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    [ ] 3002MKT_3065_CO.pdf [ ] 3002MKT_3065_CO.pdf Document Transcript

    • COURSE OUTLINE Academic Organisation: Department of Marketing Faculty: Griffith Business School Credit point value: 10 Student Contribution Band: Band 2 Course level: Undergraduate Campus/Location/Learning Mode: Logan / On Campus / In Person Convenor/s: Mrs Lynda Andrews (Logan) Enrolment Restrictions: Nil This document was last updated: 24 May 2006 BRIEF COURSE DESCRIPTION The course is designed to allow students to explore the ways in which culture and language impact on the increasingly international/intercultural dimensions of business communications. Particular emphasis is placed on interactions between Australian businesses and key areas of international trade (such as South East Asia or Russia). The first part of the course involves establishing World Wide Web, journal and text information that would be beneficial to a business trying to understand the communication systems in play when the interaction between them is international and, more specifically, intercultural. This resource will be a compilation of all resources located by individual students. Seminars will focus on cultural awareness and its implications for business communication, with emphasis on the Australian populace. The second part of the course will involve the use of this information to produce a report on suggested communication and negotiation strategies for a business that would support its need for advice on intercultural interactions. Again, there is a focus on intercultural business communication between Australia and possible major international trading partners. Students are required to submit all items of assessment in order to pass this course. Prior Assumed: 1016MGT/MKT Business Communication OR 1003MKT Introduction to Marketing
    • Course Offering: offered at night time in even years and in the day time odd years on the Logan Campus.
    • SECTION A – TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT COURSE AIMS • Introduce students to the theories, concepts and processes of intercultural communication, and their application within organisational and business settings; • Promote awareness among students of the range of information available to the business and academic professional in the intercultural and international business communication arena. • Develop students’ interpersonal, oral and written communication skills at individual, group and organisation levels; and • Highlight for students the implications of different cultures on the communication process. • Works towards developing the Griffith graduate skills of oral communication, written communication and interpersonal skills. LEARNING OUTCOMES On successful completion of this course, students should be able to: ♦ Describe various influences on the intercultural behaviour of business participants; ♦ Examine an intercultural business scenario and recommend suitable strategies for successful dialog and negotiation in that context; ♦ Locate information on the World Wide Web, in journals and other academic sources that would assist a client in planning appropriate business communication strategies for interaction with international counterparts; ♦ Write a report on key influences on international expansion strategies for a business from an intercultural communication perspective; ♦ Draw comparisons of beliefs, values, and norms between two cultures; ♦ Explain ways in which culture and language (both verbal and non-verbal) influence business communication patterns. ♦ Undertake peer assessment to develop skills in discernment and judgement. This subject does not aim to develop skills in the use of electronic communication for business presentations (e.g. PowerPoint). Therefore, the content-based outcomes are the understanding of effective intercultural business communication strategies and the concepts behind it. The cognitive outcomes include understanding how to apply these strategies in a business communication situation. Additionally there is an emphasis on the understanding and application of critical thinking and reflective skills in international business communication. The relevant skills developed should include interpersonal skills, communication and writing skills, problem solving skills and information literacy skills. CONTENT, ORGANISATION AND TEACHING STRATEGIES This course builds upon the basic concepts and skills taught in 1003MKT Introduction to Marketing, 1016MKT Business Communication and 2029MKT Marketing Communications. It seeks to further develop students’ knowledge and understanding of those basic marketing concepts and communication theories and demonstrates how to apply them specifically by utilizing skills such as effective intercultural communication and international negotiations. 1
    • The course is designed to allow students to explore the ways in which culture and language impact on the increasingly international/intercultural dimensions of business communications. Particular emphasis is placed on interactions between Australian businesses and key areas of international trade (such as China or Europe). Weekly seminars will focus on cultural awareness and its implications for business communication. Each week a different business communications theme is theoretically examined and then readings, exercises and practical case studies are used to illustrate the application of the theory. The course also involves students leading class discussions on weekly lecture topic areas to engage students in learning. The course also involves establishing World Wide Web, journal and text information that would be beneficial to a business trying to understand the communication systems in play when the interaction between them is international and, more specifically, intercultural. This resource will be a compilation of all resources located by individual students who are members of a group. This information will then be used to produce a group report on suggested communication and negotiation strategies for a business that would support its need for advice on intercultural interactions. Again, there is a focus on intercultural business communication between Australia and possible major international trading partners. Students will gain experience in the following generic skill areas: • Teamwork and Interpersonal Skills – the ability to work as an effective team member will be tested through a group assessment in which students are required to undertake the development of business communications projects and presentation of the projects. • Conceptual, analytical and information skills will be enhanced as students learn how to research and prepare a WWW, journal and text resource project. This aims to demonstrate students’ capacity to research sources providing useful information in advising on potentially successful international/intercultural communication in a business context. • So too, will their adaptability, learning skills, problem solving and decision making skills be enhanced by working as team members within a group environment using their knowledge about international/intercultural business communication in developing a report for a nominated business client. • Information technology skills will be developed through the groups’ final WWW, journal and text resource project which would demonstrate students’ capacity to research sources providing useful information in advising on potentially successful international/intercultural communication in a business context. • Written Communication will be developed through the delivery of the groups’ final WWW, journal and text resource project and the groups’ business communications project. • Oral Communication will be developed through the individual presentations in tutorials on selected topics and the final group presentation of their business communications project by allowing students to create a presentation of high quality to pitch to the group’s client with regard to the findings of the international/intercultural business communication strategies for the particular country researched for the group project. • The outcome should be a well-researched and documented business communications project that will clearly demonstrate to potential clients and employers that students have the necessary skills and abilities to be able to communicate and work successfully in an intercultural environment within a business setting. • Finally, knowledge and understanding of the broad range of international/intercultural communication concepts presented in the course and its practical application will be tested through the final exam. The course will consist of a two-hour seminar (lecture) and a one-hour tutorial each week. The weekly seminar will focus on guiding students to the information required for the major assessment items and is focused on the introduction of the various intercultural theories and concepts. 2
    • Contact Summary Component Compulsory Contact Hours Seminar (lecture) 2 hours per week, wks 1-13 Tutorial 1 hour per week, wks 2-12 Although the lectures are not compulsory, students are recommended to attend weekly lectures and tutorials. In addition to lectures and tutorials, students are expected to complete a number of assessment items to develop their intercultural business communication skills. Tutorials start in Week 2. The subject matter of the tutorials will be material from the previous week' seminar s and set readings. Tutorials will also centre on discussion and small awareness-building and practically based exercises run through the discussion leaders each week. Tutorials will be designed to enhance students’ understanding of concepts covered during the seminar and to provide an opportunity to discuss specific issues arising from the course. Tutorials are also designed to allow individual presentations on identified topics from the seminars. CONTENT SUMMARY The course is comprised of weekly seminars and tutorials and completion of a number of assessment items as evidence of the ability to apply theory to practice. In weeks 1 and 2, the foundations of intercultural business communication will be covered; including what intercultural business communication is about, the importance of international business communication, and expectations of the convenor. The lectures in weeks 3 to 13 provide students with in-depth knowledge of the different aspects and areas of intercultural business communication. Students learn by working through the student guide, the WEB site, weekly seminar (lecture) sessions and tutorials, and completing assessment items. The assessment items drive the learning process of the course. The tutorials aim to enhance students'abilities to complete assessment and engage participants in experiential and reflective learning exercises. The seminar (lecture) sessions provide the theoretical and conceptual basis for student presentations in tutorials. Students learn through experiencing activities that are related to course content, reflect on these experiences, interpret them in terms of key course concepts, and plan to improve the quality of their communication. Summaries of the lectures will be placed on the course website each week. However, relying solely on website notes and missing lectures is not recommended. Students will learn information literacy, interpersonal, spoken and written communication skills through presenting and participating in tutorials. Students will form into teams early on in the semester and it is hoped this team will form a buddy system for students within the group throughout the semester. As co- learning and group assessment activities are undertaken, members play an important role in helping others solve problems and focus their efforts throughout the semester. Lecture Tutorial/Laboratory Topic Assessment Readings Content Content 1. Introduction: Web – Topic 1.1 Intercultural Text – Chapter 1 Business Communication Reading: Bennett, M Course Objectives Assessment 2. Globalisation First tutorial. Introduction Web – Topic 1.2 to course, meet and greet Common Text – Chapter 2, preparation for student Systems 3&4 presentations. Cultural Values Reading: Ferraro, GP Culture Shock 3
    • Lecture Tutorial/Laboratory Topic Assessment Readings Content Content 3. Introduction to Assessment 1 Web – Topic 1.3 Cultural Class discussion Selected material from Reading: Analysis leader on selected previous week’s seminar Hofstede, G topic from weekly lecture Rodrigues C Due on week negotiated with tutor (From Week 3- Week 10) 4. Assessment 1 Web – Topic 2.1 Class discussion Language Selected material from leader on selected previous week’s seminar topic from weekly Text: Chapter 5 lecture Due on week Reading: Ferraro, negotiated with tutor (From Week GP 3- Week 10) Usunier, JC 5. Communication Assessment 1 Web – Topic 2.2 Class discussion Oral Selected material from leader on selected previous week’s seminar Non-verbal topic from weekly Text: Chapter 6 lecture Due on week Reading: Dwyer, negotiated with J tutor (From Week 3- Week 10) 6. Communication Assessment 1 Web – Topic 2.3 Class discussion Written leader on selected Selected material from topic from weekly Text: Chapter 7 previous week’s seminar lecture Due on week negotiated with tutor (From Week 3- Week 10) Assessment 2 due by 4.00pm on Tuesday 29 August – submit to OCAHS 7. Etiquette and Assessment 1 Web – Topic 2.4 Social Customs Class discussion Selected material from leader on selected previous week’s seminar topic from weekly Text: Chapter 8 & lecture 9 Due on week negotiated with Reading: Victor, tutor (From Week 3- Week 10) DA 4
    • 8. The Internet in a Assessment 1 Web – Topic 2.5 Communication Class discussion Selected material from context leader on selected previous week’s seminar topic from weekly Reading: Jones, lecture SG Due on week negotiated with tutor (From Week 3- Week 10) 9. Assessment 1 Web – Topic 3.1 Class discussion Negotiations leader on selected Processes & Selected material from topic from weekly Text: Chapter 10 Strategies previous week’s seminar lecture & 11 Due on week negotiated with Reading: Adler, N tutor (From Week 3- Week 10) Rodrigues, C Semester Break th th 25 September – 29 September 10. Assessment 1 Web – Topic 3.2 Class discussion Negotiations leader on selected Authority Selected material from topic from weekly Reading: Victor, Conception previous week’s seminar lecture DA Due on week negotiated with tutor (From Week 3- Week 10) Assessment 3 due by 4pm on Tuesday 3 October 2006 – submit to OCAHS 11. All groups must Website provision be ready for of Case examples Case Study presentation Examples Group project (Assessment 4) in presentations tutorials 12. All groups must be ready for Group project presentation presentations (Assessment 4) in tutorials 13. Course Review Exam No tutorials Preparations Discussion 5
    • ASSESSMENT Summary of Assessment Item Assessment Task Length Weighting Total Relevant Due Day and Marks Learning Time Outcomes 1. Class discussion 15 20% 20 1, 6. Weeks leader on selected minutes 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 topic from weekly (on the week lecture negotiated with tutor) Tutorial participation 2. Individual World Wide 1500 20% 20 1,3,6 Due by 4.00pm on Web, Journal and words Tuesday 29 Text Resource August 2006- Project Week 6 3. Group Business 2000 15% 25 1,2,3,4,5,6 Due by 4pm on Communication words Tuesday 3 Project October 2006 – Week 10 4. Group Business 15 10% 10 1,2,3,4,5,6 Presented in Week Communication minutes 11-12 Presentation 5. Final Examination 2 hours 35% 100 1,2,5,6 Exam Period As assessment items are designed to examine understanding and/or application of the subject’s learning objectives, non submission of a piece of assessment will result in a failure to demonstrate mastery of these learning objectives and may therefore incur a fail grade for the course. Assessment Details 1. Class discussion leader and tutorial participation 20% As the class discussion leader, students will select material that relates to the lecture topic(s) each week. Students will present a summary of this material and develop several questions to ask the class to stimulate discussion. Depending on enrolment numbers, two students will lead the discussion each week, focusing on different topic areas. 10% of marks will be allocated for this presentation. In addition to being a class discussion leader, another 10% of marks will be given for participation in the tutorials, where students will actively contribute to the discussion each week. One percent will be available per tutorial to a maximum 10%. . 2. Individual World Wide Web, Journal and Text Resource Project (20%) The purpose of the WWW, journal and text resource project is to demonstrate students’ capacity to research sources providing useful information in advising on potentially successful international/intercultural communication in a business context. At the beginning of semester students will be allocated into groups of three and will nominate a country and business of preference for the combined group activity. The composition of each group (i.e. team nd membership) needs to be finalised in the 2 tutorial of semester and students need to ensure that no two groups are researching the same country or business. Check with your lecturer before commencement of 6
    • research. Students will then individually source three websites, three journal sources and three texts (not mentioned in the course material) and write a brief description of each and the particular application that the information source may be useful to in the context of international/intercultural business communication and also with reference to the business involved. Students will also be expected to critically evaluate each source on its potential contribution in a business communication structure. 3. Group Business Communication Project (15%) The group business communications project is designed to test the level of knowledge and understanding of prior research and marketing theory presented throughout the course as they apply to a specific case. The purpose of this item is to use a group problem-solving approach to apply their knowledge about international/intercultural business communication in developing a report for a nominated business client. Students will need to select a business that either has international export as part of its current business activity portfolio or has the potential to develop export capabilities. The business can be either product and/or service based. The project should cover a broad range of theories from material covered throughout the semester. The task is to create a report for the business client that summarily gives recommendations and conclusions on international/intercultural business communication strategies. The particular use of theories will vary from group to group depending on the particular country selected. Incorporation of the information gained from the journal and text research project is mandatory. 4. Group Business Communication Presentation (10%) The group presentation after the completion of the business communication assignment is designed to evaluate the ability of the team of students to make a coherent presentation and to communicate their ideas effectively. The purpose of this is to use group skills in creating a presentation of high quality to pitch to the group’s client with regard to the findings of the international/intercultural business communication strategies for the particular country researched for the group project. Presentations will be made by each group in weeks 11 or 12. The presentation should give a brief outline of the business, the particular information sources researched and the conclusions and strategies determined. Length required is 10 minutes plus 5 minutes discussion time per group. All students in the group are required to take an active role in their group presentations. Each group is required to present their findings in a high quality presentation to their client business (that is, fellow students). All students are required to attend all group presentations in weeks 11 and 12 and to engage in peer assessment. Therefore, as part of the learning process, students are required to evaluate, mark and provide feedback for each presentation. 5. Final Exam (35%) The final semester exam is a closed book exam and is designed to test your understanding and knowledge of the broad range of international/intercultural communication concepts presented in the course. This assessment is held during the examination period. Date, time and location will be announced in class when the University Examination timetable is released. Return of Assessment Items Marked assessment items will be returned to students in their allocated tutorials. Notification of Availability of Feedback on Assessment All assignments will be marked within two weeks of receipt of the document, unless otherwise notified. GRADUATE SKILLS The Griffith Graduate Statement states the characteristics that the University seeks to engender in its graduates through its degree programs. Assess Taught Practis Graduate Skills 7
    • Effective communication (written) Effective communication (oral) Effective communication (interpersonal) Information literacy Problem solving Critical evaluation Work autonomously Work in teams Creativity and innovation Ethical behaviour in social / professional / work environments Responsible, effective citizenship Students will gain experience in the following generic skill areas: Generic Skills Development Skill Area Assignment Assignment Exam (Individual) (Group) Teamwork X Information X X Technology Interpersonal Skills X X Self-Mgt Skills X X Adaptability & X Learning Skills Problem Solving & X X X Decision Making Analytical & X X X Conceptual Skills Written X X X Communication Oral X X Communication TEACHING TEAM Convenors are required to provide information about the teaching team. For courses offered at more than one campus, the following table may be copied for each campus, or columns may be added/deleted as required. 8
    • Course Convenor Convenor Details Logan Campus Campus Convenor Lynda Andrews Email l.andrews@griffith.edu.au Office Location L08 1.31 Phone (07) 338 21482 Fax (07) 338 21981 Consultation times Information will be provided at Learning@Griffith under Teaching Team Additional teaching team members Details of additional teaching team members will be provided under teaching team on the course web page. COURSE COMMUNICATIONS Teaching and learning partnerships require clear and open communications. To that end the following guidelines are provided: 1. Individual Consultations with Staff All students are welcomed and encouraged to consult with staff on an “as needed” basis. Scheduled Consultations are available weekly with all course staff. Although drop-in visits may be made, it is often more time-use-effective, to make an appointment. The scheduled consultation times will be posted on learning@griffith Other times may be made by arrangement with the individual tutor or lecturer. 2. Telephone Student to staff: Staff may be contacted by telephone especially with regard to emergencies, absences, and to make consultation appointments. Course Convenor: Lynda Andrews 3382 1482. If you leave a voicemail message, please include your name, course, tutorial, your message, and very clear contact details so that your call can be returned. Also include the date and time of your call. A response will be made as soon as practicable. 3. Email Staff to student: From time to time it may be necessary to send an official email to you. The email address to which your mail will be sent is the official University student email address. If you prefer to receive your email at another address, you can easily arrange for your student email to be forwarded to that address. 9
    • Student to staff: All emails to course staff MUST contain the subject “3002MKT Student Enquiry”, and should come from your university student email address. Such emails will usually be about emergencies, absences or requests for appointments. Responses will be made as soon as practicable, but usually not at weekends. 4. Course notices All notices relating to the course will be delivered at lectures, tutorials or posted on learning@griffith 5. Who to contact Contact the Course Convenor about all matters relating to the course overall or for clarification of any aspect of lectures and guest presentations. Contact your Tutor in the first instance about any aspect of assignments or tutorials. 6. Course Communications through Learning@griffith (Blackboard) Summaries of Lecture notes will be posted on the website prior to the lecture wherever possible. They are designed as an aide-memoir, rather than as a substitute for attendance. They do not replace the need to develop skills in note-taking and synthesising information provided at lectures. TEXTS AND SUPPORTING MATERIALS Set Textbook: Chaney, LH & Martin, JS (2004), Intercultural Business Communication. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall Inc. Other reading materials will be referenced throughout the semester. The following book is a required text in all courses offered in the School of Marketing. Please use the guidelines provided in the book for preparing assessment items, unless directed otherwise by your course convenor. Summers, J. and Smith, B. 2002, "Communication Skills Handbook: How to Succeed in Written and Oral Communication", John Wiley and Sons, Brisbane. Set Readings: Set readings (case studies and articles) will also be provided in hard copies at the first lecture in the form of a booklet. The readings may also be available on-line at the student blackboard. Module 1: NATURE OF INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION To Topic Cit Citation 1.1 Bennett, M., (1998), ‘Basic Concepts of Intercultural Communication: Selected Readings’, (Ed.), Chapter 1- ‘Introduction Intercultural Communication: A Current Perspective.’ 1.2 Gary.P.Ferraro, (1998), ‘The Cultural Dimension of International Business’, Prentice Hall, NJ Chapter 1 – ‘Cultural Anthropology and International Business’ 1.3 Geert Hofstede, (1997), ‘Cultures and Organisations: softwares of the mind’, McGraw-Hill, New York. Chapter 1 – ‘Levels of Culture’ nd Carl Rodrigues, (2001), ‘International Management: A Cultural Approach’, 2 ed., South Western Publishing, USA. Chapter 1 – ‘Introduction to International Management’ Module 2: COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES 10
    • To Topic Cit Citation 2.1 Gary P.Ferraro, (1998), ‘The Cultural Dimension of International Business’, Prentice Hall, NJ, Chapter 3 – ‘Communicating Across Cultures: Language’ Jean-Claude Usunier, (2000), ‘Marketing Across Cultures’, Prentice Hall, UK, Chapter 13 – ‘Intercultural Marketing Communications: language culture and communication.’ 2.2 Judith Dwyer, (1999), ‘Communication in Business: Strategies and Skills’, Prentice Hall, NJ, Chaper 4 – ‘Nonverbal Communication’ 2.4 David A.Victor, (1992), ‘International Business Communication’, Harper Collins, New York, Chapter 4 – ‘Issues of Social Organisation in International Business Communication 2.5 Steven G. Jones, (1997), ‘Virtual Culture: identity and communication in cybersociety’, n Sage, London. Chapter 1- ‘The Internet and its Social Landscape’ Module 3: INTERNATIONAL NEGOTIATIONS To Topic Cit Citation 3.1 Nancy J.Adler, (2002), ‘International Dimensions of Organisational Behaviour’, South Western Publishing, USA. Chapter 7 – ‘Negotiating Globally’ nd Carl Rodrigues, (2001), ‘International Management: A Cultural Approach’, 2 ed., South Western Publishing, USA. Chapter 10 – ‘Cross Cultural Business Practices and Negotiations’ 3.2 David A.Victor, (1992), ‘International Business Communication’, Harper Collins, New York, Chapter 5 – ‘Contexting and Face Saving in International Business David A.Victor, (1992), ‘International Business Communication’, Harper Collins, New York, Chapter 6 – ‘Authority Conception in International Business Students are expected to read beyond the set readings and gather additional information from a variety of sources. Recommended Readings: The following references are recommended as additional reading material: Ricks, DA (1999). Blunders in International Business. Oxford: Blackwell Tucker, K & Renforth, W (1999), Making International Business News. South Melbourne: Longman Mead, R (2000), Cases and Projects in International Management. Oxford: Blackwell. th Harris, PR & Moran, RT (2000), Managing Cultural Differences (5 ed.). Houston: Gulf. Rugman, AM & Hodgetts, RM (1995), International Business: A Strategic Management Approach. U.S.: McGraw-Hill. 11
    • SECTION B – ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION 1. Department Resolution Dispute Charter: i) the Department encourages open communication between parties with maximum transparency. For example, students having difficulty with grades should initially discuss this with the most relevant staff member, rather than seek more senior intervention. ii) The Department strongly endorses ethical justice in all of its relationships. iii) The Department opposes the use of bullying by any party. To be eligible to pass this course, students are required to complete all forms of assessment and must demonstrate competence in the required course objectives as examined in each form of assessment. Full and detailed acknowledgement (eg notation, and/or reference list) must be provided if contributions are drawn from literature in preparation of reports and assignments. Your written work must properly cite/ reference original work, author(s), etc. Citation and referencing must conform to APA (American Psychological Association) or Harvard format both in the body of your paper and its attached reference section. All assignments submitted for marking must be word processed or typed. Students must be able to produce an electronic copy of all work submitted if so requested. Submission Deadlines and Extensions Submission deadlines will be strictly enforced. Assessment items must be submitted to the Off Campus Assignment Handling Service, Logan campus by the due date and time. Extensions will only be granted on medical or compassionate grounds and will not be granted because of work or other commitments. Normally a request for extension must be made in writing to the course convenor and must be approved by the coordinator prior to the submission deadline / due date and time of the assessment item. If exceptional circumstances prevent this directive from being meet, the issue must be discussed as a matter of priority with the course convenor. At this time it will be the students responsibility to provide adequate and justifiable reasons for both the late request and extension. Requests outside the above guidelines will not be granted. Extensions may only be granted for periods of five (5) days at a time. Any request for additional time will require another written request and approval for an extension. This policy has been established to ensure fairness to those who complete their work on time, yet accommodate the rare occasion when an extension of time may be appropriate. An assessment item submitted after the due date, without an approved extension, will be penalised. The penalty is the reduction of the mark allocated to the assessment item by 10% of the maximum mark applicable for the assessment item, for each day or part day that the item is late. Weekends count as one day in determining the penalty. Under NO CIRCUMSTANCES should assignments be placed under doors or in mailboxes unless prior arrangements have been made with your course convenor. Assignment Cover Sheets are available electronically via Blackboard for each course. 12
    • Group Assignment Cover Sheets: Where a course has a group assessment item, each member of the group MUST sign the cover sheet acknowledging the plagiarism declaration. Assignments submitted without this information may not be assessed. Assignments received by fax or email will not be accepted. Students should refer to the Learning@Griffith website for further information about this course 13
    • SECTION C – KEY UNIVERSITY INFORMATION ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT Students must conduct their studies at the University honestly, ethically and in accordance with accepted standards of academic conduct. Any form of academic conduct that is contrary to these standards is academic misconduct, for which the University may penalise a student. Specifically it is academic misconduct for a student to: present copied, falsified or improperly obtained data as if it were the result of laboratory work, field trips or other investigatory work; include in the student' individual work material that is the result of significant assistance s from another person if that assistance was unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; assist another student in the presentation of that student' individual work in a way that is s unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; cheat; (Cheating is dishonest conduct in assessment); plagiarise (Plagiarism is knowingly presenting the work or property of another person as if it were one' own.) s Visit the University’s Policy on Academic Misconduct for further details. KEY STUDENT-RELATED POLICIES All University policy documents are accessible to students via the University’s Policy Library website at: www.griffith.edu.au/policylibrary. Links to key policy documents are included below for easy reference: Student Charter Academic Standing, Progression and Exclusion Policy Student Administration Policy Policy on Student Grievances and Appeals Assessment Policy Examinations Timetabling Policy and Procedures Academic Calendar Guideline on Student E-Mail Health and Safety Policy UNIVERSITY SUPPORT RESOURCES The University provides many facilities and support services to assist students in their studies. Links to information about University support resources available to students are included below for easy reference: Learning Centres - the University provides access to common use computing facilities for educational purposes. For details visit www.griffith.edu.au/cuse Learning@Griffith - there is a dedicated website for this course via the Learning@Griffith student portal. Student Services facilitate student access to and success at their academic studies. Student Services includes: Careers and Employment Service; Chaplaincy; Counselling Service; Health Service; Student Equity Services (incorporating the Disabilities Service); and the Welfare Office. Learning Services within the Division of Information Services provides learning support in three skill areas: computing skills; library skills; and academic skills. The study skills resources on the website include self- help tasks focusing on critical thinking, exam skills, note taking, preparing presentations, referencing, writing, proof reading, and time management. 14