ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY
                   COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
                            SYLLABUS
                    ...
PURPOSE OF COURSE

This course is designed to provide hands-on instruction in basic computer hardware
components and softw...
M. Use computer hardware and applications in word processing, spreadsheet,
      database, and desktop, publishing softwar...
1.    Books
                    a. Textbooks
                    b. Supplementary books
                    c. Simulation ...
(215 possible      (255 possible     Achievement          Plus Final
     Grade             points)            points)    ...
Business Etiquette, “Birmingham Business Journal,” July 3, 1997, pp 16-17.

Business Technology Curricula, Frankfort, Kent...
Technology in the Classroom, National Business Education Yearbook, No. 33, Nancy J.
      Groneman and Karen C. Kaser, edi...
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BUS 408

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Transcript of "BUS 408"

  1. 1. ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION SYLLABUS FOR Business Use of Microcomputers COURSE NUMBER: BUS 408 CATALOG DESCRIPTION: This course covers the use of the microcomputer in education to its full potential. Any apprehensions regarding hardware will be allayed. The availability of useful programs already in existence will be demonstrated. CREDIT HOURS: 03 Semester Hours INSTRUCTOR: TELEPHONE: OFFICE: OFFICE HOURS: Posted on Office Door ATTENDENCE POLICY: Read statement inside course syllabus. TEXTBOOK: VanHuss and Forde. THE SPORTS CONNECTION/INTEGRATED SIMULATION. South-Western Publishing Company, 2001. PREREQUISITES: BUS 203-Intermediate Typewriting BUS 407-Word Processing Prepared by:__________________________ Mrs. Emma A. Faulk Date Assistant Professor/Area of Business Education Approved by__________________________ Departmental Chairperson Date Approved by__________________________ Dean, College of Education Date
  2. 2. PURPOSE OF COURSE This course is designed to provide hands-on instruction in basic computer hardware components and software applications. Emphasis is placed on extending and reinforcing touch keyboarding skills, while providing experience for learning word processing, database, spreadsheet, graphic, and telecommunication applications. Communication skills and basic mathematical concepts are reinforced in this course. This course is built upon a conceptual framework emphasizing reflection, inquiry, constructivism, problem solving, leadership, and the importance of social context in teaching and learning. Coursework and experiences will result in the assessment of knowledges, dispositions, and competencies. Students will use skills that were taught in the administrative management and word processing courses to determine which computer application is most appropriate for the various simulation tasks. OBJECTIVES OF LEARNING PACKAGE The Sports Connection, an integrated Microsoft Office 2000 simulation, requires students to: A. Apply the complete suite of Microsoft Office 2000 products. B. Perform general office functions. C. Prepare a variety of documents integrating multiple software applications. D. Use viable resources in obtaining, organizing, evaluating, and managing information. E. Enhance their communication and interpersonal skills. F. Use critical thinking skills to make effective decisions and solve business problems creatively. G. Work independently, work as a member of an internal team, and work as a member of an external team. H. Apply creative abilities that will determine ways to increase productivity by being both more efficient and more effective. I. Identify responsible uses of technologies including fair use and copyright guidelines and Internet user protection policies. J. Examine legal uses of technologies including fair use and copyright guidelines and Internet user protection policies. K. Apply ethical uses of technologies including fair use and copyright guidelines and Internet user protection policies. L. Compose business letters, reports, and memoranda; process incoming and outgoing telephone messages applying cost and time factors; apply current business terminology in writing, speaking, and interpreting business information; select alternative communications mail; select and use references in solving business-related problems; and plan, develop, and deliver oral presentation using presentation software. SDE 290-3-3/25(1)(b)(2)
  3. 3. M. Use computer hardware and applications in word processing, spreadsheet, database, and desktop, publishing software to create, modify, and print documents. (SDE 290-3-3-.25(1)(b)(3) COURSE CONTENT AND OBJECTIVES The Sports Connection is organized into 8 projects with a total of 55 jobs and a software- training manual. Listed below is a brief description of the eight projects: A. Project 1 Getting Organized requires students to use Microsoft Word to prepare routine letters, memos, and envelopes and to use electronic mail if it available. It also introduces students to Outlook, including Auto Dialer. B. Project 2 Researching requires students to use various search engines to locate needed information. It also requires students to use Excel to prepare financial documents with appropriate charts and graphs needed to present information effectively. C. Project 3 Reporting requires students to prepare a formal report with Excel work- sheets, graphs, and charts embedded. Students also prepare a PowerPoint slide show with animation, sounds, and hyperlinks to Excel charts and graphs. D. Project 4 Managing Routine Tasks teaches students to use the electronic calendar and databases to manage routine tasks and introduces the use of intranets to distribute information in a timely, cost effective manner. E. Project 5 Planning the Grand Opening gives students an opportunity to apply several software applications within a variety of documents. Students are introduced to the electronic management of documents using folders. F. Project 6 Designing Publicity Pieces builds decision-making skills, research skills. It encourages creativity and incorporates a team approach to writing using basic software features. G. Project 7 Communicating focuses on using a database to manage communications. The emphasis is on using software applications to enhance productivity. H. Project 8 Managing Information gives students an opportunity to explore using the Internet and intranets as tools of communication. METHODOLOGY A. Methods 1. Class discussion/demonstrations 2. Class performance on competency tests. 3. Demonstration of up-to-date microcomputer equipment 4. Completion of simulation assignments using business forms 5. Lectures 6. Field trips 7. Case studies showing up-to-date research B. Materials
  4. 4. 1. Books a. Textbooks b. Supplementary books c. Simulation manual d. Reference materials 2. Handouts C. Media 1. Electronic overhead projector 2. Camcorder 3. CD Cutter 4. Interactive software 5. Internet 6. Intelligent Copier 7. Auto Dialer 8. Storage Media 9. Electronic mail EVALUATION AND OUTLINE OF DAILY PROJECTS (See Overview of Projects and Estimated Completion) EVALUATION OF COURSE CONTENT AND OBJECTIVES An achievement test provides the assurance that students have mastered the basic applications required to complete this simulation successfully. The achievement test builds on tasks already completed in earlier jobs. These tests are performance based and will be evaluated according to the scales used in grading daily projects. Achievement Test 1 measures objectives B, G and C. Achievement Test 2 measures objectives C, E and Achievement Test 3 measures objectives A, D and G Students must pass all three-achievement tests with 70% accuracy. Achievement Test 4 (FINAL EXAMINATION) measures objects A-H Grading Scale A B C D 90% 80% 70% 60% COMPUTATION OF FINAL GRADE Without Internet With Internet Activities Activities Plus
  5. 5. (215 possible (255 possible Achievement Plus Final Grade points) points) Tests Examination A 193 230 90% 90% B 172 204 80% 80% C 150 179 70% 70% D 129 153 60% 60% NOTES Attendance Policy The maximum number of allowable absences during the term without a penalty is three. More than three absences may result in a letter grade of “F”. Lateness and early departures will result in a decrease in your letter grade. Alternative Instructions Any students requiring alternative formats for testing and/or handouts for this course, or other types of accommodations, due to disabling condition, should advise the instructor within the first week of classes. Bibliography A Guide to Business Course Competencies, Richmond, Virginia, Virginia Department of Education 1995. Alabama Course of Study English Language Arts, Montgomery, Alabama, Alabama Department of Education, Bulletin 1993, No.37. Becker, H. (1998). Running to catch a moving train: Schools and information Technologies. Theory and Practice, 37(1), 20-31. Boss, S. J. (2000, December). Columbia Goes Digital. Columbia College Today, 12-23. Brown, Gordon W., et.al., Understanding Business and Personal Law, Ninth Edition, Westerville, Ohio, Glensco Division Macmillan McGraw-Hill, 1993. Brown, M. (2001). Palm/Handspring, PC Magazine, 20(8), 115-120. Business Education Framework for Nebraska Schools, Lincoln, Nebraska, Nebraska Department of Education, 1994.
  6. 6. Business Etiquette, “Birmingham Business Journal,” July 3, 1997, pp 16-17. Business Technology Curricula, Frankfort, Kentucky, Kentucky Department of Technical Education, 1994. DACUM Research Chart for Accounting Assistant, produced by Northeast Wisconsin Technical College; developed by Center on Education and Training for Employment, College Education, The Ohio State University, October 13-14, 1994. Dillon, M. (2001). Wireless networks. Media & Methods, 37(6), 31. Duaghtry, Anne Scott, et. al., Introduction to Business: The Economy and You, 2nd Edition, Cincinnati, Ohio, South-Western Publishing Co., 1992. Dlabay, Les R., and James L. Burrow, Business Principles and Management, 10th Edition, Cincinnati, Ohio, South-Western Publishing Co., 1996. Everand, Kenneth E., and James L. Burrow, Business Principles and Management, 10th Edition, Cincinnati, Ohio, South-Western Publishing Co., 1996. Kanter, J. (1996). Guidelines for attaining information literacy. Information Strategy: The Executive’s Journal, 12(3), 6-12. Kurzweil, R. (2001, April). As Machines Become More Like People, Will People Become More Like God? Talk, pp. 153-155. Locker, Kitty O., Business and Administrative Communications, 3rd edition, Burr Ridge, Illinois, Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1995. Mieters, Norbert J., et. al., Law for Business, 14th edition, Cincinnati, Ohio, South- Western Publishing Co., 1993. NBEA Curriculum Standards for Accounting, Draft, National Business Education Association, Reston, Virginia, May 14, 1995. New Jersey Occupational Competency List for Clerk Typist/Word Processor, Northeast Curriculum Coordination Center, New Jersey Department of Education, Division Of Adult and Occupational Education, Aberdeen, New Jersey, 1992. Schofield, J. (1999). Conference showcases “invisible” computing. Design News, 54(1), 49-51. Stratt-McClure, J. (2001, April). You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet, Continental, pp. 45-50.
  7. 7. Technology in the Classroom, National Business Education Yearbook, No. 33, Nancy J. Groneman and Karen C. Kaser, editors, 1995. The Evolving Vision of Education For and About Business, PCBEE Policy Statement, #57, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, 1995. Vocational Education Curriculum Development/Business Education Course Outlines And Core Competencies, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Louisiana Department of Education, 1992. Web-Based Education Commission. (2000, December). The Promise of the Internet for Learning: Moving From Promise to Practice. Washington, DC: Web-Based Education Commission. Wolkomir, R. (1999). Will the kitchen please shut up! Smithsonian, 30(6), 56-64.

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