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Ch 1: Building Your Career Success with Communication Skills
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Ch 1: Building Your Career Success with Communication Skills

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  • 1. CHAPTER 1 Building Your Career Success With Communication Skills
  • 2.
    • Communication skills are essential for
      • Job placement
      • Job performance
      • Career advancement
      • Success in the new world of work
    Why do YOU need good communication skills?
  • 3. “ Businesses are crying out—they need to have people who write better.” Gaston Caperton, business executive and president, College Board
  • 4. Build Your Career Communication Skills Your Guide Instructor Your Coach Your Guffey Companion and XTRA! Web Sites http://guffey.swlearning.com http://guffeyxtra.swlearning.com Textbook Bonus Resources (p. 23)
  • 5. Projecting Professionalism When You Communicate
  • 6. Projecting Professionalism When You Communicate (continued)
  • 7. Projecting Professionalism When You Communicate (concluded)
  • 8. 0 Focus on information as a corporate asset New work environments Innovative communication technologies Heightened global competition Increased emphasis on teams More participatory management Flattened management hierarchies Trends in the New Workplace
  • 9. The Process of Communication
  • 10. The Process of Communication Verbally or nonverbally. By speaking, writing, gesturing. How may the sender encode a message? Letters, e-mail, IM, memos, TV, cell phone, voice, body. Others? What kinds of channels carry messages?
  • 11. Hearing, reading, observing. How does a receiver decode a message? When a message is understood as the sender intended it to be. When is communication successful? Ask questions, watch responses, don’t dominate the exchange. How can a communicator provide for feedback?
  • 12. Barriers to Effective Listening Clothing, mannerisms, appearance Nonverbal distractions Unfamiliar or charged words Language problems Tuning out ideas that counter our values Psychological barriers Hearing disabilities, noisy surroundings Physical barriers
  • 13. Talking all the time or listening only for the next pause Grandstanding Pretending to listen Faking attention Our minds process thoughts faster than speakers express them Thought speed
  • 14. Ten Misconceptions About Listening
    • Listening is a matter of intelligence.
    • FACT: Careful listening is a learned behavior.
    • Speaking is more important than listening in the communication process.
    • FACT: Speaking and listening are equally important.
  • 15.
    • Listening is easy and requires little energy.
    • FACT: Active listeners undergo the same physiological changes as a person jogging.
    • Listening and hearing are the same process.
    • FACT: Listening is a conscious, selective process. Hearing is an involuntary act.
  • 16.
    • Speakers are able to command listening.
    • FACT: Speakers cannot make a person really listen.
    • Hearing ability determines listening ability.
    • FACT: Listening happens mentally—between the ears.
  • 17.
    • Speakers are totally responsible for communication success.
    • FACT: Communication is a two-way street.
    • Listening is only a matter of understanding a speaker’s words.
    • FACT: Nonverbal signals also help listeners gain understanding.
  • 18.
    • Daily practice eliminates the need for listening training.
    • FACT: Without effective listening training, most practice merely reinforces negative behaviors.
    • Competence in listening develops naturally.
    • FACT: Untrained people listen at only 25 percent efficiency.
  • 19. Tips for Becoming an Active Listener
    • Stop talking.
    • Control your surroundings.
    • Establish a receptive mind-set.
    • Listen for main points.
    • Capitalize on lag time.
    • Listen between the lines.
  • 20.
    • Judge ideas, not appearances.
    • Hold your fire.
    • Take selective notes.
    • Provide feedback.
  • 21. Nonverbal Communication
    • Eye contact, facial expression, and posture and gestures send silent messages.
  • 22.
    • Time, space, and territory send silent messages.
      • Time (punctuality and structure of)
      • Space (arrangement of objects in)
      • Territory (privacy zones)
  • 23. Four Space Zones for Social Interaction Among Americans
  • 24. Four Space Zones for Social Interaction Among Americans
  • 25.
    • Eye contact, facial expression, and posture and gestures send silent messages.
    • Time, space, and territory send silent messages.
    • Appearance sends silent messages.
      • Appearance of business documents
      • Appearance of people
  • 26. Tips for Improving Your Nonverbal Skills
    • Establish and maintain eye contact.
    • Use posture to show interest.
    • Improve your decoding skills.
    • Probe for more information.
    • Avoid assigning nonverbal meanings out of context.
  • 27.
    • Associate with people from diverse cultures.
    • Appreciate the power of appearance.
    • Observe yourself on videotape.
    • Enlist friends and family.
  • 28. Culture and Communication
    • Good communication demands special sensitivity and skills when communicators are from different cultures.
  • 29. Culture and Communication Key North American Beliefs Examples Belief Little emphasis on rituals, ceremonies, rank; preference for informal dress Informality Initiative, self-assertion, personal achievement Individualism
  • 30. Examples Belief Precious, correlates with productivity Importance of Time Impatient, literal, suspicious of evasiveness Direct Communication Style
  • 31. Comparing U.S. and International’s Views Blunt, rude, oppressive Direct, aggressive Insensitive to status Egalitarian Undisciplined, overly personal Informal, friendly, casual Internationals’ Views of U.S. Persons U.S. Persons’ Views of Themselves
  • 32. Obsessed with time; opportunistic Efficient Work-oriented; deals more important than people Resourceful, ingenious Materialistic Profit-oriented Promise more than they deliver Goal/achievement-oriented Internationals’ Views of U.S. Persons U.S. Persons’ Views of Themselves
  • 33. Weak, untrustworthy Open Deceptive, fearsome Enthusiastic, prefer hard-sell Driven Dynamic, find identity in work Self-absorbed, equating “new” with “best” Individualistic, progressive Internationals’ Views of U.S. Persons U.S. Persons’ Views of Themselves
  • 34. Proverbs Reflect Culture
    • “ The squeaking wheel gets the grease.”
    • “ Waste not, want not.”
    • “ He who holds the gold makes the rules.”
    • “ If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.”
    • “ The early bird gets the worm.”
    What do these U.S. proverbs indicate about this culture and what it values?
  • 35.
    • “ A man who waits for a roast duck to fly into his mouth must wait a very, very long time.”
    • “ A man who says it cannot be done should not interrupt a man doing it.”
    • “ Give a man a fish, and he will live for a day; give him a net, and he will live for a lifetime.”
    What do these Chinese proverbs indicate about the Chinese culture and what it values?
  • 36.
    • “ No one is either rich or poor who has not helped himself to be so.” (German)
    • “ Words do not make flour.” (Italian)
    • “ The nail that sticks up gets pounded down.” (Japanese)
    What do these proverbs indicate about their respective cultures and what they value?
  • 37. High-Context and Low-Context Cultures
      • Japanese
      • Arab
      • Latin American
      • Spanish
      • English
      • Italian
      • French
      • North American
      • Scandinavian
      • German
      • Swiss
    Low Context High Context
  • 38. Comparison of High- and Low-Context Cultures Low-Context Cultures Action-oriented Contemplative Logical Intuitive Individualistic Collectivist Linear Relational High-Context Cultures
  • 39. Improving Communication With Multicultural Audiences
    • Oral Messages
      • Use simple English.
      • Speak slowly and enunciate clearly.
      • Encourage accurate feedback.
  • 40.
    • Oral Messages (continued)
      • Check frequently for comprehension.
      • Observe eye messages.
      • Accept blame.
      • Listen without interrupting.
      • Remember to smile!
      • Follow up in writing.
  • 41.
    • Written Messages
      • Adapt to local formats.
      • Consider hiring a translator.
      • Use short sentences and short paragraphs.
      • Avoid ambiguous wording.
      • Strive for clarity.
      • Cite numbers carefully.
  • 42. Effective Communication With Diverse Workplace Audiences
    • Understand the value of differences.
    • Don’t expect total conformity.
    • Create zero tolerance for bias and stereotypes.
    • Practice focused, thoughtful, and open-minded listening.
    • Invite, use, and give feedback.
  • 43.
    • Make fewer workplace assumptions.
    • Learn about your own cultural self.
    • Learn about other cultures and identity groups.
    • Seek common ground.