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BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
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BUSINESS COMMUNICATION

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  • 1. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION Building Critical Skills First Canadian Edition Kitty O. Locker Stephen Kyo Kaczmarek ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved. Kathryn Braun
  • 2. odule 2 Adapting Your Message to Your Audience Skills to Reflect on your own personality characteristics. Analyze your audience when composing messages. Adapt the content, organization, and form of your messages to meet audience needs. ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 3. odule 2 Adapting Your Message to Your Audience Topics Why is audience analysis so important? What do I need to know about my audience? How do use audience analysis? What if my audiences have different needs? How do I reach my audience(s)? ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 4. PAIBOC and Audience Analysis P What are your purposes in writing? A Who is (are) your audiences? I What information must your message include? B What reasons or reader benefits can you use to support your position? O What objections can you expect your reader(s) to have? C How will the context affect reader response? ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 5. The Communication Process The Communication Model Perception Interpretation Choice/ Selection Encoding/ Decoding Channel Noise ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Audience Analysis Factors Prior Knowledge Demographic Factors Personality Values and Beliefs Past Behaviour ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 7. Adapting Messages to an Audience Strategy Organization Word Choice Style Photographs and Visuals ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Kinds of Audiences Initial Audience Primary Audience Secondary Audience Gatekeeper Watchdog Audience ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 9. Discourse Community A group of people who share assumptions about What channels, formats, and styles to use. What topics to discuss. How to discuss topics. What constitutes evidence. ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 10. Organizational (Corporate) Culture Norms of behavior in an organization are revealed Verbally through the organization’s myths, stories, and heroes. Nonverbally through the allocation of space, money, and power. ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Gatekeepers and Primary Audience To reach, focus on Content and choice of details. Organization. Level of language. Use of technical terms and theory. ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Written Messages Make it easier to Present many specific details. Present extensive or complex financial data. Minimize undesirable emotions. ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Oral Messages Make it easier to Answer questions, resolve conflicts, and build consensus. Use emotion to help persuade the audience. Get immediate action or response. Focus the reader’s attention on specific points. Modify a proposal that may not be acceptable in its original form. ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.
  • 14. For Written and Oral Messages Adapt the message to the audience. Show the audience how it will benefit from the idea, policy, service, or product. Overcome any objections the audience may have. Use you-attitude and positive emphasis. Use visuals to clarify or emphasize material. Specify what the audience should do. ©2002 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited. All rights reserved.

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