/no credit, and no letter grades are given. All of the above requirements must be met to receive credit for the course: • regularly attend class meetings • read and participate in a discussion of both texts. • fully participate in all class discussions • present well framed contributions of fact • successfully complete and submit all papers and projects on-time All of the above requirements must be successfully completed in order to receive credit for the course. If any of the above requirements are not met, you will not receive credit for the course. ATTENDANCE I fully understand that Holt students occasionally have special business and personal situations that necessitate missing class, and I am usually tolerant of such situations. In general, attendance is absolutely expected. More than two unexcused absences will result in a grade of no credit. CLASS PARTICIPATION Active and intelligent participation by all members of the class is both necessary and expected.
  • 3. ACADEMIC HONESTY The Department of Communication works to provide a supportive and productive learning environment. High ethical standards and a clear sense of academic responsibility are essential to this environment and provide great value to the individual, the college, and the greater community. These standards are designed to protect and respect the rights of all people. Clearly, we strongly believe that academic honesty is very important. The Rollins College Academic Honesty Policy clearly outlines the fundamental obligations and responsibilities of faculty and students at Rollins when it states: “As an academic community, Rollins College holds ethical conduct to be inseparable from wisdom. Rollins students and faculty affirm the inherent value and social utility of truthfulness and respect for the rights of other individuals and the community. The students and faculty affirm the value of academic honesty and accept the responsibility to present only work that is genuinely theirs. Rollins students and faculty shall neither commit nor tolerate cheating, plagiarism, or any other form of academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty is defined as representing another's work as one's own, active complicity in such falsification, or violating test conditions.” COM 480 ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY: A single instance of academic dishonesty as defined above will result in a failing grade for the course, and notification will be sent to the Dean of the Hamilton Holt School. Additional penalties may include suspension or dismissal from the college. BLACKBOARD USAGE I’ll be using Blackboard (Bb) in our class for a number of purposes. You need to become familiar with Bb in order to use it effectively as a learning tool. You must check Bb regularly in order to stay current in the course. Bb will be used for the following: • Posting of course syllabus and class announcements • E-journal entries. You must submit five (5) e-journal entries during the term. These are due on or before 12:00 noon Wednesday of the week submitted. You may post only one per week. They should be approximately one page in length, and they must reflect your reaction to the class discussion or readings of the previous meeting. I will respond briefly to your entries as well as give you credit for the assignment. These will be submitted in Bb’s Digital Drop Box. The heading on each entry should be “John Doe (your name). Section 1
  • 4. (or 2). First (or second or third or fourth or fifth) e-journal entry.” • Ask The Professor (this is an area for you to ask questions related to the course—I will respond within 24 hours—take advantage of this free service!) CONTRIBUTIONS OF FACT: These contributions take the form of research that is directly related to the reading material from our texts. We will begin most weeks with these weekly contributions, and each student will stand and share your contribution with the class. Discussion will follow each contribution. You should have one contribution for Boxing Plato’s Shadow, and one contribution for each chapter that we read in But I Thought You Meant: Misunderstandings in Human Communication. PROGRAM SURVEY INSTRUMENT: This assignment prepares you to analyze your undergraduate education as an Organizational Communication major at Rollins College. The Program Survey Instrument is intended to allow you the opportunity to analyze your undergraduate education and its effects on you by completing a questionnaire designed to analyze and explain these attitudes. You should answer the questions in bulleted form. We will then discuss your responses together as a class. At least one large paragraph should be devoted to each question. The length of this paper should be 7-10 double-spaced pages. TOPICAL PAPER ON “THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS I HAVE LEARNED IN MY UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION: This assignment prepares you to analyze what you have learned in your undergraduate education. You will write a paper on the topic “The Most Important Things I Have Learned in My Undergraduate Education.” This paper is meant to be a “big picture” examination of your college career and should represent the most important things you have learned in your college education. I will have a writing workshop with each student before the submission of you paper. In past classes, students have discussed issues such as: learning to fully appreciate your education, gaining an understanding of the value of studying the liberal arts, learning about the importance of communication in our society, developing a taste for life long learning, and acquiring
  • 5. a repertoire of useful communication skills. The length of this paper should be 7-10 double- spaced pages. THE ORAL PRESENTATION AND RHETORICAL ANALYSIS You will be responsible for choosing a specific group of adults (not children) and delivering a well researched and well delivered oral presentation to this audience. This is considered a speech—not a business presentation--so audience interaction during the speech should be limited if at all. The time limit for the speech will be dictated by the occasion, but it must be a minimum of 10 minutes in length. The speech must be original and created solely for this assignment. A representative sample of audiences used by former students in this course includes the following: nursing homes, children's wings of hospitals, civic organizations, government meetings, and church meetings. Under most circumstances, you may not use an audience comprised of children, friends, relatives or neighbors. Co-workers may be used as the audience if the subject matter is not what you might usually speak to them about. Similarly, you may not give a speech to an audience if the speech is a normal part of your job. The audience and the occasion should be approved in advance by speaking with me or by email. Following the presentation, you will write a very thorough rhetorical analysis of your presentation. An important part of this assignment is that you must research the following ten criteria so you fully understand and can write intelligently on each one as you complete your analysis: • an introduction that introduces the assignment, your personal feelings/qualms/concerns about the assignment both before and after completion, and an explanation of the logistics of the presentation (when and where did the assignment take place, how was the appointment to speak arranged, who was your contact person, what was the room set-up at the event, how many people were present, etc.) • subject matter/topic of the speech • speech purpose (informative or persuasive) • audience analysis • organizational method used for the speech • language used in the speech • invention (logical, emotional, and ethical proofs) in the speech • vocal communication used in the delivery of the speech • nonverbal communication used in the delivery of the speech • a conclusion that focuses on a thorough explanation of specific areas of quality, areas in need of improvement, and specifically what you learned from the assignment. The length of this paper should be 7-10 double-spaced pages. You must include a copy of the speech and audience feedback forms (if appropriate) in appendices to the paper.
  • 6. Finally, you must list the complete name, organization, title, address, and telephone number of your contact person on the cover sheet of your rhetorical analysis. THE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION AUDIT You must complete an organizational communication audit that should be personal, in-depth, and indicative of what you have learned as an Organizational Communication major in the Hamilton Holt School of Rollins College. You should remember that this course is an end-of-the-major-experience and your work should be a culmination of your undergraduate education. You will conduct an analysis of the communication culture at the organization where you now work or an organization where you previously worked with recommendations for improvement. The analysis will answer the following questions of importance to any organization: • What are the history, mission, vision, structure, and products/services of the corporation? • How would you define, explain, and evaluate the communication and managerial cultures of the corporation? • What ethics and values does the corporation hold as important, and in what ways does the corporation succeed or fail in upholding them? • How effectively does the corporation use communication technologies to communicate within and outside the organization? • What does the future hold for this corporation? The length of this paper is should be 10-15, double spaced, pages in length. PRIVATE EXIT INTERVIEW Each student will have the opportunity to participate in an exit interview with the director of the Organizational Communication program. During this time, you will have the opportunity to discuss your undergraduate education, concerns and joys you have experienced, your career, your future educational pursuits, and questions you have about any and all subject matters. STUDENT ENTITLEMENTS As the instructor/learner in this course, I have a number of expectations of you, many of which were outlined in the earlier parts of this syllabus. As a student/learner in this class, you are entitled to several things as well. For example, you are entitled to know that:
  • 7. • because you believe that my high expectations are an indication of my respect for you and your capacity to work at a high level of excellence, you are entitled to a rigorous learning environment that allows you to learn and master more information and skills than you ever thought possible; • because I want to be fair to everyone and with the knowledge that, in the world beyond college, workers are expected to meet deadlines even in the absence of ideal circumstances, you are entitled to be in a classroom where everyone has read the material ahead of time, is as prepared as they can possibly be for every class, and submits work on time every time; • because I understand that learning goes on inside and outside of the classroom, you are entitled to a course in which I’ll be available to you before class, after class, or in prearranged appointments and that I will use that time wisely and constructively; • because I recognize that college students must communicate clearly in both oral and written communication, you are entitled to a course where papers will not be accepted as passing that contain significant grammatical, punctuation, or spelling errors; • because I will assign evaluated work throughout the term in a variety of venues, you are entitled to a classroom where you are assured that I will treat your work seriously and will respond to it as the serious endeavor of a serious student. • because I want to be a part of your intellectual growth and because I enjoy the play of ideas, you are entitled to a classroom all students are punctual, come to class prepared, ask questions. initiate conversations, and generally engage everyone in lively intellectual exchanges.
  • 8. COM 480 SENIOR SEMINAR IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION SPRING, 2004 AUGUST 26 Introduction to course and each other SEPTEMBER 2 Present and submit Program Survey Instrument about your experiences in the Organizational Communication Program of the Hamilton Holt School of Rollins College. Reading: Wood, (to the reader xii), Chapters 1 and 2 SEPTEMBER 9 INDIVIDUAL WRITING WORKSHOP SEPTEMBER 16 Present and submit topical paper “The Most Important Things I Have Learned as an Organizational Communication Major at Rollins College.” Reading: Wood, Chapter 3 and 4 SEPTEMBER 23 Discussion on the question “Why Will a Knowledge of Organizational Communication Be Important in My Future?” Our guest speakers will be members of the full-time and adjunct faculty of the Department of Communication.
  • 9. SEPTEMBER 30 Discussion of guest speakers from the Department of Communication Reading: Wood, Chapters 6 and 7 OCTOBER 7 Reading: Boxing Plato’s Shadow Reading: Wood, Chapters 8 and 10 OCTOBER 14 Present and submit rhetorical analyses Reading: Wood, Chapters 11 and 14 OCTOBER 21 Present and submit rhetorical analyses Reading: Wood, Chapter 15 and 17 OCTOBER 28 ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS COMMUNICATION CONVENTION NOVEMBER 4 Present and submit the organizational audit Reading: Wood, Chapters 18 and 19 NOVEMBER 11 NATIONAL COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION CONVENTION NOVEMBER 18 Present and submit the organizational audit Reading: Wood, Chapter 21 NOVEMBER 25 THANKSGIVING DECEMBER 2 Exit Interview DECEMBER 9 Exit Interview

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