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                          University Studies Course Proposal


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A. COURSE DESCRIPTION

    1.   Catalog Description and Focus. Leadership communication for personnel at all
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2. Meetings: Forums for Problem Solving
             3. Negotiation and Conflict Management
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Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Munter, Mary and Michael Netzley. GUIDE TO PRESENTATIONS, 1st Edition (2002). Upper
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AIS 410 Administrative Communication

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Transcript of "AIS 410 Administrative Communication"

  1. 1. Approved by Faculty Senate. University Studies Course Proposal Department or Program: Administrative Information Systems Department Course Number: 410 Semester Hours: 3 Frequency of Offering: Yearly Course Title: Administrative Communication Catalog Description: For all students. Leadership communication for personnel at all organizational levels. A balanced emphasis between written and spoken communication includes such topics as persuasive proposals, case analysis and writing, meeting management, the visual briefing and multi-media and communication technology applications. Prere- quisite: Completion of core requirements and CMST 191. Grade only. This is an existing course previously approved by A2C2: Yes This is a new course proposal: No Department Contact Person: Jeanette A. Karjala jkarjala@winona.msus.edu University Studies Approval is requested in: Oral Communication Flag Attachment: Although each faculty member is responsible for his or her course syllabus, an attached syllabus includes an outline of the course content and requirements. Items meeting the Oral Communication Flag requirements are identified by corresponding letters matching the listed outcomes--a, b, c, d, e, and/or f. Below each of the six outcomes listed under the “Oral Communication Flag” requirement are listed the course requirements, content, learning activities, and documentation relevant to the outcomes that promote students’ abilities to: a. Earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations. Although assignments require writing, approximately 70 percent of a student’s course grade consists of presentations within in-class groups or to the class. Preparation of the professional article critiques, business presentation with advanced visual support, meeting management project, persuasive proposal and report project, and the case analyses requires extensive reading, research, and analysis of textbook and outside resource information. After 15- to 25-minute presentations, students facilitate a question-and-answer session and request feedback about the presentation. b. Understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines. Students study the major business and professional issues of organizational and communication theory and practice, the strategic model of communication, and workplace diversity. communication.
  2. 2. They focus on developing listening, verbal, and nonverbal skills and focus on interpersonal, one-on-one communication through studying and role-playing business-related interviews. Changes and adaptations that occur in group communication contexts are addressed through problem solving cases related to conducting meetings. In addition to studying and practicing various methods of negotiation and conflict management, students prepare informative, persuasive, and special-occasion presentations enhanced by media. c. Adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences. Through cases that feature at least fifteen different companies ranging from small businesses to global corporations, students have opportunities to focus on profiles of how business and professional communication operates in the workplace. The cases include sets of questions for critical thinking that encourage students to examine the connections between concepts they are studying and communication in actual companies and organizations. In addition, mini-cases that offer strategic challenges give students opportunities to think through communication situations and problems that they eventually may encounter in business settings. The contemporary examples, link course content to real-world cultural- and gender-related issues. Current communication technologies and tools are integrated throughout the course on topics such as e-mail etiquette and web searches. d. Receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement. For each presentation or project, students receive feedback from peers and the instructor. Students practice asking questions in ways that probe topics and promote discerning comments. Formal feedback is offered for the business presentation with advanced visual support, the meeting management project, and the persuasive proposal and report. The business presentation is videotaped so that students may critique their presentation and the group’s performance. All presentations are evaluated by the instructor. e. Make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields. Advanced visual support is required for the business presentation or business case study. Although students use PowerPoint frequently, they may use blackboard, web pages, and other technologically based media. Students visit web sites to find information about the topic area, and they do research on the web. f. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields. Students submit documentation for their research on every project and for each presentation. Although students have completed a business communication course and English courses, they review documentation format. They use annual business reports, journal and news articles, interview notes, and other sources to document information presented in reports. Course Syllabus College of Business Winona State University Department: Administrative Information Systems Revision Date: August 2001 (Business Education) Course Title: Administrative Course Number: AIS 410/510 Communication Credits: 3 Semester Hours Frequency of Offering: Yearly Prerequisites: COMM 191 Grading: Grade Only
  3. 3. A. COURSE DESCRIPTION 1. Catalog Description and Focus. Leadership communication for personnel at all organizational levels. A balanced emphasis between written and spoken communication includes such topics as persuasive proposals, case analysis and writing, meeting management, the visual briefing and multi-media and communication technology applications. 2. Oral Communication Flag. The AIS 410 Administrative Communication course will satisfy three semester hours of the oral communication flag category in the University Studies Program. The course includes require-ments and learning activities that promote students’ abilities to: a. Earn significant course credit through extemporaneous oral presentations. b. Understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines. c. Adapt their speaking to field-specific audiences. d. Receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for improvement. e. Make use of the technologies used for research and speaking in the fields. f. Learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage, and documentation in their fields. 3. Course Objectives. Upon completion of this course, each student will be able to a. Demonstrate knowledge of the technological, theoretical, and behavioral foundations of effective oral administrative communications. (a, b, c, d, e, f) b. Understand oral communications functions, flows, and networks within an organizational context. (a, b, c) c. Apply presentational principles and techniques to leadership communication including conferences, interviews, briefings, and meetings. (a, b, c, d, e, f) 4. Course Outline a. An Introduction to Communication in Organizations (b) 1 1. Communication in Organizations 2. The Model of Strategic Communication 2 3. Diversity in Business and the Professions b. Basic Communication Skills (a, b, c, d) 1. Listening Skills 2. Verbal and Nonverbal Skills 3. Leadership and Management Skills c. Interpersonal Communication Strategies (a, b, c, d, e) 3 1. Work Relationships 2. Principles of Interviewing 3. Interviews in Business Settings d. Group Communication Strategies (a, b, c, d, e, f) 4 1. Fundamentals of Group Communication
  4. 4. 2. Meetings: Forums for Problem Solving 3. Negotiation and Conflict Management d. Public Presentation Strategies (a, b, c, d, e, f) 1. Developing and Delivering Effective Presentations 2. Informative Presentations 3. Persuasive and Special Presentations B. APPLICATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 1. Professional Article Critique – Keyboard two summaries and critiques of current (published within the last five years) professional articles about presentation strategies within group communication settings. Use memo format. Be prepared to present your critique in class; field questions and get feedback from group peers after your presentation. (a, b, c, d, e, f) 2. Business Presentation – Choose one of the presentations prepared during the course for videotaping and use during in-class evaluation by the students and instructor. (b, c, d, e, f) 3. Advanced Visual Support – Prepare a power point presentation that supports the business report or case study for in-class evaluation by other students and the instructor. (b, c, d, e, f) 4. Meeting Management Project – Devise an agenda and any necessary attachments for a meeting based upon a case study offered by the instructor or prepared by students. (a, b, c, d, e, f) 5. Persuasive Proposal and Report – Prepare a proposal for a case study using persuasive techniques and keyboard a report. Present the proposal to a group of your peers in class. (a, b, c, d, e, f) 6. Case Analysis and Writing – Submit keyboarded responses for collaborative teamwork. Present the assigned case(s) in a triad group for peer feedback. (a, b, c, d, e, f) A. EVALUATION Evaluation % 1. Quizzes and two exams (50% oral). 15 5 2. Professional article critiques (oral). 10 6 3. Business presentation (oral). 15 7 4. Advanced visual support (for oral reports). 10 8 5. Meeting management project (oral). 20 9 6. Persuasive proposal and report project (oral). 20 10 7. Case analysis (oral report). 10 B. TEXTBOOKS AND RESOURCES Textbook(s) O’Hair, Dan, Gustav. W. Friedrich, and Lynda Dixon Shaver. STRATEGIC COMMUNICA- TION, 3rd Edition, (1998). Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin Company. Other Text(s) Smeltzer, Larry R., Donald J. Leonard, and Geraldine E. Hynes. MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATION—STRATEGIES AND APPLICATIONS, 2nd Edition (2002). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Higher Education. Munter, Mary and Michael Netzley. GUIDE TO MEETINGS, 1st Edition (2001). Upper
  5. 5. Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Munter, Mary and Michael Netzley. GUIDE TO PRESENTATIONS, 1st Edition (2002). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. DeTienne, Kristen Bell. GUIDE TO ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION (2002). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Journal(s) Business Communication Quarterly and The Journal of Business Communication (Both are published by The Association for Business Communication.) http://www.bcq.theabc.org. Delta Pi Epsilon Journal Web Sites The Association for Business Communication (ABC) http://www.bcq.theabc.org Communication Skills http://www.queendom.com http://www.innovix.com Presentation Style Inventory http://www.leaderx.com

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