Australia: Land of plenty (opportunities for smart infrastructure)
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Australia: Land of plenty (opportunities for smart infrastructure)

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Dr. Flavio Romano presents on the massive existing opportunities in Australia where smart infrastructure could be utilised to extract efficiency and avoid costly new infrastructure builds.

Dr. Flavio Romano presents on the massive existing opportunities in Australia where smart infrastructure could be utilised to extract efficiency and avoid costly new infrastructure builds.

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Australia: Land of plenty (opportunities for smart infrastructure) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. AUSTRALIA: LAND OF PLENTY (OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR SMART INFRASTRUCTURE) FLAVIO ROMANOTELSTRA TEMPLATE 4X3 BLUE BETA | TELPPTV4
  • 2. CONTENTS1. Setting the Context: Australia’s Strategic Challenges2. The Role for Smart Infrastructure3. The Path Forward CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 2
  • 3. THE CHALLENGES CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 3
  • 4. CHALLENGE ─ POPULATION GROWTHProjected Population 2007-2056 Capital Cities and Australia Capital cities = 67.0% Capital cities grow by 10.4 million Capital cities = 63.6% Source: ABS Catalogue No. 3222.0, Released 4 Sept 2008 – Medium level projections CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 4
  • 5. CHALLENGE ─ POPULATION GROWTH Medium Growth 25 20 Population (millions) 15 Perth Brisbane 10 Melbourne Sydney 5 0 2007 2026 2056 CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 5
  • 6. CHALLENGE – ECONOMIC CHANGE Australia’s GDP by Industry Sector, 1900–2001 (%)100% 3 10 6 90% 4 80% 30 12 20 70% Mining 60% 12 Agriculture 22 Manufacturing 50% 48 Services (incl. technology) 40% 31 Construction Property 30% 25 Government 20% 8 5 10% 10 8 10 3 0% 3 3 4 1900–01 1950–51 2000–01 Source: ABS Year Book Australia 2005 CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 6
  • 7. OTHER CHALLENGESAustralian modelling of demand growth for economic infrastructure shows:  Freight demand is set to double by 2035 The cost of urban congestion to increase from $9.4 billion in 2005 to $20.4 billion by 2020  Electricity shortages on the East Coast by 2014-15 without further investments  Urban water demand to increase 42% by 2026 and 76% by 2056 CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 7
  • 8. THE AUSTRALIAN INFRASTRUCTURE TASK $300bn 2020 High estimate $30bn per year, every year 2015 $250bn Low estimate 2010 Source: Infrastructure Australia CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 8
  • 9. CHALLENGE – FISCAL CONSTRAINTS Projected Fiscal Gap Source: Intergenerational Report 2010, Chart 3.2 CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 9
  • 10. DEMAND/SUPPLY CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 10
  • 11. THE ROLE FOR SMARTINFRASTRUCTURE CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 11
  • 12. STATE OF PLAYTransport Intelligent Transport Systems Level 3Energy Smart energy metersWater & Irrigation Smart irrigation sensorsCommunications The National Broadband Network provides the key enabling technology for supporting smart infrastructure that can help achieve efficiencies across all sectors CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 12
  • 13. INTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMSMonash-CityLink-Westgate (M1) Motorway (managed road) 75 km road corridor = busiest road in Victoria (160,000 vehicles per day) $1.4 billion investment + 7% in smart infrastructure Electronic information + coordinated ramp signals = real time travel information Congestion and incident management Variable speed limits CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 13
  • 14. INTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS In 2009, NSW introduced time of day tolling = $4 up from $3 at peak times and $2.50 at other times CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 14
  • 15. INTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMSThe National Managed Motorways Strategy: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) priority (1.2 average) Full lane control e.g. tidal contra flows Ramp metering Freight only networks for added safety and economic value Spreading peak demand – telepresencing/staggered work hour strategy CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 15
  • 16. INTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMSSingapore’s Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) system varies road prices based ontraffic patterns to maintain an optimal speed range (85 th percentile).Washington DC Capital Beltway HOT Lanes: Addition of 22.4 km of HOT/bus lanes to the I-495 with dynamic tolling due 2013 One estimate: 11 billion litres of fuel spent in congestion in the US annuallyUnited States’ Public Law 106-346 (2000) and the Telework Enhancement Act(2007) Federal agencies required to develop employee telepresencing strategies. Reducing peak demand on urban transport infrastructure by 5% Australian report: -320,000t CO2 if 10% employees telework ½ time CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 16
  • 17. SMART ENERGY METERSAustralia is a very energy-intensive economy Debate has focused on the supply-side of generation but is slowly moving towards demand-side measures: Consumption choices Consumption efficiency Shortages predicted on the East Coast from 2014. Network efficiency In NSW, 8% (6400 GWh) annually is lost in transmissionCapital city smart meter programmes Mandatory in new dwellings in many catchments Victoria rolling out to all premises by 2013 Moratorium on mandatory smart meter use in VIC and NSW CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 17
  • 18. SMART ENERGY METERSBoulder, Colorado Smart energy meters that enable full control: Choice of energy source (coal, hydro, nuclear, etc) Consumer’s tolerance for interruptions to supply which appliances must not be interrupted? Pricing regime based on sensitivity to fluctuations in price Emissions intensity Management of appliances programmed meters that can deliver just-in-time hot water obviating the need to waste energy keeping large quantities of water heated CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 18
  • 19. WATER & IRRIGATIONBig issue for Australia = arid continent.Water restrictions are widespread and stringent.Household sector smart water meters allow consumers greater, real timeunderstanding of their water consumption but not common.Irrigation sector is adopting smart sensors to identify areas of most need.Potential synergies between energy and water smart meters largelyunexplored. CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 19
  • 20. THE PATH FORWARD CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 20
  • 21. CHALLENGES TO OVERCOME More collaboration both within and between infrastructure sectors More collaboration with international partners/leaders More accurate understanding of the cost/benefit dimension of proposed smart infrastructure technologies  Is a specific proposal worth doing?  How will we know it was worth doing? More engagement from the community Need to address privacy concerns Need for a national framework Need for common standards for smart technologies CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 21
  • 22. KEY MESSAGEPlenty of opportunity in Australia for smart infrastructure solutions that increasethe efficiency of new and existing infrastructure assets, thereby delaying costlynew builds and generating positive environmental externalities. CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 22
  • 23. Thank you. CeBit Australia 2012| Flavio Romano| 22 May| 23