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Science Gallery, IdeaLab: HACK THE CITY: Current & Future City Needs: Autumn 2012, Lecture 1
 

Science Gallery, IdeaLab: HACK THE CITY: Current & Future City Needs: Autumn 2012, Lecture 1

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Open Lecture & Course Overview. ...

Open Lecture & Course Overview.
The IdeaLab stems from the Science Gallery's HACK THE CITY, 2012 programme. This IdeaLab focuses on current and future city needs and is a nine week evening course, running every Tuesday, 18.00-20.00 at the Science Gallery from Oct 16 - 11 Dec 2012.

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  • Image: http://www.heritagedaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Tikal-Wiki-Commons.jpg
  • Between 2025-2030 8 billion people will live in the world; 5 million will live in citiesTaken from:http://practicalaction.org/images/events/publicgood-king-7.gif
  • State of the World Population 2011, People and Possibilities in a World of 7 Billion, UNFPAhttp://foweb.unfpa.org/SWP2011/reports/EN-SWOP2011-FINAL.pdfSanitization our cities – making them clean; pushing out the poor because they cannot live there – poor perceived as a libility – focus here on India; need to develop small-medium sized ciites. One time you could come to Dehli, polish shoes; live off 1,000 rupees now you cannot – pg. 79The mothers in the slums bear the children of our future – their concerns food prices, early marriages, domestic abuse
  • State of the World Population 2011, People and Possibilities in a World of 7 Billion, UNFPAhttp://foweb.unfpa.org/SWP2011/reports/EN-SWOP2011-FINAL.pdf
  • . Primary, and especially secondary, education for girls has crucial multiplier effects that increase women’s social and economic status and expand their freedom of choice. Educated women tend to marry later and have fewer and healthier children. In adulthood, they have greater employment potential, income-earning capacity and decision-making authority within the household.
  • Costing of living going up – despite the down turnTOKYO, JAPANLUNDA, ANGOLAFrom: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/the-world-s-most-expensive-places-to-live-2012.html?page=allReport from 2012, Mercer ConsultatingUrban agglomerations
  • From http://www.therichest.org/world/poorest-countries-in-the-world/Congo - poorest since 2012; previous known as Zaire; largest speaking French country; civil wars destroying the countryLiberia – only Africa country not colonised by EU; composed of free slaves from US; slave elite; economic dislocationZimbabe is the third poorest; live for a man 37; 34 for a woman; plus usual health problems; 20% of the population have HIV and AID
  • http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2020527/Physicist-Geoffrey-West-discovers-reason-live-cities-1-15.htmlUniversal scaling developed by UKphysciists who applied the maths of usually applied to searching for the fundemental laws of the universe; to explore if there were universal characteristics of the city
  • http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2020527/Physicist-Geoffrey-West-discovers-reason-live-cities-1-15.htmlUniversal scaling developed by UKphysciists who applied the maths of usually applied to searching for the fundemental laws of the universe; to explore if there were universal characteristics of the city
  • Kevin M. Leyden1Abraham Goldberg3⇓Philip Michelbach21West Virginia University, Morgantown and National University of Ireland, Galway2West Virginia University, Morgantown3University of South Carolina Upstate, SpartanburgAbraham Goldberg, Department of History, Political Science, Philosophy and American Studies, University of South Carolina Upstate, 800 University Way, Spartanburg, SC 29303 Email: agoldberg@uscupstate.eduhttp://uar.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/04/28/1078087411403120.full.pdf+html
  • Refer too: http://www.canberra.edu.au/studyskills/writing/literature

Science Gallery, IdeaLab: HACK THE CITY: Current & Future City Needs: Autumn 2012, Lecture 1 Science Gallery, IdeaLab: HACK THE CITY: Current & Future City Needs: Autumn 2012, Lecture 1 Presentation Transcript

  • IdeaLab HACK-THE-CITYCurrent and Future City Needs Science Gallery Dublin Tue 16 Oct 2012 Lecture 1: GLOBAL CITY TRENDS & Course Overview Teresa Dillon, Assistant Professor teresa.dillon@sciencegallery.com @TeresaHacks
  • What is the IdeaLab about? Current lab focus is on critical reflection, project development & discussion on current and future city needs The lab develops from the Science Gallery, HACK-THE-CITY programme & exhibition. This is a pilot and the first adult evening course at the gallery. Emphasis is placed on: Collaborative project development Interdisciplinary thinking Developing prototype ideas for current and future city needs Developing partnerships TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 2 @TeresaHacks
  • Why the city? TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 3 @TeresaHacks
  • Accessed on Mon 15 Oct 2012http://practicalaction.org/images/events/publicgood-king-7.gif TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 4 @TeresaHacks
  • Guardian Urbanisation MapFrom The Guardian, 28 June 2007Reproduced via The Oxford Health AllianceAccessed on Mon 15 Oct 2012 athttp://archive.oxha.org/knowledge/publications/guardianurbanisationgraphic.pdf TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 5 @TeresaHacks
  • Rapid population growth started in 1950s with reductions in mortality in less developed regions. Peak growth rates occurred between 1965- 1970 and since then have been slowing down due to overall declines in fertility. Despite this decline approx 80 million people added to the world every year (equivalent to the population of Germany or Ethiopia)Edited points from UNFPA, State of World Population 2011, People & Possibilities in a World of 7 billonDownloaded 11 Oct 2012 from http://www.unfpa.org/swp/ TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 6 @TeresaHacks
  • Complex Story Lines & Context Dependent Challenges Finland currently addressing how it can support women to have more children. Ethiopia focusing on end child marriages and prevent life-threatening adolescent pregnancies. China addressing how will house it’s ageing population. Mexico city developing road-side green spaces and green spaces.Edited points from UNFPA, State of World Population 2011, People & Possibilities in a World of 7 billonDownloaded 11 Oct 2012 from http://www.unfpa.org/swp/ TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 7 @TeresaHacks
  • Currently one in every three people living in cities, lives in what is considered a slum.Edited points from UNFPA, State of World Population 2011, People & Possibilities in a World of 7 billonDownloaded 11 Oct 2012 from http://www.unfpa.org/swp/ TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 8 @TeresaHacks
  • People under 25 make up 43 per cent of the worlds population.Edited points from UNFPA, State of World Population 2011, People & Possibilities in a World of 7 billonDownloaded 11 Oct 2012 from http://www.unfpa.org/swp/ TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 9 @TeresaHacks
  • The impacts of urbanisation on women: Increases: Access to education Promotes cultural acceptance of their right to education Extends knowledge and capacities to maintain and protect females health, including preventing unwanted pregnancies, STIs & HIV/AIDS. All of these are helpful in the fight against poverty.Edited points from UNFPA, State of World Population 2011, People & Possibilities in a World of 7 billonDownloaded 11 Oct 2012 from http://www.unfpa.org/swp/ TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 10 @TeresaHacks
  • Most expensive cities to live in the world TOKYO, JAPAN LUANDA, ANGOLA 1st most expensive city to live in 2nd most expensive city to live in Monthly Rent, Luxury 2 Bedroom: $4,848 Monthly Rent, Luxury 2 Bedroom: $6,500 Cup of Coffee: $8.29 Cup of Coffee: $3.90 One Gallon of Gasoline: $7.34 One Gallon of Gasoline: $2.38 Daily International Newspaper: $6.38 Daily International Newspaper: $5.46 Fast-Food Meal: $8.29 Fast-Food Meal: $19.94*From Guardian OnlineAccessed on Mon 15 Oct http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2012/jun/12/tokyo-world-most-expensive-city.Drawn from http://www.mercer.com/articles/cost-of-living-2012.Mercer’s annual Cost of Living rankings compares cost of living in 214 countries across 200 items (e.g., location, housing, transport, clothing,household goods & entertainment). New York and the US dollar used as the base city and currency (i.e., strength to the US dollar & pricemovements related to New York city). TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 11 @TeresaHacks
  • Poorest countries in the world CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC LIBERIA GDP per capitia $349 GDP per capitia: $456 85% of the population live on less then $1 dollar a dayPoverty is measured by ‘Multidimensional Poverty Index’ (MPI) developed at Oxford University with support from the United Nations (U.N.)and is based on ten key indicators ranging from income, to access to clean water, to length of life, education and malnourishment.Ref: http://www.ophi.org.uk/policy/multidimensional-poverty-index/Notes: Sub-Saharan Africa is the poorest region in the world. According to Mercer’s report (2011) the cheapest city to live in is: Karachi,Pakistan (population 14.8 million one of the largest cities in the world) TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 12 @TeresaHacks
  • “Every week for the foreseeable future, until 2050, every week more than a million people are been added to our cities” . Geofffery West: The surprising maths of cities and corporations From TEDx talk Julu 2011. Accessed 16 Oct 2012. http://www.ted.com/talks/geoffrey_west_the_surprising_math_of_cities_and_corp orations.html TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 13 @TeresaHacks
  • So despite all the problems with cities why are they so attractive & why are they growing as such a rate? TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 14 @TeresaHacks
  • Physicist Geoffrey West researches the mathematical laws, which govern the properties of cities. He calls for an urgent need for a scientific understanding of the city. Image: Wikicommons Accessed Mon 15 Oct http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2a/Geoffrey_West.jpgImage: WikicommonsAccessed Mon 15 Octhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2a/Geoffrey_West.jpg TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 15 @TeresaHacks
  • Geoffrey West West applies key principles of biological systems such as scalability and the economy of scale to understanding cities. He argues we need new paradigms to understand city growth and why we want to live in them. West looks at the differences between sub-linear scaling (biological systems) and linear or supra-linear scaling (humans systems). In sub-linear, biological systems, the bigger you are the less needed per capita. For example when you double (100%) the size of an organism you only need 75% more energy . Linear or supra-linear human systems, like cities, show that a double in size, requires an increase of 15% more energy. So in the bigger the city, they have found a 15% increase in wealth, creative people police, crime, disease. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 16 @TeresaHacks
  • Geoffrey West Problem that with cities this rapid growth is that is eventual collapse. What happens is that to avoid complete breakdown, we innovate, we ‘flip-the-chip’ so to speak, so that we can start again and again. The catch with this is that now the pace of the growth has become so fast that it requires faster cycles of innovation, faster level and the question then is can we do this without ‘heart-failure’? So how do we re-boot cities? TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 17 @TeresaHacks
  • “The most important network of cities is YOU. Cities are just a physical manifestation of your interactions, our interactions, and the clustering and grouping of individuals”. Geofffery West: The surprising maths of cities and corporations From TEDx talk Julu 2011. Acccessed Mon 16 Oct 2012. http://www.ted.com/talks/geoffrey_west_the_surprising_math_of_cities_and_corp orations.html TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 18 @TeresaHacks
  • "Big Seven” factors relating to adult happiness 1. Wealth and income - especially as perceived in relation to that of others 2. Family relationships 3. Work 4. Community and friends 5. Health 6. Personal freedom 7. Personal values TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 19 @TeresaHacks
  • Understanding the Pursuit of Happiness in Ten Major Cities Leyden et al., (2011) We hypothesize that the way cities and city neighborhoods are designed and maintained can have a significant impact on the happiness of city residents. The key reasons, we suggest, are that places can facilitate human social connections and relationships and because people are often connected to quality places that are cultural and distinctive. City neighborhoods are an important environment that can facilitate social connections and connection with place itself.Leyden, K.M., Goldberg A. and Michelbach, P. (2011)"Understanding the Pursuit of Happiness in Ten Major Cities". Urban Affairs Review, published online 28 April 2011.Accessed Wed Oct 11, 2012http://uar.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/04/28/1078087411403120.full.pdf+html TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 20 @TeresaHacks
  • Our goal is to work together over the next nine weeks and co-developing ideas which address our current and future city needs. Your ideas can be focused on artistic, public service, social and/or commercial enterprises. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 21 @TeresaHacks
  • Date (Tue/2012) Lecture & Activity16 Oct Teresa Dillon, City Trends & Course Overview Practical: D-E-R-M-R-R-R method23 Oct Guest Lecture 1, Sean Harrington, Architect Practical: Individual ideas & Voting30 Oct Guest Lecture 2, Deirdre Ni Raghallaigh, DCC Practical: Refining ideas & designing (& securing) end user interviewsTue 6 Nov Guest Lecture 3, Sean Coughlan, SEI Practical: Rapid design sketches & preparing design briefTue 13 Double Practical: Working with external designers/prototyping & mock upsTue 20 Double Practical: Working with external designers/prototyping & mock ups (& submissions of lit review, 1,000 wrds)Tue 27 Guest Lecture 4; James Croke, EI Practical: Market research, further testing & preparing group presentationTue 3 Dec Practice presentation sessionTue 11 Dec Final presentations (& submission of group report, 2,000 wrds) TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 22 @TeresaHacks
  • Tue 23 Oct 2012 Guest Lecture 1: Sean Harrington, Architect Practical: 2 min visual ‘elevator’ pitch on your idea What is an elevator pitch is a short summary of the key ‘value proposition’ that your idea focuses on – e.g., I want to make cities happier places to live in by…. Vote on ideas and group together to make them happen (groups min 2; max 5) Homework: Bring in 2 responses to the idea you are now working on (image, object, fact, paper etc) TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 23 @TeresaHacks
  • Tue 30 Oct 2012 Guest Lecture 2: Deirdre Ni Raghallaigh Practical: Idea refinement & empathising with your users (& securing their feedback) Working with your group to refine your idea Design interview with 2-3 end users and gain their feedback Homework: (divide tasks) Start documenting your project visually Providing 500 wrd summary Carrying out end user interviews TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 24 @TeresaHacks
  • Tue 6 Nov 2012 Guest Lecture 3: Sean Coughlan, SEI Practical: Rapid sketching of your idea (drawing solutions & storyboards) based on user feedback Homework: Preparing briefs for external design support Start market research – what is out there already that is like your idea TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 25 @TeresaHacks
  • Tue 13 & 20 Nov 2012 Double Practical: Focus on creating a project poster Short movie/animation Scrapbook Physical prototype More detailed wireframe Technical drawing Homework: Between the practical sessions you execute a small user test and gain feedback, which you refine in the second practical session TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 26 @TeresaHacks
  • Tue 27 Nov 2012 Guest Lecture 1: James Croke, Enterprise Ireland Practical: Preparing for your final presentation Bringing all stages together Co-writing your final group report Completing any further prototype testing with end users Homework: Prepare for your practice presentation Submit draft of your group report (if you want feedback on it) TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 27 @TeresaHacks
  • Tue 3 & 11 Dec 2012 Tue 3 Practice final presentation Peer review Tue 11 Final presentations with invited guests Plus beta-launch of Outspoken project TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 28 @TeresaHacks
  • The core deadlines and outputs for the course will include: Tuesday 20th November: Submit literature and/or project critique (1,000 words) Tuesday 11th December: Submit group presentation and group report (2,000 words) TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 29 @TeresaHacks
  • What is a literature review? A description of the literature relevant to a particular field or topic It’s a critical review Following logical structure Literature includes: books, journals, newspaper articles, policy paper, reports etc Relevance of the text is the key TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 30 @TeresaHacks
  • What’s in a literature review? Introduction to the piece reviewed – title, what it is about, who wrote it, arguments/topics/themes, issues, solutions. Link to your own work - how and why. Historical links – other works relating to you. Current viewpoints – what are the current trends, themes in the area. What are the major arguments/assumptions/approaches/principles and methods. Conclude summary key points and findings, what you though of the piece and it’s position within current thinking/trends and links to your own work TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 31 @TeresaHacks
  • Group report, 2,000 wrds Summaries the project. Provides background research on the idea – is there anything else like it; or what else is like it; how is it different. Describes in detail your idea development and process – the steps-by-steps engaged in each week. This will be supported by visual documentation including wire framing, images, sketches, web page etc. Findings from user testing and how this influenced the design process. Market and sustainability research – how would you go on to develop the idea; what is the market (if any) for it. What are your plans – what you would you do next. Predict what you see as the next six months of development. Budget – how much do you think this would cost to implement. This is based on our market research. Conclusions – how you worked as a team, what worked, what would you do again. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 32 @TeresaHacks
  • PRACTICAL SESSIONS Each week will run a practical session where you co-develop your idea: Tue 23 Oct Individual idea pitches Tue 30 Refining your idea & gaining user feedback Tue 6 Nov Rapid sketches & securing 1-2 primary end user interviews Tue 13/20 (deadline for lit review/20 Nov) Refining designs & prototyping (with external designers) Tue 27 Marketing idea & further user testing with prototype/mock ups Tue 3 Dec Practice pitches Tue 11 Dec (deadline for the grp report/11 Dec) Final presentations TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 33 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Method Stage 1: Define – what is the thing you are trying to do? Stage 2: Empathy – connect, who is it for? Who are they? How do they live? What do you want to say? Stage 3: Refine – refine your idea based on stage 2. What have you got now? Stage 4: Make – low cost making and testing Stage 5: Release – release and test Stage 6: Refining more Stage 7: Release againAbbreviated from the design thinking methodologies as used at d .school, StanfordRefs too: http://dschool.stanford.edu/dgift/Accessed 15 Oct 2012 TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 34 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Example: Redesigning the gift giving experience Stage 1: Define: 8 mins Working in pairs: A and B. A, I want you to interview partner B on the last gift they gave someone. Then reverse. Ask as many questions as you can, what was it; to whom, why etc. What was good/bad? Motivations and emotions. You have 4 mins per person. Write down as much as the interview as possible.Abbreviated from the design thinking methodologies as used at d.school, Stanford1 hour design challengeRefs too: http://dschool.stanford.edu/crash-course-video/Accessed 15 Oct 2012 TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 35 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 2: Empathise. 8 mins. Get into emotion, what was the most important part of giving the gift. Each partner. Dig deeper get to the heart of the emotions of why? 4 mins each. Write down the verbs/words associated with the emotions. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 36 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 3a: Reflect: Synthesise needs and insights. 3 mins Catalogue their needs and insights – what are they trying to accomplish? They are trying to show love, find a partner, feel important? What insights can you gain from the interviews. For examples was it a handmade gift. Did this make it important? are more important. Circle and verbs in your interviews. 3 mins to reflect on your findings. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 37 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 3b: Reflecting. 3mins. Defining your view of the problem - as informed by your interviews with people. From the list of needs & insights – what were the most important. 1) Handmade; 2) Beautiful…. Goal is to really understand what was important to them. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 38 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 4: Make. 5 mins. Sketch Solutions. Make, sketch, play, design a better gift. Sketch as many solutions in response to your users needs as possible. Get the idea out and move on It’s not about perfect - its about expression. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 39 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 5a: Reflection. 4 mins. B gives feedback to A on the sketches. Switch seats with partner; share your sketches; partner A you sharing what you drew for partner B. You should not care about what you are trying to figure out about each other. It’s learning the process and sketch as a method to dig deeper and uncover the underlying motivations. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 40 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 5b. Reflection. 4 mins. A gives feedback to B on the sketches. Swap. Again. You should not care about what you are trying to figure out about each other. It’s learning the process and sketch as a method to dig deeper and uncover the underlying motivations. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 41 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 6a: Revise your sketch. 3mins Based on the feedback, pool what you know; revise your sketch. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 42 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Part 6b: Revise Build your idea. 10 mins Building a physical and tangible form of our idea. Using the materials you have at hand. TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 43 @TeresaHacks
  • D-E-R-M-R-R-R Stage 7: Refine via further feedback. 8 min. Partner A; 4 mins. Test your prototype and get their feedback Switch with B .and get 4 min feedback from them and then record your feedback TeresaDillon, Science Gallery,16/10/2012 44 @TeresaHacks
  • Taken from interview with Jim Jarmush’s, Golden Rules, Movie MakerPublished Jan 22 2004. Accessed on Mon 15 Oct 2012http://www.moviemaker.com/directing/article/jim_jarmusch_2972/ TeresaDillon, Science Gallery, 16/10/2012 45 @TeresaHacks
  • Dr. Teresa Dillon Assistant Professor, Science Gallery Trinity College Dublin teresa.dillon@sciencegallery.com @TeresaHacksImage: http://www.heritagedaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Tikal-Wiki-Commons.jpg