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  1. 1. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND MANAGEMENT SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT COURSE OUTLINE - SEMESTER 3, 2002 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication COURSE CODE: 2003MGT/7203MGT COURSE TITLE: Advanced Business Communication PROGRAMS: Bachelor of Commerce Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management Graduate Diploma in Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations STATUS OF COURSE: Supporting course CREDIT POINT VALUE: 10 CP SEMESTER(S) OFFERED: Summer Semester RELATED COURSES Prerequisites: Nil Co-Requisites: Nil Prior Assumed: Assumed to have completed the first year of the BBus or BCom degree Incompatibles: Interpersonal Skills MGT2003/MGT7203 CROSS REGISTRATION STATUS: Unrestricted INSTRUCTION MODE: This course requires attendance on campus and use of the web to access instructional material. TIMETABLING INFORMATION: Offered Semester 3, 2002 - Day STAFFING Course Convenor: Ms Tracey Keegan Co-Lecture: Ms Kathy Lyons ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The design of this course is based on Interpersonal Skills (MGT2003/7203) as designed by Ms Sheryl Ramsay and Dr Ashlea Troth, and Business Communication (MGT1016) as designed by Dr Ashlea Troth and Mr Paul McCarthy.
  2. 2. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF COURSE The Advanced Business Communication course extends communication skills and understanding beyond those developed in the first year degree program towards a skill level required for competent performance in the work environment. In extending these skills, the course treats current research and practice in the disciplines of communication and social and organisational psychology and their applications in corporate communication in greater depth than is possible in the first year course. The course provides the opportunity for students to develop communication skills and competencies rated highly by employers. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES This course aims to develop and refine student’s interpersonal, intercultural, speaking and writing skills to levels commensurate with indicators of effective communication practice in contemporary workplaces. The objectives of the course are to develop student’s abilities to apply current theory and practice in communication in managing interactions, making business presentations and proposals, leading meetings, conducting interviews and appraisals, and in personal development planning. CONTENT The content is organised around three modules that address the issues listed below. Module A: Managing interactions Workshop 1 (Tuesday 07.01.02) Topic 1 Introduction: Understanding business Face to face communication at work, including communication today nonverbal communication, listening and Topic 2 Communication process models: assertion Nonverbal communication, listening and assertion Workshop 2 (Thursday 09.01.03) Topic 3 Interaction management: Managing interactions in the workplace, Communicating with difficult people including mediation, conflict resolution, and Topic 4 Mediation and negotiation negotiation Module B: Diversity, leadership and persuasiveness Workshop 3 (Tuesday 14.01.03) Topic 5 Understanding your international Diversity in the workplace, including culture, business partner identity and leadership Topic 6 Managers as leaders Workshop 4 (Thursday 16.01.03) Topic 7 Smart business proposals Persuading others, business presentations and Topic 8 Advanced business pitch techniques proposals Module C: Interviewing, appraising, and personal development planning Workshop 5 (Tuesday 21.01.03) Topic 9 Leading effective meetings Leading effective meetings and interviewing Topic 10 Conducting interviews Assignment due Workshop 6 (Thursday 23.01.03) Topic 11 Performance management Your career - communication skills self- Topic 12 Communication skills audit and evaluation and management for a successful personal development planning future Wednesday 29.01.03 Exam
  3. 3. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 ORGANISATION AND TEACHING METHODS The central question addressed in the course is: “How do I understand and apply communication skills in interacting, writing and speaking in the business environment at levels commensurate with indicators of good practice?” Students will have web and hard copy access to a Student Guide that includes a detailed description of the learning process. The learning is organised around 12 topics within six three-hour workshops. The topics and readings provide an introduction to the theory and practice that enables student's learning to proceed through interpreting and analysing experiences in the six workshops. Thus, the learning process is organised so that the topics and the workshops provide the conceptual and experiential basis for the reflective, analytical, and planning skills required to complete the assessment items. ASSESSMENT Assessment Format Marks Length Due item Assignment Essay 50% 2,500 words Workshop 5 21.01.03 Examination Short and medium-length 50% 2 hours Wednesday responses to questions and 29.01.03 case analysis The first assessment is an essay based on the content of Module A: Managing Interactions, and its application in activities and learning related to Workshops 1 and 2. It requires interpretation and analysis of workshop experiences as well as analysing and reflecting on the application of communication theory and practice in a real-life experience, using concepts drawn from topics one through four. The second assessment is an exam and will require preparation for short and medium length responses to questions covering material from the entire course. Students will be encouraged to integrate concepts and theory from all the topics in their answers. ASSESSMENT RATIONALE/CRITERIA In completing the assignment, students will learn to manage interactions in the work environment through reflection, interpretation and critical analysis by drawing on experiences in Workshops 1 and 2, and relating them to real-life experiences. They will be assessed on the quality of their analyses and the extent to which they demonstrate understanding and application of key concepts and skills from Module A. Students will also be asked to think critically about their own communication skills, and how concepts and skills learned in the course may be applied in the business context. Detailed marking guides outlining the basis of marking the assignment will be available in advance. The second piece of assessment, the exam, will require students to complete short and medium length responses on material from all six workshops. They will be assessed on their ability to interpret, critically analyse, and integrate material from the entire course. Students will be given the opportunity to demonstrate understanding and application of the theory, concepts and skills from all six workshops in response to direct questions and case studies. Naturally more weight will be placed on material in Modules B and C, as Module A was assessed in the first piece of assessment. Provision will be made for guided exam preparation in the last workshop with ample opportunity for students to ask questions and gain reassurance. GRADING CRITERIA High Distinction (HD) Excellent performance indicating complete and comprehensive understanding of the subject matter; extremely high abilities to reflect on, critically analyse, manage and plan interpersonal, oral and written communication; exceptional demonstration of abilities to interact and write in a business context; exceptional achievement of all major and minor objectives of the course.
  4. 4. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 Distinction (D) Very good level of understanding of the subject matter; demonstrates excellent abilities to reflect on, critically analyse, manage, and plan interpersonal, oral and written communication; excellent demonstration of abilities to interact and write in a business context; excellent achievement of all major objectives and minor objectives of the course. Credit (C) Good level of understanding of subject matter; demonstrates above average abilities to reflect on, critically analyse, manage and plan interpersonal, oral and written communication; high level demonstration of abilities to interact and write in a business context; above average achievement of all major objectives of the course; some minor objectives not fully achieved. Pass (P) Satisfactory performance indicating an adequate understanding of most of the basic subject matter; satisfactory demonstration of abilities to reflect on, critically analyse, manage and plan interpersonal, oral and written communication; satisfactory demonstration of abilities to interact and write in a business context; basic achievement of all major objectives of the course; failure to achieve some minor objectives. Pass Conceded (PC) Awarded at the discretion of the Assessment Board Limited performance indicating partial understanding of basic subject matter; some evidence of abilities to reflect on, critically analyse, manage and plan interpersonal, oral and written communication; partial demonstration of abilities to interact and write in a business context; achievement of most major objectives of the course; failure to achieve some minor objectives. Fail (F) Unsatisfactory performance indicating an inadequate understanding of the basic subject matter; failure to reflect on, critically analyse, manage and plan interpersonal, oral and written communication; unsatisfactory demonstration of abilities to interact and write in a business context; and failure to achieve major and minor objectives of the course. Other grades which may be awarded Fail, No Submission (FNS) Did not present any work for assessment, to be counted as failure. Withdrawal with failure (WF) Cancelled enrolment in the course after the final date for withdrawal without failure.
  5. 5. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPORTING MATERIALS Text DeVito, J. A. (2001). The interpersonal communication book (9th ed.). Sydney: Longman. Recommended Readings The following list are recommended readings only. While it is not essential to passing this course some reference to this material could enhance the students’ understanding of interpersonal communication. Appropriate reference to relevant readings could also contribute to the students’ performance on assessment items. Other suitable references are found in the BF637, HD58, HF5548, HM131/2, HM251 sections of the university library. The following journals may also be of use: Human Communication Research; Human Relations; Journal of International and Intercultural Relations; Journal of Language and Social Psychology; Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology; Journal of Personality and Social Relationships; Management Communication Quarterly; The Australian Journal of Communication; and The International Journal of Conflict Management. Adler, R. B., Rosenfeld, L. B., & Towne, N. (1995). Nonverbal communication. In Interplay: The process of interpersonal communication (pp. 185-223). New York: Harcourt Brace. Allen, M. (2001). Planning and creating your reasoning. In Smart thinking: Skills for critical understanding and writing (pp. 111-127). Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Allen, M. W., Gotcher, J. M. & Seibert, J. H. (1993). A decade of organizational communication research: Journal articles 1980-1991. In S. A. Deetz (Ed.), Communication yearbook 16 (pp. 252-330). Newbury Park: Sage. Anderson, P. (1998). Proposals. In Technical writing: A reader-centred approach (4th ed., pp. 509-529). New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Argyle, M., & Henderson, M. (1985). Social relationships at work. In The anatomy of relationships: And the rules and skills needed to manage them successfully (pp. 238-274). London: Heinemann. Armstrong, F., & Pearson, J. (Eds.). (2000). Well tuned women: Growing strong through voicework. London: The Women's Press. Beck, C. (1999). Communicating forms: The lifeline of a system. In Managerial communication: Bridging theory and practice (pp. 1-17). Upper Saddle Ridge, NJ: Prentice Hall. Bens, I. (2000). Meeting management. In Facilitation at a glance: A pocket guide of tools and techniques for effective meeting facilitation (pp. 102-126). Salem, NH: GOAL/QPC,AQP. Bolton, R. (1986). Listening is more than merely hearing. In People skills: How to assert yourself, listen to others, and resolve conflicts (pp. 29-43). New York: Simon & Schuster. Bolton, R. (1986). Four skills of reflective listening. In People skills: How to assert yourself, listen to others, and resolve conflicts (pp. 49-61). New York: Simon & Schuster. Bovee, C. L., & Thill, J. V. (2000). Communicating interculturally. In Business communication today (6th ed., pp. 60-87). Upper Saddler River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Bramson, R. M. (1992). Coping with difficult bosses (Extracts). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Brinkman, R., & Kirschner, R. (1994). Dealing with people you can't stand: How to bring out the best in people at their worst. Sydney: McGraw-Hill. Bryan, A. E., & Gallois, C. (1992). Rules about assertion in the workplace: Effects of status and message type. Australian Journal of Psychology, 44, 51-59. Burgoon, J. K., Buller, D. B., & Woodall, W. G. (1996). Defining and managing relationships. In Nonverbal communication: The unspoken dialogue (pp. 297-337). New York: McGraw-Hill. Burnett, R. (2001). Proposals. In Technical Communication (pp. 571-601). Fort Worth: Harcourt College Publishers. Canary, D. J., & Spitzberg, B. H. (1990). Attribution biases and associations between conflict strategies and competence outcomes. Communication Monographs, 57, 139-151. Caputo, J. S., Hazel, H. C., & McMahon, C. (1994). Interpersonal communication: Competency through critical thinking. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon. Daniels, T. D., & Spiker, B. K. (1991). Perspectives on organizational communication. Dubuque, IA: Wm.C.Brown. DeVito, J. A. (1990). Building toward interpersonal power. In Messages: Building interpersonal communication (pp. 314-329). New York: Harper Row.
  6. 6. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 Dick, B. (1986). Third person skills: Overview. In Learning to communicate (pp. 171-188). Brisbane: Interchange and University of Queensland. Downing, J. (1995). Finding your voice: Reclaiming personal power through communication. St Leonards: Allen & Unwin Egan, G. (1990). The skilled helper: A systematic approach to effective helping. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole. Eisenberg, E. M., & Goodall Jr., H. L. (1993). Organizational communication: Balancing creativity and constraint. New York: St. Martin’s Press. Fisher, R., Ury, W., & Patton, B. (1991). Getting to yes: Negotiating an agreement without giving in (Extracts). Sydney: Century Business. Flett, N. (1996). Planning to win: Do you really want the business? In Pitch doctor: Presenting to win multi-million dollar accounts (pp. 91-105). Sydney: Prentice Hall. Forsyth, D. R. (1990). Group dynamics (2nd ed.). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks /Cole. Furnham, A. (1997). The psychology of behaviour at work: The individual in the organization. East Sussex, UK: Psychology Press. Galvin, K. M., & Cooper, P. (2000). Making connections: Readings in relational communication. Los Angeles: Roxbury. Goldhaber, G. M. (1990). Organizational communication (5th ed.). Dubuque, IA: Wm. C. Brown. Gudyknust, W. B., & Kim. Y. Y. (1997). Communicating with strangers. An approach to intercultural communication (3rd ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill. Gudykunst, W. B., Ting-Toomey, S., Sudweeks, S. W., & Stewart, L. P. (1995). The nature of interpersonal communication. In Building bridges. Interpersonal skills for a changing world (pp.3-33). Boston; Houghton Mifflin. Haas, J. W., & Arnold, C. L. (1995). An examination of the role of listening in judgments of communication competence in co-workers. The Journal of Business Communication, 32, 123-139. Hargie, O., Dickson, D., & Tourish, D., (1999). Feedback time: Appraising performance. In Communication in management (pp. 259-279). Aldershot, UK; Brookfield. Hargie, O., Saunders, C., & Dickson, D. (1994). Social skills in interpersonal communication (3rd ed.). London: Routledge. Harris, T. E. (1993). Applied organizational communication: Perspectives, principles and pragmatics. Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum. Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, F. P. (1994). Joining together. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. Karpin, D. (1995). Enterprising nation: Renewing Australia’s managers to meet the challengers of the Asia-Pacific century. Canberra: AGPS. Kaye, M. (1994). Communication management. Sydney: Prentice Hall. Kikoski, J. F. (1999). Effective communication in the performance appraisal interview: Face-to-face communication for public managers in the culturally diverse workplace. Public Personnel Management, 28, 301-322. Knapp, M. L., & Vangelisti, A. L. (1996). Interpersonal communication and human relationships. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Lesikar, R., Pettit, J., & Flatley, M., (1993). Basic business communication (6th ed.). Boston: Irwin. Lewis, G., & Slade, C. (1994). Interpersonal communication. In Critical communication (pp. 97-119). Sydney: Prentice-Hall. Locker, K. O. (2000). Job interviews, follow-up letters and calls, and job offers. In Business and administrative communication (5th ed., pp. 564-585). Boston, Mass: Irwin/McGraw Hill. Mapstone, E. (1998). The male boss. In War of words: Women and men arguing (pp. 221-230). London: Chatto & Windus. Mapstone, E. (1998). The female boss. In War of words: Women and men arguing (pp. 231-247). London: Chatto & Windus. Mapstone, E. (1998). Arguing with an audience. In War of words: Women and men arguing (pp. 297-310). London: Chatto & Windus. McCarthy, P (2001). The bullying syndrome: Complicity and responsibility. In P. McCarthy, J. Rylance, R. Bennett, & H. Zimmerman (Eds.), Bullying: From backyard to boardroom (2nd ed.) Sydney: Federation Press. McCarthy, P., & Hatcher, C. (1996). Selling your ideas: The proposal. In Speaking persuasively: Making the most of your presentations (pp. 163-173). Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Metcalfe, S. (1994). Speaking to persuade. In Building a speech (2nd ed., pp. 358-382). New York: Harcourt.
  7. 7. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 Moore, D., & McDonald, J. (2000). Transforming conflict: In workplaces and other communities (Extracts). Sydney: Transformative Justice Australia. Morgan, G. (1997). Creating social reality. In Images of organisation (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage. Munter, M. (2000). Guide to managerial communication: Effective business writing and speaking. London: Prentice Hall. Munter, M., & Netzley, M. (2001). Guide to meetings. London: Prentice Hall. Munter, M., & Russell, L. (2001). Guide to presentations. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Myers, G. E., & Myers, M. T. (1992). Managing interpersonal tensions. In The dynamics of interpersonal communication: A laboratory approach (6th ed., pp. 267-301). New York: McGraw-Hill. Napier, R. & Gershenfeld, M. (1993). The incredible meeting trap. In Groups: Theory and experience (pp. 434-461). Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Newton D. A., & Burgoon, J. K. (1990). The use and consequences of verbal influence strategies during interpersonal disagreements. Human Communication Research, 16, 477-518. Pearson, J. C., & Spitzberg, B. H. (1990). Conversational coordination. In Interpersonal communication: Concepts, components, and contexts (2nd ed., pp. 260-286). Dubuque, IA: W.C.Brown. Penrose, J. M., Rasberry, R. W., & Myers, R. J. (2001). Advanced business communication (4th ed.). Cincinnati, Ohio: South-Western College. Phatak, A. (1997). The international cultural environment. In International management: Concepts and cases (pp. 140-170). Cincinnati, Ohio: South-Western College. Putnis, P., & Petlin, R. (1999). Negotiation. In Professional communication: Principles and applications (pp. 238-280). Sydney: Prentice Hall. Rahim, M. A. (Ed.). (1990). Theory and research in conflict management. New York; Praeger. Rakos, R. F. (1991). Assertive behaviour: Theory, research and training. London: Routledge. Ramsay, S. (1997). Social rules and attributions in the personnel selection interview. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 70, 189-203. Reep, D. (1997). Technical writing: Principles, strategies, and readings. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Rifkin, J. (2001). The age of access: How the shift from ownership to access if transforming modern life (Extracts). London: Penguin. Rodenberg, P. (2000). Powerspeak: Women and their voices in the workplace. In F. Armstrong, & J. Pearson (Eds.), Well tuned women: Growing strong through voicework. London: The Women's Press. Rogers, E. M., & Allbritton, M. M. (1995). Interactive communication technologies in business organisations. The Journal of Business Communication, 32, 177-195. Schein, E. (1993). On dialogue, culture, and organizational learning. Organizational Dynamics, 22, 40-51. Sherwood, P., & Holroyd, C. (2000). Interpersonal communication goals to build a sense of community with an organisation. Social Alternatives, 19, 8. Simmons, A. (1998). Territorial games: Understanding and ending turf wars at work. New York: American Management Association. Sorensen, R., DeBord, G., & Ramirez, I. (2001). Business management and communication: A guide book. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Spitzberg, B. H. (1993). The dialectics of (in)competence. Journal of Social and Interpersonal Relationships, 10, 137-158. Tannen, D. (1994). Talking from 9 to 5: How women’s and men’s conversational styles affect who gets heard, who gets credit, and what work gets done. New York: William Morrow. Thompson, K. (1998). The past, present and future of emotional capital: A timeline. Emotional capital: Capturing hearts and minds to create lasting business success (Extracts). Oxford, UK: Capstone. Thompson, P. (1998). Persuading Aristotle: The timeless art of persuasion in business, negotiation and the media. Sydney: Allen & Unwin. Van der Molen, H., & Kluytmans, F. (1997). The appraisal interview and the performance evaluation interview. In O. Hargie (Ed.), The handbook of communication skills (pp.430-450). London: Routledge. Wertheim, E., Love A., Peck, C., & Littlefield, L. (1998). Skills for resolving conflict: Creating effective solutions through co-operative problem solving. Emerald, Vic: Eruditions.
  8. 8. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 Whitaker, L., & Austin, E. (2001). The good girl's guide to negotiating: How to negotiate effectively without being a bitch. Sydney: Random House. Windschuttle, K., & Elliott, E. (1999). Interviews. In Writing, researching, communicating: Communication skills for the information age (3rd ed., pp. 143-149). Sydney: McGraw- Hill. Wood, J., Wallace, J., & Zeffane, R. (2000). Teamwork and team building. In Organizational behavior: A global perspective (pp. 287-322). New York: Wiley. ADMINISTRATION Course Evaluation This course will be evaluated through surveys run by the School of Management in accordance with Griffith University and Faculty policy. Submission of Assignments Assignments should be submitted to the Griffith Flexible Learning Services (GFLS) office (level 0, Willett Centre) by the due date. Please contact GFLS to find out closing times for the due date. Assignments should never be placed in a staff member’s mailbox or room. All students should keep a copy of their assignment until it is marked and returned to them. Assignments should be kept until a final grade is awarded. Extensions Extensions may be obtained by consulting the course Convenor. Requests for extensions are to be made in writing, and accompanied by appropriate documentation to support the case for the extension. Late Submission of Assignments Where an extension has not been granted, late assignments will be penalised by having 10% (of the total grade) subtracted for each day they are late for the first three days and 100% (of the total grade) for four days late. The weekend (Saturday and Sunday) will count as one day. Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct Students must conduct their studies at Griffith University honestly, ethically and in accordance with accepted standards of academic conduct. Any form of academic conduct, contrary to these standards, is academic misconduct for which the University may penalise a student. Plagiarism is the most serious offence that can be committed in the academic world. Plagiarism is knowingly presenting the work of another person as if it were one's own. This includes:  Copying from any published or unpublished work and not acknowledging the work as another person’s work with the use of appropriate quotation marks and/or references.  Two or more students submitting the same piece of assessment and claiming it to be their own individual work. On determination that academic misconduct has taken place, the penalty which may be imposed on the student, is one or more of the following:  a fail mark or a zero grade for the assessment  a fail mark or a zero grade for the course  suspension from Griffith University  exclusion from Griffith University Where a student has been found guilty of plagiarism for the second time, the normal penalty is suspension or expulsion. Penalties for plagiarism will be enforced for this subject. If you are not sure about referencing your work please ask your tutor. Further Information Students are advised to consult the Griffith University Enrolment Guide for further information on the University’s administration of assessment.
  9. 9. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 Learning Assistance Unit The Learning Assistance Unit (LAU) provides free learning assistance services to Griffith University students. These include help with writing assignments, developing effective writing strategies, critical thinking, exam preparation, and much more. To find out more about the range of resources and study skills programs visit the website at http://www.gu.edu.au/ins/lils/lau/home.html or call into their offices on the second floor of the library, or e-mail at lau@mailbox.gu.edu.au, or telephone a friendly learning adviser on any of the numbers listed on the web site.
  10. 10. 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication School of Management 106/02/MGT Semester 3, 2002 APPENDIX ONE 2003MGT/7203MGT Advanced Business Communication Semester 3,2002 RESOURCE DOCUMENT Is the course manageable within existing resources? Yes COURSE APPROVAL The course outline must be reviewed each semester. The resource implications of any changes should be considered and detailed in the above documentation. The course has been reviewed , and all changes have been indicated. _____________________ Course Convenor date The changes to the course outline, and the resource documentation are approved/not approved. _____________________ Head of School date The changes to the course outline, and the resource documentation are approved/not approved. _____________________ Program Convenor date The changes to the course outline, and the resource documentation are approved/not approved. _____________________ Dean, CAM date

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