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  • 1. _____________________________________________________________________________ _ UBC Certificate Program in Liberal Studies Proposed Syllabus _____________________________________________________________________________ _ Feb. 27 – July 15, 2006 Continuing Studies, University of British Columbia
  • 2. _____________________________________________________________________________ _ TABLE OF CONTENTS _____________________________________________________________________________ _ WELCOME & COURSE SUMMARY 2 SCHEDULE & DETAILS 3 COURSE SUMMARY 3 CRITICAL THINKING SEMINARS 4 ACADEMIC LECTURES INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN ARCHITECTURE 5 ART THROUGH HISTORY: FROM THE PYRAMIDS TO THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 6 CANADA AND CANADIAN IDENTITY 7 THE LANGUAGE AND PSYCHOLOGY OF NEGOTIATIONS 8 COMMUNICATION WORKSHOPS 9 PROFESSIONAL SKILLS SEMINARS 13 FIELD STUDIES 14 PROJECT WORK 15 SOCIO-CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 16 DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY 17 SELF-DIRECTED COMMUNIITY EXPLORATION 17 THE FACULTY 18 IMPORTANT PROGRAM INFORMATION 20 LANGUAGE POLICY FOR PARTICIANTS 21 INCOMPLETE OR FAILED ASSIGNMENTS AND COURSES 22 ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT 22 PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL CONDUCT 22 MAINTAINING A POSITIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT 22 CONTACT INFORMATION 23 PAYMENT DETAILS 24 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT APPLICATION 25 UBC Continuing Studies 1
  • 3. ______________________________________________________________________________ Congratulations and Welcome to the UBC Certificate Program in Liberal Studies! The Certificate Program in Liberal Studies (CPLS) is a twenty-week program offered by the University of British Columbia to international undergraduate students preparing for a professional career. The CPLS curriculum is a combination including international study in the UBC Continuing Studies Certificate in Liberal Studies and an interactive program of communication and leadership skill development. The first part of this curriculum, the UBC Continuing Studies Certificate in Liberal Studies is designed to develop critical thinking skills while exploring subjects in the arts and humanities. We feel that a focus in this area is critical because today's competitive business climate requires creative, imaginative and “out of the box” solutions. Employers are promoting critical thinking around the world, arguing that today's global, technologically dependent, constantly changing economy has placed new demands on employees. Employers are searching for employees who have developed sound reasoning and judgment skills. Nothing teaches critical thinking better than a liberal education. The second part of the curriculum is designed to build both leadership and communication skills. Leadership development has numerous benefits for young adults. It includes the abilities of building trust, taking action, managing people and events, creating opportunities and communicating clearly. For others, leadership can be more about representing your community, reaching consensus, assisting others to reach your goals, seeing opportunities and communicating effectively. No matter how they are defined, leadership skills are essential tools in an increasingly global society. In short, tomorrow’s leaders must learn to work with a wide range of international and domestic colleagues and to master the professional and intercultural communication skills essential for success in the global economy. 2
  • 4. ______________________________________________________________________________ SCHEDULE & DETAILS ______________________________________________________________________________ The program will take place on the beautiful campuses of UBC and will run for twenty weeks (February 27 – July 15, 2006). The program will be divided into four terms: Term Length Start Date End Date 1 6 weeks February 27 April 08, 2006 2 6 weeks April 09 May 20, 2006 Break 1 week May 21 May 27, 2006 3 6 weeks May 28 July 08, 2006 4 1 week July 09 July 15, 2006 There are approximately 30 hours per week of structured activities in the classroom and community. The remaining time will be spent in Directed Independent Study, a form of academic preparation time to allow you to complete assignments, put language skills in use following their own interests (volunteer community work, athletics, travel), and explore the local community. During Term 1 of the program, emphasis will be on building your confidence to use International English communication skills and adapting culturally to academic and community life in North America. This work will continue during Terms 2 and 3, while a new emphasis on critical thinking begins in support of the Academic Lectures in Liberal Studies. Term 4 takes place during the final week of the program where participants and staff will review your work together. Participants will prepare for return home and feedback will be exchanged about the program and each individual’s accomplishments. The program will conclude with a formal closing ceremony and the presentation of the UBC Certificate in Liberal Studies. ______________________________________________________________________________ COURSE SUMMARY ______________________________________________________________________________ The Certificate Program in Liberal Studies will be divided into nine main components: Activity Instructional Hours Assigned Work* 1 Critical Thinking Seminars 36 hours 20 hours . 2 Academic Lectures 120 hours 60 hours . 3 Communication Workshops 156 hours 40 hours . 4 Professional Skills Seminars 24 hours 10 hours . 5 Field Studies 27 hours . *Assigned hours are directed by an instructor but completed outside of classroom hours. 3
  • 5. 6 Project Work 63 hours . 7 Socio-Cultural Activities 40 hours . 8 Directed Independent Study . 9 Self-Directed Community Exploration . Total: 403 Total: 193 *Assigned hours are directed by an instructor but completed outside of classroom hours. 4
  • 6. Critical Thinking Seminars Class time = 36 Hours Course Description Critical thinking is about arguments. An argument is a set of reasons given to support a belief, or claim. This course is designed to improve the student’s ability to construct cogent arguments, and their ability to assess the arguments of others. We will begin by examining the structure of deductive and inductive arguments. Then, we will practice constructing well-structured arguments. Finally, we will evaluate arguments critically, paying particular attention to common fallacies, or mistakes in reasoning. The arguments we choose to examine, construct, and critique will be related to the students’ areas of study. Arguments topics will include everyday issues, global finance, marketing and advertising, mass media and business decision-making. Course Objectives On completion of the course, students will • be able to explain the necessary elements and the structure of arguments • be able to construct cogent arguments • be able to identify common fallacies • have experience presenting arguments in a clear and structured fashion • be able to evaluate arguments found in business, media, marketplace, academic research and everyday conversations. More generally, students will improve their ability to reason, which will help them to became better readers and listeners, and, in turn, better writers and speakers. Requirements for Successful Completion Completion of all in-class exercises, newspaper argument analysis, written examinations, group presentations, and regular attendance is required. 5
  • 7. Academic Lecture: Introduction to Western Architecture* Class time = 30 Hours Course Description This course will familiarize students with basic concepts in the development of Western architecture, from the civilizations of the ancient Middle East and Mediterranean, through the Classical, medieval and Renaissance periods, to modern and postmodern theory and production. Using a combination of lectures, participatory activities, assignments, presentations and walking tours of Vancouver and UBC, we will examine the evolution of six basic building typologies through ten successive historical eras. We will look at the formal and technical aspects of these architectural monuments within the broader framework of social history and cultural theory. Course Objectives On completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate the application of their critical thinking skills and historical knowledge of four millennia of Western architecture in a final project involving research into a given building typology in a contemporary context. Requirements for Successful Completion Completion of all in-class exercises, newspaper argument analysis, written examinations, group presentations, and regular attendance is required. *Academic Lecture topic is subject to change due to availability of faculty. 6
  • 8. ________________________________________________________________________________ Academic Lecture: Art through History: From the Pyramids to the Italian Renaissance* Class time = 30 Hours ________________________________________________________________________________ Course Description Throughout history, art has been a profound expression of the values, beliefs and ideals of societies. This course examines some of the modes in which artistic practice of the Western World have been shaped by a range of historical developments, changing political and social institutions, and patronage and viewing practices. Painting, sculpture, architecture, print, and works in other media from Ancient Egypt to the sixteenth century are taken as case studies inciting investigation into the various functions of art objects and the ways they acquire meanings and value for particular audiences. Through lectures, discussion, gallery visits and audio-visual materials (slide and video presentation) the concepts behind the making and meaning of Western art at different moments in history - from the creation of pyramids in Egypt to the artistic production during the High Renaissance - are explored. ________________________________________________________________________________ Course Objectives By the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate their critical thinking skills and have gained an understanding of key factors pertaining to the production, circulation and reception of works of art from the Ancient Egypt to the High Renaissance in Italy. Students will have learned how to apply their critical skills in approaching, analyzing and interpreting works of art and architecture, and improved their communication and presentation skills. Requirements for Successful Completion Regular attendance, participation in discussions, completion of all in-class assignments, oral and written project proposal, and a written essay, is required. *Academic Lecture topic is subject to change due to availability of faculty. 7
  • 9. Academic Lecture: Canada and Canadian Identity* Class time = 30 Hours Course Description Using two literary texts, Emily Carr’s Klee Wyck and Wayson Choy’s The Jade Peony, we will examine how Canada has developed, from its status as a new Dominion in 1867 to its present form as a country that valorizes multiculturalism and is increasingly being recognized as such on the world stage. Emily Carr was born four years after the British North American Act (1867). Discussions around her text, Klee Wyck, will include literary manifestations of colony and empire; economic impulses involved in art and nation-building; spirituality, nationalism, and the rhetoric of the sublime; Native art and Native communities; the development of indigenous art; and issues of appropriation. Wayson Choy, a contemporary writer, addresses dilemmas that faced Chinese and Japanese immigrants at mid-century Canada. Discussions around his text, The Jade Peony, will include the evolution of multiculturalism in Canada; the status of the Japanese and Chinese during the Second World War; contestations of a homogenous national identity; the process involved in racialization; the effects of the First and the Second World War in Canada; and Canadian immigration patterns. Course Objectives On completion of this course, students will have developed their critical reading and writing skills and be able to demonstrate the application of these skills in a literary context. They will also gain some understanding insight into the development of literature in Canada, better understand how Canadian culture has evolved, including multicultural and First Nations communities, and be able to discuss how national and personal identity are constructed and defined. Requirements for Successful Completion Completion of all project work, including Journal Responses (one page or 250 words), four times over the course of the course; one final paper (5 pages or 1250 words), in-class participation and regular attendance is required. *Academic Lecture topic is subject to change due to availability of faculty. 8
  • 10. Academic Lecture: The Language and Psychology of Negotiations* Class time = 30 Hours Course Description This course will explore the language and psychology of negotiations and look at why negotiations break down, why they fail, and how they succeed. We will explore the presence of negotiations from our interpersonal communication to the widely complex world of economic and political interactions. Topics include: 1. the nature of negotiation 2. the relationships between negotiators 3. negotiation models 4. skills of negotiations 5. impact of culture on negotiation 6. the verbal and nonverbal impact of language in the process of negotiations 7. the changing trend of negotiations in a world of globalization. The course will draw on the latest scholarship in the field of language, psychology and semiotics. Our discussions will include a review of the scientific literature in the field and practical examples that enrich our understanding of not only the theories but also the techniques and skills of negotiations. Course Objectives After having completed this course, students will be able to apply their critical thinking skills in the area of negotiations, have an overview of the scientific literature in the field of negotiation, and understand why negotiations break down, why they fail, and how they succeed. Requirements for Successful Completion Completion of all in-class exercises, newspaper argument analysis, written examinations, group presentations, and regular attendance is required. *Academic Lecture topic is subject to change due to availability of faculty. 9
  • 11. Communication Workshops Class time = 156 Hours Course Description The course will allow you to learn about the principles of leadership and intercultural communication, and – just as importantly – practice them in a variety of hands-on and interactive activities. Participants become oriented to life in Vancouver and to the expectations and cultural differences of working and studying in North America. They will build their communication skills, cultural sensitivity, knowledge of local and other culture, and confidence in communicating effectively in English in professional, academic, and community settings. The goal is to help students gain confidence in communicating across cultures beyond simply language skills. Three areas are stressed: A. Awareness of Your Own and of Foreign Culture B. Communication and Presentation Skills C. Interpersonal Skills The CPLS will give you a chance to familiarize yourself with this way of thinking and interacting, so that you can deal effectively with English-speaking North American colleagues and friends. Course Objectives After having completed this course, students will have: • confidence in working with foreign partners and associates or with multicultural and international teams • strategies for effective presentations in North American settings • improved fluency and understanding of informal and formal spoken English • communication skills for academic, professional and personal usage • increased cultural understanding and sensitivity • skills in intercultural communication through real-life contact assignments • increased understanding of Canadian current events, history, economy, politics, geography, etc. 10
  • 12. Course Prerequisites Students should be 3rd or 4th Year university undergraduates with a minimum language proficiency score equivalent in level to TOEFL 500. Course Changes Note that the key components listed below are meant to be a general guide and that the instructor will modify it to meet the level of students’ expertise. Key Components • Self Introductions • Multicultural Forum • Vancouver Safety Talk • Presentation Skills • UBC Campus Tour • Community Visits • Homestay Orientation • Seminar Discussion Groups • Introduction to Culture • Academic Culture in Canada/Korea • Cultural Dimensions • Reading Strategies • Cultural Adaptation / Shock • Debates • Gestures and Body Language • Idioms • Introduction to Canada • World Current Events • Introduction to French Canada • Canadian News Analysis • Canadian Holiday History • Phone Etiquette • Academic Writing • Thought Grouping Requirements for Successful Completion Participants will be assessed in four categories: Participation, Assignments, Presentations, & Project Work. Participation – This is the most important part of your assessment. To pass the course, participants must be present for at least 80% of classes (including absences related to medical visits and sickness). High marks will be awarded to participants who: 11
  • 13. o Are on time in the morning and after breaks o Come prepared for workshop discussion o Regularly volunteer to speak and contribute during workshops and group work o Make an effort to use English o Listen to others o Make a visible effort to improve on your initial level of knowledge and ability Assignments – Participants will be asked to complete various assignments designed to improve his/ her cultural, career and communicative competence. Written assignments may include a personal profile, reflections on what is observed, or a learning log. Contact assignments may involve community visits and investigative work such as short interviews with English speakers. High marks are awarded for written assignments that: o Show an effort to reflect and ‘scratch below the surface’ o Show an effort to learn from revisions. o Are submitted on time o Have been checked for spelling and grammar as much as possible High marks are awarded for contact assignments that: o Show initiative in contacting English speakers o Show an effort to find out as much as possible about the topic assigned o Show an effort to learn through the contact with English speakers o Are followed up by questions in class o Are done on time Presentations – Participants will learn strategies to prepare formal and informal presentations in English for international audiences, and you will practice delivery skills including voice projection, body language, handling questions, and the use of audio-visual supports. High marks will be awarded for presentations that apply newly acquired presentation skills, including: o Clear presentation structure and organization of information o Communication of ideas in English, supported by visual aids o Appropriate voice, eye-contact and body language o Skillful handling of the room, questions and answers o Ability to interest audience o Effort made to learn and improve Project Work – Participants will be required to demonstrate your teamwork, research and presentation skills while working on a major project. The project will link all of the themes identified in the program and be presented to an audience of their peers and invited guests at the end of the program. High marks will be awarded to participants who: 12
  • 14. o Work well together as a team o Take initiative in researching your projects through a variety of sources (interviews, newspapers, magazines, Internet) o Demonstrate critical thinking and analysis of research findings o ‘Go below the surface’ in your comparison of the physical and cultural environment of Vancouver and your home countries o Effectively organize your presentation flow and materials o Practice your presentations together ahead of time Individual performance will be tracked daily and the instructors will give participants feedback on a regular basis. The grading will be done using the UBC Continuing Studies Grading Scale and weighing the categories as follows: UBC Continuing Studies Grading Scale 90% - 100% A+ Category Weighing 85% - 89% A Participation 35% 80% - 84% A- Assignments 30% 76 % - 79% B+ Presentations 20% 72 % - 75% B Project Work 15% 68% - 71% B- TOTAL 100% 64% - 67% C+ 60% - 63% C (60% is the minimum passing grade) 59% and below F 13
  • 15. __________________________________________________________ Professional Skills Seminars Class time = 24 Hours Course Description The Professional Skills Seminars focus on selected themes related to leadership development. These themes are designed to relate to current life experiences and the challenges you will likely face as young adults preparing for professional life. Seminars will emphasize the skills learned from Communication Workshops, participants will also examine topics such as work ethics and responsibilities in a variety of learning strategies including discussions, lectures, presentations, case studies, problem-based learning and general data gathering and reporting. Course Prerequisites Students should be 3rd or 4th Year university undergraduates with a minimum language proficiency score equivalent in level to TOEFL 500. Course Changes Note that the key components listed below are meant to be a general guide and that the instructor will modify it to meet the level of students’ expertise. Key Components  Team Work  Time Management  Building Trust  People Management  Professional Networking  Leadership & Community Service  Consensus Building  Goal Setting Strategies  Problem Solving  Relationship Building Across  Meeting Effectiveness Cultures Requirements for Successful Completion Assessment will be on the same basis as Communication Workshops (see above). 14
  • 16. FIELD STUDIES 27 hours Course Description Local Community Visits are arranged to encourage observation and analysis of various communities of the Greater Vancouver area in guided field studies. During these segments of the program, participants explore the cultural character of the city and expand their knowledge of the themes raised in the Professional Skills and Critical Thinking Seminars as well as the Academic Lectures. Course Prerequisites Students should be 3rd or 4th Year university undergraduates with a minimum language proficiency score equivalent in level to TOEFL 500. Course Changes Note that the key components listed below are meant to be a general guide and that the instructor will modify it to meet the level of students’ expertise. Key Components Visits to different ethnic areas in Vancouver reinforce Canada’s social philosophy of multiculturalism and provide research opportunities for the final projects. Sites may include:  Multicultural Vancouver:  Local Commercial and Industrial Chinatown/ Sikh Temple visit/ an Enterprises: retail co-op/ open air aboriginal community centre/ an market/ commercial district/ Italian neighbourhood transportation centre  Local Entertainment Centres:  Community Centres and Classes: theatre/ concert hall/ sports arena school/ Church/ child care centre Requirements for Successful Completion These site visits will debriefed in the field and classroom through discussion. Assignments based on the visit will be reviewed on the same basis as Communication Workshops (see above) and may require written assignments. 15
  • 17. _________________________________________________________ Project Work 63 Hours of Assigned Activity to be competed outside of classroom hours Course Description Participants will pursue knowledge in areas related to their future career plans, critical thinking, leadership development, communication and culture. Participants will work in small groups on projects often involving exploration of the local community and the interviewing of Canadian professionals, students, and community members to gain new perspectives. Each project team will receive mentorship from UBC staff as well as training in research skills and interviewing skills. There will be approximately 63 hours of scheduled time to complete the Project Work assignments, but there will be no class time given for this work. Course Prerequisites Students should be 3rd or 4th Year university undergraduates with a minimum language proficiency score equivalent in level to TOEFL 500. Course Changes Note that the key components listed below are meant to be a general guide and that the instructor will modify it to meet the level of students’ expertise. Key Components Sample projects might include an overview of the leadership opportunities in Asia / Canada, the cultural challenges of teamwork, or perhaps, contrasts and comparisons of North American and Asian society.  Photo Essay Project  Major Debate Project Requirements for Successful Completion These projects will be reviewed to encourage effective teamwork and to give guidance in the selection of a theme and the development of the investigation. Throughout the program, participants will be expected to present a summary of their projects to a public audience. Assessment will be on the same basis as Communication Workshops (see above) and may require written assignments. 16
  • 18. SOCIO-CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 40 hours Course Description Guided socio-cultural activities will be arranged according to participant’s interests. They will be able to choose from many different activities including ones that expose them to a range of cultural experiences while strengthening their understanding of underlying North American cultural values. Course Prerequisites Students should be 3rd or 4th Year university undergraduates with a minimum language proficiency score equivalent in level to TOEFL 500. Course Changes Note that the key components listed below are meant to be a general guide and that the instructor will modify it to meet the level of students’ expertise. Key Components Visits to different ethnic areas in Vancouver reinforce Canada’s social philosophy of multiculturalism and provide research opportunities for the final projects. Sites may include:  Swimming & Hiking  Longboat Races  Museums & Galleries Visits  Curling & Snow Shoeing  Ballroom Dancing  Concerts & Festivals  Horseback Riding  Sports (Football, Baseball, Beach  Spectator Sports (Ice Hockey, Football) Volleyball, Basketball, Soccer, etc.) Requirements for Successful Completion These activities will debriefed in the field and classroom through discussion. Assignments based on the visit will be reviewed on the same basis as Communication Workshops (see above) and may require written assignments. 17
  • 19. DIRECTED INDEPENDENT STUDY No Class time given Course Description Instructors will assign participants tasks and research related to the Workshops, Seminars and Lectures. They are expected to complete these assignments independently and outside of class time. Time in the schedule for study is set aside several evenings each week for this Directed Independent Study. SELF-DIRECTED COMMUNITY EXPLORATION No Class time given Course Description Free time in the schedule is also provided for participants to enjoy and explore the area of Vancouver according to their own interests. During this time we encourage each participant to practice their observation, language and cultural skills in the community. 18
  • 20. THE FACULTY ________________________________________________________________________________ Dr. Sayyed Mohsen Fatemi Sayyed Mohsen Fatemi holds a PhD. in language and literacy education from the University of British Columbia and is a frequently published author and poet with numerous conference presentations. He also holds a doctorate in psychology and has taught courses on language, education, communication, writing, research methods, research on reading and writing, hermeneutics, psychology, mindfulness and creativity, narrative inquiry, psychology of mass media, discourse analysis, English poetry and prose, creative writing, culture, language and media, emotional intelligence, etc. for UBC and institutions Like Athabasca University, Upper Iowa University, New York Institute of Technology. Mohsen has also conducted a wide variety of seminars and workshops on areas such as emotional intelligence, negotiation skills, communication skills, presentation skills, creative thinking and creative writing, motivation and performance enhancement, facilitation and emotional creativity, language awareness and self-actualization, intercultural skills, team building, etc. across North America and overseas. Mohsen is currently teaching graduate and undergraduate courses on areas of education, psychology and communication for UBC, the University of Phoenix, City University and Upper Iowa University. ________________________________________________________________________________ Dr. Ana Harland Dr. Ana Harland is the Program Advisor and Program Leader for the Certificate in Liberal Studies. Dr. Harland has taught critical thinking and philosophy for many years. She enjoys introducing students to the rewards of clear thinking and fostering curiosity about, and engagement with, key issues of the times and philosophical questions. Dr. Harland has taught at local community colleges, and at UBC in the Philosophy and Continuing Studies departments. In addition to teaching in regular academic programs, she has taught in both the Certificate in Liberal Studies and the Humanities 101 programs. In philosophy, Dr. Harland holds a Master’s (M.A) degree and a Doctorate (Ph.D.) degree from the University of British Columbia. Her master’s thesis examines the relationship of virtue to happiness in Socrates’ moral theory, and her Doctoral thesis proposes a way to construct successful thought experiments in Ethics. (Master’s thesis: The Relationship of Virtue to Happiness in Socrates’ Moral Theory. Doctoral thesis: Thought Experiments in Ethics: A Contextualist Approach to the Grounding Problem) Dr. Harland also holds two degrees in music. She is an associate of the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto (A.R.C.T.) and has a Bachelor’s degree (B.A.), majoring in the fine and performing arts, from Simon Fraser University. In addition to teaching philosophy, Dr. Harland teaches piano to students of all ages. ________________________________________________________________________________ 19
  • 21. Dr. Alexandra Idzior Dr. Idzior has taught art history in her native Poland as well as in Canada (Toronto, Vancouver, Abbotsford). She holds Master of Arts degrees in Tourism and Recreation (AWF-Pozna) and in Art History (UAM-Pozna, and the University of Toronto), and a Doctorate in Art History from the University of British Columbia. Aleksandra has lectured for Continuing Studies at UBC since 1998 on various topics related to history of architecture and visual representation. She has traveled extensively throughout Europe, and lived for a short period in Russia and the United States. Her interests include film, photography, music, outdoor recreation and intercultural issues in communication. ________________________________________________________________________________ Dr. Linda Morra Dr. Morra is a specialist in Canadian Studies. She holds a Doctoral degree from the University of Ottawa and recently completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of British Columbia on Canadian artist and writer, Emily Carr. She has taught at the University of Ottawa, the University of Edinburgh, and the University of British Columbia. ________________________________________________________________________________ Dr. Christopher Pearson Dr. Christopher Pearson is a historian of modern art, architecture, design and urbanism. A graduate of the University of British Columbia, he holds a Master of Arts degree from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London (England) and a Ph.D. from Stanford University (California, USA). Dr. Pearson has taught for several years in departments of art, art history and architecture at universities in the western United States, including the University of California at Davis, Santa Clara University, Arizona State University, the University of Oregon, and Trinity University in San Antonio. His most recent publications deal with the buildings of Le Corbusier, the art and architecture of the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, the architectural vision of populist painter Thomas Kinkade, and the sculpture of Henry Moore. His current research interests are broadly concerned with the intersection of art and architecture in modernist theory and practice, modernist sculpture, countercultural building trends of the 1960s, and architectural and urbanistic traditions of the west coast of North America. ________________________________________________________________________________ David Anderson (Instructor) David Anderson originates from the Kootenays - part of the Southern Interior of British Columbia. He is a graduate of the University of British Columbia having completed his Bachelor of Arts with a Major in English Literature and a Minor in Critical Studies in Sexuality. David has also been involved in student volunteer groups looking at social justice issues and recently spent a year in the co-ordination of a conference on overlapping oppressions and intersectional identity politics. Since 2002, David has worked on UBC international education programs with participants from South Korea, Singapore, China, Taiwan, and Mexico. He has also worked and volunteered with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) and has special interest in English, Canadian and Indigenous literature. David speaks English and French and even knows a little Korean. 20
  • 22. IMPORTANT PROGRAM INFORMATION ________________________________________________________________________________ Students enrolled in this program are classified as Continuing Studies students. Certificate Program in Liberal Studies participants will receive a library card, which will entitle them to borrow materials from both the main campus libraries and the Robson Square library. The card will bear the student’s photo on it. Students are strongly encouraged to apply for International Student Identity Cards (ISIC) at their home universities prior to departure. These cards will not only serve as an additional source of photo ID, they may also entitle students to certain travel discounts through Travel Cuts, the university travel agency or STA Travel. Once in Vancouver, students will not be able to obtain the ISIC cards. Students will not receive a student number from the University of British Columbia. Students must be enrolled in a degree program at UBC in order to qualify for the UBC issued student number. Students in the Certificate Program in Liberal Studies are not members of the Alma Mater Society (AMS). Thus, no AMS benefits and/or discounts will apply. This includes benefits for campus facilities such as the swimming pool, ice rink etc. Likewise, students will not pay membership fees for AMS. Students in the Certificate Program in Liberal Studies are required to have an email address. They will not be provided with email addresses through the University of British Columbia or through UBC Continuing Studies. It is important to notify their instructor or program coordinator of any changes to your contact information, especially if your email address changes. Students are encouraged not to use Hanmail as their primary contact email address due to difficulties in receiving emails from UBC. Students in the Certificate Program in Liberal Studies are required to provide their own supplies (e.g. notebook, pens, pencils etc.). Students in the Certificate Program in Liberal Studies may be studying at the UBC Robson Square campus and the UBC Point Grey campus. Classroom space has been designated for lectures and supervised labs. Additional study space is the responsibility of the student. UBC Point Grey offers study space in the campus libraries along with general seating areas in the Student Union Building (SUB) and other buildings on campus. UBC Robson Square has limited study space in the Robson Square library and general seating around the facility. Additional study space may be found at the Vancouver Public Library Main Branch nearby and other locations around town. 21
  • 23. Students in the Certificate Program in Liberal Studies may or may not receive student discounts for entertainment, sightseeing and other events around town. It is up to the discretion of the business as to whether or not such a discount exists and whether or not it will be granted. Students do not receive discounts on single purchase fares on public transit. Furthermore, students should budget to pay full price for their fare cards depending in which zone they reside. ________________________________________________________________________________ Language Policy for Participants Participants in the Certificate Program in Liberal Studies have made an important decision about their education and traveled a long distance to study at a Canadian university. Their experience at the University of British Columbia will be part of a cultural immersion that will be full of challenges and rewards. One of the biggest challenges will be to live and study full-time using English while surrounded all day by Canadian culture. The rewards, however, will be a dramatic improvement in their communication skills and a much deeper intercultural understanding of how and why we do things in North America. To reach these goals, we hope all participants will try very hard to function in English full-time. We suggest that each tries to make Canadian friends and avoid spending time only with other Koreans. To support this progress in intercultural growth, we have planned several activities in and outside of the classroom. To support each other’s progress in communication skills, including English language practice, we ask everyone to follow a full-time English only policy. Communicate in English at ALL times The temptation to speak Korean will sometimes be very strong. UBC staff will help keep participants motivated in communicating in English. UBC staff can also help participants find opportunities to join events, clubs, and classes in the community as well as volunteer in the community to improve their communication skills. If participants choose not to communicate full-time in English, UBC staff will give them 3 reminders. If participants speak Korean during class time, the instructor will ask them to leave momentarily. With some discipline on their part and these reminders, we hope that participants will be able to follow the program’s communication policy. If, however, participants continue to not use English full time, they will be unable to remain in the program until they have met with the Program Managers. The Program Managers will then work with the participant and may consult with their home university in order to support a return to the program. 22
  • 24. ________________________________________________________________________________ Incomplete or Failed Assignments and Courses In a typical education program, students are obligated to makeup for incomplete or failed assignments and courses by retaking courses on their own time at their own cost. Because of the cohort nature of the full-time, intensive programs, this is not always practical or possible. As such, in the case of incomplete or failed assignments and courses, individual accommodations may be made by the Program Leader for a “make-up” assignment, project, exam or course. This will be determined on a case-by-case basis. However, in keeping with standard academic practice, students will be required to cover expenses for any additional course work, supervision or assessment involved. ________________________________________________________________________________ Academic Misconduct UBC Continuing Studies takes academic misconduct in the form of cheating and plagiarism seriously and such activities are not tolerated. Students found cheating or plagiarizing will be subject to penalties which may include dismissal from the program or course with a failing grade. For additional information about cheating and plagiarism, please read UBC Policy #69 Student Discipline located at http://www.universitycounsel.ubc.ca/discipline/index.html ________________________________________________________________________________ Professional and Ethical Conduct The special nature of our programs obligates UBC Continuing Studies to foster a learning environment that respects the diversity of individuals, but also applies standards and ethics in keeping with a professional, adult workplace. Our goal is to make programs a positive learning experience for the majority of students. As such, students in our programs are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with professional standards of behaviour, respect and scholarly integrity. The ability to work respectfully in a team environment and specifically with other students, instructors and staff is essential and will be assessed in one or more aspects of the program. In addition, the Senate of the University may require a student to withdraw from the University at any time for unsatisfactory conduct, for failure to abide by regulations, for unsatisfactory progress in a program of studies or training, or for any other reason which is deemed to show that withdrawal is in the interests of the student and/or the University. In such cases a certificate of completion will not be issued. ________________________________________________________________________________ Maintaining a Positive Learning Environment Full-time, cohort programs require a constructive and positive learning environment to be successful. The stress of assignments, deadlines, personality conflicts, etc., are realities that students, instructors and staff must deal with. Our experience is that with some individuals, such stresses can manifest themselves in unconstructive ways that detract from the learning experience of 23
  • 25. others in the program. In keeping with our standards for professional and ethical conduct, we expect that any and all disagreements and concerns will be brought forth to the appropriate person in a respectful and constructive manner. Where UBC Continuing Studies feels that an individual is not able to exercise constructive problem or conflict resolution, he or she may be required to withdraw from the program. CONTACT INFORMATION __________________________________________________________ Authorized Representatives The Korean representatives of UBC Continuing Studies are the initial contact point for Korean Universities and their Students. Their responsibilities include Program development, Student recruitment and selection, Information seminars, and University documentation support. Korea Bong Hyun (Justin) Hwang E-mail: justin.hwang@ubc.ca Korean Cell: 011-9714-0230 Canadian Cell: 604-240-2810 Canada Phil Eng E-mail: phil.eng@ubc.ca Cell: 604-671-1976 UBC Continuing Studies Centre for Intercultural Communication Director Helena Hensley E-mail: helena.hensley@ubc.ca Phone: 604-827-5416 Associate Director Allan English E-mail: allan.english@ubc.ca Phone: 604-822-1471 24
  • 26. PAYMENT DETAILS __________________________________________________________ Program Period: Certificate Program in Liberal Studies is scheduled to run from February 2006 to July 2006. Program Fee : Cdn$9,350 per participant Payment Dates and Cancellation Policy Program fees are payable in three installments:  First payment of C$1,870 per participant is due December 15, 2005,  Final payment, which is the remaining balance, of C$7,480 per participant is due January 20, 2006. In order to qualify for partial refunds up to 80% of the total tuition, students must notify UBC Continuing Studies two weeks prior to the start date of the program. No refunds will be made for cancellations received after that time. In the case that UBC cancels a course due to insufficient enrolment or other causes, the full amount (less bank charges) will be returned. Minimum Class number : 15 Students Acceptance Letter: Acceptance letter will be mailed out to the students upon receipt of the first payment. 25
  • 27. ______________________________________________________________________________ INTERNATIONAL STUDENT APPLICATION Family name: Given name and initials: A. Contact Information Home Address: Home number: Mobile telephone number: E-mail Address: (Due to difficulties in receiving UBC email, please do not use a Hanmail account for your primary contact address) B. Education Backgroud Home University: Current Major: Year of Study: TOEFL/TOIEC Score: ___________ / ____________ C. Student Profile/Biography (Max 250 words) 26
  • 28. D. Accommodation Will you be requiring home stay services referred to you by UBC Continuing Studies? Yes No If No please complete the following: Name of Homestay Coordinator: Phone number of Homestay Coordinator: Your Vancouver Address: E. Medical Insurance Insurance Company: Insurance Policy Number: F. Pre-Arrival Information Arrival Date: Arrival Time: Airline: Flight Number Will you require airport pick-up service? Yes No G. Departure Information Departure Date: Departure Time: Airline: Flight Number Please email this form to Phil Eng: phil.eng@ubc.ca. 27

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