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  • 1. Business as UNusual The 2007 net impact student Guide to Graduate Business Programs
  • 2. ��������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������� �� � �� ���������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������ �������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������� ����������������������������������� �� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������� � ���������������������������������������������� ��������������������� �������������������� ����������������������������������� � � ����� ����� ��������������������������������������������������������� ������������ ���������������������������������������
  • 3. Business as UNusual The 2007 net impact student Guide to Graduate Business Programs The print edition of this guide was balanced out by Eco-Libris.
  • 4. Business as UNusual: The 2007 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs is a publication of net impact 88 1st street, suite 200, san Francisco, California, usa http://www.netimpact.org © 2007 all rights reserved.
  • 5. Table of ConTenTs Introduction about net impact i about the Guide i is Business school for You? v school stand-Outs v aggregate Responses v How You Can Get involved vi Part 1: school Profiles Bainbridge Graduate institute - MBa in sustainable Business 3 Carnegie Mellon university - Tepper school of Business 6 Claremont Graduate university - Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi ito school of Management 8 Columbia university - Columbia Business school 10 Columbia university - school of international and Public affairs 13 Cornell university - Johnson Graduate school of Management 15 Dalhousie university - Dalhousie Faculty of Management 18 Dartmouth College - Tuck school of Business at Dartmouth 20 Duke university - Fuqua school of Business 23 George Washington university - George Washington school of Business 26 Georgetown university - McDonough school of Business 29 Gordon institute of Business science - Pretoria university 32 Hanken - swedish school of economics and Business administration 35 Harvard university - Harvard Business school 37 Harvard university - Kennedy school of Government 39 HeC school of Management - Paris Master of Business administration 41 indiana university - Kelley Business school 44 inseaD - Master of Business administration 47 instituto de impresa - international MBa, MBa, MMM 50 Massachusetts institute of Technology - sloan school of Management 52 Monterey institute of international studies 54 new York university - stern school of Business 56 north Carolina state university - College of Management 59 northwestern university - Kellogg school of Management 60 Pennsylvania state university - smeal College of Business 64 Presidio school of Management 66 Purdue university - Krannert school of Management 69 school for international Training - Master of science in Management 71 simmons College - school of Management 74 Tufts university - The Fletcher school 77 university of alberta - school of Business 80 university of arkansas-little Rock - College of Business 82 university of British Columbia - sauder school of Business 83 university of California - Berkeley Haas school of Business 85 university of California - Davis Graduate school of Management 88 university of California - irvine Paul Merage school of Business 91 university of California - los angeles uCla anderson school of Management 93 university of Chicago - Graduate school of Business 96 university of Colorado - Boulder leeds school of Business 99 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007
  • 6. university of Denver - Daniels College of Business 101 university of Geneva - international Organizations MBa 104 university of iowa - Henry B. Tippie school of Management 107 university of Maryland - Robert H. smith school of Business 110 university of Massachusetts - amherst isenberg school of Management 113 university of Michigan - Ross school of Business 115 university of Minnesota - Carlson school of Management 118 university of north Carolina - Chapel Hill Kenan Flagler Business school 120 university of Pennsylvania - The Wharton school 123 university of Rochester - simon Graduate school of Business 126 university of san Francisco - Masagung Graduate school of Management 128 university of southern California - Marshall school of Business 130 university of south Carolina - Moore school of Business 133 university of Texas - McCombs school of Business 135 university of utah - David eccles school of Business 137 university of Wisconsin - Madison school of Business 139 Yale university - school of Management 141 York university - schulich school of Business 144 Part 2: Ratings and aggregate Responses Rating Charts 147 aggregate Responses 159 Part 3: special advertising supplement MBaMath: Build the pre-MBa math and spreadsheet skills you’ll need a2 accepted.com: Your one stop shop for MBa admissions a3 ecolibris: Moving towards sustainable reading a4 university of Geneva inside front cover/top page Monterey institute of international studies a5 Haas school of Business at uC Berkeley a6 school for international Training a6 The Fletcher school Tufts university a7 Michigan Ross school of Business a8 Bainbridge Graduate institute a9 Graduate school of Management uC Davis a10 Presidio school of Management a11 Duke Fuqua school of Business a12 Marlboro College Graduate Center a13 nottingham university Business school a14 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 7. About Net ImpAct InTRoduCTIon Net Impact’s mission is to make a positive impact on society by growing and strengthening a community of new leaders who use business to improve the world. Since 1993, we have supported a grassroots movement of student chapters to educate, inspire, and equip individuals with ideas and tools for using business for social good. As of August 2007, we have more than 150 student and professional chapters on 6 continents in 90 cities and 110 graduate schools. Our central office in San Francisco provides tools for member networking, organizes an annual conference, and manages programs to support members in combining business skills with values on their campuses, in their companies, or in their communities. Net Impact has chapters in schools that include the top 30 business programs (as ranked by Wall Street Journal), 22 international business programs, and 8 non-business graduate programs. Our student chapter leaders, usually elected by their classmates, are committed individuals who organize events and activities for their chapters while serving as a liaison to the larger Net Impact network. Student members participate in local chapter activities as well as activities with Net Impact Central, such as our annual fall conference, Issues in Depth conference calls, and online career resources. Net Impact also has a professional membership, which includes both business school graduates and other professionals working in socially responsible business and related industries. Our website is www.netimpact.org. About the GuIde The information in Business as UNusual: The 2007 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs was compiled from two sources: a qualitative survey completed by chapter leaders from 56 programs, and an online survey completed by 1264 student Net Impact members. This version is our second annual publication, and contains 44% more program descriptions than the first edition. Net Impact started the Guide in 2006 for several reasons. First, we received numerous inquiries from prospective business school applicants who wanted to know what MBA programs had to offer for those with social and environmental interests. Second, we heard from many of our chapter leaders that they wanted the chance to share the student perspective on how their program addresses these issues. Finally, we believed that the Guide would be a useful tool for business schools to compare themselves with their peers and develop more robust social impact curricula, career services, and support for student activities. Which schools are included in the school profiles? Net Impact asked each of the chapter leaders in our MBA and graduate school programs to complete a survey with information on their school curriculum, student activities, career services, and administrative support. You can find a full list of our student chapters at www.netimpact.org/chapters. We were pleased that 56 chapters completed the survey. What schools are included in the ratings? Net Impact sent an online survey to 3723 student chapter members. We included schools in the ratings that received more than ten responses,. A total of 1264 students answered the full survey. Note: since the survey was sent only to Net Impact members, and not to the student body as a whole, the opinions represent a sub-set of students who are committed to and interested in Net Impact issues. We asked students not to forward the survey to their classmates so we could ensure a consistency in type of respondents between schools. Who wrote the school profiles? Were they edited? did admissions offices submit any content? Net Impact chapter leaders wrote the school profiles, at times with input from other Net Impact students. Members of the Net Impact staff provided edits, focusing mostly on clarity, grammar, and consistency. Our goal was to keep as much of the students’ original language and writing as possible; in almost every case the profile published in the Guide is very close to the content the student submitted. Net Impact staff did insert quotes into the profile that were submitted by students in the online survey. Net Impact also contacted admissions officers from every program profiled in our Guide and invited them to review their program’s entry. We made factual edits and clarification edits based on their feedback. No alterations to the opinions and subjects of the students’ text were made based on admissions’ comments. To learn more about the process involved in creating and compiling the Guide, please email chapters@netimpact.org. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 i
  • 8. What does the “At a Glance” box show? The “At a Glance” box contains the following information: - The number of full-time students, as reported by the Net Impact chapter leader(s) at that program - The percentage of full-time students at the program who are Net Impact members, based on numbers provided by the Net Impact chapter leader(s) at that program. - The Net Impact chapters’ self-reported percentage of “very active” members and “somewhat active” members - Three words that the chapter leader(s) chose, to characterize their program. - A quotation from one student survey respondent from the featured school, selected by Net Impact staff. - The names of chapter leader(s) who completed the chapter leader survey. In some instances the chapter leaders have provided their email addresses, and in most cases, these leaders wrote the school’s profile. - This is the number of students who took the all student survey. Please note that even if this number is more than ten, some of the sections may still not be included if fewer than ten students chose to respond to a particular question. how should I read the “data bars”? Many profiles include data in the bars that divide the profile into subsections. The data presented in these “data bars” were compiled from our spring 2007 survey of Net Impact members at the program being profiled. Data bars appear for schools that generated at least ten responses to the question to which each percentage corresponds. Percentages of 0% were omitted. cuRRIcuLum Program strengths: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked if applicants interested in international development, nonprofit management, community development, corporate responsibility, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship would have a positive experience at their program. Each area of study was rated on a 3-point scale. The three highest-rated areas of study are included as program strengths. Program strengths were required to receive an average rating of at least 2 out of 3 to be included Student support for social and environmental themes in curriculum: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate student enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The first number in the curriculum bar is the percentage of respondents who said that students at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Faculty support for social and environmental themes in curriculum: Each respondent to the all-student survey InTRoduCTIon was asked to rate faculty enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The second number in the curriculum bar is the percentage of respondents who said that faculty at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. StudeNt ActIVItIeS Student activity level: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate the activity level of their Net Impact Club on a five point scale from “inactive” through “one of the most active clubs at the program.” The most frequent response (the mode) is included as the activity level. Student support for social and environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate student enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The first number in the student activities bar is the percentage of respondents who said that students at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. ii Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 9. Faculty support for social and environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate faculty enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. InTRoduCTIon The second number in the student activities bar is the percentage of respondents who said that faculty at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI Career Services: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their career services office. Ratings were done on a 3-point scale with “very helpful” being the highest rating. The first percentage in the career services and alumni bar is the percentage of respondents rating their career services as “very helpful.” Job/internship placement: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to indicate if they had found an internship or job that “utilizes their values and their business skills.” Respondents who did not have this as their end goal were asked to skip the question. The possible responses were, “no,” “somewhat,” “yes,” and “still looking.” Six or more responses were required for this section to be included. The percentages of respondents answering “yes” or “somewhat” were combined to get the second percentage in this box. Alumni Network: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their alumni network from “not at all helpful” to “very helpful.” Ratings were done on a 3-point scale with “very helpful” being the highest rating. The third percentage in this bar is the percentage of respondents rating their career services as “very helpful.” Prominent Alumni: chapter leaders were asked to name up to five prominent alumni. AdmINIStRAtIVe SuppoRt Administration support for social and environmental themes in curriculum: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their administration’s enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The first number in the administrative support bar is the percentage of respondents who said that the administration at their program is “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Administration support for social and environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their administration’s enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The second number in the administrative support bar is the percentage of respondents who said that the administration at their program is “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. ReASoNS to AtteNd Social and environmental leadership preparation for Net Impact members: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked whether their program prepared Net Impact members for socially responsible leadership. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “strongly agree” being the highest rating. The first percentage in this box is the percentage of students who selected “strongly agree.” Social and environmental leadership preparation for the general student body: Each respondent to the all- student survey was asked whether their program prepared the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “strongly agree” being the highest rating. The second percentage in this box is the percentage of students who selected “strongly agree.” Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 iii
  • 10. To sum it up: The chapter leader survey asked the chapter leader to choose from four statements about what type of student their program would be best for. Net Impact created icons to go with each statement to draw a comparison between the chapter’s development and the building of a house. The statements chapter leaders chose from are: someone interested in laying the foundation for social/environmental awareness at the program; someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth; someone interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body; someone interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/environmental issues. how should I read the Ratings section? The Ratings section is not meant to give a definitive ranking of business programs; rather, the data presents a way to compare student opinions of their schools. When reviewing the data, please keep in mind the “n” for each school as programs included in the ratings had anywhere from 10 to 84 survey responses. Who funded the Guide? InTRoduCTIon Net Impact accepted no payments for including school profiles in the MBA Guide. Student writers submitted the published content voluntarily and without compensation from Net Impact. Paid advertisements from schools and businesses appear in a “Special Advertising Section” at the back of the Guide. Proceeds from the sale of these ads were used to publish 400 hard copies of the guide (available for sale at http://www.netimpact.org/bizschoolguide) and to market the Guide to new readers. If you find the Guide interesting or helpful and if you’d like to see us continue with similar projects, we encourage you to make a tax-deductible donation to Net Impact at www.netimpact.org/donate. If you are interested in advertising in the 2008 version of the Guide, please write to us at chapters@netimpact.org. What other information should I use to learn about what business schools are doing in these areas? We encourage you to take a look at publications from the Aspen Institute. Their Beyond Grey Pinstripes publication is a biennial survey and ranking of business schools, which spotlights innovative full-time MBA programs and faculty that lead the way in integrating issues of social and environmental stewardship into business school curricula and research. The information in Beyond Grey Pinstripes is provided by faculty and staff and thus complements the student perspective. To learn more about Beyond Grey Pinstripes and other Aspen institute publications, please visit www.beyondgreypinstripes.org. iv Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 11. Another good resource is the Idealist.org Graduate School Fairs, which take place in major cities across the United States. See InTRoduCTIon www.idealist.org for more details. We also encourage you to speak with student members of Net Impact at programs that interest you. Each program’s admissions office will be able to put you in touch with them. IS buSINeSS SchooL FoR You? Today, business school is no longer just for future bankers, consultants, and corporate executives focused only on bottom- line financial results. More and more graduate business programs are recognizing the importance of training values-based leaders who understand the significance of a healthy environment, strong communities, and long-term sustainability. Many of today’s business schools have both required and elective courses that include discussion and assignments focusing on the triple bottom line (financial, social, and environmental).The students at business programs today include former and future nonprofit leaders, social entrepreneurs, public sector leaders, and corporate employees who are committed to helping their company make a positive net impact on the environment and society. Some of the recent alumni highlighted in this Guide include an ethics and compliance officer at Starbucks; the CFO of Citizen Schools, Inc; and the director of TransFair USA. Net Impact encourages individuals with all backgrounds and interests to apply to business school. The management, strategy, and financial skills taught in an MBA or similar program will be valuable for anyone who will manage people, programs, or an organization in all sectors. While strong grades, GMAT scores, and professional achievement are required to gain admission to top programs, admissions officers are increasingly aware of the importance of ‘Net Impact’ values and priorities among their business school classes. SchooL StANd-outS A number of MBA and graduate programs stand out in the Guide. Last year, programs were ranked by how many times they received a top-10 rating from their students. This year’s Guide foregoes an overall ranking and focuses instead on how programs performed in individual categories, as determined by aggregated student survey data. These category ratings can be found on pages 147-158. A cautionary note on the ratings: please be sure to take into account the number of respondents from each program as they differed widely between programs. Our goal with the ratings is not to give a definitive ranking, but rather to provide an easy way to compare how students assess their own programs. As you read through the school profiles, you will be impressed with the amount of activity that is going on today at business schools. As a preview, we are including some brief excerpts here: • UCLA’s Anderson School of Management collaborated with UC San Diego and Cal Tech to co-host the Clean Innovation Conference which attracted industry leaders and held a business-case competition. • The Duke and George Washington chapters collaborated for an international development career trek in Washington DC • The Net Impact chapter at HEC in Paris hosts an annual Sustainable Development Conference, which has become a compulsory part of the MBA program’s curriculum. • The School for International Training (SIT) has implemented wide-ranging campus greening projects including instating food composts, installing lights with timers in classroom, and working with campus vendors to sell only fair-trade coffee. • The University of California – Davis chapter worked with their administration to create a new class on sustainability and were able get it on the schedule for the following quarter. AGGReGAte ReSpoNSeS The all-student survey was emailed to a total of 3,723 students and yielded a 33% response rate, with 1,264 of those students answering the survey. The response rate was up 5% from the 28% response rate in 2006. The respondents consist of 724 first year students, 487 second year students, and 53 students who are in their third or fourth year. Although the majority of our respondents are in school in the United States, 30 students answered the survey from schools in Canada, 70 in Europe, 2 in Australia, and 10 in Africa. The 112 international respondents in 2007 is up 46% from 70 international respondents in 2006. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 v
  • 12. Overall, most students are positive about how their program is incorporating social and environmental issues to date, while signaling that there are still opportunities for growth. Most students described their fellow students, faculty, and administration as supportive or enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in business school. As with 2006, each of the groups was described as slightly more enthusiastic about the themes in extracurricular activities than in curriculum. For more detail on the 2007 breakdown, please see pages 160-162. Students also told us whether they thought their program prepares students like themselves – Net Impact members with an interest in social and environmental issues – for ethical and socially responsible leadership. In 2007 85% of students agree or strongly agree that their program prepares Net Impact members for ethically and socially responsible leadership, exactly the same percentage as in 2006. When asked if their program prepares the general MBA/grad school population for ethical and socially responsible leadership, 68% agree or strongly agree a slight change from 70% in 2006. For more detail on the 2007 breakdown, please see page 159. On the career front, most programs were rated fairly well. Of the 744 students whose goal was to find an internship that utilized both their values and their business skills, 47% told us they did find an appropriate internship, with an additional 28% answering “somewhat” and 21% “still looking” in April. Of the 385 second year students with the same goal for a full-time job, 35% found a position, with another 27% answering “somewhat” and 35% still looking as of April. The majority of students called their fellow students, alumni networks, and career services staff somewhat or very helpful, with fellow students getting the most enthusiastic response. For more detail on the 2007 breakdown, please see pages 163-164. In terms of student club activity, 44% consider their chapter “one of the most active clubs at their program,” up from 36% last year; only 7% of students said their Net Impact chapter was less active than others at the school. 16% said their chapter had an average level of activity while 32% called their activity above average. Next StepS: hoW You cAN Get INVoLVed We hope that Business as UNusual: The 2007 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs will serve a variety of purposes. For readers considering graduate school, it demonstrates the breadth of opportunities to build business skills while cultivating social/environmental interests and career prospects. The Guide also provides insight into different programs to help applicants make an informed graduate school choice. Current students, faculty, and administration, can use information in the Guide to benchmark how their program compares to others, and to identify specific ideas and opportunities for improvement. InTRoduCTIon We think readers will be impressed with the wealth of classes, variety of student activities, and dedication of career services to incorporating social and environmental issues into the business school experience. If you did not see your program in the Guide this year and would like to see it in next year’s publication, please email us at chapters@netimpact.org. vi Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 13. PaRT 1: sCHool PRofIles Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 1
  • 14. baInbRIdge gRaduaTe InsTITuTe mbA IN SuStAINAbLe buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: ~150 ~67% of Bainbridge students are net impact members The school attracts very smart and interesting students, and great faculty 18% of those members are “very active” who are able to teach things at ” 80% are “somewhat active” Bainbridge that they often can’t teach anywhere else. This chapter in three words: collaborative, Sustainable, Visionary chapter leaders: Jean-Michel Toriel (jmtoriel@gmail.com) and andre Furin (drefur.bgi@gmail.com) n= 46 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of Corporate social Responsibility, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 96% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 93% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. B GI is the first graduate school with an MBA program fo- cusing on sustainable business. It incorporates action- learning and distance learning with a triple-bottom-line and share a passion for sustainability. One student notes that the school attracts “faculty [members] who are able to teach things at Bainbridge that they often can’t teach any- focus. All classes incorporate social justice, sustainable man- where else.” This makes BGI “an inspiring place to study, agement, green marketing, lean operations, values-based learn, and connect” writes another. entrepreneurship and intrapraneurship with strong leader- Guest speakers, executives and “entrepreneurs in resi- ship skills and diverse community building based on mutual dence”, are encouraged to join the students and participate respect. Every course infuses sustainability, environmental in our monthly intensives which are held in our Bainbridge and social responsibility with traditional MBA courses, like Island Gold LEEDS-standard facility, called Islandwood. finance and economics. The emphasis is on making a differ- We nearly have 100% membership in Net Impact which ex- ence, and “changing business for good” (BGI’s motto). All emplifies the values-driven mandate in business that BGI faculty and staff are innovators and pioneers in business stands for. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 93% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 91% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. B GI strives to be at the forefront of sustainability in busi- ness and our community continues to lead the way. We are a new school, heading into the 6th year. We started our intensive, we have “community processing” time where the students are encouraged to participate in bettering the com- munity of BGI. One student reports that the BGI Net Im- Net Impact Chapter in the third year and we continue to grow pact chapter is “relatively inactive, but that is only because with the engaged community. In each monthly face-to-face everything that all students do at BGI is focused on sustain- Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 3
  • 15. bAINbRIdGe GRAduAte INStItute, continued ability…We are very active in the work, just not through the meals and events. channel of Net Impact.” Last year, we won fourth place in the Leeds School of Busi- As we are already a “green” campus with exceptionally low ness Net Impact Case Competition. Our Vancouver-based emissions, due to the green buildings that host us at Island- students won a similar competition in that city with the Net wood, we still encourage greater reductions of our ecological Impact Chapters at UBC and Simon Fraser Universities. impacts. For instance, we measure our emissions and water This year, four teams emerged to participate in the Thun- use and are currently researching fair and efficient ways to derbird/Net Impact Competition, and one team made it to offset the emissions our students incur when they travel the final round. from as far away as Boston, Houston, Atlanta and Toronto. The BGI Chapter is beginning to organize a possible Net We encourage guests to participate in our Sustainable Impact event next year that would encourage widespread Speaker series. In addition, we have “Family Intensives” participation from all MBA programs with Net Impact chap- where we invite family members to participate in our classes, ters. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 41% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 67% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 33% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. F unding is available through grants for students and the community is currently engaged in developing a grant to further encourage greater diversity at BGI. for loans. Grants and/or scholarships covering all demon- strated financial need are extremely rare. All students have the opportunity to apply for student loans that are not based Phil Ronniger is a tremendous asset to our community and on financial need. heads the BGI Center for Work Transition and Redesign. He Before applying for a grant, you might first consider other leads Designing Your Future sessions on the first mornings sources of aid and/or loans aside from those that BGI may of each intensive. He remains at the intensives for face to be able to provide. The average BGI grant in the 2006-2007 face discussions as well as to assist in finding work or tran- year was $5,441 and ranged from $906 to $7,965 for a total sitioning to a more sustainable employment opportunity. of $168,673 in institutional grants. For the 2007-2008 aca- There is also a constant stream of postings for employment demic year, we anticipate a similar average award size and on our interactive community website, the Channel. range. The total amount of institutional grants awarded is We have fieldtrips or career treks before every intensive to expected to be between $217,500 and $261,700 depending businesses or non-profits. on the size of the class and its students’ financial need. BGI believes that no student with demonstrated financial need should be forced to borrow an unreasonable amount of prominent alumni money to fund their education. We will do everything pos- Michelle Knab (2006) - Manager, GoToMyPC Karin Borgerson (2006) - Community Leader, BGI sible to ensure that our students are not strapped with un- Eric Magnuson (2006) - Entrepreneur, Magnuson Consulting reasonable financial burden upon graduation. Don Wong (2006) - Director, Camp Mumba However, every aid recipient should still expect to apply Kevin Hagen (2005) - Sustainability Director, REI admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 96% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 89% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. J ill Bamburg, BGIs Dean, strongly encouraged full (100%) Net Impact participation and offered to assist members who could not afford the fee. BGI and Net Impact are virtual- by the students and faculty. This living system of an institu- tion constantly improves itself to deliver the most current content via world renowned experts.” Another adds that BGI ly aligned in values. One student writes that “The curriculum “is the only place that I have found that practices everything and the guiding principles of the institution are co-created it preaches.”  Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 16. bAINbRIdGe GRAduAte INStItute, continued Reasons To aTTend 91% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 76% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he strength of BGI is primarily the incredibly support- ive community. Faculty and staff members are extremely encouraging, knowledgeable and experienced in their fields. to express a uniform opinion. It is a diverse community of people who’ve all come together for many different reasons, with a singular guiding motivation: to learn and to make the Many of them are alumni who assist in bridging the faculty world a better place.” and staff with the students. This greatly expands and inte- grates the community’s core values. The curriculum speaks for itself. A few highlights: MGT 551 Foundations of Sus- tainable Business, MGT 553/MGT 554 Finance, Accounting to sum it up & the Triple Bottom Line I, and II, MGT 567 Social Justice & Business, MGT 564 Sustainable Operations Management, Bainbridge would be most fitting for someone interested MGT 568 Creativity & Right Livelihood, MGT 566 Dal La- in attending a school where students and faculty are on Magna Series on Responsible Capitalism. the forefront of social/environmental issues. One student concluded, “Bainbridge is not a group of radi- cal environmentalists and socialists who’ve come together 284 Madrona Way NE, Suite 124, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110, USA • Phone: +1 206 855 9559 • E-mail: info@bgiedu.org Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 
  • 17. CaRnegIe mellon unIVeRsITy teppeR SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 275 15% of Tepper students are net impact members The small program provides a strong 25% of those members are “very active” community focus and the cross campus collaboration provides opportunities not ” 55% are “somewhat active” available in most business schools. This chapter in three words: collaborative, Innovative, expanding chapter leaders: : Curtis stratman (stratman@cmu.edu) and Oren lieberman (olieberman@cmu.edu) CuRRICulum T he Tepper School continues to incorporate the themes of corporate social responsibility throughout the curricu- lum. While there are a limited number of courses that spe- credible asset to allow students to pursue their own interests and initiatives,” one wrote. The Heinz School of Public Policy and Management, in particular, provides a number of classes cifically focus on these topics, there are many opportunities in conjunction with the following programs: The Center for for discussion through seminars, speakers, and club activi- Economic Development, Institute for the Study of Informa- ties and events. The faculty and administration continue to tion Technology and Society, the National Consortium on be supportive of incorporating social topics into both formal Violence Research, and the Institute for Social Innovation. classroom curriculum and other student programs. These class resources are “at your fingertips,” wrote one sur- vey respondent. MBA students also have the option of ap- One of the strengths of the Tepper program is the ability plying to dual master degree programs in Public Policy and to take graduate courses anywhere across the CMU campus. Management, Healthcare Policy and Management, and Civil Several students surveyed cited this cross-campus collabora- and Environmental Engineering. tion as one of the programs greatest strengths. “[It’s] an in- sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Net Impact chapter at the Tepper School of Business has a mission to promote the education and understand- ing of business ethics and corporate social responsibility ulty Discussion Lunch Series, field trips, community involve- ment programs (along with Net Impact’s Service Corps), cross-campus collaborations (including the national Solar among MBA students and bring together other like-minded Decathlon competition, campus environmental greening, graduate students across Carnegie Mellon University. The and mixers with students involved with the Institute for So- chapter, founded in 2004, has established a solid foundation cial Innovation), and conferences. One student cited “activ- of contacts and events to connect students with activities in ism in the community” as Tepper’s greatest strength, adding almost any social interest. We have established numerous ac- that “Students have many opportunities to work with non- tivities to benefit our members and bring awareness to the profit organizations or to volunteer. Many students have larger student community including a Speaker Series, a Fac- been involved in at least one of these events.” 6 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 18. cARNeGIe meLLoN uNIVeRSItY, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he small community at Tepper allows the Career Oppor- tunity Center (COC) to work with students individually on their specific goals. The COC also has a dedicated staff terested in these areas have been successful in securing posi- tions through postings sent to the school posting board. There is no formal program to support students pursuing member for students interested in careers within non-profit internships with nonprofits, but in the past the school has or governmental organizations. In addition, Tepper has an provided supplemental funds to students who have made in- entrepreneurship track that has worked with many students dividual requests. in starting socially focused businesses. While there are no companies that currently perform on- prominent alumnus David Gonzales (1975) - Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, Pepsico, Inc. campus interviews for CSR or non-profit jobs, students in- admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he Tepper administration has been supporting the Net Impact chapter as the driver of CSR awareness through the student community. They have provided opportunities also provided supplemental funds. “The strong faculty and administration support for any career pursuit that a student may have creates opportunities not equal anywhere else,“ to promote speakers that address social topics and they have wrote one student. Reasons To aTTend T he Tepper School of Business focuses on building leader- ship of thought and influence. In class, we take the lat- est concepts in management science and learn effective ways pursue his or her passion. Those interested in social themes will find the Tepper community to be an exceptional asset. of adopting them throughout our future careers. There are almost unlimited leadership opportunities in working with to sum it up the administration, in student government, and in club of- ficer positions. The curriculum tracks also expect their par- The Tepper school would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/ ticipants to take leadership roles in arranging conferences, environmental impact activities with opportunity for speakers, and networking events. In summary, Tepper is significant growth. looking for individuals who want to step up and make a dif- ference. Because of the small class size, every individual can 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA • Phone: +1 412 268 2269 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 7
  • 19. ClaRemonT gRaduaTe unIVeRsITy the peteR F. dRuckeR ANd mASAtoShI Ito SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 140 social/environmental impact themes are inte- 25% of Drucker net impact members are “very active” grated in our case analysis/discussion of business problems. and in instances when professors don’t 25% are “somewhat active” bring them up, one or more of the students always ” brings up the issues, which the class is very recep- tive to and appreciates. This chapter in three words: potential, Growing, Striving chapter leaders: Christina lam (christina.lam@cgu.edu) and Curtis Hall (curtis.hall@cgu.edu) CuRRICulum T he Drucker School of Management concentrates on the human side of management: ethics, organizational be- havior, human capital, and leadership. The School’s flexible for example. In addition to the courses offered at the Drucker School, students are welcome to take courses outside of the CGU curriculum and small size allow students to pursue social, campus. Claremont Graduate University, Keck Graduate environmental, and ethical issues – or any area of interest. Institute of Applied Life Sciences, and five highly regarded Students are here to study under Drucker’s legacy. One of undergraduate colleges—Pomona, Scripps, Claremont McK- the core leadership courses students can choose to take is enna, Harvey Mudd, and Pitzer colleges—comprise The Cla- “Drucker on Management” taught by Joseph Maciariello. remont Colleges, also know as the “5 Cs.” In addition, the The administration and faculty members are greatly sup- Claremont School of Theology and the Rancho Santa Ana portive of students’ pursuing dual degrees in such areas as Botanic Garden are affiliated with the Graduate University. politics and economics, behavioral and organizational sci- Because many of the 500 faculty members from the “5 Cs” ences, financial engineering, and arts and cultural manage- and affiliated institutions participate actively in the Graduate ment. The Drucker School is also enthusiastic to provide University’s programs, CGU students benefit from potential guidance for students pursuing dual degrees outside of the access to a faculty of far greater depth than the University “management” realm—in Women’s Studies and Education, could provide independently. sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Drucker/CGU chapter of Net Impact is fairly new. Recently, it shared with Dartmouth the honor of being named School Chapter of the Year. When the leadership have a large conference in late September 2007. Current stu- dents seem to see Net Impact as an important student club on campus, though it is somewhat difficult to recruit mem- team graduated, the chapter slowed down its activity on bers. While the school is very much pro-Net Impact, many campus until this year. During the 2007 spring semester, the students are commuters and working students which limits chapter’s leadership has been working on pulling the chapter their participation in any afternoon activities. back up to speed, making the student body aware of the club This chapter is directly linked to the Drucker School Stu- and widening its membership net, targeting both MBA and dent Association and is a partner with other student clubs non-MBA students. such as the Management Consulting Association and the It is the chapter’s goal to plan out the rest of the calen- Marketing Association. In fact, our chapter is looking to oth- dar year and to bring in a couple more leaders to succeed er clubs to help co-sponsor events so as to increase student the current leadership by the spring semester. We hope to participation and enthusiasm. 8 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 20. cLARemoNt GRAduAte uNIVeRSItY, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he Office of Career Management staff is very new to the interview preparation, and skills assessment. The Drucker school. They have been working to bring internships and School has also partnered with an outside career placement opportunities of all kinds to Drucker students. company to expand our career placement and search services The OCM staff usually work one-on-one with students in to students. finding opportunities and have been receptive to students’ Since CGU is part of the Claremont Consortium, students requests for more postings in the realm of socially respon- are welcome and encouraged to attend the “5C’s” career cen- sible business. They have also been helpful with finding and ter workshops and conferences as well. co-sponsoring guest speakers for all of the student clubs, in- cluding Net Impact. The OCM is also a sponsor of the Alumni Mentor Pro- prominent alumni Richard Park (2005) - Management Consultant, Deloitte Consulting gram which matches current MBA students with a Druck- Scott Collins (2005) - Admissions Coordinator, Drucker School of Management er alum in their choice of field. In addition to this pro- Michael Crooke - Principal/Founder, Revolution gram, OCM offers workshops such as resume building, admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT O ur new dean, Ira Jackson, is a major supporter of Net Impact. His presence and public support of our club has been helpful in bringing in members and boosting participa- asked for more monetary support to expand and increase participation for the upcoming fall semester, and we have been approved for a bigger budget . They are committed to tion at events. seeing Net Impact and the other student clubs succeed and The administration is supportive of our chapter here, sug- expand. The word “no” is not in their vocabulary. In fact, they gesting ideas and cheerleading us when we have events. We are big proponents of “Yeah! Go for it.” Reasons To aTTend T he Drucker School of Management would be an ideal place for a student interested in building up a solid base of ethical and dynamic leadership skills, diving into activities relating to the social responsibility, and embracing Drucker’s phi- losophies on innovation and the knowledge worker. to sum it up The Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi ito school would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. 160 East Tenth Street, Claremont, California 91711-6163, USA • Phone: +1 909 621 8069 • E-mail: admiss@cgu.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 9
  • 21. ColumbIa unIVeRsITy coLumbIA buSINeSS SchooL aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 1,300 24% of CBs students are net impact members The students and faculty are very eager 25% of those members are “very active” to support students who want to use their ” MBa for a socially responsible cause. 60% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: engaged, Strong, Forward-thinking chapter leaders: Cai steger (csteger08@gsb.columbia.edu) and Michael stone (mstone08@gsb.columbia.edu) n = 51 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, nonprofit management, and social entrepreneurship. 41% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 51% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. C olumbia Business School has a rigorous and stimulat- ing curriculum which weaves social and environmental themes into the core class offerings and is punctuated by the Individual, Business, and Society (IBS) Curriculum. The idea of this new initiative is to intertwine an element of so- cial consciousness into all courses for at least one full class highly-regarded electives which challenge students to apply session. For more information, see http://www0.gsb.colum- core business skills to real-world problems. bia.edu/leadership/curriculum/. The Social Enterprise Program has focused on developing Columbia Business School students are allowed to take up high-impact courses across four broad areas of study which to six graduate credits at any on-campus graduate school, in- include public and nonprofit management, international de- cluding the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), velopment and emerging markets, social entrepreneurship, the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preserva- and corporate social responsibility and sustainability. The tion, Columbia Law School, and Teachers College. students’ enthusiasm for this curriculum is reflected in high A number of thought leaders in social enterprise are facul- enrollment and student ratings. A student in our survey adds ty at the Business School including: Ray Horton, director of that “The Social Enterprise Program at Columbia is growing the Social Enterprise Program, Ray Fisman, research director quickly, and has tremendous school resources behind it. Be- of the Social Enterprise Program (whose research interests cause of that, an incoming student has a unique ability to include business in developing countries and corporate so- shape the future of the program and the school.” cial responsibility), Geoffrey Heal, professor of public policy A selection of courses include: Modern Political Economy, and business responsibility (whose research interests include The Private Sector and International Development, Global- corporate social responsibility and controlling the impact of ization and Markets: Reforming the International Econom- economic activity on the environment), Cathy Clark, adjunct ic Architecture, Business in Society: Doing Well by Doing professor (whose research interests include social investing Good?, Service Operations Management, Finance and Sus- and social capital markets), Bruce Usher, adjunct associate tainability, Social Entrepreneurship, Board and Executive professor (whose research interests include renewable ener- Management of Nonprofits, Education Leadership Consult- gy and the carbon markets) and CEO of EcoSecurities Group ing Lab, Corporate Governance, New Challenges in Health- Limited, the world’s leading climate change advisory firm, care Management, and Marketing Art, Culture and Educa- Jonah Rockoff, assistant professor, (whose research interests tion. This fall three new courses will be launched: Strategic include local public finance and the economics of education), Philanthropy, Credit Markets for Developing Economies, and Suresh Sundaresan, chair of the finance division (whose re- New Directions in Energy Marketing. For more information: search interests include microfinance and microinsurance). http://www0.gsb.columbia.edu/leadership/curriculum/ For more information: http://www2.gsb.columbia.edu/so- All courses in the core curriculum include an element of cialenterprise/academics/faculty/. 10 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 22. coLumbIA buSINeSS SchooL, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 9% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 63% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. C olumbia Business School fosters a dynamic and intel- lectually stimulating environment filled with passion- ate students, active alumni, and supportive faculty and staff Management • Matt Flannery, CEO and Founder of Kiva.org • Fran Barrett, Executive Director and Founder, Commu- members who produce a variety of top-notch events and ac- nity Resource Exchange tivities that allow you to explore the breadth of social enter- • Mr. Mallam Nuhu Ribadu, Executive Director, Economic prise. and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) in Nigeria Students were exposed to over fifty social-enterprise re- • For more information: http://www2.gsb.columbia.edu/ lated events this year including large speaker events, panel socialenterprise/events/ discussions, intimate lunches and dinners with practitio- The “Individual, Business, and Society” (IBS) curriculum is ners, career treks, corporate visits, international study tours an integral part of the Business School’s larger aim to edu- and consulting projects. Highlights included the Social En- cate students for a lifetime. Orientation this year included a terprise Conference, the Social Enterprise Retreat, and the number of speakers dedicate to CSR, including Leon Cooper- Annual Social Enterprise Reception. Noteworthy speakers man ’67, Chairman and CEO of Omega Advisors, Inc.; Dotti included: Hatcher, Gap Inc.; Peter Knight, Generation Investment • Jim Sinegal, President and CEO, Costco Wholesale Corpo- Management; and Eric Eve, Citigroup Global Consumer ration Group. • Geoffrey Canada, President and CEO of Harlem Children’s Students are enthusiastic, open, and creative in their drive Zone to promote social enterprise issues on campus. One student • Lord John Browne, Group Chief Executive, BP plc writes that CBS has a “great network of alums and students • Steve Young, Global Executive Director of the Caux Round who are working in a variety of social fields; those that aren’t Table are also supportive of those that want to work in social en- • John Whitehead, Chairman of the Goldman Sachs Foun- terprise. We raised over $77,000 from students to subsidize dation summer internships for people working in the nonprofit and • William Browder, Founder and CEO of Hermitage Capital public sectors.” CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 37% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 80% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 63% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni Rohit Aggarwala (2000) - New York City Director of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability, New York City Mayor’s Office of Operations Susan Henshaw Jones (1985) - President and Director, Museum of the City of New York Joyce Roche (1972) - President and CEO, Girls, Inc. Shari Berenbach (1990) - Executive Director, Calvert Foundation Daniel Nissenbaum (1988) - Senior Vice President, Head of Community Development, HSBC Bank USA C areer support is provided by the school in MBA Career Services, the Social Enterprise Club, and the Social Enterprise Program. Finding the perfect career in social enterprise requires Staff members in MBA Career Services and the Social Enterprise Program are devoted to supporting the career needs of social enterprise students. Each semester, we have panels a strong effort on the part of the student but there are extensive geared toward demystifying the non-traditional career search, resources at the school to support students in this process. One and our “Alumni and Mentoring” initiative brings in alumni student comments that, “I am overwhelmed by the support I’ve and professionals to advise students on the process. As the received, including enthusiasm from colleagues and faculty and population of social enterprise students has grown, Career financial support for my socially responsible internship.” Services has increasingly focused on the needs of the social Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 11
  • 23. coLumbIA buSINeSS SchooL, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI continued enterprise students. job opportunities, and are frequently contacted to provide Social Enterprise Club: The club has two devoted student informational interviews. positions for careers. The student representatives work in Internship support: There are two funds designed to support conjunction with the MBA Career Services and the Social students doing summer internships in public, nonprofit, or Enterprise Program to keep members informed of interesting social ventures. Both programs match or supplement salaries, job opportunities, to foster opportunities for informal offering up to $6,000 for the summer. networking, and to support a constant stream of organization Loan Assistance: For students entering the nonprofit or public and career information sessions. sectors, we have a loan assistance program, which guarantees Alumni: There is a strong social enterprise alumni pool that a minimum payout based on the student’s outstanding debt support and participate in club events, serve as mentors, post load. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 7% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 3% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he social enterprise community receives significant sup- port from Columbia Business School’s administration on all levels. The bulk of this administrative support comes from the the students to bring high-quality events and activities to the social enterprise community. Furthermore, the dean’s office has highlighted the program in Social Enterprise Program, which has five dedicated administra- its fundraising efforts with the clearly stated goal of developing tors and an active faculty director. This team works jointly with a Social Enterprise Center. Reasons To aTTend 7% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 16% of respondents strongly agree their program ad- equately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. C olumbia Business School tries to get all students to think about ethics and social impact through the Bern- stein Center for Ethics and Leadership and the Individuals, to sum it up Business and Society (IBS) curriculum. Because of this inte- The Columbia Business school would be most fitting for grated approach, students interested in social and environ- someone interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body. mental issues feel like they’re part of something larger, and not on the fringe. The Social Enterprise Program has a staff that is committed to making Columbia Business School the top business school in the country for students interested in policies and green building. There’s also a push to develop a lot of careers with social impact. They’re open to ideas from students. affordable housing and to redevelop old industrial areas all over In addition, they help make events and new initiatives possible, the city. MBAs can be involved in all of this—both the Business and they generally help the student club meet its goals. It’s a very School and the Social Enterprise Program have great connections collaborative relationship. to alumni and other professionals working in these areas. A potential applicant should think about the amazing resourc- Columbia University is also a great resource for students who es, contacts, and opportunities available to them in New York want to learn about social and environmental innovation. CBS City. The city is home to thousands of nonprofit organizations has a relationship with the Earth Institute, led by Jeffrey Sachs, and NGOs in need financial, managerial and operational skills and with the Center for Environmental Research and Conserva- and leadership. And “everyone wants a b-school intern,” writes tion. Students can take advantage of courses and events at The one student. NYC also has an expansive healthcare and human School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (Urban Plan- services system, and is home to many corporate headquarters. ning), the School of Public and International Affairs and the Mail- NYC is poised to become a center for progressive environmental man School of Public Health. Uris Hall, 3022 Broadway, New York, New York 10027, USA • Phone: +1 212 854 5553 12 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 24. ColumbIa unIVeRsITy SchooL oF INteRNAtIoNAL ANd pubLIc AFFAIRS aT a glanCe Full-time students: 850 18% of siPa students are net impact members 14% of those members are “very active” 47% are “somewhat active” “ siPa has a very diverse curriculum, which is great because students have such wide access to many different types of courses focused on social ” and environmental issues. This chapter in three words: transforming, Growing, Networking CuRRICulum T he Master of International Affairs (MIA) and Master of Public Administration (MPA) programs at SIPA offer a number of concentrations that can be applied to using include the School of Business, the School of Journalism, the School of Law, the School of Public Health, the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, and the School of business for social and/or environmental impact. Social Work. Dual-degree programs for MPA students can be The following concentrations are a sample of concentrations arranged with the School of Law, the School of Public Health, offered: the School of Social Work, the London School of Economics, • Economic and Political Development (EPD) and Sciences Po. • Environmental Policy Studies (EPS) One student describes SIPA’s curriculum as “very diverse” • Human Rights (HR) but adds that “I think that having adequate coursework • International Energy Management and Policy (IEMP) preparation in finance is also very important, and while these • Social Policy courses are offered at SIPA, they are not required. Therefore, • Urban Policy the burden is really on the student to make sure that they There are a number of elective courses offered at SIPA that select the appropriate mix of classes so that they graduate incorporate social and environmental themes. Furthermore, with the right skills.” Another student who combined studies through the business school, students can take courses in on environmental and energy policy with quantitative and social entrepreneurship, nonprofit board management, and finance classes, writes “I really liked SIPA’s emphasis on finance and sustainability. building hard skills (through the quantitative work) while Dual-degree programs for MIA students can be arranged allowing students to become an expert in a specific policy- with some of the university’s professional schools. These based issue.” sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he SIPA Net Impact chapter officially kicked off in January 2007. These are the activities that we organized for spring 2007: In February, we held a club kick-off meeting Clearinghouse.” In April, we held a forum on Sustainability in Business and a brown bag discussion entitled “Gone Rural in Swaziland: Making a Sustainable Social Enterprise with with special guest speakers (SIPA Alum, Elya Tagar and the Development Impact” New York Professionals Net Impact Chapter), a monthly Our chapter collaborates with the Business School’s Social networking happy hour with two other SIPA student groups, Enterprise Club, the Columbia University Partnership and a brown bag discussion on “Human Rights and Supply for International Development, and other university Chain Management – A Discussion with the Fair Factories organizations. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 13
  • 25. coLumbIA SchooL oF INteRNAtIoNAL ANd pubLIc AFFAIRS, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI C areer Services posts a number of jobs, many of which have a social and/or environmental focus. This is an area where Ca- reer Services has an opportunity to expand the number and type of jobs offered for students interested in these areas. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT W e are a new chapter and we hope to have more engagement with the administration as the organization grows. The Sci- ence and Environmental Policy MPA program was instrumental in providing funding for our Forum on Sustainability in Business. Reasons To aTTend T he SIPA Net Impact chapter is unique in that it seeks to understand issues at the intersection of business to sum it up and policy, specifically focusing on three pillars: social entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility, and The Columbia school of international and Public affairs would be most fitting for someone interested sustainability. We have a board that is enthusiastic and in building upon an existing base of social/environmental committed to forming this new organization and laying impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. a foundation for future SIPA students interested in us- ing business and policy to make a social impact. 420 West 118th Street, Room 408, MC 3325, New York, New York 10027, USA • Phone: +1 212 854 6216 • E-mail: sipa_admission@columbia.edu 1 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 26. CoRnell unIVeRsITy JohNSoN GRAduAte SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 511 The Johnson school is at the forefront 20% of Johnson net impact members are “very active” of research being done on how 20% are “somewhat active” business can proactively address ” emerging environmental and social concerns. This chapter in three words: Leadership, Vision, Access chapter leaders: Jeffrey Fuchs (jpf44@cornell.edu) and scott McClintock (scm7@cornell.edu) n = 47 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 66% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 47% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Johnson School has a strong curriculum relating to business opportunities and strategies in the realm of social, environmental, ethical, political, and international venture capital funding for low income markets. Students may elect to take up to 25% of their coursework outside the Johnson School. This affords them the oppor- issues. Many classes are taught by faculty associated with tunity to enroll in classes in any of Cornell’s nine colleges. the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise (www.johnson. Among the courses available are: sustainable agriculture, cornell.edu/sge), which was endowed by the late Samuel C. ecology, renewable energy, green building, public affairs, and Johnson to “enhance students’ understanding of global sus- international development. A document highlighting many tainability and prepare them to be leaders of ethical, equi- of these relevant courses can be downloaded at: http://fo- table, and economically and environmentally sustainable en- rum.johnson.cornell.edu/students/orgs/netimpact/. terprises.” A unique aspect of the Johnson School curriculum The Johnson School also offers dual degrees with Cornell’s is its immersions, which are electives taken in the second half other top programs including the School of Engineering, the of the first year. Immersions supplement lecture and case- Cornell Law School, the Cornell Institute of Public Affairs, based training with integrated experiential learning. The and the Cornell School of International Labor Relations. The Johnson School’s Sustainable Global Enterprise immersion, programs further add to the breadth of opportunities avail- taught by professors Stuart Hart and Mark Milstein, com- able to Net Impact members. bines traditional case and lecture based courses with field Stuart Hart, the Samuel C. Johnson Chair in Sustainable work to explore connections between global sustainability Global Enterprise, is one of the leading voices in the area and business strategy. The practicum component of the SGE of corporate strategy for social and environmental sustain- Immersion places students in multidisciplinary teams to ability. His book, “Capitalism at the Crossroads: Unlimited solve real problems and provide practical operational solu- Business Opportunities in Solving the World’s Most Difficult tions to participating companies struggling with social and Problems” was named by Strategy+Business as a Best Busi- environmental business challenges. MBA participation in ness Book of 2005. In addition, his article “Beyond Green- the SGE Immersion increased 70% from 2006 to 2007. Stu- ing: Strategies for a Sustainable World,” won the McKinsey dents have worked on a diverse range of assignments, includ- Award for Best Article in Harvard Business Review in 1997. ing projects related to distributed energy in Rwanda, market Professor Hart is widely sought out by top business leaders, feasibility studies of sports apparel for Muslim women, and and Johnson students have access to him on a regular basis. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 1
  • 27. coRNeLL uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 68% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 3% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. F ormed in 2003, Net Impact has become one of the most active and influential clubs at the Johnson School. The chapter enjoys a close relationship with the school’s Center for Sustainable Global • Community Impact – Provides students with volunteer activities and community consulting projects. The club hosts an annual char- ity auction to raise money for a local non-profit organization and to Enterprise. fund a student’s non-profit summer internship. Net Impact events from the past year included two symposiums • Microfinance Club – Increases awareness about microfinance. (one co-sponsored by the Entrepreneurship and Private Equity The club hosts speakers, shows movies, and is currently working to Club), one career fair, an ongoing speaker series, networking break- establish a domestic microfinance fund aimed at small business de- fasts/lunches with professionals, a two week trip to China to study velopment in Tompkins County. sustainability, and a video series on renewable energy co-sponsored • Big Red Ventures/Big Red Incubator – A venture capital fund and by the Energy Club. consulting group that works with start-up companies. This year stu- Participation in sustainability-focused case competitions is also an dents were involved with a number of clean technology ventures. important part of our Net Impact club experience. Last year mem- • Camp $tart-up – A summer program that introduces young wom- bers participated in the LEEDS Net Impact Case Competition, the en to aspects of business, entrepreneurship, leadership, and financial Thunderbird Sustainable Innovation Challenge, the JP Morgan Good independence. Venture, and GE’s Ecomagination Challenge. The Johnson School • Ethics Action Group - Seeks to strengthen the understanding of, and the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise often provide fund- commitment to, and integration of integrity, respect, mutual trust ing for travel expenses related to these competitions. and ethical practices into everything we do within the Johnson Several students cited strong student interest in sustainability. School, throughout Cornell and in our future careers One cites the “support you get from your classmates who are just Additional clubs at Cornell that Johnson School students partici- as passionate as you are” as a key strength of the school. Another pate in include the Sustainable Enterprise Association, Engineers student writes that “Students [interested in sustainable business] for a Sustainable World, Renewable Energy Society, Greens, Kyoto will find many likeminded peers.” This interest is shown in the many Now!, Society for Natural Resources Conservation, and the Solar De- other Johnson School clubs that share Net Impact values, including: cathlon. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 49% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 89% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 77% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. N et Impact members have a host of resources available to can lead to internship and full-time employment opportunities. them for pursuing careers that support their values. Many The second annual sustainability career symposium entitled “The students opt for one-on-one job search counseling from a member Relevance of an MBA in the Millennial Age,” provided students of the Career Management Center (CMC). In addition, one CMC with an opportunity to meet dozens of company representatives staff member is designated to oversee Net Impact-related career in the areas of sustainability, renewable energy, and international searches and routinely posts job opportunities to our online job development. Companies such as GE, Accenture, McDonalds, SC database. Furthermore, there are career work groups run by sec- Johnson, and Emerging Markets Group were on hand to discuss ond year students that specifically help first-year student prepare career opportunities and pass along advice to students. for independent job searches. Johnson School students have access to alumni through the Cor- The Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise supports student nell-wide alumni database. This database tracks tens of thousands job search efforts by leveraging its contacts to generate em- ployment leads. Professors Stuart Hart and Mark Milstein prominent alumni provide access to their extensive network of contacts in the Justin De Koszmovszky (2006) – Manager, Strategic Sustainability, SC Johnson area of business and sustainability and are routinely avail- Andy Dijkerman (1985) – CEO, The Emerging Markets Group Kevin B. Thompson (2003) – Program Manager for Corporate Citizenship, IBM able for career advice. Furthermore, students in the Sustain- Alex Sloan (1998) – Principal, Expansion Capital Partners able Global Enterprise immersion take part in projects that Barbara Sullivan (2000) – Broad Resident, Boston Public Schools 16 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 28. coRNeLL uNIVeRSItY, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI continued of Cornell alumni around the world. In addition to this resource, non-profit and international development sectors. Additionally, the Johnson School has its own database and former Net Impact the Weil Fellowship, a loan forgiveness program, is granted to stu- members are captured in a searchable “club” field. dents seeking full-time work in entrepreneurial ventures abroad. A stipend of $5,000 is available to students pursuing jobs in the admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 9% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 1% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. O ur chapter receives a high level of administrative support and funding from the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise (CSGE). Director Mark Milstein, is active in mentoring students and Faculty members throughout the Johnson School have embraced Net Impact and the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise. There are growing links between sustainability and the different functions serves as the club’s faculty advisor. One student writes, that “The ac- and contexts of business. Classes on the commercialization of tech- cess we have to Mark Milstein and Stuart Hart is amazing…The sup- nologies frequently bring practitioners to campus. Entrepreneur- port we get from CSGE is second to none and a large part about what ship courses are also beginning to stress the idea of sustainability as makes us unique.” The CSGE also organizes classes, holds workshops, the foundation for new enterprises. and invites speakers from organization that share our mission. Next year the Johnson School will have a new dean, and two high- The Johnson School application process allows us to identify pro- ly qualified candidates are being considered. Both candidates have spective students who are interested in social and environmental is- cited sustainability, its relationship to international business and en- sues as they relate to business. Net Impact members subsequently trepreneurship, and the existence and growth of the Center for Sus- work to support these applicants through the admissions process. tainable Global Enterprise as fundamental strengths of the school. Reasons To aTTend 87% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 21% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. S tudents at the Johnson School have access to an increasing num- ber of faculty, a diverse array of visiting speakers, and a number of unique networking opportunities in this area. The School’s Center and interpersonal skills. Finally, the Johnson School is increasingly recognized as one of the top programs for MBAs with a commitment to sustainable enterprise, a fact reflected by the growing number of for Sustainable Global Enterprise, led by visionary scholars Stuart students here who are enthusiastic and engaged in these important Hart and Mark Milstein, is at the forefront of cutting-edge research issues. As one student writes “The program is constantly being im- on how companies can profitably address growing environmental proved - new classes and initiatives are added each year. Students and social issues. Through the Immersion in Sustainable Global have tremendous enthusiasm that generates growing support for Enterprise, students at the Johnson School are also able to develop the program.” For applicants interested in sustainability, the John- practical skills during their first year, which they can then draw upon son School provides a collaborative and dynamic environment that in a sustainability-oriented summer internship. Unique among ensures their personal investment in an MBA will pay off. business programs, the immersion also enables students to custom- ize their experience around specific interests during their second year. Supporting this are a number of other world-class graduate programs at Cornell through which Johnson students are encour- to sum it up aged to take classes. Underlying the focus on sustainability is a focus on creating leaders capable of making a real impact in their careers. The Johnson Graduate school of Management would be most fitting for someone interested in attending a In addition to the Park Leadership Fellowship program, which offers school where students and faculty are on the forefront 25 full-tuition scholarships to leaders with a commitment to social of social/environmental issues. responsibility, there is a comprehensive leadership program avail- able to all students who are interested in developing their personal Sage Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-6201, USA • Phone: +1 607 255 4526 • E-mail: mba@cornell.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 17
  • 29. dalHousIe unIVeRsITy dALhouSIe FAcuLtY oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 75 7% of Dalhousie student are net impact members ” 60% of those members are “very active” We just have a new dean and he is very keen on sustainability issues. 40% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: budding, energetic, Foundational chapter leaders: Mari Beth slade (mbslade@dal.ca) and Kable Frank (frankk@dal.ca) CuRRICulum O ur faculty is made up of three other schools besides the School of Business Administration: the School of Information Management, the School for Resource there is much collaboration between schools and between faculties. Our University also has an Environmental Science program, an International Development Studies program, and Environmental Studies and the School of Public courses in Environmental Law, and a Master of Development Administration. At present, first year graduate students Economics. The Faculty of Management offers a number of from all programs have a mandatory interdisciplinary course dual degree programs such as MBA-LLB, MBA-MLIS, MPA- called “Management Without Borders” that addresses social MLIS, LLB-MLIS. Faculty research also supports our social, and environmental issues. In addition to this course, social, ethical, and environmental curricula. Julia Sagebien has a ethical, and environmental concerns are built into other number of private-sector development and CSR classes. Our disciplines of the core courses such as accounting and human Dean, David Wheeler, is cross-appointed with the Business resource management. So in addition to numerous elective School and the School for Resource and Environmental courses that students can take within the business school, all Studies. students get some exposure in their core courses. *Note: Dr. Julia Sagebien has been on sabbatical for the last The real strength of our program lies in its interdisciplinary academic year. Therefore, the answers below reflect typical potential. Our students can take courses from any of the course offerings and may not be representative of 2006 to other three schools and from other faculties as well. Indeed, 2007. sTudenT aCTIVITIes S tudent life at Dalhousie’s Faculty of Management is what you make it. There are a variety of student groups to get involved with. The Net Impact chapter is akin to where we worked on reducing the amount of disposable coffee cups used on campus. Perhaps the most notable event put on by CESR is the Annual Dump and Run , a community the student group called CESR (The Society for Corporate garage sale whose proceeds are donated to charities and Environmental and Social Responsibility). Although CESR non-profit groups. At this event there is also a forum where has been operational for a number of years, the official Net environmental organizations can set up exhibits. Impact chapter is relatively new. We have a lot of potential Upon graduation, all students have the opportunity to take for growth and development but do not have a solid strategy a Social and Environmental Responsibility Pledge. or action plan yet. With tremendous support from faculty There is also the Dalhousie Business Ethics Case and growing student interest, the potential is outstanding. Competition, which is a student-led conference hosted at our We participated in this year’s Campus Greening Challenge university which focuses on ethical business decisions. 18 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 30. dALhouSIe uNIVeRSItY, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI prominent alumni Catherine T. Enright, PhD (1986) - Associate Professor, Aquaculture and Shellfish Nutrition, Nova Scotia Agricultural College Bill Thornton (1987) - Assistant Deputy Minister, Forests Division, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Pascal A. Giasson (1991) - Manager, Species at Risk, New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources & Energy York U. Friesen (1992) - Head of Inspections, Environment Canada Atlantic Bryanne Tait (2001) - Project Leader, Shell WindEnergy T he Management Career Services puts an emphasis on the value of volunteering in the not-for-profit sector for experience and networking opportunities. They host a Services team is very approachable and in tune with student needs and interests. If students do have in interest in this or any area, the Career Services team will give personal support variety of corporate tours, networking events, and career and use any contacts and information at their disposal to workshops. Although there is no official career educator for connect students with careers in social, environmental, and social, environmental, or nonprofit management, the Career nonprofit sectors. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT A dministrative support could not be much stronger for social and environmental issues in Dalhousie’s Faculty of Management. Our new Dean, David Wheeler, is strongly and outside stakeholders committed to making our campus more sustainable. This roundtable was coordinated by the marketing and communications manager at our school, Colin committed to these concerns; he teaches courses in these Craig, who commits a lot of his time to making submissions areas and provides funding for students to attend conferences such as this one and promoting our school as one dedicated on these topics. This past fall, he led a Campus Greening to social and environmental issues. Roundtable, a collection of students, faculty members, staff, Reasons To aTTend T he Faculty of Management at Dalhousie University is a Faculty or School which “retrofits” social and ecological uniquely placed to prepare our MBA and other graduate impact considerations into the MBA experience simply students for a world of increasing economic, political, and through electives or token introductory lectures. We aim for technological complexity. Our four schools of Management the holistic, total student experience. together with our five Centers for Integrated Research and Learning and our Marine Affairs program represent some of the best resources available in interdisciplinary thinking and management. All units of the Faculty to sum it up of Management maintain a genuine commitment to students’ understanding the social and ecological Dalhousie would be most fitting for someone interested impacts of their future employment choices. As a result, in building upon an existing base of social/environmental our graduates are equipped to use this thinking whether impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. they pursue careers in business, the public sector, non- profit organizations, or indeed all three. Ours is not 6100 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5, CANADA • Phone: +1 902 494 7080 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 19
  • 31. daRTmouTH College tuck SchooL oF buSINeSS At dARtmouth aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 500 2% of Tuck students are net impact members Tuck is a place where students are 60% of those members are “very active” ” listened to and can be vehicles for 40% are “somewhat active” change. This chapter in three words: passion, unwavering commitment chapter leaders: Rob Pennington (rob.pennington@tuck.dartmouth.edu) n = 28 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 36% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the cur- riculum; 36% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T uck is a small school and a general management program, and our social and environmental offerings reflect this. Tuck does not have an in-depth focus on any As is always the case at Tuck, faculty members are extremely accessible and will help students to create independent studies in their areas of interest. This provides an opportunity to single aspect of social or environmental issues, but offers work directly with a faculty member or a client on an in-depth instead a broad and integrated experience around such project. Several other project-focused courses also provide topics. The goal is to provide the knowledge and experience opportunities for students to pursue their interests in social base for students to thrive in a social and environmental and/or environmental issues. Field Studies in international world as a businessperson. In keeping with this, there is business are focused on gaining international experience no dual-degree program, but students are allowed to enroll with a three-week project outside the US, and have provided in courses throughout all of Dartmouth. Offerings include opportunities to work with nonprofits. Additionally, all those through the Earth Sciences Department and the students have a capstone First Year Project course. Students Environmental Studies Program. are free to choose their own clients for these projects; many Core courses do deal with social and environmental themes, choose companies with social or environmental focuses. but there is no required course focusing solely in this area. Tuck students are also very engaged in the administration’s There are, however, a number of elective courses that focus push to find ways to incorporate additional social and on these topics, such as: environmental themes into the core curriculum. • Entrepreneurship in the Social Sector • Leadership and Corporate Social Responsibility • Transformative Marketing (social marketing) • Strategic Response to Market Failure (focus on externalities and non-market strategies) • Ethics in Action • Social Leadership Course (a year-long course focused on social/environmental topics, next year on microfinance) 20 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 32. dARtmouth coLLeGe, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 3% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 0% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T uck provides an abundance of opportunities to get in- volved in Net Impact issues outside the classroom. Tuck has an active Net Impact chapter, which serves to edu- opportunities with local and nonprofit organizations (http:// mba.tuck.dartmouth.edu/pages/clubs/tscs/index.html) • Tuck GIVES: A charitable auction with proceeds funding cate students, help them in their job search, and provide them students’ nonprofit internships. Over $125,000 was raised with a social outlet. We have regular events that are educa- in 2007 (http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/news/releases/ tional, career-focused, or simply social in nature. The group is pr20070507_gives.html) active both in educating the broader Tuck community and in • Tuck Board Fellows Program: Provides the opportunity providing a meeting place for those with more focused inter- to sit on the board of a nonprofit ests. The chapter was recently re-branded Net Impact, but has • Allwin Roundtable: A group of students help to guide the been in existence for many years as the Sustainable Business strategic direction of Tuck’s umbrella organization for all is- Club. The goal of our chapter is to provide a central point of sues at the intersection of business and society student community for all the social and environmental ac- • Tuck Volunteers: Provides opportunities for students to tivities taking place at Tuck. volunteer Under the larger Allwin Initiative umbrella, there are many • Allwin Days of Service: A school-wide day of service in amazing activities in which to get involved. The Allwin Ini- the community tiative is the administrative organization that deals with “the • Allwin Dialogues (fireside chats): Assortment of speak- intersection of business and society.” Some of their activities ers speaking in an informal setting on a wide range of Net include: Impact-related topics including international development, • Business in Society Conference (formerly known as the global warming, nonprofit management, and ethics Business Sustainability Initiative): A completely student-run Nearly all these activities are student-led and provide nu- conference with approximately 300 attendees, two keynotes, merous opportunities to get involved in a leadership and sup- and nine panels (http://mba.tuck.dartmouth.edu/pages/ port roles. In addition to Tuck activities, the larger Dartmouth clubs/bsi/) College community also has regular speakers and events on • Tuck Student Consulting Services: Student-led consulting environmental and social issues. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 39% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 88% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 57% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. A lthough career services at Tuck spends much of their Net Impact-related employers at Tuck. Tuck’s alumni network time placing “traditional” job candidates, the small size is every bit as responsive as it is reputed to be, and it proves to of the school allows career services to be a great aide in per- be a very valuable resource for graduates seeking jobs in non- sonalizing the job search for non-traditional candidates, traditional, Net Impact-related areas. Furthermore, the Busi- too. Several other organizations also work to help students ness in Society Conference brings many professionals in social find job opportunities in social and environmental fields. and environmental fields to Tuck and provides a great oppor- The Net Impact chapter has leaders whose role it is to help tunity for students to interact with them. And nearly every students by working with career services and holding activities for students looking for careers in this space. prominent alumni And the director of the Allwin Initiative is also in con- Jennifer Sikes (2006) – Advocacy Officer, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Shruti Sehra (2006) – Portfolio Manager, New Profit Inc. stant communication with career services to generate Lindsey Lee Noecker (2006) – Financial Analyst, City Year, Inc. leads. Elizabeth S Jackson Stram (2005) – Consultant, Bridgespan Group Anna Fincke (2003) – Director, Council on International Educational Exchange There are many other opportunities to gain exposure to Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 21
  • 33. dARtmouth coLLeGe, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI continued visiting executive holds office hours, providing students with dents interning at nonprofits receive at least $10,000 for their the opportunity to have one-on-one time with visitors in fields summer. The school also has grants available to supplement of their interest. the income of students interning at small for-profit businesses. Tuck also has excellent resources to support those entering Finally, Tuck has a loan-forgiveness program for students en- the nonprofit sector. The Tuck GIVES auction ensures that stu- tering full-time employment with a nonprofit. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 0% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; % of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T uck has an amazingly supportive administration relating to Net Impact topics. The school’s Allwin Initiative seeks to further this cause through curriculum change, research de- pact chapter chairs. The administration also provides great support for all social and environmental organizations and activities. The administration is velopment, and student activity. At Tuck, students have the helpful in ensuring the use of facilities, the availability of faculty unique opportunity to be involved in shaping the strategic di- members, and the adequate funding for these events. The Allwin rection of these initiatives. Students are actively engaged in Initiative has also acted as a sponsor for the Business in Society the Allwin Initiative through the Student Roundtable. This dia- Conference and has made funds available to offset students’ ex- logue is also frequently conducted on an informal basis as well. penses such as the Net Impact Conference. Even the Dartmouth Tuck values students with an interest in Net Impact-related College Development Office has opened up their rolodex in an ef- themes. Applicants expressing an interest in these areas are re- fort to help us locate keynotes for our Business in Society Confer- ferred to both the director of the Allwin Initiative and the Net Im- ence. Reasons To aTTend 6% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 21% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T uck has a strong curriculum that incorporates social and environmental leadership through coursework, the Allwin Initiative for Corporate Citizenship, and student run events and obtain the resources they need—be it faculty time, administra- tion funds or alumni support—to achieve their academic and professional goals. “I am very happy with my decision [to attend activities. As relatively small business school, Tuck does not Tuck],” writes another student, “as I have not only found what I have the number of in-depth courses that may be available at was looking for, but have also been able to create an impact on larger schools. However, Tuck has great electives dealing with this program through a number of curricular and extra-curricu- social and environmental issues, and there are many opportuni- lar initiatives.” ties to craft academic projects to suit individual student inter- ests. Additionally, opportunities abound for engaging in Net Impact activities through the numerous student-run groups to sum it up and events, and the Allwin Initiative for Corporate Citizenship. Both faculty members and the administration are continuously The Tuck school would be most fitting for working to improve the program’s offerings, and students have someone interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body. a lot of say in this process. “Tuck is a place where students are listened to, and students can be vehicles for change,” explains one student. Tuck’s small size ensures that interested students 100 Tuck Hall, Hanover, NH 03755, USA • E-mail: tuck.admissions@dartmouth.edu 22 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 34. duke unIVeRsITy FuquA SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 850 Fuqua as a school has an amazing spirit 50% of Fuqua students are net impact members about it that i could feel when i visited the campus. so many drivers of change are 15% of those members are “very active” ” student-led and the campus is truly our own. 40% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: Innovative, engaged, Inspired chapter leaders: Jenny Harms (jenny.harms@fuqua.duke.edu) and Gita Rebbapragada (gita.rebbapragada@fuqua.duke.edu) n = 84 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 54% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the cur- riculum; 40% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. S ocial entrepreneurship is a primary curricular focus at Fuqua. This follows the philosophy that social entrepre- neurs are the driving force behind systemic change through- ics and moral responsibility [aspect] are interwoven into the fabric of the program.” An extra-curricular case competition involving issues of out the world and that business leaders must understand the sustainability will be integrated into the core strategy course power of innovative ideas and alternative approaches to cre- for 2007-2008. Students are given great flexibility to tailor ating societal wealth and benefits. Fuqua has made consider- their MBA, and many entrepreneurship, finance, marketing, able institutional investments in developing the Center for and operations classes complement the goals and studies of the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE), which students pursuing social sector careers. Additionally, stu- works closely with our Net Impact Chapter, the Social Impact dents have the option to take classes and/or to enroll in dual Club (SIC), to support curricular, career, and student develop- degrees at the Sanford Institute of Public Policy, the Nicholas ment. School of the Environment, and Duke Law. SIC members are Fuqua’s commitment to social and environmental ethics and also leading a movement to bring even more issues of social innovation extends through the entire Fuqua curriculum. This responsibility and sustainability into the classroom and cur- year the school introduced a social entrepreneurship concen- riculum. tration. Professor Greg Dees is nationally renowned for his From the perspective of student life, SIC has been very ef- thought-leadership in the social entrepreneurship field and fective in collaborating with the MBAA (Fuqua’s student gov- leads a class on the same topic. In addition, two new courses ernment) to institute social responsibility and sustainability were introduced: Corporate Social Impact Management and as a principle for all student-led clubs. The impact of these Entrepreneurial Management in the Social Sector. Almost activities is evident in everything from an improved campus- all of the Global Academic Travel Experience (GATE) courses wide recycling effort to a variety of symposia and conferences incorporate social sector themes and include in-country field hosted at Fuqua to the Dean’s Distinguished Speakers Series. visits. Furthermore, Fuqua has strong mentored internship Among social sector leaders who have come to Fuqua is Susan and small business consulting programs. CASE works with Beresford of the Ford Foundation. SIC to cultivate opportunities for students to receive credit The value of social innovation, responsible decisions and while working with local values-based organizations. strategies, and ethical leadership is a widely accepted tenet In addition to electives, many core curriculum classes en- of Team Fuqua. We are fortunate to have the support of stu- gage students in discussions about sustainability and corpo- dent leaders, faculty members, and the dean as we continue rate social responsibility. As one student writes, “Duke’s eth- to grow this movement. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 23
  • 35. duke uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenTinActIVItIeSto other sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level net impact compared clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 63% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 39% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. S IC, honored as Fuqua’s Club of the Year for the past two years, was formed four years ago when three different clubs consolidated: Net Impact, Business & Environment, SIC’s Business & Environment group links Fuqua with the Nicholas School of the Environment, hosts an annual Conser- vation Week, and develops additional programming including and Community Involvement. These were all well-established speaker events, case competitions, and company visits. Also, clubs, allowing SIC to leverage the strengths of our diverse the campus-wide Microfinance Club was established this year membership. Our mission is to equip students with the tools and is housed within SIC. This club strives to make Duke the necessary to pioneer change in the public, private, and so- premiere institution for cultivating microfinance leaders and cial sectors. We strive to meet our membership’s vast needs is pioneering the Duke Microfinance Initiative. and interests by connecting Fuqua with social innovators SIC aims to meet the volunteer needs of local organizations and thought leaders, offering student opportunities to effect and also to provide all students the opportunity to create change in social sector organizations, and assisting Fuqua in their own programs benefiting organizations of their choice. developing top-line leaders for social enterprises and value- Our annual Day in Durham kicks off the school year and in- based businesses. troduces new students to numerous community organiza- Our speakers and events series has added incredible value tions. Fuqua on Board, coordinated by CASE, links students to the Fuqua community. Recent luminaries who have spoken to local non-profit boards for year-long consulting projects. at Fuqua include Muhammad Yunus, David Bornstein, Tom In addition, SIC is constantly expanding student involvement Tierney, Ami Darr, C.K. Prahalad, and Bill Drayton. We find in external consulting projects. This year, a team consulted these events to not only inspire our core membership, but to for entrepreneurs in Nicaragua through Agora Partnerships. draw students from all sectors of Fuqua. Each spring we host Another team helped a local organization look at scaling their the Footprints Conference. This regional symposium engages social impact. SIC is also active in Junior Achievement, the over 400 students and professionals in lively debates, interac- Student Entrepreneurs Program (STEP) with local high school tive breakouts, and traditional panels looking at ways busi- students, and the House that Fuqua Built, a Fuqua-based ef- ness can make a positive social and environmental impact. fort to annually sponsor a Habitat for Humanity home. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 51% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 88% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 50% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. F uqua’s Career Management Center, CASE, and SIC collaborate Fuqua-specific internship opportunities for students. to support students and alumni pursuing social sector and SIC organizes at least one career trek to a major city every year. social/environmental impact internships and careers. The CMC Location and content are largely driven by student interests. has a visible and solid commitment to students with these inter- This year we collaborated with Georgetown’s Net Impact chapter ests and has a dedicated advisor for social sector career counsel- for an international development trek in Washington, DC. Orga- ing. The CMC also selects second-year Career Fellows with social nizations included Chemonics, World Bank, and Ashoka. In ad- sector expertise and interests to provide additional support for dition, students attended a Social Entrepreneurship career trek cover letters, resumes, mock interviews, and job search teams. in San Francisco. Organizations included REDF, Global Fund for Additionally, SIC works with local alumni, the CMC, and CASE to Women, and Kiva. provide seminars, workshops, and career planning panels. Work- Fuqua also has some of the most generous financial support shops and panels cover areas from corporate responsibility to traditional non-profit or- prominent alumni ganizations. In addition, job listings from Keith Artin (1999) - COO, TROSA (Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers, Inc.) Gordon Lefevre (1994) - Vice President, Finance and Accouting, Institute for OneWorld Health the MBA-Nonprofit Connection and other Robert P. Hargreaves (2003) - Senior Manger of Strategic Planning, Public Broadcasing Service sources are posted to the school’s internal ca- Chad Sclove (2003) - Portfolio Manager, Common Good Ventures Michael E. Green (1985) - VP of Marketing and Development, Africare reer management tool. CASE also cultivates 2 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 36. duke uNIVeRSItY, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued for students committed to working in the social sector and is • Loan Assistance Program – provides significant assistance to committed to attracting top talent: graduates pursuing social sector employment with a nonprofit • CASE Social Sector Scholarship – provides two students each or government agency and is one of the most generous and com- year with two-years of financial support worth up to $25,000. prehensive in the MBA community • Summer Internship Support – provides support to students More information about the above can be found at: http://ca- pursuing social and public sector summer internships. seatduke.org/mba/financialaid/index.html#lap. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 0% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 2% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. O ne of Fuqua’s greatest successes in the social impact area comes from partnerships among its students, faculty, and administration. The administration is very supportive recruit applicants with social sector interests. In addition, Fuqua faculty members have been very receptive to adding social and environmental issues to course material and have of our chapter. The dean of the Daytime MBA program has actively supported SIC’s extracurricular activities. One sur- worked closely with Fuqua’s student government to make vey respondent wrote that “students get fantastic support sustainability and social responsibility core values to be em- from all angles—peer students, faculty, and administra- braced by the entire school and all student organizations. SIC tion—that create an environment where ideas consistently is seen as a vital resource of information and leadership in get built upon and pushed further.” this arena. Both the dean of Fuqua and the dean of the Day- More importantly, Fuqua established CASE to both re- time program attend key club events and receive important search and explore the field of social entrepreneurship and thought leaders in social entrepreneurship. to work actively with students pursuing a social sector career The office of admissions continually shows its support by path. By recruiting Greg Dees and establishing CASE, Fuqua working with SIC and CASE. It helped establish the Peace has strengthened its ability to develop future leaders in the Corps Fellows program and constantly explores new ways to field. Reasons To aTTend 69% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 32% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. I n recent years, Fuqua has dedicated significant resources to several new initiatives that exemplify the school’s commit- ment to social and environmental impact and ethics, a com- Perhaps the greatest advantage for SIC members is the insti- tutional support from CASE, the Career Management Center, and SIC leadership. CASE continues to grow and is very re- mitment that is integral to the school’s mission to educate sponsive to student interests. Students seeking to be involved thoughtful business leaders worldwide – leaders with an out- with SIC and CASE will get great personal attention and guid- rageous ambition to make a difference. ance on how to best leverage their MBA experience with their Fuqua is a welcoming place for students with different levels interests in the social sector. of interest in social and environmental themes. One student confirms this, saying “Students with social/environmental in- to sum it up terests will receive great personal attention from both faculty and other students. Fuqua is a highly collaborative environ- The Fuqua school would be most fitting for some- ment, and there are many people invested in the success of one who is interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for others.” Another agrees, adding that “The collegial environ- significant growth. ment of the school is highly empowering.” Box 90120, Durham, North Carolina, 27708-0120, USA • Phone: +1 919 660 7700 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 2
  • 37. geoRge wasHIngTon unIVeRsITy GeoRGe WAShINGtoN SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 175 The caliber and drive of students, 15% of GWu net impact members are “very active” especially the net impact members/ ” officers is incredible. 50% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: passion, dedication, Leadership chapter leader: sarah Tuntland (Tuntland@gwu.edu) n = 10 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and environmental sustainability. 40% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 20% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. G eorge Washington (GW) School of Business incorporates some social and environmental themes into its core MBA curriculum, and Net Impact officers and members con- also offers joint degrees with the Law School (MBA/JD) and Elliott School of International Affairs (MBA/MA). A number of GW faculty members are considered to be tinue to advocate for more. As one student explains, “There is leaders in social and environmental impact fields, and as a interest in social enterprise here, but it’s less developed--you result, “Ethics and corporate responsibility are frequent top- have to shape the program to fit your particular interests, ics” in class discussion, writes one student. The most active which is easy to do in your second year.” Overall, the faculty is Mark Starik, Department Chair and Professor of Strategic has been receptive to including such themes and speakers Management and Public Policy at the GW School of Busi- into classes and Global Leadership of Business Enterprise ness. Starik directs the Environmental and Social Sustain- (GLOBE) events. The GLOBE program is a series of co-cur- ability Initiatives at GW and recently held a two-day climate ricular speakers, site visits, and presentations scheduled action conference of which Net Impact was a co-sponsor. throughout the year. GLOBE organizers encourage Net Im- Starik also leads an annual summer study abroad program pact to arrange speakers and site visits, and awards GLOBE titled “Sustainable Communities and Organizations” in Brit- credit for Net Impact events. Dan Bross, senior director of ish Columbia. The program enables MBA students to gain in- Microsoft’s Corporate Citizenship department is scheduled ternational management experience by working with firms as a GLOBE speaker this semester. Net Impact is working on to address environmental issues. Another notable professor arranging a Green Roof Tour as a GLOBE site visit. is Timothy Fort, executive director of the newly chartered There are countless Net Impact-oriented electives available Institute for Corporate Responsibility (ICR). The ICR aims to MBA students at GW and throughout Washington, D.C.’s to be the world’s leading intellectual center for scholarship in University Consortium. Classes available at GW include the field of corporate responsibility. Timothy Fort is a Lind- NGO Strategy and Sustainability, Economics of the Environ- ner-Gambal Professor of Business Ethics and teaches courses ment and Natural Resources, and Sustainable Tourism. GW in the GW School of Business. He is assisted by Mark Starik students may take electives at any consortium school in the in his role as executive director of the Institute for Corporate D.C. area. GW offers MBA concentrations in Environmental Responsibility. Professors Starik and Fort serve as Net Im- Policy and Management and Nonprofit Management. GW pact faculty advisors at GW. 26 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 38. GeoRGe WAShINGtoN uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 60% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 30% of respon- dents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. G W’s Net Impact chapter began as the Socially Responsible Business Club in the mid 1990s. The club had a few name changes before officially becoming a Net Impact chapter in healthy” educational event. Net Impact community service events fulfill students’ GLOBE obligations. GW students have an opportunity to learn practical envi- 2002. The chapter is well-known throughout the GW-MBA ronmental assessment skills through the Net Impact Campus program and is considered the most active of all student MBA Greening committees. The Campus Greening committees are clubs. One student writes that “The Net Impact board mem- doing feasibility studies on a green roof and a light sensor bers are very vocal and involved classmates and everyone in project for the Business School. the program knows for what we stand.” The GW chapter is Social and environmental issues are not addressed during reaching out beyond the MBA program by partnering with orientation, but Net Impact does make a presentation to new the Center for International Business Education and Research students about membership. This year, we will work to en- (CIBER), an Elliott School for International Affairs group, hance this orientation by clearly marking recycling bins at all and the undergraduate environmental groups Green GW and meals. Each March, Net Impact also makes a presentation to Environment GW. This semester we will co-sponsor a CIBER admitted students who are deciding whether to attend GW. panel on working in emerging markets. The chapter will also The GW Net Impact chapter measured awareness during partner with Green GW on an energy pledge drive, and with our green pledge drive and found most people to be at least Environment GW and Navy Yard for DC Green Week. somewhat familiar with our mission. To clearly communicate GW’s Net Impact chapter has a number of members par- our mission, we have adopted a descriptive slogan to accom- ticipating in Service Corps this semester. We are also build- pany our logo: “Harnessing the power of business for a better ing our Board Fellows program and introducing an “eating world.” CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 40% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 60% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 50% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. G W’s vast alumni network is centrally located among so- cial, environmental, international, and governmental organizations. A comprehensive database is available for prominent alumni Andy Furrows (2005) – Aspen Institute Rachel Goldstein (2003) – EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program Stephanie Stevenson (2005) – Nike students to contact professionals in various industries. Most Jen Boulden (2004) – Ideal Bite alumni have been very receptive to helping students find in- Mary Balmaceda (2003) – Calvert Foundation ternships or jobs, discuss specific industries, or expand their networks. The career center hosts a student-professional themes. We also encourage membership to Net Impact Central breakfast each month and GW Net Impact will sponsor the for access to the job database. We are actively raising funds for first CSR Breakfast this March. The career center database in- the GW Net Impact Summer Fellowship Fund to assist students cludes a CSR Resume Book and an Environmental / Sustain- wishing to take an unpaid or underpaid internship. Students in- able Business Resume Book, as well as job-searching criteria terested in climate change-related internships are also eligible to for CSR and Environmental/ Sustainable Businesses. apply for funding from the Environmental Social Sustainability The GW Net Impact’s weekly newsletter includes links to Initiative group. We assisted two students this year with a total jobs and internships with social and/or environmental impact of $3,000 in funding. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 27
  • 39. GeoRGe WAShINGtoN uNIVeRSItY, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 30% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 0% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. O ne student reports that “The administration gives Net Impact a lot of freedom in organizing extra-curricular activities (community service, guest speakers, etc) and then is also covering entry fees for this semester’s Net Impact LEEDS case competition in Boulder, Colorado. To cover the costs of catering, meeting facilities, etc , there are six univer- puts their weight behind those activities to encourage the sity funding sources to apply to on a rolling basis. This year, entire class to attend.” There are a number of key faculty and we anticipate a new university president and a new associate administration members at GW that have provided funding dean at the School of Business. We are planning meetings to to Net Impact. Last semester, the MBA office covered entry engage these new leaders in a dialogue about GW’s environ- fees to Net Impact’s national conference. The MBA office mental and socially-conscious objectives. Reasons To aTTend 0% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 30% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. G W ranked sixth in a listing of the top thirty global MBA pro- grams released by Beyond Grey Pinstripes. The ranking mea- sures the extent to which business schools equip students with the few graduate-level tourism programs in the world with a number of courses focusing on sustainable tourism. Given GW’s breadth of course offerings, customizable MBA con- an understanding of the social, environmental, and economic centrations, strategic D.C. location, and the growth poten- perspectives of global business. The student body is very diverse: tial of the Net Impact chapter, GW is an excellent choice for forty percent of last year’s incoming students were international pursuing a socially and environmentally conscious education and fifty percent were female. and career. In addition to traditional areas of concentration like Ac- counting and Finance, GW offers concentrations in Environ- mental Policy and Management, Nonprofit Management, and International Business and Real Estate Development. to sum it up The International Business and Real Estate Development faculty are regarded as experts in their fields and provide a George Washington university would be most fitting great venue for students interested in green building and for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with international development. GW’s Finance program is also opportunities for significant growth. quite strong and offers a class that enables students to man- age a real portfolio of investments. Finally, GW offers one of 2201 G Street, NW, Duequès Hall Suite 660, Washington, D.C. 20052, USA • Phone: +1 202 994 6380 28 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 40. geoRgeTown unIVeRsITy mcdoNouGh SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 475 28% of MsB students are net impact members 10% of those members are “very active” Georgetown attracts a lot of net impact-minded ” individuals to its program. 40% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: collective-action, expanding, pervasive chapter leaders: allison Blackwood (amb55@georgetown.edu) and Jamie Dunchick (dunchicj@georgetown.edu) n = 11 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International develop- ment, Corporate social Responsibility, social entrepreneurship. 36% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the cur- riculum; 27% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Georgetown McDonough School of Business curricu- lum has added several socially-minded electives: Social Entrepreneurship, Current Issues in Social Responsibility Our objectives were to: 1) Educate McDonough students about socially-minded opportunities across several disci- plines (management, marketing, finance, and consulting), (reinstated), Entrepreneurship (two social enterprise proj- and 2) Empower student with information that will help ects), and Nonprofit Consulting. Net Impact has increased them utilize their business skills to make a net social, eco- speaking events at MSB and instituted a separate Func- nomic, and environmental impact. We have one-hundred tional/Career Day (detailed information provided below). In attendees and fifteen participants. The keynote speaker was addition, our chapter continues to run the Ethics for Break- Seth Goldman, Founder and CEO of Honest Tea fast speakers series, which gives students access to several MSB students are encouraged to take classes in George- socially-minded fields that are not currently explored in our town’s other graduate programs, including the Georgetown curriculum, and is designed to reach beyond our Net Impact Public Policy Institute, the School of Foreign Service, the Member base. Net Impact established this program in the Medical School, and the Law School. The most popular dual- spring with the Georgetown Ethics Institute to bring senior degree option is the MBA/MPP. Students wishing to supple- executives from various functional areas to the MBA pro- ment their MBA degree with a certificate in International gram to have a roundtable discussion with students about Business Diplomacy may do so through Georgetown’s School an ethical situation the leader has encountered at his or her of Foreign Service without being dual-degree candidates. company. Other events include a joint Net Impact/Emerging MSB’s new Dean, George Daly, has been receptive to the Markets Network Case Competition. suggestions that the Net Impact leadership team has com- In previous years, Net Impact has hosted speakers on oth- municated to him. Net Impact MSB is also advised by two er organization’s functional days, but with increased student active faculty members, Professor George Brenkert and Pro- interest the team decided that there was enough interest and fessor Ed Soule. This year marks the first time a designated need to host a Net Impact Functional Day. Career Management staff member will be overseeing the ca- Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 29
  • 41. GeoRGetoWN uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. % of respondents say the students at their program are en- thusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; % of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. G eorgetown’s Net Impact Chapter strives to meet the interests and demands of our members and to magnify the impact of their own efforts through events, conferences, and projects. Impact chapter works to create a variety of programs and chan- nels that enable students to transform their ideals into measur- able results. Net Impact is MSB’s largest club by membership. At the McDonough School of Business, Net Impact promotes a One student and a chapter member describes it as a “functional positive role for business in society. Our focus is on business and club,” adding that “we share our networks and support each oth- the environment, business and social responsibility, business in er. We are very active in organizing extracurricular activities that the public/nonprofit Sector, global trends, community develop- expand not only our knowledge but our network.” ment, and leadership/career development. Georgetown’s Net CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 18% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 88% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 36% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. W ith its Jesuit foundation committed to education and community service, Georgetown has an exceptional reputation among socially responsible businesses and Consulting Club in the past. Through the Non-Profit Internship Fund, students wishing to do summer internships may apply for funds to supplement their income. This year, the fund has nonprofits. This year we will have the benefit of an appointed $32,000 available to 2008 MSB students. We are working on Career Management staff person to oversee the career paths of establishing a loan forgiveness program, but one does not exist Net Impact members. MSB’s career searching tools for students currently. has seen increased opportunities for those wishing to pursue socially-minded careers. Also, Net Impact Central has made prominent alumni Leslie Payne (2006) - Financial Advisor, Arabella Philanthropic Financial Advisor contact with our Career Management office, in the hopes of Stephani Kobayashi Stevenson (2005) - Corporate Social Responsibility, Nike further increasing services offered to Net Impact students on Renee Baiorunos (2007) - Corporate Social Responsibility, Edelman Public Relations Sarah Brenner (2006) - Community Wealth Ventures campus. Net Impact supports career treks both independently Michael Dupee - Corporate Social Responsibility, Green Mountain Coffee and in partnership with the Emerging Markets Network, and the admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 9% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 36% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. N et Impact receives monetary support through our Stu- dent Government Association and our Student Services office. The admissions office places great value on applicants after they enroll, and various admissions events are orga- nized both in Spring and Fall orientation events. The strat- egy undertaken by the new Dean is definitely aligned with with social and environmental interests, connecting inter- Net Impact values. This includes curriculum development, ested and admitted students directly with club leaders. In- increased Career Management support, and incorporating formation regarding Net Impact is sent to admitted students undergraduate students in joint programmatic initiatives. 30 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 42. GeoRGetoWN uNIVeRSItY, continued Reasons To aTTend 36% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership. W ith new leadership and a number of new faculty members, the McDonough School of Business is in a period of transi- tion. Our Net Impact Leadership Team saw this as a great and of our successes is brought to the attention of the faculty and administration. The goal of our work is to get the administration and faculty to think of Net Impact and Georgetown as one. Ac- rare opportunity to raise the position of Net Impact. We have cording to one student, this is already becoming the case since, strived to demonstrate to the administration and faculty the im- “Georgetown attracts a lot of Net Impact-minded individuals to portance of a strong Net Impact Chapter from both a student its program.” and institutional perspective. We have done this by increasing the number of events and expanding the reach and focus of these events and then quantifying the interest and importance based on student feedback and attendance. In this past year the leader- to sum it up ship team had a number of firsts: our first case competition, the launch of our Ethics for Breakfast Series and the inaugural Net The McDonough school would be most fitting for Impact Functional Day. We have also strived to bring in more someone interested in building upon an existing speakers, to host stronger consulting projects and to grow our base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. Board Fellows program. Net Impact is MSB’s largest student club by membership, and one of the larger chapters nationally. Each 3520 Prospect Street, NW, Suite 215, Washington, DC 20007, USA • +1 202 687 4200 • E-mail: MBA@georgetown.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 31
  • 43. goRdon InsTITuTe of busIness sCIenCe (gIbs) uNIVeRSItY oF pRetoRIA aT a glanCe Full-time students: 250 40% of GiBs students are net impact members 10 % of those members are “very active” “ GiBs is an international quality degree with a local south african focus. There is an oppor- tunity to travel to other developing countries to understand how they are dealing with the ” 50% are “somewhat active” challenges they face. This chapter in three words: cross-functional, cross-academic, cross-cultural chapter leaders: Verity Hawarden (pvharden@global.co.za) and Grant little (grant.little@ecosecurities.com) n = 10 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Community development, and social entrepreneurship. 10% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 60% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. I n looking at the program, one needs to understand that GIBS is present in South Africa, a country that is just 10 years into a fully democratic society, that is dynamic and has courages dialogue on such issues as racial tension, diversity , and gender issues. A diverse range of electives is offered, from social entre- elements of both an advanced infrastructure of a developed neurship, impacting the emergent economy, and banking in economy and of a developing nation with all its associated the base of the pyramid. An elective on sustainable develop- social and environmental issues. Ours is a part-time program ment and climate change impacts for business has also been (seven days of lectures and two days of exams in an ongoing proposed. Four electives are required, with the option to six-week cycle for twenty-four months), and the majority of take more as non-examinable courses. our students are from Southern Africa (mainly the Gauteng Social and/or environmental themes are easily incorpo- province) with international students generally being from rated into class dialogue. Assignments are often given with a other African nations. Consequently, debate and class dia- broad enough base to include elements of business that are logue, which are encouraged and form much of the learning of personal relevance. In addition, many students do a full experience, are generally centered on the needs of an emer- research thesis on topics such as climate change, social issues, gent African economy and the challenges and opportunities and HIV/AIDS. Many of these result in academic papers af- within that context. ter the completion of the MBA and are published in journals The core curriculum covers the main business subjects: ac- around the world. GIBS has a CSR program that students are counting, marketing, operations management, innovation, encouraged to participate in, and which supports a primary etc. However, a number of the class discussions and case school for economically disadvantaged children. Fundrais- studies are used to encourage dialogue on issues such as di- ing, hosting activities, and teaching are all encouraged. versity, economic empowerment, and operating a business The faculty runs the dialogue circles and a number are ac- in a developing world environment with many of the associ- tive on NGO boards, and in the development of entrepre- ated social and environmental concerns that go with it. Also neurs across the country. One student characterizes the cur- on offer is a HIV/AIDS and business impact course, which is riculum as “forward-thinking and dynamic,” adding that it completely aimed at one of Africa’s largest social and busi- is “constantly changing to adapt to changing needs in both ness priorities for the early part of the twenty-first century. [South Africa] and Africa.” The personal leadership course is very introspective and en- 32 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 44. GoRdoN INStItute oF buSINeSS ScIeNce, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes sTudenT ActIVItIeS to other clubs on campus: above average. 20% student activity level in net impact compared of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 70% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. G IBS is a part-time campus of early to mid-career profession- al, and the average student age is around 30. On-campus clubs are not the norm on South African B-schools. However, the MBA class leading it. It aims to draw the alumni, student, and professional base together in the greater Johannesburg / Preto- ria area under the banner of the GIBS brand and to supplement concept that Net Impact offered was a valuable extension of the the GIBS experience and social and environmental opportunities B-school experience. With GIBS also being a fairly new school offered by the B-school. The chapter is very much member-driv- (started in 2000), the alumni base is also not that strong yet. The en and the annual plan of activities is guided by current member Net Impact chapter started in 2007, with a core of the 2005/6 needs and interests, within the Net Impact vision and model. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 10% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 10% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni Grant Little (2006) - Climate Change and SD Manager, Sappi A s most students are fully-employed during their studies, this Paul MacKenzie (2004) - Project Manager, SOS Kinderdorf Adam Rabinowitz (2005) - Serial entrepreneur, Imagin8 network is not a service that is offered on the program. Many stu- Soma Zaaiman (2006) - self-employed, social networking dents are sponsored by their companies. Coenraad Joncker (2001) - Director, Emergent Banking, Standard Bank admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 20% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 30% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration has been extremely supportive of the Net Impact chapter. The chapter leaders have aligned the chap- ter closely with many aspects of the GIBS program, and the dean of the school has regular meetings with the leadership of the chapter. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 33
  • 45. GoRdoN INStItute oF buSINeSS ScIeNce, continued Reasons To aTTend 10% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. G IBS encourages dialogue between members of its di- verse student body who live in an emergent economy. GIBS strikes an excellent balance between the core business Europe) from a business perspective. The program’s reliance on syndicates (team work) adds an element not often found in an intensive MBA program. subjects, the personal interest electives, and individual re- search. There are ample opportunities to explore both per- sonal interests and subjects out of your comfort zone. One student in our survey benefited from this, saying that “I did to sum it up not choose to attend the program for social/environmen- GiBs would be most fitting for someone who tal reasons…[but] my experience was broadened during the is interested in attending a school to help build upon an program to the extent that these became relevant to me.” A existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunities for significant growth. compulsory global elective gives students the opportunity to experience Asia, North America (and previously Africa and PO Box 787602, Sandton 2146, South Africa • E-mail: info@gibs.co.za 3 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 46. Hanken SWedISh SchooL oF ecoNomIcS & buSINeSS AdmINIStRAtIoN aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 2,000 For me, i did not attend this program for <1% of Hanken students are net impact members social/environmental reasons. But it was ” 15 % of those members are “very active” a great positive surprise when i realized it matched my values so well. 65% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: Friendly, open, Inspiring chapter leaders: Johanna Brotherus (johanna.brotherus@metso.com) CuRRICulum C SR and sustainable business are mandatory modules in the basic class for Logistics and Corporate Geography. Every Hanken student is provided with a sound basic back- dents with extensive and deep knowledge in CSR, environ- mental sustainability, and business ethics, and uses multiple case studies, real-life problem solving, and guest lectures ground in CSR, ethics, and environmental sustainability in as teaching methods. Students have called the class “one of business. Additionally, the department of Logistics and Cor- the best at Hanken” and have said such things as, “This class porate Geography provides elective classes in CSR. The class totally changed my way of thinking of business.” Different “Corporate Sustainability” in particular is one of the most CSR-related topics are covered in several other classes, espe- popular classes at Hanken, filling up fast every semester and cially within HR and leadership. garnering excellent student feedback. The class provides stu- sTudenT aCTIVITIes N et Impact Hanken was founded in September 2006. Within a few months, Net Impact Hanken gained over 60 mem- bers, and the interest is definitely growing. Net Impact Hanken to students. Net Impact Hanken has also partnered with the “Sustainable Business Club” of the Helsinki School of Economics to organize joint meetings and events. Highlights from 2006-7 is now one of the most active clubs at the Student Union of Han- include watching the film “An Inconvenient Truth” and organiz- ken. Net Impact Hanken has partnered with professors at Han- ing a visit to Glope Hope, a leading ecological clothing brand in ken who teach sustainability classes, and we have co-organized Finland. Net Impact Hanken keeps a blog at http://netimpact- movie nights where sustainability-related movies were shown finland.blogspot.com/. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI U nfortunately, Hanken does not yet have specific resources for environmental and/or social jobs. prominent alumni Dennis Hamro-Drotz (2006) - Environmental Analyst, The Nordic Investment Bank Tony Eichholz (2006) - Employer Branding Consultant, Universum Johanna Brotherus (2007) - Corporate Social Responsibility Coordinator, Metso Magdalena Lönroth (2006) - Fund manager, ethical investing, The Finnish Lutheran Church Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 3
  • 47. hANkeN, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT N et Impact Hanken is a club at the Student Union of Hanken, and as such, enjoys the union’s administrative and financial support for such things as free use of its facili- discussed with her various ways we could cooperate closely on academic issues. Hanken as a business school is striving to put greater focus on research and teaching within the sus- ties, information channels, and financing for different proj- tainability topic, and Net Impact Hanken’s mission is already ects and events that benefit Hanken students. Net Impact very well aligned with that. Hanken’s board has also met the principal of Hanken and Reasons To aTTend to sum it up H anken is a small and innovative business school in Fin- land, where corporate sustainability issues are increas- ingly given emphasis in teaching and research. One student Hanken would be most fitting for someone interested in laying the foundation for social/environmental awareness in our survey noted that “I did not attend this program for at the program. social/environmental reasons. But it was a great, positive surprise when I realized it matched my values so well.” PB 479 (Arkadiagatan 22), 00101 Helsingfors, Finland • Phone: + 358 (0)9 431 331 36 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 48. HaRVaRd unIVeRsITy hARVARd buSINeSS SchooL aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 1,800* [There are] fantastic students here, with * just a ton of different backgrounds, and a solid proportion of progressive MBas <1 %* of HBs students are net impact members ” at this school—perhaps my biggest and most pleasant surprise. *This information is from 2006. n = 12 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 25% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the cur- riculum; 33% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. I n keeping with its core mission to educate leaders who make a difference in the world, Harvard Business School (HBS) exposes MBA students to the principles and practices of social practice-oriented approach designed expressly to give stu- dents experience in working together to make difficult deci- sions in the face of the full context and complexity of actual enterprise, corporate governance, ethics, and values through- business situations. The first-year (required) curriculum, in- out the curriculum, and offers a host of related activities and cludes the course Leadership and Corporate Accountability in opportunities. which students learn about the complex responsibilities facing In 1993, the School established the Social Enterprise Initia- business leaders today through an examination of the legal, tive (SEI) which, through an integrated approach to social-en- ethical, economic, and societal responsibilities of corporate terprise related teaching, research, and activities at HBS, en- leaders. Related cases are also taught in other required courses gages with leaders in all sectors to generate and disseminate throughout the curriculum. practical resources, tools, and knowledge with the ultimate In the second year (elective) curriculum several courses fo- goal of bettering society. Each year, more than 60 faculty cus specifically on social enterprise, leadership, and values. members from around the School engage in social enterprise They include Entrepreneurship in the Social Sector, Effective through participation in individual or interdisciplinary multi- Leadership of Social Enterprise, Business Leadership and Stra- faculty research projects, teaching within the MBA curricu- tegic Corporate Citizenship, Business Approaches to Serving lum, teaching in the Social Enterprise portfolio of Executive Base-of-the-Pyramid Markets, Entrepreneurship in Education Education programs, advising students on social enterprise Reform, Innovating in Healthcare, Business and the Environ- field study projects, and more. ment, Field Studies in Social Enterprise, The Moral Leader, Classes at HBS are taught via the case method, an intense and The Board of Directors and Corporate Governance. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 37
  • 49. hARVARd buSINeSS SchooL, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 2% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 0% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. O utside the classroom, students can join the Social En- terprise Club, the Business and Environment Club, HBS Volunteers, and the International Business and De- and the Harbus Foundation. The student-led Leadership and Values Initiative raises awareness of ethical issues in busi- ness through such activities as a speaker series and round- velopment Club. There are a variety of experiential learn- table discussions. The annual student-led Social Enterprise ing opportunities available to students including the Social Conference attracts nearly a thousand students, alumni, and Enterprise track of the HBS Business Plan Contest, a Board practitioners each year. Fellows program, the Volunteer Consulting Organization, CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 58% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 88% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 50% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. C areer development is supported with social enterprise spe- cific career coaches, as well as focused industry and informa- tional sessions. The School develops recruiting relationships and to students through the Social Enterprise Summer Fellowship (summer) and the HBS Leadership Fellows program (post-gradu- ate). Additionally, a loan assistance program supports qualify- identifies social enterprise related opportunities with nonprofit, ing students pursuing careers in the field. In 2005-06, approxi- public, and private sector organizations for summer and full- mately 15% of the postings in the job bank represented social time employment opportunities. Funding support is available enterprise opportunities. Reasons To aTTend 0% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 2% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. to sum it up A s part of the School’s general management focus, it strives to develop leaders who can apply the principles they have learned at HBS in any of the broad range of sectors Harvard Business school would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with significant opportunities for growth. they choose to enter at the various stages of their careers. Soldiers Field, Boston, Massachusetts 02163, USA • Phone: +1 617 495 6000 38 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 50. HaRVaRd unIVeRsITy keNNedY SchooL oF GoVeRNmeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 1,800* The Kennedy school’s unique perspective combines policy, advocacy, and business management. KsG’s 12% of KsG students are net impact members net impact chapter brings together students, 9% of those members are “very active” practitioners, and CsR leaders to act on emerging ” trends and direct students towards careers that 91% are “somewhat active” actualize positive societal change. This chapter in three words: connected, dynamic, professional* *This information is from 2006. chapter leaders: Tony Park and Christopher sutton (christopher_sutton@ksg08.harvard.edu) CuRRICulum CuRRICulum The Kennedy School of Government (KSG) offers nu- merous electives on social and environmental themes and social entrepreneurship, and students are free to take ethics, food policy and agribusiness, and energy and envi- ronmental policy. Relevant courses at HBS cover business and the environment, and business approaches to serving courses at Harvard Business School, MIT, and the Fletcher bottom-of-the-pyramid markets. KSG students can choose School at Tufts University. The school’s Center for Business from concentrations in business and government policy, po- and Government has internationally recognized faculty litical economy and development, environment and natural in the field of CSR, including Jane Nelson, formerly of the resources, and the nonprofit sector, among others. (It should UN Secretary-General’s office and currently affiliated with be noted that the concentrations are currently undergoing the Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum a major review by the KSG administration and may be sig- (IBLF), and John Ruggie, Special Representative to the UN nificantly revised.) The second-year Policy Analysis Exercise Secretary General on Business and Human Rights. KSG also (PAE) for Master in Public Policy students also presents an features faculty in social entrepreneurship: Dutch Leonard, opportunity to complete a year-long consulting project on a Mark Moore, and Gordon Bloom teach Entrepreneurship for public interest topic related to CSR. Our chapter is working Social Value Creation and a practical Social Entrepreneurship actively with faculty in the CSR Initiative at KSG to advocate Collaboratory. Professor Leonard also teaches a cross-listed for courses that deal more explicitly with the connection be- course with Harvard Business School (HBS) called “Strategic tween business and society, such as a course on Business and Corporate Citizenship.” Other curriculum highlights include the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). courses on public-private partnerships, social marketing, sTudenT aCTIVITIes S tudents at KSG explore CSR issues through a number of clubs, including the Corporate Responsibility Coun- cil (CRC), the official Net Impact chapter, as well as related on CSR practices. The CRC has hosted lectures and discus- sions with top practitioners in the field from preeminent global businesses. Highlights from the 2005-2006 calendar clubs such as Social Enterprise in Action (SEIA), Environ- year included discussions with the former CEOs of Coca-Cola mental Professional Interest Council (PIC), and Business and Heineken, SRI guru Steven Lydenberg, the directors of and Government PIC. The Corporate Responsibility Council, human rights programs at Reebok and Abbot Laboratories, founded by Kennedy School students just two years ago, has and the head of Bayer China’s CSR activities. A number of quickly become one of the most visible and active student CRC alumni have also returned to campus to discuss their organizations in the Harvard community. The CRC serves as work with organizations including Coca-Cola, Cemex, and a lively forum for dialogue on CSR as well as a barometer of the Global Business Coalition to Fight HIV/AIDS. Our chap- the growing interest in corporate citizenship. The CRC has ter believes strongly in providing experiential learning op- served as a sounding board for Fortune 500 executives in- portunities through direct dialogue and focus groups with terested in fresh perspectives from tomorrow’s leaders, by practitioners. This year, students contributed directly to the participating in strategic reviews of draft sustainability re- inaugural corporate citizenship report for InBev, the largest ports and forming focus groups to advise leading companies brewer in the world. This marked the second consecutive Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 39
  • 51. hARVARd keNNedY SchooL oF GoVeRNmeNt, continued StudeNt ActIVItIeS, continued year that students were involved in producing a Fortune 500 dialogue and experiential learning in the field of corporate CSR report. The Net Impact chapter and social enterprise responsibility and to expand resources related to addressing club at KSG work very closely with counterpart organiza- this topic at the Kennedy School of Government, throughout tions at Harvard Business School by co-hosting events such Harvard University, and in the Boston Area.” There is broad as the annual Social Enterprise Conference. The Kennedy student interest among policy students as the private sector School’s CRC is one of the nation’s most active graduate stu- deepens its involvement in social and environmental issues, dent-run organizations focused on CSR, and its ambitions taking on some former public sector functions. are to be even more active. The CRC’s mission is: “To promote CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI O ur chapter’s goal is to be an employment resource for current school’s reputation and alumni network are tremendous assets in KSG students interested in the field, and KSG Career Services the job search. Funding for unpaid summer internships is available supports us by hosting practitioner panel discussions in the field through the Summer Internship Fund and various centers such as the of CSR. By establishing a formal alumni network for KSG alumni Carr Center for Human Rights, Women and Public Policy Program, working in the field of CSR, our chapter ensures that job and the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, and the Center for internship opportunities will continue to be offered in years to come. International Development. The school also offers a four-year Loan We are working actively with recent alumni in the field of CSR to Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP) for students working for develop specialized job and internship opportunities for chapter the public interest and earning up to $50,000 for single applicants members. KSG Career Services specializes in placing students in ($80,000 for married applicants). nonprofits and is developing its capacity to support cross-sector opportunities. CSR prominent alumni opportunities are ad hoc but faculty contacts Marika McCauley – Research Analyst, The Coca-Cola Company are very helpful. Students wanting to start Celina Gorre – Technical Manager, Global Business Coalition to Fight HIV/AIDS Arturo Franco – Corporate Advisor for Social Responsibility and Community Development, CEMEX their own social enterprise can incubate it in Tom Knowlton – Vice President and Director, TCC Group the Social Entrepreneurship Collaboratory. The admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he purpose of the Kennedy School is to train leaders to solve public problems and the administration demonstrates a com- mitment to fulfilling this mission by supporting a wide range of available for clubs and activities. Faculty also support CSR work through various centers, including: the Corporate Social Respon- sibility Initiative, the Center for Business and Government, the student activities and the development of new curricula that re- Carr Center for Human Rights, the Women and Public Policy Pro- flect the changing needs of cross-sector professionals. Through gram, the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, and the the Kennedy School Student Government (KSSG), funding is Center for International Development. Reasons To aTTend B ecause it is a policy school, the Kennedy School is unique among Net Impact chapters in providing the best of both worlds: in-depth study of social and environmental issues with cutting-edge faculty in CSR and social entrepreneurship at KSG is complemented with access to courses and activities at Harvard Business School and other Boston area schools. alongside core management, leadership, and evaluation skills. Students from a wide array of professional, educational, and geographic backgrounds thrive at the Kennedy School, as evi- denced by this year’s Net Impact leadership team which rep- to sum it up resented eight countries and included a lawyer, a pharmacist, The Kennedy school of Government would be most two investment bankers, a fair trade advocate, a journalist, a fitting for someone who is interested in attending a school social worker, four MBA students, and representatives from to help build upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunities for significant growth. the fields of healthcare, international development, philan- thropy, education, and national security. Close interaction 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA • Phone: +1 617 495 1100 0 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 52. HeC sCHool of managemenT - PaRIs mASteR oF buSINeSS AdmINIStRAtIoN aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 250 16% of HeC students are net impact members [HeC is a] good alternative to the cut- 50% of those members are “very active” throat, grow-or-die approach that many ” 25% are “somewhat active” other business schools teach in MBa programs. This chapter in three words: entrepreneurial, Growing, Active chapter leaders: leticia Kawanami (leticia.kawanami@gmail.com) and Gajender sharma (gajender.sharma@mailhec.net) n = 10 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International develop- ment, Corporate social Responsibility, and environmental sustainability. 20% of re- spondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 10% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. M BA HEC program takes a proactive, holistic approach in training leaders with a high degree of ethical aware- ness. HEC has responded to environmental issues by further range of management education subjects, from accounting and strategy to communications and marketing. • The MBA participants can choose from a wide range of developing the quantitative and qualitative role of sustain- sustainable electives, such as “Business ethics”, “CSR be- able development within the MBA program. On a quanti- yond the controversy”, and “Corporate strategy and devel- tative basis, the MBA HEC program has added more weight opment.” to the teaching of business ethics, sustainable development, • MBA HEC students have the opportunity to enroll in a and corporate social responsibility, thereby increasing the sustainable development program at a partner school. No- number of electives in these key areas. tably, HEC has joint degrees with the Fletcher School of Law The qualitative changes are materialized through a “sus- and Diplomacy and the London School of Economics and tainable development strategy.” It has been launched Political Science. through the creation of a “positive management program” • Students are required to work on a Marketing Project as whose aims are to reinforce and coordinate the sustainability part of Core 2. Many students choose to work with non- business within the HEC MBA curriculum. profit or fair-trade companies on this project. HEC believes that these subjects should not be taught in • Some HEC MBA students have taken the initiative to isolation or added artificially to existing courses. Instead, we work for nonprofit organizations as part of a summer in- take an integrated approach to positive management, encour- ternship program. aging participants to draw from a wide range of viewpoints Candidates will not only understand the relevant ethical on a daily basis over the sixteen-month program. This inte- and ecological issues, they will also be able to play an active grated approach is put into practice in a number of ways. role in this area. Whatever their position, company, or con- • All HEC MBA candidates follow an experiential learning tinent, HEC alumni will contribute to spreading awareness process that trains them to adopt high ethical standards in and global change. their actions, whether in the classroom, in work groups, or In September 2007, the fourth HEC Sustainable Develop- in project work. ment Seminar, which will be organized in connection with • All HEC MBA participants take a “Sustainable Business the Spanish business school ESADE, will feature keynote Strategy” course and several “positive economy” seminars. speakers from sustainable development organizations, as • Faculty members are required to teach sustainable man- well as guest speakers from the corporate world, and presti- agement concepts in a systematic manner across the entire gious European business schools. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 1
  • 53. hec SchooL oF mANAGemeNt, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 10% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 20% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Net Impact HEC MBA chapter was created in 2005, and is in its peak period of growth and development. Members are self-motivated and collaborative. They come with new ideas We encourage members to participate in debates to which the Club is invited. These include the Human Rights Workshop at the UN and the conference at the World Bank to strengthen and grow the club. The Club Officers are very entitled “Tomorrow’s Leaders Speak Out: Partnering to active and they constantly work on new events, activities, and Combat Corruption.” networking. Net Impact HEC MBA is well-linked with other chapters The main activity at Net Impact HEC MBA is the Sustainable and “positive” MBA clubs in Europe. Our aim is to support Development Conference, which takes place in the fall. This the Net Impact HEC MBA members to attend conferences conference is a compulsory part of the MBA’s curriculum, at other schools and to promote networking and career which explains its importance and size. It is a two-day opportunities. We are also working with organizations such conference with very important guest speakers from diverse as MBAs Without Borders on fundraising and internships in areas of sustainable development including energy, CSR, and the area of sustainable development. We have also started to economic development. It is a great opportunity for students work with ESF (Entrepreneurs without Borders) in France. to learn more about these specific areas, to discuss their point In addition, we collaborate with the undergraduate clubs of views, and to network. and associations at HEC. We have an on-campus Sustainable In addition to the conference, our aim is to have at least Development Day and other events, which we develop one speaker come to campus monthly. together. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 10% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 29% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 40% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. C areer Services acts on demand. They are working hard to improve their network of nonprofit organizations and increase the number of internship and job offers in that sector. prominent alum Thierry Fornas – Sales and Marketing Director, EcoAct admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 30% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 40% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration is very supportive. The associate dean and academic director are members of the Net Impact HEC Governance Board. dean and the administration to implement the changes. To develop individual, interpersonal, and collective skills, the MBA program has developed a Mission and Action project Increasingly, they admit candidates who are interested in (MAP) within its curriculum. MAP offers an opportunity for the field. those who are ready and willing to be actively engaged in The curriculum is being changed to include more subjects strategic social and humanitarian missions. Walid Malouf in this area not only as part of the electives but as part of (MBA 2006) was the first to take advantage of this option. the core. Net Impact HEC MBA played a leading role in this He joined a team of experts to rehabilitate semi-arid land, change. The club conducted a student survey to understand sustain habitats, and develop rural life in Western African their needs; afterwards, the club worked with the associate countries. 2 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 54. hec SchooL oF mANAGemeNt, continued Reasons To aTTend T he HEC MBA program is the place to come if you have great ideas and a huge drive to make them happen! The program also offers a flexible and open environment in marketing, entrepreneurship, finance, or strategy track and complement those with the electives of their interest. They can focus on their track but participate in the club’s events to which to exercise your leadership skills. The sixteen-month develop their social and environmental side as a very impor- program balances academics and personal growth. The cur- tant complement to their career in the for-profit sector. One riculum gets stronger every year. We have the support from student cites these as the reason to attend: HEC has “strong administration to create events and influence changes in the links between best business practices and the humanitarian curriculum. The Sustainable Development Conference is an sector, creating added value for both.” It is therefore a “good excellent opportunity to network and develop your skills alternative to the cut-throat, grow-or-die approach that since it is made by the students for the students. We are very many other business schools teach.” well-linked with other “positive” clubs in European Business Schools which creates the perfect opportunity to expand your network. Our club is here to support you with job and intern- to sum it up ship searches, career advice, and academic development. The HEC MBA program is also ideal for those candidates HeC would be most fitting for someone interested in build- who are interested in social and/or environmental themes ing upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunities for significant growth. but do not necessarily want to work in that field. Students are offered a very strong curriculum where they can choose a 14, avenue de la porte de Champerret, 75838 Paris, FRANCE • +33 01 44 09 34 00 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 3
  • 55. IndIana unIVeRsITy keLLeY buSINeSS SchooL aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 400 Kelley is one of the warmest and friend- 13 % of Kelley students are net impact members liest environments where business is ” 20% of those members are “very active” viewed holistically as an integral part of the social fabric of life. 15 % are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: diverse, enthusiastic, Revered chapter leaders: Trevor lobo (tjlobo@indiana.edu) n = 11 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International develop- ment, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 18% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 9% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. K elley’s flexible curriculum and university partnerships al- low students to pursue social and environmental interests. Beginning in the core curriculum, social and environmental wards social and environmental issues in several elective courses. Kelley also offers “Kelley International Perspectives” classes in which students learn about international business issues are included as part of case discussions and competi- development and then travel to another country during spring tions. The depth of the issue depends on the case, professor, break. KIP classes usually focus on developing markets, and and level of student interest. Strategy discussions are led by recent trips include those to Brazil, Peru, China, India, South Professor Kesner and are one of the strongest elements of the Africa, and Eastern Europe. Kelley core. These debate-style discussions incorporate all At Kelley, students join “academies,” which are a combina- aspects of corporate strategy, including social responsibility tion of a club and an academic class. These faculty-led orga- concerns. Also in the core, Professor Metzger leads a critical nizations provide an intimate setting for both learning and thinking module that incorporates ethics and the responsibil- career development and give students opportunities to pursue ity of managers. Other core professors incorporate social and their areas of interest, including social and environmental ca- environmental issues as is appropriate to their teachings. reers and projects. Since academies change from year to year In a unique partnership with Indiana University’s School depending on demand and interest, there is also the potential of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA), Kelley students to initiate an academy more specifically focused on social and can choose to pursue a Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship. environmental issues. The certificate merges the respective schools’ strengths in pri- Finally, Kelley faculty members and administrators are ex- vate and public/nonprofit management and requires classes tremely responsive to student ideas and input. This is for- in each, as well as an integrative course and an appropriate malized through the Curriculum Advisory Committee, a stu- internship experience. In addition, Kelley students can take dent-led group that brings students’ concerns and ideas to the electives at SPEA, which is located just across the street from school’s attention. Through both formal and informal means, the School of Business. Other formal joint degree programs Kelley students have the opportunity to continuously develop that may meet the needs of students with social and environ- their curriculum. Currently, Kelley Net Impact members are mental interests are available at the School of Law and several working with the MBA program chair and various department other graduate schools. heads to present ideas for greater integration of social and en- Kelley students have the ability to frame their projects to- vironmental issues.  Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 56. INdIANA uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 18% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmen- tal themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 18% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. N early all of Kelley’s graduate clubs consider the social and environmental aspect of business, but Kelley’s Net Impact chapter leads the way. has also organized a series of documentary/discussion events that allow students to gain awareness of corporate social responsibility-related issues through the viewing of a movie The Kelley chapter of Net Impact is well-established and followed by a faculty-led discussion on the topic. Net Impact builds momentum every year. More and more students and also volunteers in the community; for example, students faculty are becoming interested in companies that are socially helped plant trees to support Earth Day and Net Impact will responsible and that work toward making the world a better also host a clothing and book drive. To keep its members up place. “The general receptivity of the program to Net Impact to date and informed of all these activities, Kelley Net Impact topics has made programming easy and highly effective, and holds regular meetings and provides timely announcements. the possibilities seem endless,” writes one student. Aside from these activities, our chapter works closely with Net Impact has several events that are held every year. In the other graduate business clubs to make sure that events the fall, for incoming students, Net Impact partners with have a socially relevant component. the Consulting Club and Entrepreneur Club to hold a case “Plenty of opportunities exist, be it in a leadership role or competition that focuses on a socially relevant business otherwise, for student involvement in the Net Impact club,” problem taking place in the world today. Net Impact also writes one student. “In addition, the atmosphere at the hosts an ethics panel, where industry executives are invited Kelley School of Business is very supportive of fresh ideas in to discuss ethical issues they have faced in the business world the realm of social/environmental/ethical impact themes.” and to answer any questions students may have. Net Impact CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 64% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 75% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 36% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. T he Kelley School of Business has a Graduate Career Services (GCS) department that gives students the opportunity to prepare for interviews in the corporate tips on how to conduct job searches, and there are ways for students to contact alumni. Aside from the GCS department, students who are setting, and these skills are also valuable to students pursuing admitted into the Social Entrepreneurship Certificate careers in nontraditional settings. However, the vast majority Program can select from a number of established internships of career services’ effort is geared toward corporate jobs, with nonprofit organizations in the surrounding area, as especially by corporations that recruit at Kelley. It also seems well as a few corporations that have active corporate social that a majority of Kelley students are interested in the jobs responsibility initiatives. In the past, students have held offered by the corporate recruiters. Still, the GCS has offered internships with organizations such as Middle Way House, various and continuous workshops on how to pursue jobs in United Way, Clarian Health Partners, and Eli Lilly and corporate social responsibility. The counselors offer a lot of Company. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 
  • 57. INdIANA uNIVeRSItY, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he leadership and administration of Kelley appreciate students who are interested in Net Impact and show strong support for the club in various ways. the Dean’s Council, or the MBA club chairperson. In addi- tion, the Ethics Institute often covers much of the expense to bring in speakers who are focused on business ethics. Net Impact receives funding from the school that can be Thus, the school at large recognizes the importance of Net used for socially relevant events decided upon by the current Impact. “The administration is always receptive to students’ Net Impact leadership with the influence of the active mem- interests and is always looking for ways to improve the pro- bership. Most years, the school also reimburses a number gram,” writes one student. However, the school can only de- of students for expenses incurred at the annual Net Impact liver what is requested by the students, so it is imperative conference, which they highly encourage students to attend. that in upcoming years there are dedicated students who In addition to its base of funds, Kelley Net Impact can also keep social and environmental issues at the forefront of the receive additional funds from the Bunke’s Ethics Institute, school’s consciousness. Reasons To aTTend 27% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 9% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/envi- ronmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. I ndiana’s Kelley School of Business has a strong entrepre- neurship program. As a result, there are opportunities to pursue a Certificate of Social Entrepreneurship, which en- profit sector, many students pursue work that is aligned with their social and environmental priorities by working with companies with excellent reputations for corporate respon- tails taking classes in both the School of Public Affairs and sibility. Environment (SPEA) and the Kelley School of Business. En- Kelley’s Graduate Career Services office recently started an trepreneurship, finance, and marketing programs at Kelley initiative to address the needs of students interested in less provide a good foundation for starting and growing a busi- traditional careers. ness—a skill-set very applicable to someone considering a nonprofit management track. In addition, while Kelley does not have a formal loan for- to sum it up giveness program, the school’s tuition is the one of the low- est of the top business schools. Considering that the school The Kelley school would be most fitting for is also very generous with assistantships and grants, all stu- someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity dents, not just those participating in a loan program, have a for significant growth. wide variety of career options available to them. While almost all students accept employment in the for- 309 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA • +1 812 855 8100 • E-mail: mbaoffice@indiana.edu 6 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 58. Insead mASteR oF buSINeSS AdmINIStRAtIoN aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 900 The inDeVOR club (i.e. net 22% of inseaD students are net impact members impact) is the largest student club on campus and it is very 10% of those members are “very active” proactive. also, the alumni ” 25% are “somewhat active” network in net impact related areas is large and helpful. This chapter in three words: Influence, engagement, opportunities chapter leader: Megan Pillsbury (megan.pillsbury@alumni.insead.edu) n = 41 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 34% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 27% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he INSEAD MBA curriculum incorporates social and en- vironmental issues through a combination of required modules at the beginning of the program, specific cases and Some examples of electives include courses in: ethics and business, business and the social sector, environmental management, managing in developing countries, and social sessions as part of the core courses, and a large set of elec- entrepreneurship. While the MBA program at INSEAD is a tives. general management MBA and does not offer specializations Our MBA curriculum is composed of twenty-three and a or majors, students can shape almost forty-five percent of half credits, of which thirteen are core courses. Social and their curriculum. As such, students could take all their elec- environmental issues are included in three levels: tives in the area of social and environmental issues. • During the introduction to the program, all students go In recent years, these electives have introduced an increas- through modules on management, culture and values, and ing number of projects that have a real social impact. These ethics. projects, sometimes in regions of the world with which stu- • During the required courses, we encourage faculty to in- dents might not be familiar (South Africa, Kenya, India, Chi- clude materials that are relevant to their courses, but which na), provide a hands-on experience that complements the also have a social or environmental component. As an exam- material discussed in the courses. ple, discussions on ethics and business are included in several A new center for social responsibility provides an umbrella sessions of the courses in leading organizations, finance, and for research and activities in this area. A group of about ten accounting; issues related to international development ap- faculty members from very different disciplines is respon- pear in the macroeconomics and political analysis courses. sible for the development of the curriculum. • There are about fifteen different electives with content Because we are a business school without a university that is mainly related to social and environmental issues. around us, we do not offer dual-degree programs. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 7
  • 59. INSeAd, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 46% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 46% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. F ounded in 1993 and made an affiliate chapter of Net Impact in 2003, our Net Impact club (INDEVOR) is the largest MBA student club at INSEAD. Students, partners, faculty, areas is large and helpful,” writes one student. Finally, we run fundraisers and community involvement activities, such as Habitat for Humanity. and staff are all invited to become members of INDEVOR. It Due to overwhelming interest in INDEVOR-related issues this serves as a forum to examine the role of business in society, year, two clubs have been spun off to focus on specific issues: and our main areas of concern are international development, • The INSEAD Energy Club aims to leverage its alumni network corporate social responsibility, environmental sustainability, and INSEAD’s existing corporate relationships to provide nonprofit and non-governmental organizations, and social ongoing career services and to support future entrepreneurs in entrepreneurship. nascent industries such as alternative energy technologies and We host speaker events featuring students, faculty members, energy trading. We encompass the entire energy spectrum from and industry professionals. Among those who have spoken or are nuclear, oil, gas, and coal through to the newer technologies, scheduled to speak are Sir Richard Feachem of the Global Fund, often in association with private equity and venture capital Patrick Cescau of Unilever, and Peter Goldmark of Environmental firms. Here, we work closely with the INSEAD Private Equity Defense. We also focus on networking with alumni, identifying Club. career opportunities for our members, influencing the academic • The INSEAD Emerging Markets Club examines business curriculum, distributing a monthly newsletter, and liaising opportunities and strategies for meeting the needs of emerging with other clubs both within INSEAD and externally. With markets. We recently co-hosted a social entrepreneurship event such enterprises, “the alumni network in Net Impact-related with INDEVOR that featured students and faculty members. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 44% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 73% found jobs that uti- lize their values and skills; 54% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni I NSEAD’s MBA Career Services provides advice and assistance to companies wishing to recruit our Penny Grewal (1984) - Head of Sector Health Care, Novartis Foundation Sustainable Development Alain Bougard (1967) - President, Fondation Crusoé Suisse Sarah Dodds (1997) - Director of Ventures, Un Ltd Julien Morcom Harneis (1997) - Chief of Field Office, UNICEF MBA participants and supports MBA Eric Usher (1998) - Head, Renewable Energy Finance Unit, United Nations Environment Programme participants in optimizing their career choices after graduation. Two members INSEAD has been able to bring to campus such organizations as of our teams in Fontainebleau and Singapore cover the social Environmental Defense, Ashoka, the British Red Cross, Oxfam, sector, building relationships with recruiters from nonprofit and the Global Fund to fight AIDS. Here, these organizations organizations, consulting firms that operate in nonprofit or have presented and met the MBA participants, providing them development sectors, for-profit companies that pursue socially with first-hand information about the sector. responsible business practices, and for-profit ventures within Although few students join the nonprofit world directly after nonprofit organizations. Currently over fifty foundations, their MBA (approximately five percent), we see many MBA nonprofit organizations, and inter-governmental agencies turn participants show a strong desire to work in socially responsible to INSEAD to meet their recruitment needs. companies. Several participants are planning to build their A dedicated NGO career website on our intranet provides own social venture in the future. In addition, a growing number research material to all MBA participants, and we have several of MBA participants use their two-month summer break subscriptions to job boards that specialize in nonprofit or the first months after graduation to do an internship at a opportunities. Our team offers individual counseling sessions, nonprofit or in a CSR-related field. Lastly, our Career Services feedback on CVs and cover letters, and assistance in interview has successfully increased the internship and project offerings preparation. Due to our strong commitment to this sector, over the past few years. 8 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 60. INSeAd, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 1% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 9% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he INSEAD Social Innovation Center centralizes all activities related to social and environmental issues in the school (research, teaching, events). It also supports the emphasis in profiles that are considered to be different from the more traditional MBA profiles. Interest in social issues, and experience in nonprofit or international institutions is student activities and the Net Impact chapter (INDEVOR). valued by the admissions committee. When it comes to the admissions process, INSEAD Currently the school has set three priorities in terms of emphasizes diversity in the classroom as a key value of future developments and strategy. One of them is social the MBA program. When looking for diversity, there is responsibility, very much linked to the Net Impact values. Reasons To aTTend 44% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 22% of respondents strongly agree their pro- gram adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he main differentiating factor of the INSEAD MBA pro- gram is its international reach and the diversity of its participants. With two campuses (one in France and one in are coordinated by the INSEAD Social Innovation Center. A group of about ten professors are committed to this area and they provide the research and teaching that our participants Singapore) and an alliance with the Wharton School in the are exposed to in our programs. The center is linked with the United States, INSEAD brings participants from all over the Net Impact chapter, INDEVOR, which has about 200 mem- world and provides a learning experience based on the expo- bers. In addition to the courses, we organize a good number sure to different ideas and values. Discussions on values and of activities (events, conferences, projects) in this area. There cultural differences are an integral part of the everyday life in is also a focus, within the Career Services team, in linking the INSEAD MBA program. our participants to organizations that have an interest in re- Ours is a general management program with emphasis on cruiting in this area (nonprofit, international organizations leadership. Participants take a set of required courses that or multinational companies that are developing teams spe- provides the foundation, and then they choose among a very cialized in social issues). large number of electives (more than eighty) to complete their curriculum. Discussions on the impact of business in society, on in- to sum it up ternational development, and on values are common in the inseaD would be most fitting for someone classroom because of the diversity in the backgrounds of interested in attending a school where students and our participants. The fact that there is no dominant culture faculty are on the forefront of social/environmental issues. makes it a very open environment. Activities that relate to social and environmental topics Boulevard de Constance, 77305 Fontainebleau, FRANCE • Phone: +33 (0)1 60 72 40 00 • E-mail: mba.europe@insead.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 9
  • 61. InsTITuTo de emPResa INteRNAtIoNAL mbA, mbA, mmm aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: ~600 2% of ie students are net impact members [students’] views about worldwide con- cerns will be enriched and there is a lot 20% of those members are “very active” ” of room for enthusiastic net impacters. 40% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: Social responsibility, conferences, the Net Impact day chapter leaders: soledad Pons Caruso (soleponscaruso@hotmail.com) and laurence Friberg (laufriberg@gmail.com) CuRRICulum T he Instituto de Empresa is very active concerning social responsibility and entrepreneurship. Social responsibili- ty is something really important to the school: every instruc- ganize a Christmas market. As has been widely announced, the IE won the Thunderbird competition this year. IE is lis- tening to the students and tries to fulfill their needs and ex- tor talks about it during his or her classes (e.g., in designing pectations. To this end, a cycle of “social and environmental” business plans for our class on entrepreneurship, we were re- conferences has been organized recently. There are numer- quired to have a “social impact” section). You can see books ous elective courses about social and environmental themes about social responsibility in the hallways or in the store, and and quite a few conferences that are organized throughout there is always support from the faculty members to organize the year on these subjects, either by Net Impact or by faculty any type of event related to social responsibility, whether it members. Net Impact organized a conference with a faculty is to send students to the Thunderbird competition or to or- member who is part of the Global Compact. sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Net Impact chapter started two years ago and is devel- oping. Currently we have forty-five members of whom twenty are pretty active. One of our key events is the annual but we want this action plan to be flexible so that any idea a member may have can be realized. We often organize events together with many other clubs, including an entrepreneurs conference on social responsibility, which takes place in No- club, an environmental club, a global warming club and the vember. Last year, Jed Emmerson joined us for the conference Venezuelan club. Net Impact is labeled “the social responsibil- and it was a huge success. We are currently getting organized ity club” and we have a pretty good reputation among faculty for the 2007 event. We do special events such as conferences members and students. We are seen as a club that concerns or whatever comes up to mind. In December, we organized itself with a serious issue, and our conferences always attract a Christmas market, and we are thinking about organizing people. Social and environmental issues are really integrated a “Diversity Day.” We have a strategy and an action plan, into school life at the Instituto de Empresa. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI W e have a department in charge of helping students to find a job, and slowly but surely, there are jobs with more of a “social side,” such as positions in the Red Cross. We also have a program for social internships, whereby a student may do such things as help a local NGO define their strategy. One of the NGOs with which we have a partnership is in Kenya. 0 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 62. INStItuto de empReSA, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT O ur Net Impact chapter and the other clubs related to so- cial or environmental issues always get support from the faculty members. We believe the social office places special value on applicants with a social background. For instance, one of our active members used to work for the NGO sector. The future priorities are aligned with Net Impact values. Reasons To aTTend I nstituto de Empresa IMBA and MBA programs are recog- nized for their focus on entrepreneurship, the diversity of their classes, their high percentage of women enrolled, to sum it up The instituto de empresa would be most fitting and their diversity. Moreover, it is possible to focus on so- for someone interested in attending a school cial entrepreneurship through a concentration in the “Ven- where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ environmental issues. ture Lab” elective. Throughout the year, there are also many conferences and events related to social and environmental themes. María de Molina 11, Edificio A - Planta Jardín, Madrid, SPAIN • Phone: +34 91 568 96 10 • E-mail: admissions@ie.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 1
  • 63. massaCHuseTTs InsTITuTe of TeCHnology (mIT) SLoAN SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 750 it is easy to talk about ideas, but at sloan 13% of sloan students are net impact members i felt that students were more likely to 40% of those members are “very active” ” take action and do something about it. 20% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: Active, Growing, hot chapter leaders: Joanna Brownstein (jbrownstein@sloan.mit.edu) and Gabe shapiro (gshapiro@mit.edu) n = 19 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International develop- ment, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 42% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the cur- riculum; 53% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. A t orientation, students are introduced to a clear ethics and social focus which is carried out in the core. In each of our core classes there is at least one case that touches upon entrepreneurship are incorporated in many classes, even if it is not the primary focus of the class. Students also have many opportunities to attend seminars in the MIT Sloan Innovation social/environmental/ethical themes. We are working with Period and winter break. key faculty and staff to incorporate more of these teachable There is a core group of senior faculty, staff, and administrators moments into the core and popular electives. Also, because who are committed to social/environmental issues. A very MIT Sloan’s core requirements are all taken in the first active sustainability working group is also raising the profile semester, one student notes that “There is a lot of time and of these issues throughout the MIT Sloan community. flexibility to pursue very specific areas of interest.” Dual degree programs are offered through the Kennedy MIT Sloan has many opportunities to explore Net Impact School of Government at Harvard University, the Harvard- issues in elective classes. This semester, a class entitled MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, and the Sustainability Lab was introduced. There are also electives Faculty of Engineering. MIT Sloan students can also cross on ethics and environmental issues. Themes around social register for any class at Harvard or MIT. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most ac- tive clubs at the program. 42% of respondents say the students at their program are enthu- siastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 42% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he MIT Sloan Net Impact chapter has doubled in size dur- ing each of the last 2 years. One student comments that despite the “growth by leaps and bounds,” entering students ronment, international development, global health, ethics, and curriculum change. “The level of engagement and action that I saw in the student body” is what attracted at least one survey will still find opportunities “to help shape the future of MIT respondent to MIT Sloan. Sloan Net Impact” which is now one of MIT Sloan’s largest and We work with the MIT Sloan Senate to coordinate the MIT most active clubs. Our members are active in sustainability is- Sloan Service day, where volunteers go into the community and sues across the MIT campus, including energy and the envi- do projects for nonprofits. We also coordinate the “Food Fight” 2 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 64. mASSAchuSettS INStItute oF techNoLoGY (mIt), continued StudeNt ActIVItIeS, continued a competition between cohorts to see who can raise the most work in the nonprofit and social impact space, and implement- money for hunger relief organizations. We co-sponsor events ing new initiatives such as a CSR seminar series. We are also with almost every other professional club at MIT Sloan. increasing our involvement with the Career Development Of- Our strategic plan for the next year includes implementing fice, to improve recruiting opportunities for people interested a Board Fellows program, expanding support for students who in impact-based careers. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 16% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 89% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 26% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni T he MIT Sloan Career Development Office (CDO) has made a great effort to increase the resources for students interested in social impact careers. They have partnered with the MBA - George Chu (2004) - CFO, Citizen Schools, Inc. Alberto Citarella (1999) - Director of Finance, Jumpstart for Young Children Johanna Klein (2005) - Structured Finance Specialist, Asian Development Bank Laura Paglione (1999) - Director of the iBridge Network, Kauffman Foundation Nonprofit Connection and Common Good Careers to increase Dale Galvin (1998) - COO, Rare Conservation the number of job postings available to students. In addition, the CDO holds information sessions on social impact careers. The summer internships with nonprofit organizations. The Net CDO also supports the student-run Sloan Nonprofit Internship Impact chapter sends out a weekly digest which includes career Fund (SNIF) which provides up to $5,000 to students who take opportunities gathered from a variety of resources. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 3% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 68% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration is a great supporter of the MIT Sloan Net Impact chapter. Net Impact receives $1,000 of funding each semester from the Student Affairs Office (SAO). In addition, students interested in social/ environmental issues, and reach out to prospective students interested in this area. As an exam- ple of administrative support, one student mentioned “a grow- the SAO provides financial support for Net Impact members to ing focus on renewable energy brought on by a mandate from attend the Net Impact national conference. The administration MIT’s president to focus on this issue.” is also very open to suggestions about how they can support Reasons To aTTend 32% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 11% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. O ur program has a very strong, committed leadership team that is active across campus. We have the support of the administration, and a core group of senior faculty who interest and activity surrounding social impact, and the num- ber of involved students is increasing every day. are committed to bringing MIT Sloan to the forefront of sus- to sum it up tainable business. The strong ties we have with the rest of MIT provide amazing opportunities to be involved in leveraging The MiT sloan school would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing new technologies for social good. The entrepreneurship com- base of social/environmental impact activities with munity at MIT Sloan is quite strong and there is a lot of sup- opportunity for significant growth. port for social entrepreneurs. Our school has a high level of Suite E52-126, Cambridge, MA 02142-1347, USA • Phone: +1 617 258 5434 • E-mail: mbaadmissions@sloan.mit.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 3
  • 65. monTeRey InsTITuTe of InTeRnaTIonal sTudIes FISheR GRAduAte SchooL oF INteRNAtIoNAL buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 80 With [relatively few] students in the 21 % of Fisher students are net impact members business school, you have the power to make large changes to the school and a 46% of those members are “very active” ” lot of opportunity to grow and develop 34% are “somewhat active” yourself as a business person. This chapter in three words: energetic, Resourceful, collaborative chapter leaders: neal Reardon (neal.reardon@miis.edu) and Rashelle simpson (rashelle.simpson@miis.edu) CuRRICulum O ur school is currently exploring ways in which to incor- porate social and environmental themes into the core curriculum. As the program stands, it is possible to find “the business and policy schools don’t usually see eye to eye,” which means “ you must create your own program and sometimes fight your way into policy classes.” The school courses of interest within these areas, but they are not nec- is exploring the option of a Green Business track in which essarily part of the traditional program. “There is…a strong students could receive a degree related directly to busi- environmental policy program at the Monterey Institute ness and the environment. This is possible now, but only which allows for increased learning in the subject area” one through formal enrollment in dual-degree programs. Many student writes. Another adds, however, that many of these students pursue a Master’s in International Environmental courses are offered by the school of public policy and that Policy and an MBA. sTudenT aCTIVITIes sTudenTNet Impact chapter has been ac- aCTIVITIes T he Monterey Institute tive for about four years. It is not large but remains one of the most active clubs on campus. The chapter hosts an Monterey Institute club that focuses on sustainability issues for the campus. They have activities ranging from recycling efforts to increasing plant-based offerings in the cafeteria annual forum in which speakers are invited from the San to hosting an Earth Day event. ETF and Net Impact have Francisco Bay area to discuss issues related to business and been working closely together to build a strategy for campus sustainability. The most recent forum in March 2007 was greening. One student notes that “people’s intentions here entitled “Greening Outside the Niche.” Our chapter also re- are good when it comes to social and eco issues, but turnout ceived money to begin an on-campus speaker series focused at our Net Impact events is low. There is a degree of extra- on business sustainability. In addition, we work with anoth- curricular participation apathy here that, with all the appar- er student-led club, the Environmental Task Force (ETF), a ent ‘green’ attitude while in class, is surprising.” CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI C areer Services at the Monterey Institute are rather gen- eral. Due to the small size of the school, there is only one person who interacts with students in the career ser- jobs, there is a high degree of individual attention to pursue such interests. vice department but this allows for highly specialized career prominent alumni searches and individual attention. Therefore, while there is Kate Butchart (2006) - Business Development Manager, SustainLane Alison Hopcroft (2006) - Consultant, Good Company not a specific career service for social/environmental impact  Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 66. moNteReY INStItute oF INteRNAtIoNAL StudIeS, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he Business School staff has been supportive of activities put on through the chapter, but they are still working on implementing social and environmental initiatives within the been realized through the school’s administration and Board of Trustees, who are quite interested in learning how the Mon- terey Institute can become a green campus and integrate sus- curriculum and office spaces. However, recent momentum has tainable practices into the core values of the Institute. Reasons To aTTend to sum it up T he Monterey Institute is a small school which affords numerous opportunities for students to make an impact in areas they are passionate about. If a student wants to The Fisher school at Miis would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an exist- ing base of social/environmental impact activities with help move the Institute into a new era of sustainability, the opportunity for significant growth. Monterey Institute is the place for them. There are many movements underway at this time to establish a base for sus- tainability. Because of the small size, individuals can make Along the same lines, specializations can be created rather lasting impressions and effect change in extraordinary ways. easily within the program to find each student’s niche. 460 Pierce Street, Monterey, California 93940, USA • Phone: + 1 831 647 6586 • E-mail: fgsib@miis.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 
  • 67. new yoRk unIVeRsITy SteRN SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 800 [stern’s] social entrepreneurship resources are very impressive, including the classes 12 % of stern students are net impact members (e.g. the student-run social Venture Fund) ” 30% of those members are “very active” and extracurricular opportunities (e.g. the 20% are “somewhat active” Business Plan Competition). This chapter in three words: passionate, dynamic, Inspiring chapter leaders: liz Greenbaum (liz.greenbaum@stern.nyu.edu) and Mel Ochoa (mel.ochoa@stern.nyu.edu) n = 15 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 27% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 27% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. S tern currently offers a breadth of academic opportunities in social enterprise. The majority of these opportunities are offered through electives rather than through the core how much to integrate social and environmental themes into the coursework. Most professors are aware of the growing interest in social enterprise, so an increasing focus curriculum. Some of these electives include corporate is evident in classes. Certainly professors doing research on branding and social responsibility, social venture capital, and these topics include them in their lectures. Additionally, the social venture fund practicum, one of the school’s most students have the flexibility to incorporate these themes unique courses. “The Fund,” as the practicum is called, serves into their papers and projects. Stern students can also cross as a catalyst for social change by supporting organizations register at Wagner, the NYU School of Public Policy, which that are committed to improving the social and economic has many well-known leaders in the social enterprise field. position of underserved communities in New York City. Despite the variety of resources available to students, there Throughout the course, NYU graduate students serve as high- is currently no formal “social enterprise” program. Most of engagement grantmakers, providing both financial grants the information synthesis and distribution is provided by the and ongoing organizational assistance to the grantees. The student-led Social Enterprise Association. However, a social Fund has raised and granted $250,000 since its inception in enterprise specialization is in the works. The program will 2005. formalize and integrate the myriad social and environmental In the core curriculum, professors have discretion about opportunities at Stern. 6 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 68. NeW YoRk uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 33% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 33% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. S tern provides a number of opportunities through extracurricular activities, the most popular of which are the Social Enterprise Association (SEA) and the Stern Consulting of Kraft Foods, who discussed marketing to “the bottom of the pyramid,” and a presentation by Wal-Mart’s vice president of corporate strategy and sustainability. The SEA leadership Corps. board is already collaborating with the administration and Students wishing to make a social impact through business other Stern clubs to make SEA even more valuable and relevant will definitely be interested in SEA, the home of the NYU Stern to Stern students. Net Impact Chapter. SEA’s mission is to serve as a resource Stern Consulting Corps is one of the dean’s strategic and conduit for students who desire to use their business skills initiatives. This unique program links graduate students seeking for social good in the for-profit, nonprofit, and public sectors. consulting experience with local nonprofit organizations for a Given the breadth of student interest, the organization focuses semester-long consulting-based internship. The students are on a wide variety of topics: corporate social responsibility, mentored by leading consulting firm managers and have the social entrepreneurship, economic development, microfinance, chance to work with prominent New York-based organizations, socially responsible investing, education, environmental such as the Clinton Foundation and Jazz at Lincoln Center. management, and nonprofits. The organization is young but Additionally, students take advantage of the Stern Incubator, growing and the Stern population is supportive and responsive a business plan competition with a $100,000 prize for the social to our growing presence within the school. We have had great track, the Reynolds Program in Social Entrepreneurship, the feedback on this year’s events, which have included a fundraising Berkley Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, and a new venture and awareness generating party, a speech by the vice president mentor program.” CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 33% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 90% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 33% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. T his is the first year NYU Stern has made a formal effort for students by frequently posting job opportunities on its to include discussion on careers with a social and website. These include well-publicized openings, such as those environmental focus in the on-campus recruiting program. through Net Impact and other organizations’ newsletters, The Office of Career Development dedicated a small team and those that come from members’ broad individual to finding related networks. job opportunities At this time, few and these became prominent alumni students seem to a part of weekly Anne Burkhardt - Ethics and Compliance, Starbucks be interested in Sarah Chiles - Director, Entrepreneurship Program, Berkley Center, NYU Stern School of Business newsletters sent Christine Looney (2001) - Program Manager, Ford Foundation pursuing a post- to all students. Sean Pfitzenmaier (2006) - Co-founder, Social Sauce MBA career in these Judy Sanford - Brand and CSR Strategist, Addison Earlier this year, areas, and there we also initiated a are fewer options relationship with presented than Commongood Careers. The organization presented to a group those available in the traditional “business school” areas. We of dedicated first and second-year students and included them are interested in seeing more opportunities and we plan to in its ongoing efforts. Additionally, SEA acts as a resource pursue these more actively in the coming years. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 7
  • 69. NeW YoRk uNIVeRSItY, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 33% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 47% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. W e have made great headway in this area over the past year, bringing our perspective to almost all areas of the administration. SEA’s leadership has actively participated in collaborating with several professors to develop a course on social entrepreneurship that focuses on New Orleans and culminates in a trip to the region. We have also worked closely recruiting at events, online, and through direct contact with with the school’s Office of Public Affairs to inform them of interested students. The percentage of applicants interested our programs and we have received positive press coverage in “social enterprise” and related areas is at an all time high both internally and within New York City. With the help of and the current population, too, has a growing interest in Student Activities, we are planning a Social Enterprise Trek the topic. The administration is responding to this interest! to a developing country to look at microfinance, fair trade, We are in final discussions with the vice dean of academic and environmental stewardship education. In general, “the affairs regarding a major social enterprise initiative, which administration is extremely open to allowing the students would include a specialization, a summer internship salary to steer the wheel and conceive new programs,” one student fund, and a “social impact project.” Additionally, we are writes. Reasons To aTTend 20% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 13% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. N YU Stern’s Net Impact Chapter has huge potential. Despite the school’s long-time expertise in finance, it has only just begun to focus on the intersection of traditional business topics increases students’ networking and educational opportunities exponentially on a daily basis. As students consider which business school to attend, they will likely consider two options: and social and environmental themes. This, of course, occurs those leading the way for programs focused on social enterprise at the same time that the for-profit sector is recognizing their and those just beginning on the path. NYU Stern is one of the interdependency as well. This benefits our efforts greatly. NYU latter. This means that students have the incredible opportunity Stern’s program has a number of critical strengths, which will to impact the program and the flexibility to shape their graduate allow Net Impact-related topics to become a more integral part educational experience however they wish. It is perfectly suited of the formal program over the next few years. SEA’s leadership for passionate, inventive, self-driven leaders and we look forward is by far the most dedicated team within the school. Not only is to attracting many more in the next few years. the team committed to social enterprise generally, but it is also focused on cementing it as part of the school. Each member is a to sum it up champion for the themes publicly through his or her involvement in academics and extracurricular activities. The school also has The stern school would be most fitting for an incredibly supportive administration. As student interest someone interested in building upon an existing grows, the deans continue to prove their support, as discussed base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. above. Finally, the school has the distinct advantage of being located in New York, a critical hub for the field. The location Henry Kaufman Management Center, 44 West Fourth Street, New York, New York, 10012, USA • Phone: +1 212 998 0100 E-mail: sternmba@stern.nyu.edu 8 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 70. noRTH CaRolIna sTaTe unIVeRsITy coLLeGe oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 75 nC state’s MBa program focuses on 20% of nCsu students are net impact members two areas that are key to...a sustain- 30% of those members are “very active” able economy: entrepreneurship and ” supply Chain Management. students 50% are “somewhat active” are encouraged to look holistically at sustainability from the ground up This chapter in three words: and the inside out. on the rise chapter leaders: sheldon Gay (ncstatenetimpact@gmail.com) and David Bunge (dmbunge@ncsu.edu) CuRRICulum CuRRICulum related in the curriculum. The closest we have are the discussions on ethics. We don’t have anything “Net Impact” sTudenT aCTIVITIes O ur local Net Impact chapter was founded in the fall of 2005 by Gary Bernstein and Jacob Traverse, who both share a passion for different areas of sustainable and respon- theme. A link to the podcast of this event can be found on our chapter website at http://www.mbasa.org/netimpact. We don’t have a formal strategic plan right now. We have sible business. We have since grown to 15 members. The linked with businesses in the area such as the NC Solar Cen- chapter serves to complement our MBA education by orga- ter, Advanced Energy, Cherokee Investors, and more. We are nizing tours of local sustainable companies, hosting speakers thinking of working something into orientation that will and employers, and sharing information that our members show students how important social and environmental is- have learned. sues are to business, and that it’s not just for grassroots orga- This past semester we had the first student-organized con- nizations anymore. In general, people here don’t want to be ference within the MBA program, and sustainability was the involved with Net Impact unless it will get them a job. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T here are limited options available but we have had businesses such as Arborgen visit our campus. Most opportunities are things one has to find on his/her own. Our program is new so we have not built much of a reputation yet. Due to pressure from our members, the career resources department has provided access to a few sites with nonprofit job listings. We will also be looking to utilize www.idealist.org more. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he administration provided some support for our conference this term. We are working with them to get them more involved. We are making sure that we provide events that are of interest to all types of Net Impact members (environmental, social, and economic). Reasons To aTTend to sum it up to sum it up O ur chapter’s strengths surround our program’s focus on technology. We feel as though we will have both the fu- ture business problem-solvers and the future tech-company nC state is most fitting for someone interested in laying the foundation for social/environmental awareness at leaders who will use their knowledge to change the corporate the program. landscape. Campus Box 8114, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8114, USA • Phone: + 1 919 515 5584 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 9
  • 71. noRTHwesTeRn unIVeRsITy keLLoGG SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe Full-time students: 1,200 33% of northwestern students are net impact members 18% of those members are “very active” “ i found the people at Kellogg to be amazing; they are passionate about the issues i am interested in, while also being some of the ” nicest, most intelligent business school 38% are “somewhat active” students out there! This chapter in three words: engaged, collaborative, Far-reaching chapter leader: nicole Barry Dorn (nbarry2008@kellogg.northwestern.edu) n = 56 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 41% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 23% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T hrough the creation of the Social Enterprise at Kellogg (SEEK) program in 2005, Kellogg provides students interested in applying their business skills to social/ study component. One of the highlights of the SEEK program is Kellogg’s Board Fellows program, which brings together students with environmental issues with an academically rigorous, globally professional interests in the nonprofit and private sectors. relevant curriculum. The Social Impact Club (as Kellogg’s This program combines two courses in board governance Net Impact chapter is known) and a multidisciplinary group with a year-long practical experience as a non-voting board of faculty and administrators worked together to create member of a Chicago-area nonprofit. During the first year, SEEK, which combines into one academic program Kellogg’s students explore aspects of good board governance through previous offerings for students interested in the social lectures, guest speakers, case readings, and simulations. The sector, the Public/Nonprofit Management and Business and second year consists of both small and large group sessions its Social Environment (BASE) majors. through which students share experiences from their current SEEK is affiliated with Kellogg’s Center for Nonprofit board service and study different aspects of board governance, Management and the Ford Center for Global Citizenship, and such as fundraising and personnel selection. Approximately draws on faculty from multiple disciplines, including those 45 students participate in this popular program each year. with interests in social enterprise, public policy, and non- The academic committee of the Social Impact Club works profit management. Students have access to thought leaders with the SEEK Department, through the student-faculty in these areas, including the Director of SEEK Timothy SEEK Advisory Board, to consistently evaluate and adjust Feddersen, and affiliated faculty such as Daniel Diermeier. the program so that it remains aligned with student interests The SEEK curriculum provides students with the skills to and relevant issues at the forefront of social/environmental lead successfully in a variety of roles and across a variety of themes in business. For example, in 2006 a new course industries in the for-profit, nonprofit, and public sectors. was introduced: Microfinance and the Role of Financial The program encompasses both a regular SEEK major and a Institutions in Development. In addition, our club focuses on SEEK major with a nonprofit specialization. The curriculum creating partnerships with professors within the traditional includes courses in values-based leadership, social departments (i.e., Marketing and Strategy) to incorporate entrepreneurship, public economics, nonprofit leadership, social/environmental topics across the curriculum. Finally, and socially responsible business. In addition, SEEK 440A- Kellogg also offers dual-degree programs with Northwestern’s Values and Crisis Decision-Making, is part of Kellogg’s core School of Law and Feinberg School of Medicine. curriculum. The SEEK program also includes an independent 60 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 72. NoRthWeSteRN uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most ac- tive clubs at the program. 50% of respondents say the students at their program are en- thusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 36% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Social Impact Club is the leading club at Kellogg that inspires and supports student interest in using business skills for social and environmental good in any industry. The Global Health Initiative (GHI), which works to develop innovative solutions to global health concerns, gives students the chance to develop, market, and implement health During the academic year, the club brings to campus over a products in developing countries to better the lifestyles of dozen speakers who are leaders in these sectors, and organizes those living with HIV/AIDS. Through GHI, Kellogg students a faculty case debate around a specific social/environmental work closely with Northwestern engineering students in theme. In addition, the club operates several career-related the development of these products. Furthermore, Kellogg programs for students pursuing internships and full-time offers students the chance to provide pro-bono marketing or opportunities in nonprofit and public management, and in strategy consulting to local nonprofit organizations through for-profit areas such as corporate social responsibility. The the Neighborhood Business Initiative. Business With A Heart club financially supports member attendance at the annual organizes numerous volunteer opportunities for students Net Impact conference, and in 2006, Kellogg hosted the Net throughout the year, and through KelloggCorps, small teams Impact conference. Our club also administers the Gap Inc. of graduates go on four- to six-week long consulting projects CSR Scholars Program. This unique fellowship, supported with nonprofit organizations in developing countries by the Gap Foundation, supports one Kellogg student each worldwide. year who has demonstrated a commitment to the field of Finally, the Social Impact Club organizes the annual corporate social responsibility in their professional and “Innovating Social Change” Conference. The conference educational pursuits. Finally, the club regularly plans social theme for 2007 is Awareness to Action: Empowering events to promote networking between club members. Socially Responsible Leaders. Through a series of expert The Social Impact Club collaborates with numerous other panels, keynote speakers, and networking opportunities, clubs on campus to provide Kellogg students with multiple this conference will examine how leaders in the private, ways to explore social/environmental themes. The Board public, and nonprofit sectors are working to integrate social Fellows Program prepares Kellogg students to be civic leaders responsibility into their businesses and organizations by training them to be effective nonprofit board members. through their actions and strategic decisions. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 45% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 84% found jobs that uti- lize their values and skills; 46% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni T hrough both the Social Impact Club and Kel- logg’s Career Management Center (CMC), there are several ways that Kellogg supports students in- Darryl Cobb (2000) – Chief Learning Officer, KIPP Foundation Andrew Youn (2006) – Founder, One Acre Fund John Wood (1989) – Founder and CEO, Room to Read Sheryl O’Laughlin (1994) –CEO, Clif Bar, Inc. terested in working on social/environmental issues Janet Froetscher (1983) – President and CEO, United Way of Metropolitan Chicago in the nonprofit, public, and for-profit sectors. First, the CMC supports and assists students with non- profit sectors by paying a percentage of student loan debt traditional and off-campus job searches; approximately 50% for students working in low-salaried positions within these of first-year students get their internships from off-campus sectors. Kellogg also offers the Beacon Capital Fellows Pro- sources. In addition, Kellogg provides a limited number of gram, a highly-competitive one-year fellowship for graduat- summer internship stipends to students working in the non- ing Kellogg students working on outstanding projects in se- profit and public sectors, and the Loan Assistance Program lected nonprofit and public organizations. Finally, Kellogg’s (LAP) helps graduates enter careers in the public and non- Levy Institute for Entrepreneurial Practice provides support Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 61
  • 73. NoRthWeSteRN uNIVeRSItY, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued to students interested in social entrepreneurship. sectors. Most of the organizations are from the Chicago area; The Social Impact Club recently created a club co-chair however, there are always a few from other parts of the coun- position in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) to work try. Additionally, our club organizes a career trek each year to with the CMC on providing students with increased access to cities and companies of interest to the students. In the past, career opportunities in CSR and related roles in the private these treks have gone to San Francisco and Washington, DC sector. In addition, the Social Impact Club hosts a career fair to meet with both nonprofit and for-profit organizations. Fi- each year to provide students with networking opportuni- nally, each year the Social Impact Club assists students with ties with organizations in the nonprofit, public, and private developing their resumes for non-traditional job searches. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 32% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 41% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration at Kellogg fully supports the Social Impact Club. This commitment can be seen in the cre- ation of the SEEK program and in the significant resources focused on social/environmental themes while at Kellogg. The admissions office is also very interested in hearing how applicants have been involved in the social/environmental provided to the Social Impact Club. The club is funded by areas through their work and/or volunteer experience. As a the Kellogg Student Association, the Ford Center for Global result, “the student body is incredibly active and involved in Citizenship, and the Center for Nonprofit Management. Like and supportive of social and environmental issues,” writes any other club at Kellogg, the Social Impact Club also has ac- one student, adding that “I was most impressed by the num- cess to all of Kellogg’s facilities. ber of Kellogg students who become involved with nonprof- The Kellogg community highly values students who are its, governmental, and mission-based organizations for their interested in applying their business skills to effect positive internship, full-time employment, or board service.” social change, and encourages students to engage in a project Reasons To aTTend 48% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 14% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. K ellogg’s strength draws from the combination of its Social Impact Club and SEEK program, which together provide Kellogg students with numerous opportunities to apply business The Social Impact Club works closely with the administration, faculty, and with other students to integrate social/environmen- tal themes into the overall Kellogg experience, and frequently skills to social and environmental themes. The SEEK program is collaborates with other clubs on campus to co-host events. The continuously evolving and growing, with new courses added each students at Kellogg have a wide-range of professional back- year that reflect students’ interests. At the same time, the Social grounds and interests – from social entrepreneurship to CSR. Impact Club (one of the most active clubs on campus) plans nu- Those with non-business backgrounds are “welcomed, respected merous activities to enhance the classroom experience, provide and valued,” writes one student who “came from a career in in- students with a community of like-minded peers, and connect ternational nonprofit work” and found that his experience “has students with career opportunities in the public, nonprofit, and been highly valued” by fellow students who were “truly…inter- private sectors. Kellogg students have significant opportunities ested and respectful of my experiences and opinions.” The So- for leadership, and are very active and engaged in shaping both cial Impact Club works to support these diverse interests, and, extracurricular offerings and the curriculum. As one student in conjunction with other clubs on campus, provides students writes, “right now, there is a solid group of students committed with numerous ways to engage in socially responsible business. to keeping the changes initiated over the past few years moving.” Whether it is serving on a nonprofit board through the Kellogg 62 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 74. NoRthWeSteRN uNIVeRSItY, continued Reasons To aTTend, continued Board Fellows program, volunteering as a tutor in a local school to sum it up through Business With a Heart, consulting to a local nonprofit through the Neighborhood Business Initiative, hearing the CEO The Kellogg school would be most fitting for someone of a microfinance organization speak at the Social Impact Speak- interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for er Series, or working on an education business plan in the Educa- significant growth. tion Industry class, there is something for everyone interested in social/environmental themes at Kellogg. Donald P. Jacobs Center, 2001 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208-2001, USA • Phone: +1 847 491 3308 • Email: MBAadmissions@kellogg.northwestern.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 63
  • 75. PennsylVanIa sTaTe unIVeRsITy SmeAL coLLeGe oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 150 This is a well-rounded program; you’ll gain 31% of smeal students are net impact members exposure to a wide variety of business ” 30% of those members are “very active” functions while truly developing personally and professionally. 50% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: Respected, Growing, energetic chapter leader: Kirsten Grenoble (kgrenoble@psu.edu) CuRRICulum A t Penn State, Penn State Net Impact (PSNI) is working with the MBA faculty to strengthen the presence of social and environmental themes in both the core curriculum and the form of a corporate social responsibility course in the core curriculum as well as a closed-loop supply chain elective. One of the great things about Penn State is the breadth of learning the electives. In its short three years of existence, PSNI has opportunities available to all students. “The program is small been able to establish itself as an influential group within the enough that you can mold it … to get out of it what you are program. We have helped to shape an elective entitled “Busi- looking for,” writes one student. Specifically, students can take ness and the Environment” which educates MBAs (nineteen sustainability courses through both the School of Engineering are enrolled this year) about the interaction between our busi- and the School of Architecture. nesses and their physical environment. In addition to this “This is a well rounded program,” adds another student. course, Penn State’s faculty members support the expansion “You’ll gain exposure to a wide variety of business functions of social and environmental themes, which will likely come in while truly developing personally and professionally.” sTudenT aCTIVITIes sTudenT aCTIVITIes I n 2006-2007 (PSNI’s third year of existence), our chapter had 46 members out of a student body of 150, which makes it the largest student club in the MBA program. PSNI offers bers to participate in yearly projects organized by PSNI and to volunteer in community improvement activities. In the past, PSNI has participated in the LEEDS Case Competition, worked its members opportunities to learn, participate, and enhance. with a local nonprofit to establish a marketing strategy, and The “learn” part of this vision is accomplished by bringing volunteered with the local Habitat for Humanity chapter. In speakers to campus, working with the administration to im- addition to our activities, PSNI helps to develop its members’ prove course offerings, and helping our members get to the careers by connecting current students with PSNI alumni and conferences they want to attend. PSNI encourages its mem- by helping them attend career expos. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI P enn State MBAs enjoy career development through three terested in working for a certain company, there is an alum at major avenues: on-campus interviewing, career treks, that company willing to do whatever he or she can to help. If and alumni interaction. The MBA career development cen- there is an industry that a student is interested in, there is an ter does an excellent job of bringing companies to campus. alum with contacts in that industry. If there is a nonprofit The companies that visit vary greatly in size, industry, and that a student wants to connect with, there is probably an location. Since Penn State is not in a major city, career treks alum that works there or knows someone that does. to New York City, Philadelphia, and Washington DC are also organized. Finally, and by far the prominent alumni most important aspect of the Penn State experi- Ian Joseph (2007) - Banking Officer, M&T Bank Corp. Non-Profit Lending ence is the bond with alumni that becomes clear Derek Six (2006) - Controller, Environmental Credit Corp. Stephanie Martz (2006) - Chief of Party, Afghanistan, Futures Group, a Constella Company when developing one’s career. Once a Nittany Patricia McGoldrick Sheehan (2005) - Marketing Manager, Dupont Lion, always a Nittany Lion. If a student is in- Edward Robinson (1995) - Vistage Chair, Groups 130 & 663, Capacity Building Solutions Inc. 6 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 76. peNNSYLVANIA StAte uNIVeRSItY, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT I t is a great time to be a Penn State MBA interested in social and environmental themes in our program. There is tremendous support from our faculty, especially the eight the administration the demand–both from incoming students as well as potential employers–for social and environmental themes in the classroom. The future at Penn State is bright faculty members who make up the PSNI Faculty Advisory for students interested in CSR. The small size of our program, Board. These eight outstanding faculty members work combined with the interests of our faculty members, enable directly with PSNI to assist in any efforts we care to take on. us to stay flexible and incorporate changes to the program Specifically, they have supported our efforts to impress upon quickly. Reasons To aTTend W ithout communication skills, how are you going to get your great ideas across? At Penn State, the MBAs pride themselves on their communication skills and leader- more CSR themes is apparent and PSNI has helped and will continue to help develop this aspect of an already outstand- ing MBA experience. ship potential. The core classes are integrated in the first year with a communications course that gives the students the opportunity to learn and practice written and oral com- munication. Often, second-year students return from their to sum it up summer internships and comment on the effectiveness of Pennsylvania state university would be most their presentation skills, especially when compared with fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities their internship counterparts from other schools. Currently, with opportunity for significant growth. Penn State provides applicants interested in social and envi- ronmental themes with ample opportunities. The desire for 220 Business Building, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802, USA • Phone: +1 814 863 0474 • E-mail: smealmba@psu.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 6
  • 77. PResIdIo sCHool of managemenT aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 190 Presidio’s range of diversity with regard to interests, backgrounds, and goals 100% of Presidio students are net impact members makes for a very rich environment while 5% of those members are “very active” the shared commitment to sustainability ” 10% are “somewhat active” makes for a very friendly, open, and productive environment. This chapter in three words: determined, Resourceful, Focused chapter leaders: Brie Johnson (bjohnson@presidiomba.org) n = 73 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of of Corporate social Re- sponsibility, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 100% of re- spondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 97% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he MBA in Sustainable Management at Presidio School of Management is unique in that it engages students and faculty members alike in the process of integrating finance, operations, marketing, and strategic management) require a sustainability section. The economics classes delve into the sustainability implications of economic social and environmental values with the application of systems. Courses on sustainable business and management practical business skills. As one student puts it, “You can’t provide essential established and emerging frameworks opt out of social/environmental impact themes without and tools to guide and shape businesses. Additionally, the opting out of the school.” The school’s academic calendar communications, leadership, and ethics classes contain schedule also sets it apart: classes meet once a month over readings and assignments on how to effectively build values- an intensive four-day weekend, thus facilitating working driven organizations and be a values-based leader. In their professionals. final semester students take a course entitled “Integrative The curriculum is based on four strands: numbers, people, Capstone Venture Plan,” in which they plan, start, or build markets, and sustainability. The concepts of sustainable an ethical, sustainable, and profitable venture for a new or management are integrated into all courses. One student existing business, NGO, or governmental organization. comments that “The shared commitment to sustainability Students are encouraged to incorporate social and makes for a very friendly, open, and productive environment.” environmental issues into their work through faculty- Sustainable management is defined as the ability to direct facilitated Project-Oriented Learning (POL) projects where the course of a company, community, or country in ways that they engage and work with existing or emerging sustainable restore and enhance all forms of capital– human, natural, businesses, or businesses that want to further integrate and financial–to generate stakeholder value and contribute sustainability into their business model. Commenting on to the well-being of current and future generations. this collaborative learning model, one student notes that In all assignments, students are challenged to consider the “you have to be mature to be able to take advantage of the social and environmental impact of their work. For example, program,” but that “the people who are successful set the the final projects for a number of classes (e.g. accounting, standards extremely high for the rest of the school.” 66 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 78. pReSIdIo SchooL oF mANAGemeNt, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 91% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 88% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. P residio students are focused on making a positive social and/or environmental impact through their work; thus, most student activities cluster around themes relating to • Improve the ability of Presidio students to be agents of sustainability-change through activities that provide skills development, support, and education, provide opportuni- sustainable business. ties for Presidio students to learn from, and interact with, The school, now in its fourth year, has had a Net Impact both leaders in sustainable business and aspiring leaders chapter since day one. Dev Novack, in the first Presidio grad- (student and professional members from other Net Impact uating class, started the Presidio chapter, and has since gone chapters, for example) on to lead the Northern California Professionals Group of • Supplement Presidio’s curriculum and career develop- Net Impact. ment activities by assisting with or organizing additional In spring 2007, the school held its inaugural Presidio Net educational and career development opportunities for Pre- Impact Firm Night, which was a tremendous success. More sidio students. than one-hundred Presidio MBA students and grads along The chapter is linked to all the other clubs at Presidio, in- with other MBAs across the San Francisco Bay Area came to cluding the Green Building Club, International Development network with twenty-one organizations. Firms included Wil- Club, the Sustainable Food Club, and the Profit Club. liams-Sonoma, Patagonia, McKesson, 3 Phases Energy, and Social and environmental issues are integrated into stu- Free Range Studios. Sustainability consultancies included dent orientation and school life through postings and dis- WSP Environmental, Innovest Strategic Value Advisors, and cussions on the school’s intranet, and through the organic, Act Now Productions. Nonprofit organizations and govern- zero-waste community dinners that are served by the school ment agencies included TransFair USA, Build It Green, and each month. the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Presidio Net Although all students are automatically enrolled in Net Impact chapter has also organized workshops on resume Impact, most students aren’t actively involved in our chap- writing, interviewing, and salary negotiation. ter because they feel that Presidio is sufficiently focused on The chapter developed its own Mission Statement, which sustainable business. Net Impact at Presidio is somewhat guides our activities. The Presidio Net Impact Chapter’s mis- redundant. That is why the Presidio Net Impact chapter has sion is to: focused on career development and networking, areas where • Leverage Net Impact and its network to serve the needs Presidio lacks resources but where Net Impact can help. of Presidio students CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 9% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 67% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 23% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni P residio excels in preparing students to be compelling sustainable business entrepreneurs and/or candidates for jobs with a social or Corina Beczner (2006) - Founder, VibrantEvents.net Dedee Delongpré (2005) - Director of the Office of Sustainability, University of Florida Taja di Leonardi (2005) - Owner and Founder, EcoHome Improvement Jason Smith (2006) - Executive Director, DriveNeutral environmental focus. However, its career services Holly Coleman (2006) – Managing Director, Highwater Research (Paul Hawken) are only beginning to be formally developed. Presidio recently conducted a survey on the type of career Impact Firm Night. The school also established a program services most in demand by students, and is budgeting to on Project-Oriented Learning (POL) to pair students with accommodate these demands in the next school year. In emerging and existing companies for consulting projects 2007, it devoted faculty, staff, and funding to the Presidio Net that serve as school assignments, which also helps students Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 67
  • 79. pReSIdIo SchooL oF mANAGemeNt, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued gain experience in, and exposure to, potential careers. Other year. Nonprofit internship funding and/or loan forgiveness career resources available include an online jobs database, programs have not yet been developed but are under guest speakers in sustainable business, and very accessible consideration for the future. faculty who willingly provide references, contacts, and career Among socially responsible businesses and nonprofits, advice. Presidio has a reputation for experienced professionals with While the school has not yet offered career treks, the diverse backgrounds and a focus on achieving triple-bottom- Net Impact chapter is planning on organizing some next line results. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 99% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 86% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. P residio’s administration contributes staff, resources, and funding to our Net Impact chapter for the Presidio Net Impact Firm Night and other activities. Presidio’s admissions interests to apply, and considers their desire and ability to contribute to sustainable business. The program, as a whole, is closely aligned with Net Impact values. office encourages applicants with social and environmental Reasons To aTTend 93% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 82% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. P residio’s main strength is that it integrates sustainability principles throughout its entire curriculum. Students are challenged to make the business case for sustainability and to strength also lies in its faculty members who are experienced professionals in sustainable management and who have paved the way for future leaders. develop new metrics and models of sustainable business. The school prepares students to be values-based leaders of sustainable organizations. Students get hands-on learning through the Project-Oriented Learning model wherein they have the chance to sum it up to apply the concepts they are learning in class to real world situations. With the constantly evolving field of sustainability, The Presidio school would be most fitting for it is particularly important to test the cutting edge theories and someone interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ practices learned about in the classroom. Through such projects, environmental issues. students learn how to overcome resistance to sustainability initiatives and develop strategies to implement them. Presidio’s Presidio Building 36, P.O. Box 29502, San Francisco, California 94129, USA • +1 415 561 6555 • E-mail: info@presidiomba.org 68 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 80. PuRdue unIVeRsITy kRANNeRt SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 400 10% of Purdue students are net impact members There’s a great potential to participate 25% of those members are “very active” as net impact members will get support ” from the faculty and administration. 50% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: burgeoning, hopeful, Active chapter leaders: Jess O’leary (jcoleary@purdue.edu) n = 11 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 9% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum. O ne area of development has been the CSR course. Net Impact Purdue conducted a survey of current students to assess interest in such an offering. After discovering sig- This is an area of opportunity, writes one student: “While [this initiative is] still in its infancy [Net Impact members] can help to grow the program, make it much stronger and nificant student interest, the club has been working on get- more important to the curriculum.” ting a class in the schedule that would address this area. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 9% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. enthusiastic. N et Impact Purdue is still developing its direction and focus. We have concentrated on a few key areas this past year: case competitions and educational events, social of students pursued an independent study on the topic of microfinance. Our social events centered on communication and exploring events, community events, and fundraising. student interests. We hosted coffee hours, movie nights, and For case competitions and educational events, the club social hours. These events gave students the opportunity participated in three key case competitions—Case and Race, to discuss current CSR and ethics topics, as well as network the Leeds Ethics Case Competition, and the Thunderbird with fellow students and faculty and staff members. Innovation Challenge. We also had a presence at the national Our community events encompassed an array of activities. conference as well as at the Purdue University Sustainable A number of students were active with the campus greening Supply Chain Conference. Furthermore, we brought in committee and a few members volunteered in pro-bono outside speakers and local experts for roundtable discussions activities for local businesses. These opportunities gave on microfinance and CSR measurements. Lastly, a group students a chance to prove themselves outside of the Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 69
  • 81. puRdue uNIVeRSItY, continued AdmINIStRAtIVe SuppoRt, continued classroom and to participate in the community. Additionally, events, social activities, and whatnot, the club had to raise we planned a series of Earth Week events that encouraged some funds. We engaged local businesses in mutually beneficial campus-wide participation. events to raise over $1,200 in the spring semester. Lastly, and in order to pay for the conferences, educational CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 18% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 67% found internships that utilize their values and skills admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he faculty and staff at Krannert and Purdue are becom- ing more aware of Net Impact’s influence on admissions and career paths. During our Earth Week activities, several potentially introducing a stand-alone Corporate Responsibil- ity class are possibilities for increasing awareness that are on the table. The Master’s Office has also expressed an interest prominent faculty and staff members participated in the in co-sponsoring future on-campus CSR speakers. “There’s Earth Week Trivia Challenge, which included a “Jeopardy- a great potential to participate, as Net Impact members will style” competition during the popular business school coffee get support from the faculty and administration,” writes one hour. Including CSR-related themes into the coursework and student. Reasons To aTTend 9% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 9% of respondents strongly agree their program ad- equately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. N et Impact Purdue has grown significantly since its 2006 inaugural year. Membership has exceeded forty stu- dents with several attending CSR-related case competitions, tour in Chicago, Earth Week events, networking and fund- raising events, and a handful of other activities. Net Impact Purdue has only begun. With a strong leader- conferences, lectures, and a variety of other activities spon- ship team already in place for next year, Net Impact Purdue sored by the club. will grow not only in membership, but also in activities. The This has been a great year for case competitions. For the new team is already working on implementing CSR-related second year in a row, our Net Impact Race and Case Team courses at Krannert, finding speakers for next year, and ini- placed in the top four of the case competition. We also had tiating campus-wide greening activities. two teams selected to compete in the Net Impact/Leeds School of Business case competition and one of those teams made it to the top five. Finally, a team made it to the top to sum it up ten in the Thunderbird Sustainable Innovation Submit which Purdue would be most fitting for someone interested drew eight-eight teams from forty-five countries. in building upon an existing base of social/ This year was not just about case competitions. We had environmental impact activities with opportunity for guest speakers, campus greening activities, pro-bono con- significant growth. sulting, CSR-related independent studies, a green building 403 W. State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2056, USA • Phone: +1 765 494 0773 • E-mail: masters@krannert.purdue.edu 70 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 82. sCHool foR InTeRnaTIonal TRaInIng mASteR oF ScIeNce IN mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 220 18% of siT students are net impact members There is no better place to build a skill set 50% of those members are “very active” and be prepared for the ever changing ” 30% are “somewhat active” world that will dictate our careers. This chapter in three words: motivated, passionate, Innovative chapter leaders: audra Grady (audra.grady@mail.sit.edu) and Talia levin (Talia.levin@mail.sit.edu) n = 10 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, nonprofit management, and Community development. 70% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 60% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. F ostering a worldwide network of individuals committed to social responsibility is one of the School for International Training’s chief objectives, and as such, the institution bases causes of environmental and global health issues. Faculty members at SIT are diverse in their fields of expertise, their places of origin, and their work experience. its curriculum entirely on social, environmental, and fiscally Through its rigorous hiring process, SIT ensures that its responsible themes. The School for International Training instructors hold similar values to the institution and are (SIT) believes that promoting intercultural understanding equally as committed to promoting cultural understanding through education is one of the key paths to achieving its and global responsibility. As a result, the majority of the goals of positive social change. For this reason, SIT recruits course assignments are related to social themes, and students responsible leaders from all over the world to participate in its are usually given the option of incorporating environmental programs. Each SIT student and faculty member brings rich themes. In fact, environmental themes have become more experience and background in social issues to the campus, prevalent both on campus and in the curriculum in recent adding invaluable depth to the curriculum and learning years, which can partially be attributed to the SIT Net environment. One student puts it this way: “This is a school Impact Chapter’s Campus Greening Initiative. In addition, and a program that is different from MBA and/or green students at SIT are always developing ways to incorporate MBA programs. It adds to the mix intercultural relations, social and environmental topics into their learning through responsibilities, theory in nonprofit organizational behavior, extracurricular activities, an integral part of one’s education accountability, and theory of social change.” at SIT. In SIT’s required core courses, social and environmental Weaving cross-disciplinary courses into the management themes are woven into every class session. Because teaching degree is an important part of an SIT education. MSM students to be culturally sensitive and socially responsible is students interested in courses outside of the MSM program a key component of SIT’s mission, students are consistently can choose to fill their elective credits with courses from encouraged to critically think about global issues and how to other degree areas such as sustainable development, conflict approach them appropriately and effectively. “The academic transformation, international education, social justice, process at SIT focuses not only on books and papers but also and intercultural relations. Through this flexibility and offers students the time and space to develop into strong program collaboration, students are able to develop a deeper global citizens,” writes a student. In elective courses, such understanding of key social issues while enhancing their as Issues in Sustainable Development, students explore root intercultural communication skills. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 71
  • 83. SchooL FoR INteRNAtIoNAL tRAINING, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 80% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 50% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. S ince the on-campus phase of SIT’s graduate program is only nine months, student life on the Vermont campus is exciting, challenging, and filled with wonderful learning a number of social and environmental goals on campus. Our chapter chose to focus on three distinctive topics dur- ing the 2006-2007 academic school year: the environment, and growing opportunities both in and outside of the class- Darfur, and responsible business. Activities have included room. bringing over fifteen speakers to campus to speak on these Each year, the incoming graduate students are charged important issues, organizing a statewide race to raise aware- with creating their own extracurricular initiatives. In 1999, ness about the atrocities being committed in Darfur, and col- a group of students decided to found the SIT Net Impact lecting funds for an organization which is supporting women Chapter. Some of the chapters’ key achievements in the past social entrepreneurs in the region, and sponsoring dozens of have included the instatement of food composts, the replace- activities related to SIT’s Campus Greening Initiative and cli- ment of all coffee sold on campus with fair trade coffee, and mate change. Through our efforts, we have been successful the installation of lights with timers in every classroom. In in raising issues of concern on campus and bringing some of addition, each year, the SIT Net Impact chapter organizes a these important topics into the classroom and curriculum. “Race For A Reason,” a 5k/10k with proceeds benefiting a In addition, we have cultivated strong relationships with social cause. Beneficiary organizations in the past have in- several local community groups through the events we spon- cluded the American Cancer Society, the Spina Bifida Clinic: sor both on and off campus. Our efforts are far-reaching, Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth, and the ALS Association and thus most SIT community members have been directly of New England. or indirectly involved with the work of Net Impact this year. This year, SIT’s Net Impact Chapter set an ambitious Overall, SIT’s Net Impact Chapter is generally perceived to agenda, deciding that the club would need to be fully insti- be an asset to the institution; many consider it to be a won- tutionalized. We set out to create a set structure, gain the derful educational and experiential addition to the required institution’s support at the administration level, and achieve coursework and campus environment. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 50% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 25% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 40% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. T he School for International Training offers a vast network students for free, they are offered for the entirety of an al- of dedicated professionals worldwide as well as compre- um’s life for a small fee. The jobs that you can find through the hensive career resources for students and alumni; through PDRC are socially and/or environmentally focused, and range the Professional Resource and Development Center (PDRC), from internships with the UN to Executive Director positions students are given the opportunity for career development in business-oriented and/or international development orga- assistance through workshops, one-on-one consultations, nizations. networking, and job data banks. The PDRC of- fers the only two certified resume writers in the prominent alumni state of Vermont, an excellent support staff, Venkatesh Raghavendra (2007) - Director, Global Diaspora Initiative, Ashoka Debra B. Natenshon (2005) - CEO, The Center for What Works and career services that are highly sought after- Tamara Stein (2004) - CEO, Kusikuy Clothing Company - not to mention extremely expensive elsewhere. Donna Shepherd (1992) - Co-Founder/Co-Director, Creating Communities While these services are available to registered Mary Hensley (2004) - Founder and Project Developer, Eighth Wonder 72 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 84. SchooL FoR INteRNAtIoNAL tRAINING, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued SIT’s phenomenal reputation, combined with its impressive receiving an incredible education and an internationally rec- professional career services, provides its students and gradu- ognized institution’s stamp on your diploma, but you also ates with endless job opportunities in the fields of nonprofit will enter into an extensive and supportive network of SIT and for-profit management, social entrepreneurship, social graduates. This network can provide lifetime, career-enhanc- responsibility, and sustainable development management. ing opportunities and collaborations that you will not find With highly accomplished alums worldwide, you are not only elsewhere. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 0% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 0% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he SIT administration’s support for our Net Impact chap- ter has grown substantially this year. Through our various committees we have encouraged the administration and staff the forefront of social change and leading the way in environ- mental sustainability and innovation. Over the last year, the administration has taken steps to become more involved with Net Impact and the various through its strategic planning and reorganization of the Pro- initiatives that we have organized throughout the year. The gram for Intercultural Service, Leadership, and Management administration and the overall community at SIT values posi- (PIM) to continue transmitting its institutional values to fac- tive social change in society at large, which is echoed through- ulty members and students. During this exciting time at SIT, out the curriculum. The future priorities of the program will the administration has been extremely supportive of, and continue to be aligned with the values of Net Impact—as Net involved with, our Net Impact chapter. SIT is increasing sup- Impact continues to grow, so does SIT’s commitment to so- port for socially and environmentally responsible businesses, cial and environmental issues. SIT’s administration, faculty and has been successful in consistently incorporating these members, staff, and students enjoy a long history of being at values into the graduate curriculum. Reasons To aTTend 40% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 40% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. I f you are interested in pursuing a more just world through socially responsible business, the School for International Training offers a solid foundation in social issues combined strategic management, economics, and human resources, which is augmented by SIT’s impressive global intercultural experiences and experiential learning style. with management competencies. While you build a firm base in social theory, you can explore the past, present, and future of interconnected commerce and justice. With professional career services, a wealth of extracurricular activities, and to sum it up opportunities to expand knowledge, especially in the areas siT would be most fitting for someone interested of language and culture, students graduate SIT as intercul- in building upon an existing base of social/ tural managers and leaders in the fields of social enterprise environmental impact activities with opportunity for and corporate social responsibility. At SIT, students receive a significant growth. rich education in disciplines such as organizational behavior, Kipling Road, P.O. Box 676, Brattleboro, Vermont 05302-0676, USA • +1 802 258 3510 • E-mail: admissions@sit.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 73
  • 85. sImmons College SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 167 everyone at all levels at simmons 18% of simmons students are net impact members (administration, faculty, students) 60% of those members are “very active” ” is genuinely committed to socially 20% are “somewhat active” responsible ideals. This chapter in three words: passionate, dynamic, curious chapter leader: Mandy Osborne (mandy.osborne@simmons.edu) n = 28 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 61% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 64% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. B oth the concept and practice of principled leadership are deeply integrated into our MBA curriculum. First intro- duced during “Foundations,” our five-day orientation for new sion of the dual-degree program. Currently, there is one student in a MBA/Master of Social Work (MSW) program. Simmons also offers a post-MBA certificate program with MBA students, ethical decision-making and social impact the School of Health Studies. Relevant courses on princi- principles are woven into the full spectrum of core and elec- pled leadership are open to MBA students at these two other tive courses. In a recent survey addressing the percentage of Simmons College graduate schools, including those not spe- relevant ethical, environmental, and social impact content cifically enrolled in dual-degree programs. Finally, there is in our courses, faculty members reported that one-hundred a post-MBA certificate in entrepreneurship offered by the percent of core and ninety-four percent of elective courses School of Management which has been acknowledged as address topics related to corporate social responsibility. highly innovative by Fortune magazine, Entrepreneurship From accounting to finance to strategy, our general man- magazine and The Princeton Review. This program’s cur- agement curriculum offers numerous opportunities to ex- riculum also covers social entrepreneurship. plore issues including: the impact of investor incentives, the The research of faculty members affiliated with our inter- social impact of key economic concepts, differential account- nationally-recognized Center for Gender in Organizations ing standards, negotiating responsibility for environmental (CGO) ensures that our MBA teaching and curriculum are “externalities,” differential access to capital, managing di- at the cutting-edge of addressing both gender and diversity versity, and the changing nature and role of shareholders. dynamics in organizations. Publications from the CGO and “Leadership, Governance, and Accountability,” a required its affiliated faculty members continue to shape the field and capstone course, pulls all facets of principled leadership to- are widely cited and used by academics and practitioners gether – ethics, accountability to multiple stakeholders, and worldwide. responsibility for managing environmental and social im- Thirty-five percent of Simmons School of Management pact. full-time faculty members are engaged in research with a There is strong administrative support for future expan- CSR focus, directly informing our MBA curriculum. 7 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 86. SImmoNS coLLeGe, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 46% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 57% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. O ur chapter grew out of the Ethics Club which has been existence for approximately twenty years. In 2004- 05, the group officially aligned itself with Net Impact and Food laboratory, and Recycline. Other events include dis- cussions on our green/LEED- certified SOM building which is under construction, and a conversation on microfinance became the SOM Net Impact chapter. The chapter collabo- with Deb Drake, vice-president of ACCION International. rates with other groups such as the Women of Color Club The SOM provides financial support to students, alum- and the Scott Ross Center for Community Service. nae, and faculty members who attend conferences that This group offers a wide array of events to SOM students touch on these issues, including the national Net Impact and guests from the community. Among its many year- conference. This support also extends to guest speakers round activities is a panel discussion with CSR officers, or- and entrepreneurship practicum opportunities. In 2006, ganized by Simmons Net Impact. In 2005-06, we hosted more than half of our entrepreneurship certificate stu- representatives from BP, Eileen Fisher, HP, Whole Foods dents did a practicum with a company at which corporate Market, Bright Horizons, and Green Fuel Technologies. social responsibility is central to the business model. This year we will host executives from HP, the Sustainable CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 57% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 43% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 46% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. A s a business school located in Boston, home to some of companies recognized for their CSR initiatives with students the nation’s leading nonprofit institutions, Simmons is interested in this data. The Library staff is also very active in uniquely poised to meet the needs of its many students whose this regard and they assist students with targeted research post-MBA plans are to switch to, or advance in, careers in in these areas. the nonprofit sector. The Career Services Office (CSO) builds In addition, a portion of SOM Class Gift Funds have been recruiting relationships with the many nonprofit organiza- dedicated to defraying the cost of attending career-related tions and private companies that partner with the prominent alumni Sandra Guryan (1985) - Assistant Superintendent, Newton Public Schools school on CSR Morgan Herman (2006) - Executive Director, Institutional and Planned Giving, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center initiatives. CSO Gail Snowden (1978) - Vice President for Finance and Operations, The Boston Foundation also provides a Lora Neilsen (2004) - Deputy Commissioner of Administration, Finance, CFO, Mass. Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing powerful career connection to the extensive network of successful SOM alumnae, many of conferences for students interested in CSR-related confer- whom serve in independent sector organizations or compa- ences. nies recognized for their commitment to social and environ- At present, there is no loan forgiveness for graduates in the mental concerns. nonprofit sector, although scholarships and assistantships The CSO is currently compiling an overview of career op- are available to students who apply for social entrepreneur- tions and resources for students who are interested in CSR- ship practicum placements in the post-MBA Entrepreneur- related positions. At present, the CSO staff shares listings of ship Certificate Program. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 7
  • 87. SImmoNS coLLeGe, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 61% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 64% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he current and future priorities of the Simmons School of Management are strongly aligned with the values of Net Impact. This is most heavily embodied by: uled to open in early 2009, as a green building. We have committed to attaining LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Certification at the silver level, A) The administrative and financial support provided to which involves vigilant attention to energy and water con- students, alumnae, and faculty members who are inter- servation, the use of recycled materials, and aggressive ested in CSR-related conferences, events, research, and waste recycling. careers. The SOM Admissions Office values students with social B) The integration of these issues and values throughout and environmental interests. There is no preference in ad- the curriculum, and in faculty research. missions based on these interests, however. C) The decision to design our new SOM building, sched- Reasons To aTTend 50% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 64% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. O ur focus on principled leadership is at the center of our mission and academic enterprise. Simmons MBA students gain the skills and knowledge to build strong and enduring member of the Simmons community models the way for this kind of leadership, and everyone is passionate about helping business to do good and do well.” organizations that are successful by all traditional measures and that vigorously align sustainability, social responsibility, and profitability in their business strategy. MBA graduates leave to sum it up Simmons with a deep understanding of how principled leaders think and act, fostering equitable workplaces and adhering simmons would be most fitting for someone assiduously to ethical decision-making wherever they choose to interested in building upon an existing base of social/ lead. environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. “The mission of Simmons is to educate women for principled leadership,” one student writes, adding that “every 409 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA • +1 617 521 3800 • E-mail: som@simmons.edu 76 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 88. TufTs unIVeRsITy the FLetcheR SchooL aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 450 [Fletcher is] an especially good choice if you already have a background in tradi- 11% of Fletcher students are net impact members tional business/finance, and are looking to 60% of those members are “very active” get a more international, broad perspec- ” 30% are “somewhat active” tive on the role of business in international affairs and social issues. This chapter in three words: Innovative, Global, changemakers chapter leaders: Hai Huynh (hai.huynh@tufts.edu), Maia seaden (maia.seaden@tufts.edu), Moses Choi (moses.choi@tufts.edu), Richard Finke (richard.finke@tufts.edu) CuRRICulum T he Fletcher School is America’s oldest graduate school of international affairs. Its approach to business educa- tion reflects the dynamic nature of international business complete a final project or thesis, which allows them to de- velop a topic of interest that lies beyond the scope of any one particular course. Recent thesis topics include: “In Pursuit of and accordingly equips its students with a mix of manage- the Triple Bottom Line: Economic, Social, and Environmen- rial acuity and diplomatic sensibility, which allows them to tal Commitment at Clif Bar, Stonyfield Farm, and Starbucks,” adapt and be attuned to the complexities inherent in inter- “The Changing Face of Microfinance in India,” “High-Tech In- national financial management, business transactions, and novation in Emerging Markets: The Case of Mexico,” and “A development. A business-oriented Master of Arts in Law and Global/Local Approach to Conflict Resolution in the Mining Diplomacy (MALD) degree from Fletcher differs from more Sector: The Case of the Tintaya Dialogue Table.” traditional MBA programs in that it supplements the quanti- The flexibility and interdisciplinary nature of Fletcher’s tative hard skills in finance with a foundation in economics, curriculum allows students to explore issues that face busi- a regional expertise, or competence in the legal and policy nesses in an interconnected world, such as corporate gover- environments in which businesses operate. nance, financial and fiscal law, human rights, environmental With no set core curriculum, business-oriented MALD stu- sustainability, and rule-of-law. In addition, students can cus- dents can combine concentrations in International Business tomize and supplement their Fletcher education with classes Relations with topical matters such as Environmental Policy, at all other Tufts graduate schools, at Harvard’s graduate Development Economics, Trade and Commercial Policies, schools, and at a number of exchange programs. Moreover, or Law and Development. The result is a degree that caters students can also choose to pursue joint and dual-degree to non-traditional business paths such as community de- programs in law, business, nutrition, journalism, or medi- velopment, socially responsible investment, environmental cine, among others. sustainability, microfinance, or private equity in emerging Some notable faculty members include William Moomaw markets. (natural resources and alternative energy technologies), Adil The Masters in International Business (MIB) is a new pro- Najam (sustainable development and environmental negoti- gram beginning in fall 2008. The MIB differs from the MALD ations), Kim Wilson (microfinance), Eileen Babbitt (conflict in that students complete a core business curriculum similar resolution), Jeswald Salacuse (corporate governance), John to a standard MBA program including finance, marketing, Hammock (development), Peter Uvin (human rights), Lau- accounting, and strategy. Students then combine this core rent Jacque (international financial markets), Shirley Hunt- business foundation with studies in international affairs. er (accounting and NGO management). All students, regardless of degree program, are required to Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 77
  • 89. tuFtS uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes S tudent life at Fletcher is vibrant, dynamic, and rooted in a strong sense of community. Fletcher students are a di- verse group of highly-motivated and well-traveled individu- ing vulnerable populations and strengthening the founda- tions necessary to support sustainable growth. In addition, Fletcher Net Impact is implementing an undergraduate men- als with a passion for life and a taste for adventure. Accord- toring program and is planning to work with Fletcher’s Com- ingly, the organizations, activities, and publications available munity Action Group to address social problems on a local at Fletcher mirror students’ myriad interests and experi- level through community development and improvement. ences. The school boasts eight cultural-interest groups, em- In the spring of 2007, Fletcher Net Impact sponsored bodying the global expanse. Publications address such issues events including a conversation entitled “Innovators for the as international law, politics, economics, technology, diplo- Public” with Fletcher alumnus Bill Carter, who is a found- macy, southwest Asia, Islamic civilization, and development ing member of the International Board of Ashoka, and a studies. Fletcher students understand that it is impossible Q&A session with Andy Savitz, author of “The Triple Bottom to separate business from social and environmental devel- Line.” Net Impact-related speaker events sponsored by the opment and most arrive with extensive experience abroad. International Business Program included: Moreover, many have lived in the developing, emerging, and • Patrick Dolberg, CEO of Holcim Inc, on “Climate Change marginalized countries that they study and seek to assist. and Business Strategy” Fletcher Net Impact draws from the school’s many orga- • Sidney Taurel, CEO of Eli Lilly nizations and regularly co-sponsors and coordinates events • Nicolas Sullivan, the author of You Can Hear Me Now, pertaining to the intersection of business and development. along with Iqbal Quadir, the founder of GrameenPhone Other relevant organizations include: the Environment and • Langdon Greenhalgh, founder and CEO of the Global Sustainability Initiative, International Education Group, Emergency Group Human Rights Project, International Business Club, Inter- • A. Michael Spence, Nobel Prize Laureate national Communications Club, International Development • Naif Al-Mutuwa, founder and CEO of Teshkeel Media Club, International Migration Group, International Negotia- Group on “From Mecca to Metropolis: Creating Superheroes tion and Conflict Resolution Club, and the Microfinance and for the Islamic World. A Conversation with a Socially Minded Development Venture Capital Network. These clubs stress Entrepreneur.” safeguarding the environment, investing in people, protect- CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI F letcher’s Office of Career Services (OCS) provides a with employers who are doing social and environmental broad range of services and resources for students to impact work. The Fletcher alumni who work in these areas develop the knowledge and skills necessary for success in are very active in supporting the school and developing their targeted professional fields. One such resource is a networks that allow students to learn about career options group of more than thirty career field guides, which pro- and meet people working in those fields. vides students with information on types of jobs, associ- Fletcher realizes that many students work for organiza- ated classes at Fletcher, salary expectations, and additional tions that cannot pay their summer interns, so the school resources including websites with sector-specific informa- has set aside some funding to support students who have tion. A sampling of the guides available include: Corporate unpaid internships. The amounts vary from year to year de- Social Responsibility, Microfinance, Environmental Policy pending on the availability of funds and student demand, and Sustainable Energy, Nonprofit Management and Inter- but in most years, all students who apply get some fund- national Development. Students can also search an exten- ing. Graduates of the Fletcher School employed in public sive database of previous Fletcher student internships to service-oriented jobs can also apply to a loan assistance identify the types of work available through various organi- program. zations. Other services include a profes- sional development course, one-on-one prominent alumni counseling, mock interviews, and on- Lisa Neuberger (2002) - Senior Manager, Institute for Public Service, Accenture campus speakers. Bhuvana Anand (2004) - Consultant, Emerging Markets Group, LTD The OCS organizes career trips every Reeta Roy - Vice President for Global Citizenship and Policy, Abbott Laboratories Svetlana K. Bagaudinova (2002) - Private Sector Dev. Specialist, International Finance Corporation year where students attend site visits Tamsin Spencer Randlett (1991) – Director, Government Affairs, GAP, Inc. 78 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 90. tuFtS uNIVeRSItY, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT F letcher is home to the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy, the Institute for Human Security, the Center for Emerging Market Enterprises, the Global Develop- Students who enter Fletcher to study economic development or security studies realize that business acumen is key to sustain- able development, allocative efficiency, and NGO management. ment and Environmental Institute, the Center for Human Rights Fletcher Net Impact, through its cooperation with other orga- and Conflict Resolution and the International Development nizations, centers, and programs, strives to compel all Fletcher Program, all of which attract leaders in their respective fields, students to share in and benefit from their collective wealth of and complement our in-class education. Prospective Fletcher experience, so as to form a greater understanding of the busi- students are chosen for their potential to lead, desire to address ness side of development. global issues, and capacity to elicit positive and lasting change. Reasons To aTTend T he Fletcher School was founded in response to a lack of leadership with a global perspective. This was a critical deficiency in an extremely divisive period characterized by nomic development to the next level by addressing social and environmental issues through the lens of business, while not neglecting the importance of trade and commerce. Fletcher isolation and insulation. The Fletcher School continues to students straddle the world of business and development, prepare leaders who are perceptive to the subtle shifts in the and in doing so come to understand that the two are impos- winds of the world, a trait which allows them to better adapt sible to decouple. Fletcher caters to those who are truly pas- and adopt change. At Fletcher, international business man- sionate about making globalization a positive force and who agement builds on a thorough understanding of the firm’s are sincere about employing business as an agent for social broader socio-political, socio-economic, and industry-spe- and environmental improvement. cific environments. Business at Fletcher offers a comprehensive coverage of these diverse environments while providing a rigorous train- to sum it up ing in core functional disciplines such as accounting, finance, strategic management, and marketing. But “unlike tradi- The Fletcher school would be most fitting for someone interested in attending a school where students and faculty tional MBA programs, our core focus is on interdisciplinary are on the forefront of social/environmental issues. social issues, not just business,” writes one student. Fletcher students are constantly challenged to take eco- 160 Packard Avenue, Medford, Massachusetts, 02155-7082 USA • Phone: +1 617 627 3700 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 79
  • 91. unIVeRsITy of albeRTa SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 220 16% of alberta students are net impact members The chapter is very involved at the uni- versity of alberta and the program is 38% of those members are “very active” ” very supportive of the chapter and its 20% are “somewhat active” goals. This chapter in three words: enthusiastic, Small, Flexible chapter leader: Casey McKenzie (cm_mckenzie@yahoo.com) n = 12 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and environmental sustainability. W hile the curriculum in the Alberta MBA program is flex- ible, allowing students to focus their studies in a particu- lar area of interest, issues relating to social and environmental NRE specialization, students develop an energy-related ana- lytical expertise based on a broad understanding of the re- source and energy industries from the exploration and project impact are brought into the classroom in a great number of development phases, through extraction and transformation, courses. Issues relating to corporate social responsibility, val- to transportation, logistics marketing, and market issues. ues sets, environmental concerns, and ethical behavior would Students address and analyze key strategic questions facing seem to be intrinsic to the education of an MBA student, as today’s business leaders and policy makers. Throughout the such courses from across business disciplines would include program, the many links between resource and energy ques- discussions on social and environmental concerns. It should tions and environmental issues are highlighted, analyzed, and be noted that beginning in fall 2007, a course on corporate so- understood. cial responsibility will become a required part of the core cur- Students who complete the Public Management Stream will riculum. have the skills to work in leadership positions in the public sec- Individuals interested specifically in using business for social tor. Students will develop attributes key to advancing their ca- and/or environmental impact would be able to tailor their pro- reer to senior managerial and executive levels within federal, gram to include courses specifically dedicated to these areas. provincial, or local government, or at a health authority or a Combined with classes designed to provide students with a nonprofit agency, and to making a career change from the pri- general business background, students will leave the MBA pro- vate to public sector. Alternatively, students who choose a ca- gram with a strong knowledge of business and an understand- reer in the private sector will have acquired knowledge of the ing of how to apply it in a social/environmental context. public sector and the public policy processes that will enable The MBA program offers specializations in both natural them to be an effective advocate for their company or social resources and energy (NRE) and public management. In the interests. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: below average. O ur chapter was started in 2003. Our key events include our partnership with EONFIRE, and our participation in case competitions and the annual Net Impact conference. EONFIRE Mandel who gave an inspiring talk about the importance of so- cial responsibility in the business community. Our chapter hosts a number of speakers every year, focusing on the areas important is an undergraduate student group focused on corporate social to Net Impact. In the 2006-07 year, we had speakers represent responsibility and social entrepreneurship. Together, we co-host- interests in international development, social enterprise, corpo- ed a speaker event featuring an alumna who works for the U.N. rate social responsibility, and renewable energy. Five members in Africa. She spoke about her work defending child interests. attended the Net Impact conference and about forty-five percent We also co-hosted an event featuring Edmonton Mayor Stephen of our members participated in case competitions. 80 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 92. uNIVeRSItY oF ALbeRtA, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 8% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 33% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 8% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. he Alberta MBA Career Services Office is geared prominent alumni T toward helping students excel in their fields of choice. The office offers exclusive job postings, Guy Kerr - President and CEO, Workers’ Compensation Board Gay Mitchell - Executive Vice President, Strategic Business Development, RBC Financial Group Guy Turcotte, Chairman - Western Oil Sands Inc. networking and employer events, one-on-one Michael Lang - Chairman, Stonebridge Merchant Capital Corp. coaching, professional development seminars, mock interviews, career self-assessment, and mentorship environmental practices and the understanding of how to programs. Students seeking careers with a social or environmental incorporate environmental costs into business practices. The Public focus receive additional support on how to tailor their job search in Management Stream is valuable for aspiring nonprofit managers the relevant industry. as coursework is geared towards management in the public and The University of Alberta MBA Program has a strong reputation nonprofit sectors. While no dedicated funds are set aside to support with local non-profits, environmental companies, and socially students who embark on internships with nonprofit organizations, responsible companies. Environmentally, the school’s Natural the MBA program does its best to help fund students who are Resources and Energy Specialization prepares leaders for sound interested in socially responsible internships. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 8% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 8% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he Alberta MBA program tries to support all student activi- ties on campus, including the Net Impact chapter. Partial funding is available for students to attend the annual Net Impact cial responsibility within the MBA program. A new class based on ethics and corporate social responsibility will become a required class for students starting in fall 2007. One of the priorities of Conference. Funding is also available to support social initiatives the Alberta MBA program is to produce the future leaders of the brought forward by students and student groups. business world. Ensuring that they are fully aware and attentive The Alberta MBA program places an emphasis on corporate so- to ethical and social issues is a key goal of the MBA program. Reasons To aTTend 8% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership. The biggest strengths of the University of Alberta MBA program tunities. The University of Alberta is home to the Canadian Centre include its small classes, its active alumni support network, a high for Social Entrepreneurship (CCSE). This organization encourages job placement rate and a good reputation in Canada. The full-time social entrepreneurship and is a recognized leader in strengthen- program admits a maximum of sixty students, meaning that the ing community capabilities through creative thinking, innovative classes are small, which builds a supportive and cooperative atmo- practices, and strategic alliances. sphere among students. A large percentage of its MBA alumni net- As host of the Centre for Applied Business Research in Energy work remains in Edmonton and alumni are extremely active and and the Environment (CABREE), the University of Alberta School supportive of the program, regularly hosting networking events of Business is dedicated to research on climate change, electricity and offering employment and internship opportunities. With a job restructuring, and energy markets. CABREE is an independent placement rate of ninety-four percent, the Alberta’s MBA program and non-partisan research center that specializes in economic and is one of the best in Canada. Because the University of Alberta business analysis to inform public policy debates on issues of im- School of Business is the longest continuously AACSB-accredited portance to Alberta and to Canada as a whole. business school in Canada, it is considered to be highly reputable by employers. The professors are highly qualified with strong back- to sum it up grounds in research. alberta would be most fitting for someone interested in There are several ways for students to learn about social and building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. environmental themes through the university’s research centers, which focus on these areas and offer courses and research oppor- 2-30 Business Building, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2R6, CANADA • Phone: +1 780 492 3946 • E-mail: mba@ualberta.ca Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 81
  • 93. unIVeRsITy of aRkansas-lITTle RoCk coLLeGe oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 165 Our tight-knit group of faculty and students strive to provide the best 2% of arkansas students are net impact members learning experience for students. a 100% of those members are “very active” ” number of students are working professionals who bring a wealth of real- world knowledge to the classroom. This chapter in three words: New, Ambitious, Growing chapter leaders: adam Bartlett (atbartlett@ualr.edu) and Robby Matthews (robby@rewgroupofarkansas.com) CuRRICulum T he University of Arkansas-Little Rock (UALR) core cur- riculum continues to focus on traditional MBA topics, but elective coursework is available, and an enhanced desire faculty members who provide leadership in social and envi- ronmental issues in the greater Little Rock community, and incorporate these experiences in their coursework. to increase the study of these areas in the College of Busi- Several majors and certificate programs are available, in- ness exists. There are opportunities for students to enroll in cluding: dual-degree programs with the following schools: the Bow- • Dean’s Certificate for Public Service en School of Law (JD), the Clinton School of Public Service • Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management (Master of Public Service), and the University of Arkansas • Masters of Public Administration, Masters of Public Ser- for Medical Science (MD/PharmD). We have a number of vice at the Clinton School of Public Affairs sTudenT aCTIVITIes Our chapter is new and excited about the opportunities that lie ahead for us. The Global Issues Group is another student organization that places environmental and social sustainability at the forefront of its goals. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI The Counseling and Career Planning Services group at UALR provides many resources for students searching for careers in any field. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT The administration is generally helpful and interested in improving sustainability and other social responsible practices on cam- pus. The administration is also supportive of student-led activities and programs to help further the quality of campus life. Reasons To aTTend to sum it up O ur tight-knit group of faculty and students strive to provide the best learning experience for students. A number of students are working professionals who bring a The university of arkansas-little Rock would be most fitting for someone interested in laying the foundation for social/environmental awareness at the program. wealth of real-world knowledge to the classroom. 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, Arkansas 72204-1099, USA • Phone: +1 501 569 3356 82 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 94. unIVeRsITy of bRITIsH ColumbIa SAudeR SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 103 a great opportunity to help shape and 39% of sauder students are net impact members grow a sustainability program at a great ” 50% of those members are “very active” school in a fantastic location. 25% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: Growing, entrepreneurial, dynamic chapter leader: Rebecca Pearson (rpearson@alumni.sauder.ubc.ca) CuRRICulum T he Sauder MBA program has developed a new specialization called “Sustainability and Business,” and continues to work to incorporate social and environmental impact into some areas of farming at UBC, salvaging logs on the Fraser River, encouraging green building practices at UBC, and more. Following the CORE, students can choose from eight different specializations, includ- the core curriculum. The first three and a half months of the Saud- ing the aforementioned new specialization in “Sustainability and er full-time MBA is the same for all students and features twelve Business”. Approximately ninety different modules are offered courses including finance, marketing, and ethics, as well as inte- in all, including specific modules on business ethics, global envi- grated projects, case studies, and critical issue papers. Topics such ronmental issues, corporate social responsibility, and sustainable as social and ethical marketing, balanced scorecard performance development. The administration has been supportive of sus- analysis, business ethics, and the economic perspective of CSR are tainability initiatives; they have, for example, sponsored students covered in various courses. Students begin the program by pre- to attend Net Impact conferences and curriculum-change confer- paring a paper in response to “The Corporation,” a critical review ences, and there has been an effort to attract suitable faculty for of the pathological pursuit of profit by the contemporary corpora- the program. The Sauder School of Business features almost 100 tion. Students then have the opportunity to debate these issues full-time faculty, including: James Tansey, who focuses on ethics with the author himself, as Joel Bakan is a member of the faculty and sustainable business and also heads a nonprofit carbon-off- of law at the University of British Columbia, and graciously comes set society called Offsetters.ca; Peter Nemetz, who has researched to Sauder to speak with the students each year. Social and envi- natural resource policy related to energy and the environment ronmental themes are also considered during several integrated and is the current advisor for new “Sustainability and Business” case studies. In addition, students are required to incorporate specialization; James Brander, who is interested in the role of re- sustainability into their CORE business plan projects, and typi- newable resource management in economic growth and decline; cally, a large number of the plans have a sustainability focus. Past and finally, Charles Weinberg, who specializes in public and non- projects completed for real organizations have focused on organic profit organization marketing. sTudenT aCTIVITIes A growing Net Impact Chapter at the Sauder School of Business leads student initiatives in the areas of social and environ- mental impact. The Net Impact chapter at UBC is approximately the social and environmental impact of business. Speakers have included persons involved in clean-tech venture capital, social enterprise, sustainable entrepreneurship, and sustainable mar- five years old. Although it is a well-established MBA club, it con- keting. This summer, Net Impact will be part of the orientation tinues to grow in momentum by attracting interest from a greater planning team, integrating social and environmental issues into number of students and by holding a greater number and wider the orientation program. variety of events. For example, every spring, Net Impact partners UBC Net Impact has developed a “Three-E” strategy: education, with the Community Experience Initiative to host the Leader- experience, and exposure. ship and Social Change Career Fair. In 2007, this event attracted • Education: through curriculum development as well as cor- speakers and recruiters from over twenty for-profit and nonprofit porate and community-related speaker events and conferences, organizations that are leaders in social and environmental prac- we strive to ensure that members and the MBA community as a tices in the region. Net Impact also partners with the other MBA whole develop a greater understanding of social and environmen- specialization clubs to host an annual speaker series addressing tal issues. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 83
  • 95. uNIVeRSItY oF bRItISh coLumbIA, continued StudeNt ActIVItIeS, continued • Experience: activities such as a new campus greening program to the local business community using various methods, such as and case competitions for local companies help to develop practi- holding networking events, attending events in the local business cal skills for our members. community, and aligning with like-minded organizations. • Exposure: we aim to expose Net Impact and our members CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he Business Career Centre has the flexibility to provide sup- sector, and is open to specific funding requests from students. port for students interested in nontraditional careers; in ad- Net Impact works in partnership with the Business Career dition, funding is available for students interested in pursuing Centre to foster relationships with local companies and orga- nonprofit internships. The UBC Business Career Centre does nizations, with the goal of facilitating eventual career opportu- not focus on helping students who wish to enter nontraditional nities for students. The keystone event is the Leadership and social and/or environmental careers. However, they have con- Social Change Career Fair. tacts with many related organizations, and customized career coaching is provid- ed for any interest a student might have. prominent alumni Helen Goodland - Executive Director, Lighthouse Sustainable Building Centre The administration typically supple- Andrew Haughian (2006) - Associate, Pangaea Ventures, Ltd. ments the salaries of several students do- Donovan Woolard (2006) - Director, New Business Development Offsetters Climate Neutral Society ing summer internships in the nonprofit admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he administration at the Sauder School of Business is a strong supporter of social and environmental leadership in the school. Funding is available for student initiatives in the and plans to open a new research center focusing on ethics and sustainable business. The school’s associate dean of academic programs, Dale Grif- community; with this support, MBA students are able to help fin, is a strong supporter of Net Impact and has been instru- local organizations develop their business plans. There is also mental in curriculum change initiatives. Dean Griffin has led funding available for student-organized events, case competi- Net Impact-organized workshops. He also attended the Net tions, and conferences that focus on sustainability and social de- Impact conference in 2005. velopment in business. This year, funding enabled a student to Still, one survey respondent noted that the administration attend the Leeds Net Impact Case Competition, and the school lags behind the students: “The students are completely open also funded four students’ attendance at the Net Impact confer- and enthusiastic, but the administration and faculty are split in ence in Chicago. their support.” This, however, means that there is a “great op- The school’s dean, Daniel Muzyka, actively supports the hir- portunity to help shape and grow a sustainability program at a ing of new professors who specialize in sustainable business, great school in a fantastic location.” Reasons To aTTend S auder is known for its strengths in traditional areas, such as finance and supply chain management; however, it has recently begun to leverage the greater university’s cutting-edge spectacular natural spaces in the process. Accordingly, there is a strong awareness of social and environmental responsibility, and many leading companies have begun here, including Vancity work in sustainability to bring fresh material into the program Credit Union, Mountain Equipment Co-op, and Nature’s Path. to address social and environmental issues in a business context. Business students hoping to develop a career in this area will find The school is growing and is open to enthusiastic students’ ideas no lack of inspiration. for improvement. Vancouver is a fantastic location for students interested in to sum it up social and environmental themes, being rated by the Economist The sauder school would be most fitting for Intelligence Unit as one of the world’s top cities in terms of quality someone interested in building upon an existing of life. A primary reason for this ranking is that Vancouver has base of social/environmental impact activities with avoided some of the unsustainable development practices that opportunity for significant growth. have plagued other North American cities, and has preserved 2053 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia C V6T 1Z2, CANADA • +1 604 822 8500 8 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 96. unIVeRsITy of CalIfoRnIa–beRkeley hAAS SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 480 students also have unique access to the 21% of Haas students are net impact members greater uC Berkeley campus, which is a 50% of those members are “very active” ” leader in more disciplines than any other 20% are “somewhat active” institution. This chapter in three words: energy, commitment, diversity chapter leader: elizabeth lombardi, Jeff Denby (netimpact@haas.berkeley.edu) n = 22 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 45% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 14% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he expansive Haas curriculum allows students to not only master principles of general management, but also to tailor their educational experiences to focus on themes of Public Management Program (ranked fourth in the nation by US News & World Report) complement the core by offering electives in strategic corporate social responsibility, social social and environmental impact. venture development, nonprofit boards, business and public The intense core curriculum includes a comprehensive policy, and corporate environmental management, just to corporate social responsibility component as part of the name a few. The class in strategic CSR is an unparalleled required ethics course. At least fifty percent of the cases opportunity for students to consult on meaningful projects addressed directly pertain to CSR, focusing on issues such for CSR industry leaders such as Hewlett-Packard, eBay, as global trade, overseas manufacturing, climate change Wells Fargo, Levi’s, Dow, and Williams-Sonoma. and business, and internet censorship. In addition, the We also have faculty members who are on the forefront marketing, organizational behavior, accounting, and of these fields including Kellie McElhaney, recipient of the statistics classes include cases with social themes. Aspen Institute’s Faculty Pioneer Award for Institutional Haas is arguably the best place to take courses that cater Leadership; Nora Silver, director of the Nonprofit to students interested in corporate social responsibility, Management Program; and David Vogel, author of The nonprofit management, and social entrepreneurship. Market for Virtue and editor of the California Management We also have many students studying international Review, which dedicates an annual issue to CSR. development, technology and emerging markets, renewable Furthermore, Haas students have access to the entire UC energy, and socially responsible investing. Many classes Berkeley campus, which has more top-ranked programs involve hands-on consulting projects, which provide than any other U.S. university. Many Net Impact members students with excellent opportunities to choose their own take courses in the Department of Environmental Science socially responsible themes and companies. Policy Management, the Energy and Resources Group, the The Center for Responsible Business (ranked second in the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the Boalt School of nation by the Wall Street Journal) and the Nonprofit and Law. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 8
  • 97. uNIVeRSItY oF cALIFoRNIA-beRkeLeY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 50% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 36% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. H aas is a student-run school and offers incredible lead- ership opportunities for students interested in social and/or environmental issues. As one student writes, “you a university-wide graduate student organization that works with Net Impact on campus greening. Volunteerism is important at Haas and is organized can be actively involved from day one.” through the student government by the elected Vice Presi- The Haas Net Impact chapter is over ten years old and dent of Community, in close coordination with Net Impact. is one of the largest student clubs on campus. In 2004, we Young Entrepreneurs at Haas (YEAH) allows Haas MBA and merged with the Nonprofit Management Club. We continue undergraduate mentors to use the principles of business to to grow every year in membership and activity. excite, educate, and prepare under-served youth for academ- Our Net Impact chapter offers meaningful benefits to our ic and economic success. We are also active in an inter-MBA members through networking opportunities, career develop- Challenge for Charity organization. This year during orien- ment, and social events. Our two primary goals are to sup- tation week, students helped paint an Oakland school and port our members in pursuing careers concerned with social raised money for the Special Olympics. and/or environmental impacts, and to educate our peers Social and environmental impact themes permeated the pursuing traditional MBA careers about how Net Impact is- 2006 first-year orientation week. Professor McElhaney, di- sues affect them. rector of the Center for Responsible Business, gave a pre- In addition to Net Impact, Haas students benefit from the sentation to the entire class about her program’s offerings Global Social Venture Competition, the oldest student-run and applications. Paul Rice, Haas alum and founder/CEO business plan competition with a social and environmental of TransFair USA, was the keynote speaker at the student focus. GSVC is an incredible opportunity for students to learn banquet and Priya Hadji, Haas alumna and successful social from social venture capitalists and initiate social enterprises entrepreneur, kicked off the club’s first social event at a local of their own. Other clubs on campus that share the values pub with a speech about social innovation. Finally, all stu- of Net Impact include the Education Club, Global Initiatives dents participated in an innovation workshop with eBay to at Haas (International Development), and the Energy and help them develop an eWaste recycling strategy. Resources Collaborative. Students for a Greener Berkeley is CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 32% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 57% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 5% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni S tudents conducting a nontraditional job search at Haas must be proactive, but can take advantage of incredible resources at their fingertips. Marcus Chung (2004) - Manager, Public Affairs, Gap Inc. Steve Hardgrave (2005) - Manager, Investments, Omidyar Network Rob Kaplan (2007) - Senior Corporate Social Responsibility Analyst, Brown-Forman Joanna Mackness (2004) - Director of Business Engagement, Ernst & Young LLP Haas has an excellent reputation among companies Paul Rice (1996) - Director/CEO, TransFair USA that appreciate social and environmental mindsets and it is apparent when you send in your resume for job and internship opportunities in nonprofits looking cold. for MBAs. Additionally, the CSO recently put together an en- The Career Services Office (CSO) assigns a case manager to tire binder of CSR job resources and has allocated part of an support Net Impact members and trains several students to adjunct advisor’s time to “CSR-type” job counseling. be peer career coaches. The CSO also provides students ac- Net Impact not only organizes Firm Night and Days on the cess to job listings and workshops from the MBA-Nonprofit Job, but also provides important mentorship opportunities Connection, an organization that serves as a clearinghouse for first-year students to learn from the all-knowing second- 86 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 98. uNIVeRSItY oF cALIFoRNIA-beRkeLeY, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued years. who intern for nonprofit organizations with stipends to help In addition, the Haas and Berkeley alumni are incredible cover costs of living. The Fund is completely student-run and accessible. It is evident that Haas has a culture of peer and supported. Historically, one hundred percent of the ap- support that is consistent throughout the years. The search- plicants were awarded grants. The Haas Loan Repayment As- able online database allows students to find alums working sistance Program provides loan postponement and forgive- at nearly any organization in the Bay Area. ness for students who work in nonprofit or government for Finally, the Haas for Students Fund provides first-years up to ten years after graduation. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 32% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 45% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration openly promotes the principles of us- ing business for social and environmental impact. Dean Tom Campbell, a founding board member of the Cen- The CRB sponsors the Peterson Lecture Series in Corporate Responsibility, which brings diverse thought leaders to Haas, and the Levi Strauss Small Grants Program, which awards ter for Responsible Business (CRB), is deeply committed to funding to students who promote innovative ideas on advanc- public leadership. He has served as a congressman and, most ing the CSR agenda both inside and outside of the Haas com- recently, as Director of Finance for the State of California. He munity. The Gap Inc. CSR Scholars Program is a unique fel- publicly supports the importance of social and environmen- lowship opportunity that supports Haas MBA students who tal impacts in business and has committed to raising those demonstrate a commitment to the field of corporate social questions with guests of the Dean’s Speaker Series. responsibility in their professional and educational pursuits. Haas is primarily student-run, but the administration’s The admissions committee values personality and individ- support of Net Impact’s efforts is important. They have pro- uality. They want people who are passionate and who care vided funding for key career and social events and they also about the world. They look for students who are interested in support the Center for Responsible Business and Nonprofit responsible business, and have a foundation and interest in and Public Management Program. mainstream business and quantitative methods. Reasons To aTTend 73% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 23% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. H aas is a unique MBA program because it serves the needs of a diverse group of students—both those pursuing a career in social and/or environmental impact and those inter- ested in obtaining a top-notch traditional business education to sum it up from a highly ranked institution. There is no better place to go for students interested in corporate social responsibility, The Haas school would be most fitting for someone social entrepreneurship, or nonprofit management. If you interested in attending a school where students value the opportunity to engage with students and faculty on and faculty are on the forefront of social/environmental issues. social and environmental issues and want to become an inno- vative leader in business, then Haas is the best MBA program for you. 545 Student Services #1900, 2220 Piedmont Avenue, Berkeley, California 94720-1900, USA • + Phone: 1 510 642 1405 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 87
  • 99. unIVeRsITy of CalIfoRnIa–daVIs GRAduAte SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 110 We have a very supportive administration 53% of uC Davis students are net impact members and faculty. We asked for a class on 30% of those members are “very active” social responsibility mid-quarter and ” were able to get it on the schedule for 50% are “somewhat active” the following quarter. This chapter in three words: dynamic, collaborative, committed chapter leaders: Jessica Carter (msjcarter@ucdavis.edu) and Daniel MacDonald (dsmacdonald@ucdavis.edu) n = 24 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 75% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 29% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he UC Davis Graduate School of Management (GSM) has themes related to social and environmental responsibility integrated into nearly every course offered. Of the six core curriculum and learning environment, and connect the school more directly with corporations and practicing managers. The Center for Investor Welfare and Corporate Responsibility, the classes, four devote at least one entire session to these top- Center for Women and Leadership, the Energy Efficiency Cen- ics. Additionally, the GSM has five elective courses that are ter, and the Center for Entrepreneurship all feature cutting- focused on fostering a positive social and/or environmental edge opportunities for students with social and environmen- impact through business. These classes are: Sustainable and tal interests. The GSM is also actively seeking to strengthen Responsible Business, Social Entrepreneurship, Managing a its connection with other UC Davis establishments, including Socially Responsible Investment Fund, Corporate Governance, the Institute of Transportation Studies and the John Muir In- and Management of Nonprofit Organizations. Students also stitute of the Environment. regularly use course projects as opportunities to incorporate Looking beyond the curriculum, the UC Davis campus has a related topics into the more traditional subjects, which gives plethora of opportunities for MBA students. The GSM allows them practical working knowledge of the role and impact of students to take classes from other departments and apply up responsible business. Professor Brad Barber lends substantial to six of these units to their MBA unit requirements, without support to responsible business education at the GSM by act- seeking prior approval. MBA students can take classes that ing as the Net Impact faculty advisor, teaching the Socially Re- incorporate many social and environmental topics in such sponsible Investing (SRI) Fund course, facilitating the Beyond fields as agricultural and resource economics, transportation Grey Pinstripes initiative, and guiding curriculum change. technology and policy, and community and regional develop- In addition to classroom education, the GSM offers a num- ment. There are also three dual-degree programs with the De- ber of hands-on experiences in which students can receive partment of Agricultural and Resource Economics, the School course credit for material learned in the real world. These op- of Law, and the School of Medicine. In short, social and en- portunities are molded to student interests and include Com- vironmental responsibility is woven into the foundation of munity Consulting Group projects, an annual international the Graduate School of Management at UC Davis. As a small study practicum, and independent study projects. Along MBA program, the GSM is flexible and responsive to student these lines, the GSM offers multiple Centers of Excellence that interest in developing new curricula and expanding students’ serve to leverage faculty research and expertise, enrich the learning opportunities. 88 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 100. uNIVeRSItY oF cALIFoRNIA-dAVIS, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 67% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 29% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he GSM is home to several student organizations that pro- vide extracurricular opportunities for exploring and creat- ing positive social and environmental outcomes. The mission of in a Community Consulting Group project for the UC Davis Sus- tainability Advisory Committee. Net Impact members also uti- lized the Net Impact network to successfully integrate energy Davis Net Impact is to promote MBA students as social and en- and environmental responsibility education within the 2007 vironmental leaders both on campus and in the greater North- International Study Practicum in Japan. ern California communities. “Our school takes it very seriously,” Complementing Davis Net Impact, Challenge for Charity is writes one student. Member involvement and cross-collabora- another GSM organization that draws on the talents, energy, tion are instrumental to its success, demonstrated at the 2006 and philanthropic efforts of MBA students. It raises money for Net Impact Conference in Chicago, when Davis Net Impact was the Special Olympics and the Boys and Girls Club while infusing named Small School Chapter of the Year. students with a lifelong commitment to community involve- Founded in 1999, the club hosts a Green Bag Lunch speaker ment. Furthermore, the Women in Leadership club strives to series and co-organizes Day on the Job company site visits each serve the GSM and greater Davis community through profes- quarter, and offers students the opportunity to become board sional and social activities geared toward the development of members for local nonprofits through the Board Fellows pro- future women leaders. In addition to its International Study gram. Net Impact also hosts a spring event for newly admitted Practicum role, the International Business Club recently cre- students and a weekend retreat that promotes related themes ated the board position of vice-president for sustainable trade during new student orientation. In 2007, the orientation event and development to facilitate club interaction. Even our annual will be held at the Headlands Institute in Marin County. UC Davis Big Bang! Business Plan Competition, which is orga- Recent chapter achievements include the newest addition to nized by GSM students, typically incorporates a social and envi- the GSM curriculum, the Seminar on Sustainable and Respon- ronmental focus. “There are large numbers of people outside of sible Business, which was initiated by Net Impact leaders. Cam- the GSM that are focused on CSR and environmentally friendly pus greening initiatives have also been very successful, including campaigns,” writes one student. “In all, it feels like we’re part of the establishment of zero-waste GSM events and participation something much larger.” CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 38% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 57% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 46% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. A central goal of Davis Net Impact during the past year has include the pension funds California Public Employees Re- been to expand the number of career opportunities that tirement System (Calpers) and the California State Teachers have a social and environmental focus. The GSM’s Career Retirement System as well as the Energy Efficiency Center. Services Team has compiled resources in the nonprofit sector By offering Day on the Job visits and partnering with other and is growing in its understanding of and access to positions Bay Area business schools in career fairs, Davis Net Impact is within corporate responsibility. As a small program, it simply actively expanding the career network. doesn’t have the same capacity or network as larger schools, but there are some key prominent alumni resources, alumni, and company partner- John Bouffard (1993) – Principal, Bouffard Associates ships that serve the school well. Examples Ted Howes (2004) - Vice President, CSR and Supply Chain Programs, Scientific Certification Systems Cleveland Justis (2004) - Executive Director, Headlands Institute of partnerships that offer career opportu- Nicole Levine (2000) - Executive Director, Wardrobe for Opportunity nities related to corporate responsibility Kyle Salyer (2006) - Senior VP, Portfolio Management, MicroCredit Enterprises Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 89
  • 101. uNIVeRSItY oF cALIFoRNIA-dAVIS, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 38% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 29% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he UC Davis Graduate School of Management embod- ies its motto of “Ideas Into Action” with respect to social and environmental initiatives. Recognizing student inter- survey in fall 2006, soliciting faculty and student support in order to ensure it properly reflected both the array of re- sources available and the level of student engagement with est in these issues, the administration invited Net Impact social and environmental themes. Dean Nicole Woolsey to host the kickoff event for the admitted students’ preview Biggart is a great supporter of Net Impact and sustainable day. In general, the school has been very accommodating of business. In addition to supporting the introduction of the student-driven initiatives from curriculum change to facil- Seminar on Sustainable and Responsible Business to the ity recycling. “We asked for a class on social responsibility GSM curriculum, she offered to co-sponsor an event to rec- mid-quarter and were able to get it on the schedule for the ognize the accomplishments of the award-winning Davis Net following quarter,” one student writes. Impact chapter, and suggested utilizing the event as a way Additionally, the GSM administration undertook the ex- to strengthen ties with other sustainability-related depart- tensive process of completing the Beyond Grey Pinstripes ments and centers across the UC Davis campus. Reasons To aTTend 67% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 33% of respondents strongly agree their program ad- equately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. W hile the small size of the Graduate School of Manage- ment at UC Davis creates some limitations with respect to the breadth of course offerings and career services, it also tally friendly,” one student writes. “Nearly all of us walk, bike or ride the bus to school.” Furthermore, the GSM’s proxim- ity to the state capital as well as the San Francisco Bay Area allows for its greatest strength: innumerable opportunities provides a variety of career and lifestyle opportunities. to innovate, influence, and have a real impact in a top-fifty In short, students attending the UC Davis Graduate School MBA program. The students, faculty members, and admin- of Management will obtain a world-class MBA education and istration have consistently demonstrated support for activi- a strong understanding of responsible business. Those inter- ties and initiatives with social and environmental themes. ested in putting in extra time and effort will face no short- Business ethics, corporate responsibility, and related topics age of meaningful leadership and program development pur- are woven into the traditional curriculum through cases, lec- suits. tures, and projects and the student experience is enhanced by the ability to interact closely with faculty members. The greater UC Davis campus has world-renowned envi- to sum it up ronmental and agricultural departments, providing fertile uC Davis would be most fitting for someone ground for academic and extracurricular activities in envi- interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware ronmental sustainability. “Fascinating research is being done program and student body. in other departments of the University,” says one student. In addition, “The whole town of Davis is very environmen- One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA • Phone: +1 530 752 7658 • E-mail: admissions@gsm.ucdavis.edu 90 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 102. unIVeRsITy of CalIfoRnIa–IRVIne pAuL meRAGe SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 177 Our school is in a very pro-socially responsible community...there are 33% of irvine students are net impact members several opportunities through our ” 33% of those members are “very active” program to network with the socially 20% are “somewhat active” responsible business community. This chapter in three words: enthusiastic, dedicated, Growing chapter leader: Priyanka saxena (psaxena08@merage.uci.edu) n = 11 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 18% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum T he theme of corporate social responsibility is worked into the curriculum for most strategy courses. In addition, a new course elective that is geared toward imparting CSR oriented education to students has been developed recently. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 18% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. T he Net Impact Irvine is a new but growing chapter, first established in 2005. Within two short years the chapter has seen a jump in student interest and support from the school. It has recently become one of the most recommended student organiza- tions to join. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 18% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 50% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 9% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. W hile there are no formal career services for students seeking jobs in social responsibility, there are networking oppor- tunities with socially responsible companies looking for MBA students. One student describes the school’s Southern California location as one of its greatest strengths, since the area has a “very pro-socially responsible community.” Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 91
  • 103. uNIVeRSItY oF cALIFoRNIA-IRVINe, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 9% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 9% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration is open to offering electives dealing with social responsibility, and there are several professors who have expressed interest in teaching such a class. Reasons To aTTend 9% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 18% of respondents strongly agree their program ad- equately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. U CI’s program is an intimate one: the faculty and students help to create a collaborative learning environment. We are also on the cutting edge of innovation in business, partic- ability issues are concerned. Net Impact UC Irvine chapter is poised for growth in the immediate future, and there are a lot of opportunities in the CSR arena at UC Irvine’s Paul ularly where environmental, social, and corporate account- Merage School of Business. to sum it up uC irvine would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. 350 SB, Irvine, CA 92697-3125, USA • Phone: +1 949 824 6855 • E-mail: mba@merage.uci.edu 92 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 104. unIVeRsITy of CalIfoRnIa–los angeles ucLA ANdeRSoN SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 1,000 The los angeles business/nonprofit community is filled with vibrant social entrepreneurs ...and 9% of uCla students are net impact members generally has a progressive slant towards 30% of those members are “very active” business. also, the general entrepreneurship ” 40% are “somewhat active” program at uCla anderson is unmatched. This chapter in three words: Growing, motivated, diverse chapter leaders: Juan Matute (juan.matute.2008@anderson.ucla.edu) and nicole nasser (nicole.nasser.2008@anderson.ucla.edu) n = 12 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 17% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 8% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. W hile most of the curriculum at UCLA Anderson tends to focus on traditional MBA topics, there has been a significant increase in the number of environmental and social entrepreneurial development within emerging markets by conducting primary research in the field of microfinance and developing an effective plan for a local microfinance classes offered. Most of these changes were led by students institution or project sponsor. and all have been supported by the administration. UCLA Located at the center of UCLA’s campus, Anderson is Anderson’s electives include Business and the Environment, fortunate to have access to classes and resources across Nonprofit Management, Public Sector Management, the entire university. Several UCLA Anderson Net Impact Microfinance, and Public Education. In 2006, students led members are dual-degree students, typically enrolling in the the creation and design of a class on social entrepreneurship School of Public Affairs, which includes departments in Social taught by Jonathan Greenblatt, founder of Ethos Water. The Welfare, Urban Planning, and Public Policy. Students will also new class uses case studies, recent publications, and guest often cross-enroll in the School of Education, School of Public speakers to illustrate the basics of launching a social venture. Health, and the Law School. In 2006, an interdisciplinary group Topics included: creating a socially differentiated product/ of UCLA graduate students and faculty members designed the service, developing/implementing smart and sustainable graduate-level emphasis Leaders in Sustainability, a program supply chain strategies, creating socially conscious branding that integrates environmental, social, and economic education. strategies, and creating end-to-end value via social investments Through case studies, events and workshops, students receive among other topics. Business and the Environment is taught leadership training, access to current decision-makers, and by Professor Charles Corbett, one of the leading academics the latest information on sustainability. in the field of environmental issues and business operations. Other UCLA resources of interest to Net Impact members Professor William Ouchi is a leader in K-12 Public Education include UCLA’s Institute of the Environment, located in reform and teaches a course on urban public schools. the university’s first LEED-certified building. The Institute Each year, several groups of students focus on microfinance provides multidisciplinary solutions for regional and global for their Applied Management Research project (the AMR). environmental problems, and educates students committed The Microfinance Research Program, run through Anderson’s to the health of our planet. Another resource, the UCLA CIBER (Center for International Business Education and Sustainable Resource Center, promotes sustainability through Research) broadens student awareness of the issues facing events and speakers for the graduate student body. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 93
  • 105. uNIVeRSItY oF cALIFoRNIA-LoS ANGeLeS, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 33% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. U CLA Anderson Net Impact has a longstanding campus presence that has recently seen exciting and accelerating growth. The club is focused on perpetuating this growth and Finance Club, Anderson Real Estate Association, and the High Tech Business Association. Recent joint events have included: the Energy Forum developed in cooperation with the UCLA fostering new opportunities to draw in even more students. Sustainable Resource Center and LA Sustainable Technology, UCLA Anderson Net Impact members pursue and share a panel on affordable housing co-hosted with the School of their diverse interests through a range of activities and events. Urban Planning, a lecture on socially responsible investing While there is room to enhance the cohesiveness of the Net co-hosted with the Investment Finance Club; a discussion on Impact community internally and with the larger UCLA business ethics with the Law School, and a global development Anderson student body, individual members are energetic and speaker series. We also coordinate with outside networks, active in promoting and creating opportunities. including a quarterly happy hour with LA-area chapters There is certainly the “opportunity to make a difference,” (USC Marshall, Pepperdine, CGU Drucker, and the LA & OC one student writes. “Students can do anything here with very professional chapters). This spring, in collaboration with little bureaucracy.” CalTech and UC San Diego Rady School of Business, we are There is a steady flow of emails through the UCLA hosting the Clean Innovation Conference, an event where Anderson Net Impact group, as members spread the word students and professionals can expand their knowledge of the about upcoming events and career opportunities. Through clean technology landscape, network with industry leaders, this network, members have participated in events with the and participate in a fast-pitch business-case competition. Sustainable Business Council of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles UCLA Anderson members also compete in national case Net Impact Professional Chapter, and other UCLA programs. competitions and Service Corps projects, where volunteers Since UCLA Anderson Net Impact members have diverse engage in short-term consulting projects. One of the largest interests that cover a wide-range of industries, we have built events on campus is the annual Nonprofit Consulting relationships other student clubs, UCLA graduate schools, and Challenge. This event brings local nonprofit organizations to Net Impact chapters. We regularly co-host events with student campus to partner with teams of MBA students on short-term clubs, such as the Entrepreneurs Association, the Investment business projects. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 25% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 50% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 25% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni H istorically focused on traditional career paths, Anderson’s career office has recently recognized students’ growing interest in socially responsible Matt Hill (2004) – Project Manager, Oakland Unified School District David Jefferson (2005) – Real Estate Douglas Buchalter (2005) – Managing Director, Green Coast Foundation Sandra Matsumoto (2002) – Project Director, The Nature Conservatory careers, and has made a formal commitment to Kate Cochran (1997) – VP of Resource Development, UNITUS providing more resources. These services include research, resources, networking opportunities, coordinates an ACT (Anderson Career Teams) group for informal advice, training, and funding tools. New students Net Impact members. Led by a second-year students, the should expect to help shape the direction of on-campus Net Impact ACT group provides students with step-by-step recruiting. guidance on finding jobs in the government, education or Anderson’s Career Management Center has designated nonprofit sectors, and in education, or socially responsible a counselor to help Net Impact students find careers and businesses. invites students to name which companies they would Students can also gain nonprofit work experience through like to see recruiting on campus. The career center also an on-campus summer internship that Anderson organizes 9 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 106. uNIVeRSItY oF cALIFoRNIA-LoS ANGeLeS, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued in partnership with Johnson & Johnson. The program Net Impact hosts events that both directly and indirectly helps directors of Head Start programs and community impact students’ career searches. Like other Anderson health centers improve their operations. In this ten-week clubs, Net Impact hosts a career night each winter. First internship, students act as mini-consultants to these and second-year students have the opportunity to meet nonprofit professionals. with others working in social enterprises or in socially- In addition, Anderson helps finance first-year students responsible positions at different companies. Actual working in nonprofit or public sector summer internships company participation reflects the interests and concerns through the Haskamp Fund. The Fund relies on student of the Net Impact members. Past companies have included participation and matching gifts from the school to make Toyota, Patagonia, Sharp Electronics, Disney, Southern these fellowships possible. Last year the first-year class California Edison, Flex Car, Gap, Ethos Water and Broad contributed over $5,000. Foundation. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 8% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 25% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. A nderson has a supportive administration when it comes to social and environmental issues. Current funding through the school is on par with other student organiza- a social and/or environmental focus, and in the funding stu- dents’ attendance at the national Net Impact conference. De- spite the support, there is much more that needs to be done. tions. Students have found the dean, professors, and several It typically takes tremendous student initiative and follow- Anderson research centers very supportive. This support through for actual changes to happen. Again, new students comes in the form of curriculum development, funding ini- will have the opportunity to shape the Anderson School’s in- tiatives and projects, in the recruiting of students who have volvement in social and environmental issues. Reasons To aTTend 25% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership. I n addition to a highly rigorous academic experience, UCLA Anderson is very entrepreneurial and student-driven, and the administration and faculty are very supportive of student path and shape your own future, then UCLA Anderson is for you. If you can dream it up and design it, you can make it hap- pen. UCLA Anderson is an excellent choice for students inter- initiatives. Most of the events, opportunities, and changes, ested in Net Impact who want to make a difference. including those concerning social and environmental issues, happen because of student initiative. This experience is very empowering and exciting. The student body is also very coop- to sum it up erative and collaborative, and partnerships between students with diverse interests spring up everyday. Increasingly, the The anderson school would be most fitting for focus has turned to social entrepreneurship, corporate social someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity responsibility, and sustainable development, with students for significant growth. pushing these issues forward through innovative programs and projects. If you are someone who wants to carve a new B-201, Box 951481, Los Angeles, California 90095-1481, USA • Phone: +1 310 825 6944 • E-mail: mba.admissions@anderson.ucla.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 9
  • 107. unIVeRsITy of CHICago GRAduAte SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 1,100 Our entrepreneurship Department is lead- 7% of GsB students are net impact members ing the curriculum change and providing 20% of those members are “very active” more opportunities to work and support ” social service agencies while at school or 40% are “somewhat active” in the classroom! This chapter in three words: progressive, opportunistic, collaborative chapter leaders: Douglas neal (dneal@chicagogsb.edu) and Meghan shehorn (mjenkins@chicagogsb.edu) n = 11 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, and social entrepreneurship. U nlike many other MBA programs, the University of Chi- cago Graduate School of Business (GSB) does not have a prescribed core curriculum. Although there is no formal number of international economic policy courses, an Inter- national MBA program, and a large study abroad program. A positive aspect of the school’s flexible curriculum is that program to integrate social and environmental themes into students may take up to six electives outside the business basic business courses, cases and group projects deal with school. For students interested in social and environmental these issues on an ad hoc basis. issues, the university’s Harris School of Public Policy and The business school currently has an elective on social School of Social Service Administration (SSA) offer many entrepreneurship that focuses on issues of social impact applicable courses. Some students pursue a combined MPP/ in business. Another elective course associated with the MBA or MA/MBA degree while others simply take classes at school’s annual business plan competition (New Venture the Harris School or at the School of SSA to augment their Challenge) offers a special track for social entrepreneurship business courses. Possible areas of study include environ- projects. Similarly, there are several hands-on “lab” courses, mental, health, and education policy, poverty and inequality, such as the New Venture Lab, in which students help real- and international development. world organizations tackle business challenges. These cours- There is no formal social or environmental concentration es facilitated projects with organizations aligned with social or certificate available at this time. However, “The school is missions, some of which have been nonprofits. Lastly, for beginning to provide a wider range of services and classes to students interested in international development, global socially and environmentally focused students,” one student business, and social policies, the business school offers a notes, “There is a big opportunity to lead at the GSB.” sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: average. 9% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 9% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. S ince our inception five years ago, our Net Impact chap- ter has continued to develop a foothold within the GSB community. There are a large number of activities, both Net al development, and other social impact topics. The Net Impact Club organizes events featuring guest speakers and roundtable discussions with experts on a va- Impact-sponsored and otherwise, that engage students in riety of issues including corporate social responsibility, non- community service and issues of sustainability, internation- profit management, international sustainable development, 96 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 108. uNIVeRSItY oF chIcAGo, continued StudeNt ActIVItIeS, continued microfinance, social entrepreneurship, and social impact our group. We believe there is potential to grow membership career options. Our club is actively involved in the Net Im- considerably through building awareness of the group and pact Service Corps program, which gives students the oppor- its goals. The full-time MBA program is currently involved in tunity to put their business skills to work by assisting local a number of community service activities, many of which are nonprofits. We are also committed to Net Impact’s Board Fel- organized by the school’s Giving Something Back club. The lows program, which gives students the opportunity to bring Ray School Tutors program pairs elementary school children valuable business skills to nonprofits while learning about with MBA students who serve as tutors and mentors. We or- nonprofit management and governance. For the second year ganize an annual charity auction to benefit local nonprofits. in a row, Net Impact has collaborated with the GSB Emerging Students interested in international development can get Markets Group, the Kellogg School of Management and the involved with Chicago Global Citizens, which supports in- Harris School of Public Policy to plan and host the Chicago ternational development agencies through GSB consulting Microfinance Conference. This year, ethics forums and facul- projects, and offers an international volunteer spring break ty debates are also planned. In addition to these events, the trip. Furthermore, students often respond to global crises club organizes networking and social events for Net Impact and natural disasters by initiating fundraisers to generate members with the Chicago Net Impact Professional Chapter, financial and in-kind donations to the affected people and Kellogg’s Net Impact Chapter, and other interested individu- areas. A number of students are involved in a tax assistance als. program that provides free tax counseling and tax services to While a lot of students aren’t familiar with the mission of underprivileged individuals in the community. Students also Net Impact, they are curious and often very supportive of volunteer for Junior Achievement. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 64% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 57% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 36% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. C hicago GSB provides weekly job postings and on-campus fellowship, and part- and full-time opportunities. recruiting for students interested in non-traditional Students also have access to an online community directory, sectors that prioritize social and/or environmental impact. which allows them to search for alumni using numerous Sarah Burkhart, MBA Career Service’s Job Development criteria, such as employer certifications, area of expertise, Manager, is in constant contact with the MBA Nonprofit club involvement, professional and personal interests, and Connection (MNC), an organization that links nonprofit volunteer activities. organizations with top MBA candidates. While MNC is a link, For the sixth year, the GSB Polsky Center for they are also an advocate for both students and organizations, Entrepreneurship will offer a social entrepreneurship summer ensuring that internship program, all jobs are of prominent alumni which gives students MBA caliber William Richardson (1971) - President and CEO, W.K. Kellogg Foundation the opportunity to David Vitale (1976) - Chief Administrative Officer, Chicago Public Schools (and salary), and Robert Drumheller (1975) - Vice President of Finance, Overseas Private Investment Corporation work for a company that students Jon Corzine (1973) - Governor of New Jersey with a social mission, are able to apply a startup or small directly with the business. The Polsky organization of their choice. Through Sarah’s interaction Center provides assistance in locating companies that with MNC, GSB has had over 200 nonprofit job postings qualify to host an intern. Through the supplemental awards, in the last year, with functions ranging from marketing to qualifying interns will receive financial assistance from the finance to supply chain management. Polsky Center; host companies match that amount at least The University of Chicago also holds an annual nonprofit dollar-for-dollar. and public service career fair, which is open to all U of C Currently, there is no loan forgiveness program for students and alumni searching for volunteer, internship, individuals who go to work at nonprofit organizations. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 97
  • 109. uNIVeRSItY oF chIcAGo, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 18% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. L ike all student organizations at the GSB, our Net Impact chapter is primarily responsible for raising its own funds, which it does primarily through membership dues. The fully incorporate social and environmental themes would require demonstration of extensive student interest before the administration would actively back them. Graduate Business Council, through its Community Fund The admissions office seems to be increasing its outreach to that supports groups with more limited income, provided students interested in “Net Impact themes.” It has recognized Net Impact with a small amount of funding this year. Net the growing number of such talented applicants that would Impact receives the same access to facilities and support as be valuable assets to the GSB community. Emphasizing any other official student group. such goals or values through the admissions process will The school is always interested in supporting and likely enhance an applicant’s file, although a person must encouraging speakers, lectures and other activities that authentically articulate how Chicago’s strengths – which enhance the circulation of different viewpoints and ideas. do not include an explicit focus on social/environmental While faculty members are given great leeway in determining concerns – will contribute to his/her professional goals. course content, initiatives to broaden the curriculum to more Reasons To aTTend C hicago GSB is widely recognized as a factory for origi- nal thought, having revolutionized the teaching of such business foundations as finance and economics. This strong, school’s only mandatory class is LEAD, an innovative course taught by second-year students on topics like team-building and ethics. Additionally, student groups are well-supported rigorous grounding provides meaningful training for man- and enjoy significant freedom. aging any type of organization. Chicago offers students tre- mendous flexibility, encouraging students to choose classes based on interests and subject expertise. For students with to sum it up social and/or environmental interests, the broader univer- The GsB would be most fitting for someone sity, including the Harris School of Public Policy and the interested in laying the foundation for social/ School of Social Service Administration, offers many classes environmental awareness at the program. that complement the GSB’s curriculum, and the curriculum’s flexibility gives ample opportunity for such exploration. The 5807 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA • Phone: +1 773 702 7743 98 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 110. unIVeRsITy of ColoRado aT bouldeR LeedS SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 155 There are lots of entrepreneurial opportunities 16% of leeds students are net impact members to get involved in the environmental and social ” 50% of those members are “very active” arena. People are very receptive to these 40% are “somewhat active” ideas. This chapter in three words: motivated, Growing, Resourceful chapter leaders: Jeff Dale (jeff.dale@colorado.edu) CuRRICulum T he Leeds curriculum is growing stronger, and increasingly supports social and environmental themes. The core curriculum includes a full semester course on business Students are leading the charge to increase sustainability content in both the core and elective courses, which currently do not include such considerations. They are making headway ethics. Relevant case studies and dialogues are discussed and the administration has vowed to continue the process of in other core classes. Due to the size of our program, there increasing the importance of sustainability. The university are a limited number of electives that address these issues, itself offers a very strong graduate degree in environmental but they are significant as a proportion of the total number studies and several current MBAs are pursuing a dual degree of offerings. Leeds allows students to take electives in in this field. Tom Dean and Steven Laurence are key faculty engineering, environmental studies, law, land use planning members who teach in these areas. and other departments at the University of Colorado. sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he movement toward sustainability at the Leeds school has momentum and is growing due to a well-established net- work at the University of Colorado at Boulder. One student (http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2006/104.html), the MBAA Speaker Series, smaller panel discussions, a Sustainable Business Plan Competition, and others. commented, “The culture of entrepreneurship allows students In general, it is a fun time to be involved in sustainability at to be creative and to push for opportunities in all things that Leeds because the core group of active students is growing ev- interest them--sustainability being one of those.” ery year. The opportunities are endless and, at times, it feels Many initiatives and interests in this field have been synthe- as though each new endeavor spawns a handful of additional sized over the last few years. Any limitation that exists in the opportunities in the Boulder area. curriculum is superseded by the network in the Boulder and Den- Within Leeds, the Centers of Excellence are active in the so- ver area. The Leeds Net Impact chapter gained strength when it cial and environmental area. Each offers its own set of oppor- offered to host the annual Leeds/Net Impact Case Competition tunities and networks. Those centers include: The Center for seven years ago. The Leeds School of Business/Net Impact Case Business and Society, the Deming Center for Entrepreneurship, Competition brings together teams from across North America the CU Real Estate Center, and the Center for Sustainable Tour- to formulate sustainable and profitable solutions to a current ism. Their networks are highly engaged and the small program company’s business issues. Teams comprised of four students size provides unparalleled student access. from each participating institution, present to a panel of indus- In recent years, we have built strong ties with other clubs on try and academic leaders during preliminary and final rounds. campus, including the Solar Decathlon Team, Engineers without Since the competition launched, Leeds has gained visibility as Borders, the CU Boulder Environmental Center, the Undergrad- a school that supports students across the country through its uate Responsbile Business group, and others. Furthermore, our hosting responsibilities. Leeds students are also involved in key CU Environmental Center is among the country’s strongest stu- events beyond the case competition, namely the Sustainable dent-run environmental centers, yet another resource available Opportunities Summit, CU’s own Sustainable Energy Initiative to Leeds students. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 99
  • 111. uNIVeRSItY oF coLoRAdo At bouLdeR, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he Leeds Career Services staff offers personalized sup- port. Because our program is small, the staff can engage companies that students wish to target. On the other hand, guarantee internship placement for students on that track, and their list of companies focused on green building design, sustainable design and development, and new urbanism is the size of the program can make it difficult to entice on- impressive and growing. campus recruiting. Nevertheless, there is a strong base of The Leeds alumni network still needs work. Students have Colorado and Boulder companies that are interested in hir- often complained that the alumni are not as engaged as they ing MBAs with socially responsible business skills. could be, and the same is true for our Net Impact alumni. Much of the internship and job placement at Leeds hap- This year’s class has re-dedicated itself to improving alumni pens through the Centers of Excellence network. These con- relations and has an action plan for doing so. nections are invaluable; the Real Estate Center even offers to admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT C U’s new business school dean has proven to be very sup- portive of the effort to push sustainability to greater prominence at Leeds. The dean believes that the construc- of social and environmental responsibility, that have become issues of concern both on campus and nationally. The Boul- der community offers an ideal setting to continue to build tion of our new LEED-certified building (nearing completion) strength in all that our chapter does. Key administrators are is an opportunity to expand the sustainability movement on open to the movement and are engaged, although some re- campus. With the distractions of building out of the way, main unconvinced. A key area of concern surrounds place- the program will likely undertake a “visioning” process in the ment issues for graduates, but this is changing as Leeds stu- coming year--a major opportunity for our Net Impact mem- dents and Net Impact members continue to land choice jobs bers. after graduation. The MBA student government is the pri- The Leeds school is well-positioned to develop in the areas mary financial vehicle for the Net Impact chapter. Reasons To aTTend T he general strength of the program has many sources: the Boulder community, the new and supportive administration, the high level of student engagement, in the curriculum, especially in core classes. By doing so, they could be a part of a change that will benefit students for generations to come. the new building, and the personalized access to program resources. The case competition is a high point for Leeds students every year, and demonstrates that students at CU Boulder are committed to being a leading chapter nationally. to sum it up The opportunities at Leeds are endless. The community is The leeds school would be most fitting for supportive, and recognizes that sustainability needs to be a someone interested in building upon an existing part of the CU experience as much in the business school as base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. elsewhere on campus. Students interested in coming to CU should be ready to help continue to push for improvement UCB 419, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0419, USA 100 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 112. unIVeRsITy of denVeR dANIeLS coLLeGe oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 900 11% of Daniels students are net impact members [My program’s greatest strength is an] integration of social/environmental 40% of those members are “very active” themes into the core of the entire ” 20% are “somewhat active” curriculum; it’s not just a mere after- thought. This chapter in three words: devoted, Resourceful, passionate chapter leaders: Chase Whitney (cwhitney@du.edu) n = 17 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and environmental sustainability. 53% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 47% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Daniels College of Business committed itself to teach- ing ethics and values-based leadership long before it be- came the norm. The Wall Street Journal ranks us third in the whether it’s teaching the finer points of leadership on a sail- ing adventure, learning how to collaborate while waist deep in Rocky Mountain snow, challenging yourself in a ski race world for producing graduates with high ethical standards or solving real business problems for real corporate clients. and ninth for academic excellence in corporate social respon- “Also, the faculty are extremely enthusiastic about ethical sibility. Now, business is catching up with the knowledge we leadership,” writes a student. have always delivered: that the most successful leaders of At Daniels, you will spend at least twenty percent of your enterprises are people who know how to lead well in all as- time learning about a global vision of sustainable business pects of their lives. Eighty-four percent of corporate recruit- practices and the role of values-based leadership in business ers consider awareness and knowledge of corporate social and the world. Ethical topics “often come up in class discus- responsibility important, and over eighty percent of execu- sions without provocation,” writes one student. tives at U.S. multinational companies rate sustainability as The Daniels Compass is a twenty-credit hour course se- either essential or very important. The Daniels Compass is quence that integrates the concepts of values, global per- more than a new curriculum; it is a bold new vision of what a spective and innovation. It is required of all MBA students. business school can provide and how business students can Students in MS programs are required to take ten credit become business innovators. It gives you the ethical founda- hours. The experience and knowledge you’ll gain in The tion you’ll need to make complex decisions, address stake- Daniels Compass courses enhances and complements our holder needs, collaborate effectively, lead in an interrelated master’s degree programs. Courses in the Daniels Compass global business environment, and change the way you think include: The Essence of Enterprise, Creating the Sustainable about the world in the process. Enterprise, Leading at the Edge, Ethics for the 21st Century Competing in this evolving business landscape requires Professional, Global Enterprise Challenges and Innovation innovative, forward-thinking professionals, so we teach in- Design and Execution. novation in ways you won’t find at other business schools. One student adds that although “there is not a specific The result is that there is an “Integration of social and envi- environmental program, there are a lot of students in envi- ronmental themes into the core of the entire curriculum; it’s ronmental industries/themes who help encourage each other not just a mere afterthought,” writes one student. and bring great panels, etc. to the school.” Our professors aren’t afraid to use creative class formats, Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 101
  • 113. uNIVeRSItY oF deNVeR, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 59% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 47% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. “B ecause of the college’s focus on social/environmental themes, Net Impact is one of the flagship student orga- nizations at the college,” writes one proud student. Since 2002, organizes many speakers and events throughout the school year to further promote our cause. Some recent speakers and events include Net Impact co-founder Dr. Mark Albion on “True to Your- Daniels Net Impact has been committed to raising awareness for self: Leading a Values-Based Business”, a green building tour of and promotion of socially responsible and sustainable business DU’s LEED-certified Law School building, a panel discussion on practices primarily within the Daniels community. Through part- corporate environmental management, tour of Keystone Moun- nerships with key stakeholders, we have been involved with many tain Resort’s environmental sustainability initiatives and tour of exceptional events and organizations, including the Voices of Ex- the 100% wind-powered New Belgium Brewery. Our alumni net- perience (VOE) speaker series and the Colorado Ethics in Business work and continued communications with prior chapter members Alliance (CEBA). Under the guidance of VOE program director and has also brought us immense opportunities. Most notably, our business ethics professor Sam Cassidy, Daniels Net Impact collabo- continued contact with former chapter president Chris McKnett rates with VOE to bring renowned business leaders and newsmak- has created an invaluable partnership between Daniels Net Impact ers to campus for a day of dialogue around broad topics focused and KLD, an investment research firm specializing in integrating on social responsibility. Our partnership with CEBA affords our environmental, social and governance factors in investment deci- members exposure to Colorado organizations and businesses that sions. This partnership makes up the core of our Socially-Respon- espouse our values of socially responsible and sustainable busi- sible Investing (SRI) program. ness practices. Annually, members of Daniels Net Impact perform Most recently, our Campus Greening Initiative (CGI) has gained due diligence on businesses nominated by the community for their tremendous momentum through broad partnerships with organi- ethical practices. It is through this work that Daniels Net Impact zations across campus. Securing commitments from the chancel- not only exposes our members to real-world examples of our val- lor and other key stakeholders has enabled campus-wide sustain- ues, but it also enables us to raise awareness for and promote these ability efforts to move forward. socially responsible businesses to the wider Colorado community. Daniels Net Impact continues to prove itself as one of the flag- In addition to these larger events, Daniels Net Impact hosts and ship student organizations for the College. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 12% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 57% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 12% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. T he Suitts Center for Career Services at the Daniels College of Business offers a comprehensive package of services for both employers as well as students and alumni of Daniels. Daniels Net as well as contacts made via the Suitts Center, we host annual career treks to local businesses who champion the same corporate social responsibility values that we do. We also foster our existing Impact enjoys a close and strong working relationship with the network of contacts by inviting guest speakers to participate on Suitts Center. This affords our members first access to many social/ various discussion panels themed around topics of interest to our environmental career opportunities made available through the members. The Suitts Center, for its part, hosts many college-wide Suitts Center. Moreover, through our partnership, we are working events to further enrich and introduce not only our members but to bring more socially-minded and sustainably-driven companies the entire Daniels community to the rich surrounding community to Daniels. The efforts of not only Daniels Net Impact but of the of business and civic leaders. entire Daniels community has been noticed by corporate recruiters. In fact, Daniels was ranked by The Wall Street Journal (through prominent alumni a survey of corporate recruiters) as third in the world for high Jim Hankins (2005) - Director of Corporate Compliance and Ethics, EchoStar Satellite ethical standards and ninth in the world for academic excellence in Andre Janusz (2005) - Director, Asia Pacific Access Chris McKnett (2005) - Business Development Manager, KLD Research & Analytics corporate social responsibility. This recognition opens many doors Jeffrey Blaugrund (2006) - Principal, Blue Bend for Daniels Net Impact. Indeed, through our own connections Chase Whitney (2007) - Developer, Iberdrola Renewable Energies USA 102 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 114. uNIVeRSItY oF deNVeR, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 29% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 24% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he Daniels College of Business benefits from a strong administrative team, led by Dean Karen Newman. In an effort to build and improve upon an already strong ethical tion provides funding for our daily operations, and support for our various events and activities, from providing meet- ing space to funding our conferences. Through its admis- foundation, the administration along with the faculty have sions process, the administration also ensures that quality revamped the existing curriculum and introduced the Dan- candidates who understand the critical value of social/envi- iels Compass, designed to further merge ethics into business ronmental stewardship are admitted into the program. In ef- decisions, resulting in socially responsible and sustainable fect, the administration is securing the continued growth of business practices. Daniels Net Impact enjoys a strong part- student organizations like Daniels Net Impact. nership with the Daniels administration. The administra- Reasons To aTTend 65% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 47% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he Daniels College of Business is above all else an in- novative institution. Led by a dedicated administration and faculty, Daniels prophetically embraces the trends that National Renewable Energy Laboratory to expose students to the remarkable technologies and business concepts being developed right in our backyard. Daniels is the window to the ultimately shape business and business education. Daniels’ innovative and proactive Rocky Mountain West where busi- incorporation of ethics into the business curriculum long be- ness, research and governance is coming together to create a fore it became customary and the recent decision to make model of sustainability. We hope you consider taking part in sustainability and innovation a part of its core focus is evi- the challenge. dence of its leading nature. Beginning next year with the new core curriculum, environmental sustainability and social re- sponsibility will be at the center of student learning. Through to sum it up classes like “Creating the Sustainable Enterprise,” students The Daniels school would be most fitting for will be given the challenge of creating feasible business plans someone who is interested in attending a school that account for more than just profitability. In addition to to help build upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunities for the innovative curriculum, Daniels is concertedly building significant growth. relationships with leading research institutions such as the 2101 South University Boulevard #255, Rifkin Center for Student Services, Denver, Colorado, 80208, USA • E-mail: daniels@du.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 103
  • 115. unIVeRsITy of geneVa INteRNAtIoNAL oRGANIzAtIoNS mbA aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 30 This is the MBa with a heart. For those interested in learning how 100% of Geneva students are net impact members to manage a CsR program, and 40% of those members are “very active” how to walk away with a practical ” 30% are “somewhat active” tool kit, to be an effective man- ager, i strongly recommend it. This chapter in three words: committed, dynamic, Fun chapter leader: anthony nguyen (anguyen@iomba.ch) n = 10 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 80% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 40% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he International Organizations MBA (IOMBA) curricu- lum at the Université de Genève offers core MBA classes in management and business fundamentals that integrate “Resource Management for Non-Profit Organizations,” “Management Consulting for International Organizations,” “Project Management for Development,” and “Social Entre- the concerns and perspectives of international organiza- preneurship.” tions, non-governmental organizations, and/or the global Students have the option of taking elective courses at any development sector. One student described the program as of the different Université de Genève departments, which unique, “in that all our students are very interested in so- include the Graduate School of Business Studies (HEC), the cial/environmental issues and the majority of us are want- Social and Economic Sciences Department (SES), the Gradu- ing to find a career that has a social impact… The majority ate School of International Studies (HEI) the International of our courses are tailored towards these interests.” Institute of Development Studies (IUED). Additionally, the The IOMBA program organizes its curriculum into three IOMBA program has partnered with other leading interna- broad groupings: global context, business fundamentals, tional academic institutions to offer dual-degree programs. and international organization management. Social, en- Partner universities include the Georgetown University vironmental, and development issues are fully integrated Public Policy Institute (Washington, D.C.), Bocconi Uni- throughout the majority of classes in the program, and in versity (Milan, Italy), and Yonsei University (Seoul, South addition to the many traditional business and management Korea). classes typically found in mainstream MBA programs, the This intense one-year program is taught entirely in Eng- IOMBA offers classes specifically geared toward IOs, NGOs, lish, but students have the opportunity to take French and international development work. A few selected ex- classes throughout the year, as well as elective classes amples of such classes include “Institutions and Social Re- taught entirely in French within the other departments of sponsibility,” “Governance of International Organizations,” the university. 10 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 116. uNIVeRSItY oF GeNeVA, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 40% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 40% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. N et Impact Geneva is a young and dynamic chapter ideally positioned in a city that stands in the heart of Europe and serves as a hub of the international community. SE, Proctor & Gamble, and the Union of European Football As- sociations (UEFA) among others, in order to present lectures on a variety of topics ranging from socially responsible investment, Net Impact Geneva was established in the spring of 2006 by climate change, corporate responsibility, micro-insurance, and students of the International Organizations MBA program at sport and development. the Université de Genève. The relative youth of the organiza- In 2006, Net Impact Geneva provided support for the World tion provides its members with enormous opportunities to de- Food Programme’s (WFP) Walk the World program in Geneva, velop the organization, and the chapter’s placement in the city and in the summer of 2007, Net Impact Geneva members will of Geneva ideally positions it to forge links with international partner with the United Nations Global Compact to provide lo- organizations, nonprofits, major multi-national corporations in gistical and programmatic assistance for the second UN Global Geneva and throughout Europe, and the growing Net Impact Compact Leaders Summit that will take place in Geneva. Fur- movement at other European business schools. thermore, Net Impact Geneva established a partnership with In a very short time, Net Impact Geneva has made itself known AISEC Switzerland, which coordinates the largest student or- through a range of activities that include hosting a monthly lec- ganization in the world, to help implement a two-day confer- ture series, organizing CSR- and development-themed confer- ence event in Biel, Switzerland on the topic of corporate social ences, participating in community charity events, and provid- responsibility. Net Impact Geneva members designed interac- ing pro-bono consulting and volunteer opportunities. tive CSR-themed workshops for the conference and chaired the For example, Net Impact Geneva has forged relationships with event. such institutions as the United Nations Environment Program Net Impact Geneva members attended the Skoll World Forum Financial Initiative (UNEP FI), the United Nations Conference on Social Entrepreneurship in 2006 and 2007, and this year, a on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the International Insti- Net Impact Geneva member and IOMBA alum reached the fi- tute on Sustainable Development (IISD), the UBS Corporate Re- nals of the Global Social Ventures business plan competition sponsibility unit, the UBS Philanthropic Services team, Allianz hosted by the Haas Business School in Berkeley, California. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 20% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 43% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 10% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. B ecause of its location and its growing reputation in the international community, the International Organiza- tions MBA program (IOMBA) at the Université de Genève tions in the world, and it is the home of over 200 international organizations and non-governmental organizations, as well as many of the world’s leading multinational corporations. The offers unparalleled opportunities for students interested in university arranges formal visits to some of the large inter- developing careers that incorporate social and environmen- national organizations based in Geneva to meet senior- and tal issues in business. director-level staff, and similarly, such people are invited to Geneva has one of the most diverse international popula- visit the program to make formal presentations throughout the academic year. prominent alumni Michelle Demateis (2006) - Project Consultant, The Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Ariel Friedmann (2006) - UBS Philanthropy Team, UBS Valerie Spalding (2006) - Network Facilitator, World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Bo Zhao (2005) - Associate Economic Affairs Officer, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) Ilona Milner (2005) – Consultant, World Food Programme (WFP) Secretariat Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 10
  • 117. uNIVeRSItY oF GeNeVA, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued IOMBA students are also given the opportunity to engage Lastly, IOMBA students also have the benefit of enjoying the variety of different organizations based in Geneva through the variety of career fairs and career services that are addi- the program’s coursework, which often requires direct engage- tionally available to them through the rest of the Université ment, consultation, and research of live “client” organiza- de Genève system. tions. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 20% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 30% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. Because of the International Organizations MBA (IOMBA) not be able to in a larger MBA program. Furthermore, be- program’s unique focus on International Organizations and cause the goals of the program and the goals of Net Impact development issues, students are given very personal and are greatly aligned, students have support from the adminis- whole-hearted support in their academic, career, and extra- tration to introduce ideas and activities to both the academic curricular interest in business and social or environmental curriculum and the Net Impact activities in equal fashion. impact issues. The IOMBA program does not attract the typical MBA stu- The IOMBA program is deliberately kept to a small cohort dent, and it is apparent from the types of students that are so that students can receive a level of individual support and eventually admitted that the program weighs the types of so- can develop relationships with not only one another, but cial and environmental interests and concerns of applicants with the program’s administration, in a way that they would in its admissions decisions. Reasons To aTTend 50% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 40% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he International Organizations MBA program at the Uni- versité de Genève is unique among global MBA programs in that it is designed specifically to develop the next genera- kit, to be an effective manager, I strongly recommend it.” With the IOMBA programs location in Geneva, Switzer- land, students are able to make real-world contacts and ex- tion of managers for international organizations, nonprofit plore opportunities to learn and work with over 200 interna- organizations, and development sector organizations. The tional and non-governmental organizations and companies program enlists a seasoned staff of academics and profes- based in Geneva and the surrounding area. sionals who are experts in the field of business and social or environmental development, and the small class size ensures that students receive a level of attention and support that to sum it up they would not get in a larger MBA program. Social and en- vironmental issues are mainstreamed throughout the pro- The université de Genève would be most fitting for gram, and are not treated as side-issues to the business core someone interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ of the MBA degree. “This is the MBA with a heart,” one stu- environmental issues. dent wrote. “For those interested in learning how to manage a CSR program, and how to walk away with a practical tool 24, rue du Général-Dufour, 1211 GENEVE 4, SUISSE (SWITZERLAND) • Phone: + 41 22 379 71 11 106 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 118. unIVeRsITy of Iowa heNRY b. tIppIe SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 120 67% of iowa students are net impact members The program is flexible - students can make as 20% of those members are “very active” much or little impact as they want and faculty is ” 30% are “somewhat active” receptive to ideas. This chapter in three words: Growing, Active, opportunity chapter leaders: abbie Dombrock (abigail-dombrock@uiowa.edu) and Rob soule (Robert-soule@uiowa.edu) n = 15 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 7% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curricu- lum; 13% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Tippie School’s curriculum is focused on providing stu- dents with the foundation they need to be successful in any business endeavors they undertake, including those that mon. This may be of particular interest to those with interna- tional aspirations, since the University of Iowa International Law program is highly regarded. are socially or environmentally centered. Few classes at Tippie We have several faculty members who are actively involved formally address environmental or social themes; however, in social and environmental areas. Professor Erik Lie’s discov- classes are highly interactive. Students may incorporate social ery of the unethical practice of backdating has had a signifi- and environmental themes into class discussion. cant impact on the corporate landscape. Marketing profes- Several applicable electives exist, including courses with sor John Murry has consulted nonprofit and socially-minded a nonprofit perspective to finance, accounting, entrepreneur- business endeavors throughout his career, and he brings his ship, and marketing. In addition, students may elect to add a passion for social improvement to his classes. He has served nonprofit management certificate to their degree. The program as advisor to several student-run consulting projects that ben- is very flexible, and several students have customized the pro- efit nonprofit organizations. For example, students currently gram to match their interests. In addition, many students take are working on a global brand awareness plan to promote the advantage of the dual degree programs. The MHA/MBA, JD/ highly successful but fairly unknown Ponseti Method, which MBA and Pharmacy/MBA degree options are the most com- cures clubfoot without expensive surgery. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 13% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 7% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he University of Iowa has a community active in social and environmental endeavors, and students with such interests will be able to be find areas in which they can serve. This year, the group has hosted several awareness events and is seeking to involve its students in volunteer and grassroots initiatives next fall. Student involvement in these events Business for a Better World (B4BW) was created about four has been high, which reflects the student body’s interest in years ago, and has been somewhat active since its creation. themes promoted by Net Impact. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 107
  • 119. uNIVeRSItY oF IoWA, continued StudeNt ActIVItIeS, continued B4BW has been in contact with the following organiza- led several campaigns to conserve and recycle. Through tions, and plans to partner with them to make a greater im- talking with this group, we have gained insight into the pact on our community in the future: environmental community in our area, gained important • Engineers for a Sustainable World: Active internation- contact information for area political leaders and have ally and locally, ESW identifies projects in other countries, identified specific areas of opportunity and challenge envi- gains funding and completes engineering solutions to rec- ronmental groups face. Future plans for the B4BW include tify problems. B4BW has met with ESW to find ways we participating in a committee uniting the efforts of these can combine business and engineering skills to make a and several other campus groups to form a stronger force greater impact. of change in our community. In addition, we plan to en- • University of Iowa Environmental Coalition: A very mo- courage more participation in volunteer activities through tivated group of mostly undergraduate students, UIEC has volunteer events next fall. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 60% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 73% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 33% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni John Diederich (1993) - Vice President, Ancillary Operations, Rush-Copley Medical Center T Neil Kumor (1993) - Supervisor, U.S. Dept of Veteran Affairs he career services staff at the University of Sonia Martindale (1998) - Financial Analyst, The Mayo Foundation Iowa is very involved in students’ efforts to Jeff Rahm (2005) - Securities Analyst-Public Fixed Income, State of Wisconsin Investment Board Emmalinde Roelofse (2005) - Executive Director, Symphony Arlington find positions that match their aspirations, both personal and professional. Staff members meet with each student individually to identify their and regular corporate speakers, etc. The university also has a skills, interests, and areas in which they will most likely find nonprofit resource center, accessible at http://inrc.continu- fulfillment. Their support of students passionate about envi- etolearn.uiowa.edu/. ronmental and social endeavors equals the support they give Our program financially supports students who take in- students with more traditional career goals, and they will ternships with nonprofits. For example, this past summer provide the encouragement, resources, and contacts neces- one of our students was given a stipend to help cover the sary to be successful in any career path. Resources include an cost of an internship with the World Health Organization in active alumni base, frequent site visits, hands-on projects, Geneva, Switzerland. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 27% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 20% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration supports all student organizations with zeal, and they freely contribute funds and other forms of support to our group. Several of our administrators are implemented. An active Net Impact group would be sup- ported and encouraged at our campus by students, faculty members, and staff. As our organization grows and becomes have attended Net Impact events and have offered encour- more organized, the administration will support its endeav- agement for our efforts. Also, since our program is small, ors. The admissions group looks at leadership in all areas administrators are constantly eliciting feedback and ideas when admitting students to our program and this includes from students. Our suggestions are considered and many interest in social and environmental efforts. 108 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 120. uNIVeRSItY oF IoWA, continued Reasons To aTTend 20% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 7% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he University of Iowa offers a well-respected MBA degree earned in a friendly, flexible environment. Faculty mem- bers are well-renowned experts in their field, yet they take who want to make a difference. Our program actively seeks ways to improve, and it supports the efforts of its students to become more involved in the school and the community. the time to make sure students understand the concepts The Net Impact chapter has not been here for long and it they present. The program offers a variety of majors, but is has a huge opportunity for growth. The students currently best known for its finance and marketing concentrations. in the program are very receptive to our efforts. Summing In addition to looking specifically for demonstration of up its strengths, one student writes, “The program is flexible leadership skills in its applicants, the program continually - students can make as much or little impact as they want seeks to build leadership. A seminar in leadership is part of and faculty members are receptive to ideas.” With several our core curriculum, and the Knapp Leadership series brings other active groups on campus to provide the contacts and high-profile speakers to campus about once a month during numbers that help a grassroots campaign, our campus and the school year. Also, since our class size is fairly small, each community would welcome the efforts of motivated MBAs student is given multiple opportunities (and is encouraged) to help the world become a better place. to serve in leadership positions throughout their time here. The Midwest, and Iowa in particular, offers a friendly com- munity atmosphere. Our international students bring a to sum it up global perspective to classes (thirty-five percent of this year’s The Tippie school would be most fitting for students are from other countries, including India, Pakistan, someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with Lithuania, Turkey, Germany, Russia, China, Korea, Taiwan opportunity for significant growth. and Singapore. Overall, the Tippie School is the perfect place for students C140 Pappajohn Business Building, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA • +1 319 335 1039 • E-mail: iowamba@uiowa.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 109
  • 121. unIVeRsITy of maRyland RobeRt h. SmIth SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 217 This is a group of people firmly committed 33% of smith students are net impact members to learning in the purest sense of the word, 15% of those members are “very active” ” and the environment is open, rigorous and 69% are “somewhat active” at the same time a lot of fun. This chapter in three words: entrepreneurial, motivated, team-oriented chapter leaders: lilah Pomerance (lpomeran2008@rhsmith.umd.edu) and laura Gonzalez (lgonzal2008@rhsmith.umd.edu) n = 11 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 9% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 27% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. C orporate social responsibility is a growing component of Smith’s curriculum and Net Impact members take an ac- tive part in shaping that curriculum. “I liked the sense that and nonprofit firms who have programs designed to create so- cial value.” The club is working with faculty members to create a con- at Smith, the rules were still being developed and as a result I sulting project elective in conjunction with the World Re- could really leave a mark,” writes one student. sources Institute. A team of four or five students will spend We are working with faculty members to develop a two-cred- a semester consulting on a business problem or opportunity it core course called “Culture, Communications, and Ethics,” for a company in the developing world. This elective will be which will start in fall 2008 and will specifically address the available in fall 2008. issues on which Net Impact focuses, including sustainability, Other core courses and electives dedicate a number of class corporate social responsibility and the triple bottom line. hours to topics of business and society as well. “The Global Economic Environment” is a first-year core There are a variety of other course options available to the course that includes lectures and readings dedicated to top- MBA student who wishes to broaden his or her coursework ics such as income inequality, poverty, NAFTA and the WTO. further. The student may take courses from other graduate Themes such as globalization, international development, and programs at the University of Maryland, including from the government regulation dominate this course. School of Public Policy, at no extra cost. Smith students are In spring 2007, Smith offered a social entrepreneurship elec- also eligible to take classes from the Consortium of Univer- tive. From the course description: “This course is about using sities in the Washington Metropolitan Area, also at no extra entrepreneurial skills to craft innovative responses to social cost. problems. Entrepreneurs are particularly good at recognizing Joint degree opportunities include the MPP/MBA and JD/ opportunities, exploring innovative approaches, mobilizing MBA. resources, managing risks, and building viable enterprises. Net Impact is a well-respected club at Smith and can draw These skills are just as valuable in the social sector as they are on support from various faculty champions to achieve curricu- in business. Social entrepreneurship applies to both for-profit lum goals. 110 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 122. uNIVeRSItY oF mARYLANd, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 9% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 27% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. N et Impact has several annual events. A summary of events follows. • Cases and Beer: a popular event that combines moder- Net Impact’s DC professional chapter and Net Impact chap- ters at other schools in the area. Net Impact has a strong relationship with the Dingman ated discussion about a corporate social responsibility case Center for Entrepreneurship. Net Impact and Dingman’s joint with snacks and drinks. We host three or four Cases and Beer program is the Social Venture Consulting program. In this se- events each year. mester-long program, students help nonprofit organizations • Career Panel. During last spring’s career panel, we had address issues —whether financial, marketing, operational, panelists from the fields of socially responsible business, so- organizational or strategic— and develop the necessary steps cially responsible investing, and international development. to solve the problems and improve the business. Most consult- • Career Trek. Last year’s trek was to the IMF and IFC. ing engagements are focused on helping the nonprofits de- • Auction. Net Impact’s auction supports students doing an velop fee-for-service business plans resulting in a diversified unpaid internship with a socially responsible organization. revenue stream for the nonprofit. The auction is also a great way to promote the club. Net Impact is currently a “Gold Standard” Club. • We are currently working to strengthen relationships with cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI 9% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 50% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 27% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni T here is room for the Smith Office of Career Man- Matt Hill (2004) – Project Manager, Oakland Unified School District David Jefferson (2005) – Real Estate agement (OCM) to improve the representation of Douglas Buchalter (2005) – Managing Director, Green Coast Foundation “alternative” career paths. The OCM does, however, Sandra Matsumoto (2002) – Project Director, The Nature Conservatory Kate Cochran (1997) – VP of Resource Development, UNITUS take advantage of the low-hanging fruit that are the local businesses and organizations. The area of Wash- ington D.C. is promising for incoming students who can be accomplished by an assertive student. The office staff are interested in non-traditional careers. The OCM has very will gladly do everything they can to accommodate a stu- good relations with many government agencies and other as- dent, and they are often adept at doing so. Net Impact held sociations and nonprofits. a successful career panel with representation from socially Simply being in the Washington, D.C. area is a great strate- responsible fields of finance, consulting, and marketing. gic advantage for those seeking non-traditional career paths. OCM helps maintain these relationships. Net Impact also or- Net Impact is assigned a specific liaison within OCM whom ganized a career trek to international finance organizations we continue to work with to attain greater representation of including the World Bank and the International Monetary nontraditional professional opportunities. The Office of Ca- Fund. reer Management is very responsive to students’ needs and There is no official funding for students who take low-wage interests. It is often just a matter of communicating inter- internships with social and environmental underpinnings; est to the appropriate person. The office also helps fund the however, the Smith Net Impact chapter has an annual fund- Smith Net Impact chapter’s trip to the National Net Impact raiser for this purpose. Students are also a great resource conference. in this area. A surprising number of interesting contacts in While jobs related to social and environmental responsibil- the world of non-traditional career paths can be leveraged ity are not as readily apparent as more traditional jobs, much through fellow students. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 111
  • 123. uNIVeRSItY oF mARYLANd, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 27% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 27% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he Smith Administration is very supportive of Net Im- pact. We have direct and consistent contact with the associate dean who recently helped us organize a taskforce attend events and accommodate the club generally. Smith Net Impact is funded like any other club, and additional money is available from a myriad of resources, such as the to facilitate the institutionalization of CSR and sustain- career office and other administration offices. These re- ability at Smith. We strive to include the administration as sources can easily be leveraged to help fund guest speakers, observers or participants in our activities and, though their travel, event catering, etc. time is scarce, they usually do everything in their power to Reasons To aTTend 9% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 9% of respondents strongly agree their program ad- equately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T his is a small program with a small but fairly well-devel- oped and well-supported Net Impact “movement.” Stu- dents with such interests who come here will have the op- ternational business, public and private equity, environmen- tal policy, etc., one needs to be proactive in pursuing these. With that approach, the resources are endless. portunity to lead and shape this movement with the support It may also be worth mentioning our strategic position re- of faculty members, staff, and students. Such students can garding government consulting. Smith’s strong reputation in be the vocal representative of the “Net Impact” perspective, consulting, combined with our proximity to D.C., makes it a can actively shift the dynamics of the community dialogue, prime school for people interested in this field. and can have a great and lasting influence on colleagues, stu- dents, and the program as a whole. In general, “Students at the school are very supportive of each others’ interests,” to sum it up one student writes, “and there is a strong culture of environ- mental and social responsibility, even among students who The smith school would be most fitting for someone will probably not pursue a career directly linked to social or interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for environmental responsibility.” significant growth. As with most schools, Smith is what you make of it. While there are many resources available in entrepreneurship, in- Van Munching Hall, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA • +1 301 405 2189 • E-mail: mba_info@rhsmith.umd.edu 112 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 124. unIVeRsITy of massaCHuseTTs-amHeRsT ISeNbeRG SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 70 in the Pioneer Valley, there is a great deal of 29% of uMass students are net impact members emphasis on social and environmental issues, 50% of those members are “very active” allowing net impact members to become actively ” 25% are “somewhat active” involved in many different projects with multiple organizations. This chapter in three words: Fun, Initiative, bold chapter leader: William noto (wnoto@som.umass.edu) CuRRICulum CuRRICulum T he core curriculum at UMass Amherst’s Isenberg School of Management is primarily delivered in the first year of the program. This intense year includes foundational study public policy school, the climate studies school, etc. There are several faculty members who support Net Im- pact at Isenberg. Our advisor is the chair of the marketing in ethics, accounting, finance, statistics, economics, mar- department and his focus is in green marketing. Undergrad- keting, and information technology. By delivering all of the uates are also very involved in energy and environmental MBA required courses in the first year, the program creates clubs. a wide-open second year in which students may take any There is extensive support for dual degree programs, of- graduate level course at the university. Courses that may fered in conjunction with the engineering, public policy, hos- be interesting to Net Impact students may be found in the pitality, and sports management departments. sTudenT aCTIVITIes A s our chapter of Net Impact was founded this year, there is much room for students interested in making an ac- tive contribution to shaping the nature of our group. The fessors from around the campus • A presentation from Mark Albion, one of the founders of Net Impact and a leading author on values-driven busi- chapter “has been warmly received by students and admin- nesses istration alike,” writes one student. Presently we are com- • A six week pro-bono consulting engagement as part of bined of not just MBAs, but also public policy, engineering, Net Impact’s Service Corps; this was enormously popular and climate science graduate students. This year we held our with club participants first elections and became an official chapter, recognized by In addition, “there is a great deal of emphasis on social and both the university and Net Impact central. Highlights from environmental issues [in the surrounding area], allowing Net this year’s activities include: Impact members to become actively involved in many differ- • Co-hosting a viewing of the film “An Inconvenient ent projects with multiple organizations,” says one student. Truth,” after which we moderated a panel of leading pro- CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he school supports trips to businesses and our Net Impact chapter can help pick the kinds of companies and industries we visit. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 113
  • 125. uNIVeRSItY oF mASSAchuSettS-AmheRSt, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT O ur administration has given us tremendous support. They have helped fund our members’ trips to the annual Net Impact conference. They are extremely interested in recruiting MBA students with an interest in Net Impact values and a desire to participate in Net Impact upon their arrival. Reasons To aTTend to sum it up T he greatest strength of the UMass Amherst MBA is that we are encouraged to take courses outside of the busi- ness school that align with our interests. The university is The isenberg school would be most fitting for some- one interested in building upon an existing base of so- open to Net Impact values and welcomes students with ini- cial/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. tiative who want to take an active role in shaping the future of the program. 121 Presidents Drive, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA • Phone: +1 413 545 5608 • E-mail: gradprog@som.umass.edu 11 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 126. unIVeRsITy of mICHIgan RoSS SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 860 20% of Ross students are net impact members 50% of those members are “very active” The people and the faculty at Ross are amaz- ingly brilliant, inquisitive, and challenging. ” 35% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: optimistic, dedicated, diverse chapter leaders: Brian swett (bswett@umich.edu) and Vanessa Frey (vfrey@umich.edu) n = 52 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 40% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 25% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Ross School curriculum is designed to give students both a strong multi-disciplinary business skill set and the opportunity to take socially and environmentally related sign Seminar,” and “Social Responsibilities of Multinational Corporations.” In creating these courses, Ross’s faculty has been very re- courses. sponsive to the interests of the Net Impact community and In addition to an exemplary “traditional” business edu- has moved to maintain relevance in the changing business cation, many faculty members have incorporated triple-bot- world. Our greatest trailblazing professors include C.K. Pra- tom line issues into their core classes. The corporate strat- halad, Michael Gordon, Andrew Hoffman, Tom Gladwin, and egy course, for example, used a Patagonia case for one of the Tom Lyon. In order to stay connected with professors and class’ two group assignments. Similarly, the core marketing have a channel for exchanging ideas, our Net Impact chapter class had students create marketing plans for distributing has a faculty advisory board of six key professors who are AIDS prevention information in African cities and for selling dedicated to incorporating social and environmental topics T-shirts to socially-conscious shoppers. The core “Manage- into their courses. ment and Organizations” course conducted an in-class exer- A significant part of the Ross experience is “action-based cise on action-based, team learning by using a mini-case on learning.” One of the signature programs is the Multi-dis- Aravind Eye Clinics in India. To encourage these develop- ciplinary Action Project, or MAP. All Ross MBAs spend the ments, Ross Net Impact has a student committee that works last quarter of their first year putting their new-found skills with core and elective professors to incorporate social and to work immediately in a real-life consulting project work- environmental themes into Ross courses. ing with businesses and nonprofits throughout the world. The faculty at Ross has also broken ground with incred- Through this program, many students have the chance to ible electives that regularly attract Net Impact members. work on social and environmental projects. Some of the most popular classes are “Competitive Environ- One of Ross’s greatest strengths is that students can mental Strategy,” “Financing the Sustainable Enterprise,” take classes from other Michigan schools or even take on ad- “Social Entrepreneurship,” “Social Institutions of Energy ditional degree programs to support their career interests. Production,” “Social Enterprise Projects,” “Business Strate- These dual-degree programs provide access to resources that gies for the Base of the Pyramid,” “Strategies for Sustainable would normally be outside the field of business. Development,” “Social Marketing,” “Green Building and De- Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 11
  • 127. uNIVeRSItY oF mIchIGAN, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 8% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 38% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. R oss Net Impact is one of the school’s largest and most active clubs. Our membership has grown over thirty percent the past two years, giving the chapter 170 members in the spring of members. Some of the most popular are the Emerging Markets Club, the Public/Private Sectors Club, the Community Consult- ing Club, the Global Citizenship Club, and Habitat for Humanity. 2007. We expect this high rate of growth to continue, and plan There are also a number of relevant institutes housed partially to increase membership to 200 students next year. Ross was also or completely within the Ross School. These include the William recognized in 2006 as Chapter of the Year for its active member- Davidson Institute, which addresses issues affecting emerging ship, influential leadership, and dynamic events. market economies, the Zell-Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Ross Net Impact’s priorities are: (1) Career and professional Studies, the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, and Development, (2) events and community development; and (3) the Nonprofit and Public Management Center. curriculum and school development. Net Impact students share All incoming MBAs also attend the Ross Leadership Program their creativity and inspiration for effecting positive change by (RLP) in the fall. RLP is a ten-day learning and bonding experi- introducing new event ideas and by engaging the administration ence which emphasizes the importance of conscientious, ethical and faculty with new socially and environmentally responsible leadership. In response to student input and with active Ross initiatives. Net Impact support, the administration is adding a Winter Ross Ross Net Impact has a strong history of organizing events Leadership Program crisis case challenge, which will provide stu- throughout the year that engage both its members and the great- dents an opportunity to address a CSR-related crisis in a real- er community. This year, the club had over 230 attendees at the world leadership scenario. 2007 Ross Net Impact Forum, the club’s signature event. Ross Finally, the class of 2007 chose to put its class gift toward Net Impact also organizes career panels, networking events, and creating an endowment for our revamped Loan Repayment As- other social, career, and educational activities. These events con- sistance Program, an indication of students’ strong support for tinue to evolve every year. The chapter, for example, is planning classmates pursuing careers in social enterprise, public service to make the 2008 Ross Net Impact Forum a regional event. and nonprofit management. There are many other clubs of interest to Ross Net Impact CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 31% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 82% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 38% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. R oss’s long-standing partnerships with a number of socially respon- sible businesses and nonprofits through- prominent alumni Jennifer Layke (1997) - Deputy Director Climate and Energy, World Resources Institute Robert Whittier (2006) - Ecomagination Director, GE out the world give students many oppor- Michael Sadowski (2003) - Senior Advisor, SustainAbility Timothy Kennedy (1984) - VP of Marketing, Stoneyfield Farm tunities to pursue careers with a social Jonathan Newton (2002) - Supply Chain Sustainability Strategy Analyst, Ford Motor Company and/or environmental focus. Because of the school’s strong reputation in these areas, Ross students have internships in searches, Ross’s alumni and job databases are easily search- CSR- and sustainability-related departments of many large able by key terms such as “nonprofit” or “environment.” Ross corporations, at innovative social ventures, as well as at well- Net Impact also works closely with OCD to recruit socially respected nonprofit organizations. responsible companies to campus and organize career-relat- Each year the Office of Career Development (OCD) trains ed events. This year marked the first annual Ross Net Impact and hires several Net Impact members as career counselors Career Fair, held in conjunction with the Ross Net Impact Fo- to provide resume reviews, interview practice and general ca- rum. Over twenty companies and nonprofits participated. reer counseling to students with alternative career interests. A number of institutes either affiliated with, or housed In addition to OCD assistance for self-directed internship inside, the business school support nontraditional career paths. DomestiCorps, for example, funds thirty nonprofit 116 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 128. uNIVeRSItY oF mIchIGAN, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued internships each summer for MBA students. The William Zell Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurship also funds intern- Davidson Institute funds twenty-five to thirty internships ships with some social ventures. Finally, Ross also subscribes related to social enterprise, base of the pyramid, and inter- to the MBA Nonprofit Connection. national development. The Erb Institute for Global Sustain- Ross also revamped its loan repayment assistance program able Enterprise supports a number of internships in CSR and and now offers full loan forgiveness to alumni making up to sustainability. The Nonprofit and Public Management Center $75,000 per year at a nonprofit or public organization. This provides funding for public and nonprofit internships. The is currently the highest cap of any MBA program! admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 21% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 8% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. R oss’s mission is to continue building a top-tier business program across all disciplines. Within this mission, the administration has placed an increasing focus on leadership, Ross School, and demonstrates a true commitment to these values. The Admissions Office highly values “Net Impact appli- including leadership on the environmental and social impact cants.” The continued success of programs within Ross, such of business. To this end, the administration is supportive of as the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise and the student-led environmental and social initiatives. The Dean’s William Davidson Institute, as well as the financial support office has responded by making the new Ross building LEED- given to students seeking social-impact careers (through certified and by adding a new Ross Leadership Program crisis internship funding and the loan repayment assistance pro- case challenge, which will provide an opportunity for first- gram) speaks to the administration’s ongoing support and year students to address a CSR-related crisis in a real world the strength of the Net Impact voice at Ross. “Members are leadership scenario. The new LEED building, set to open in making… tremendous changes in the school and are getting fall 2008, will be an ideal building to feature the power of a ton of traction with the professors, the administration, and the nexus of business, society, and the environment at the their fellow students,” one student writes. Reasons To aTTend 63% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 12% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. N et Impact’s foci parallel Ross’s overall strengths: action- based learning, powerful team spirit, and a great cross- disciplinary education. The MAP project is the cornerstone Interdisciplinary action is real. Ross has excellent profes- sors in core business disciplines as well as leading thinkers on Net Impact topics, from environmental management to of the core curriculum. Students have the opportunity to base of the pyramid strategies. Ross students can also add add a second ‘real-world’ experience to the summer intern- breadth through elective coursework at Michigan’s renowned ship—MAPs are available in scores of different industries schools of policy, social work, natural resources, law, urban and in over a dozen countries. planning, and education. The camaraderie at Ross is all-embracing. Students feel it from professors, who are accessible as teachers and men- to sum it up tors; from alumni, who are 60,000 strong and, in the spirit of “Go Blue!”, are there to help; and from fellow students, who The Ross school would be most fitting for someone enthusiastically share knowledge, experience, and contacts interested in attending a school where students and with classmates. “Contagious” is how one student describes faculty are on the forefront of social/environmental issues. the “enthusiasm in the curriculum, conferences, and among students in general.” 701 Tappan Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 117
  • 129. unIVeRsITy of mInnesoTa cARLSoN SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 230 There are a lot of students who believe 60% of Carlson students are net impact members strongly in social and environmental re- sponsibility. There is a good group of peo- 15% of those members are “very active” ” ple trying to make a difference through the 60% are “somewhat active” school’s name. This chapter in three words: Growing, Student-driven, community-focused chapter leaders: Ben schein (bschein@umn.edu) n = 27 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of Community development, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 4% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum. T he core MBA curriculum requires students to take two ethics courses, one of which is on the ethical environment of business. The requirement can also be met through par- Many Carlson students also take advantage of courses of- fered at the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs (housed next to the business school). Courses at Humphrey cover urban ticipation in a two-week summer program in Europe on the planning, nonprofit management, public policy, and corpo- ethical environment of international business. In addition to rate citizenship. Students may count up to eight credits from the European seminar, Carlson offers two-week electives to Humphrey toward their MBA degree. Perhaps as a result of Costa Rica (sustainable development) and China. The num- all these options, “Even students that are not totally commit- ber of elective courses at Carlson that deal with social impact ted understand the importance of responsibility,” one student are limited, but focus on business, the natural environment, writes. and the global economy. One student notes that the infancy In 2007, Humphrey and Carlson launched a joint Center for of the social and environmental movement at Carlson means Integrative Leadership. The new center has the potential to that “committed students have an opportunity to make an im- provide excellent resources for the Net Impact chapter and act pact... Things are definitely moving in a positive direction!” as a catalyst for additional social action at Carlson. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 11% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 11% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Carlson chapter of Net Impact was founded as Stu- dents for Responsible Business in 1993, and is still grow- ing significantly. As one student notes, “My class more than sible business people to campus for discussions. The chapter also works with the local professional chapter, Responsible Minnesota Business, Heartland Circle, and other local orga- doubled the size of the active Net Impact chapter and the nizations. A highlight of the year for the Carlson chapter is class behind me doubled it again.” Net Impact now hosts a the annual Faculty Business Ethics Case Competition, which monthly lunch speaker series which brings socially respon- allows core faculty to debate a business ethics case. The event 118 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 130. uNIVeRSItY oF mINNeSotA, continued StudeNt ActIVItIeS, continued draws a sell-out crowd every year. The 2007 case topic dealt The 2007-2008 Net Impact board has embarked on a strategic with Pfizer’s drug testing in Africa. planning process to formulate concrete goals for the chapter in the The Net Impact chapter works with other Carlson clubs devoted coming years. The focus will be on increasing the number of cours- to community action. These groups include the Community Af- es offered in business ethics, social entrepreneurship and corpo- fairs Committee (community service), Graduate Volunteer Con- rate social responsibility. The plan will also look to create strategic sultants (pro-bono consulting teams for local non-profits) and the partnerships with other campus and community groups. annual alumni charity auction. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 41% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 71% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 37% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. C urrently, Carlson’s career services office offers limited assistance for those interested in social impact oriented careers. Improving these services will be part of the Carlson Net Impact strategic plan. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T here is very limited administrative support for the Net Impact Chapter. Most of the funding for the chapter comes from the MBA Association, which is funded through student dues, and the Graduate and Professional Student Association. Reasons To aTTend 19% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 4% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. C arlson offers a number of opportunities for students to study issues of social responsibility and business ethics. Both within the core curriculum and through the Humphrey Twin Cities. The Carlson chapter of Net Impact is increasing- ly being heard within the school and will have a major impact on the campus in coming years. Institute for Public Affairs, there are many course offerings of interest to Net Impact members. The chapter brings inter- esting speakers to campus and encourages the discussion of corporate social responsibility throughout Carlson. to sum it up Minneapolis is a great environment for learning first-hand about corporate social responsibility and business ethics. The Carlson school would be most fitting for someone interested in laying the foundation for Both in its larger Fortune 500 companies and smaller emerg- social/environmental awareness at the program. ing companies, Minneapolis has a strong culture of corporate citizenship. There are also many new social ventures in the 321 Nineteenth Avenue South, Suite 4-300, Minneapolis, MN 55455-9940, USA • Phone: +1 612 625 0027 • E-mail: info@carlsonschool.umn.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 119
  • 131. unIVeRsITy of noRTH CaRolIna-CHaPel HIll keNAN-FLAGLeR buSINeSS SchooL aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 565 38% of Kenan-Flagler students are net impact members Kenan-Flagler does an excellent job of addressing both the social and 25% of those members are “very active” ” environmental aspects of business. 45% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: Inclusive, Active, Networked chapter leader: Beth Richardson (beth_richardson@unc.edu) n = 67 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of Corporate social Responsibility, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 63% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 51% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. A number of students here say that they chose Kenan- Flagler because of its curriculum. Indeed, “prospective students can know that they will not be the only ones to gain exposure to this way of thinking. Finally, the school recently hired two new professors with expertise in the areas of environmental and social economics and development. involved in sustainability when they come here,” writes Our Net Impact chapter worked closely with school one student. Another adds that, “the students are highly administrators to help bring these latter two developments dedicated to sustainability. Even those who are not pursuing to fruition. sustainability as a career are receptive to its teachings To better round out their education, students are and benefits.” The Kenan-Flagler Business School offers encouraged to take classes offered by other UNC graduate a concentration in sustainable enterprise, which includes programs, including the schools of city and regional planning, classes such as “Global Corporate Social Responsibility”, environmental science and engineering, government, and “Entrepreneurship in Developing Economies,” and “Systems public policy. Thinking for Sustainability.” These classes are offered as either Finally, UNC is proud to have Jim Johnson and Al Segars full quarter or weekend workshop electives. In terms of core as distinguished faculty members. Professor Johnson is the classes, Net Impact members have had success integrating director of the Urban Investment Strategies Center at the social and environmental themes into the core courses. Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute and is helping to establish a The club continues to work with professors to advance this new school for students from distressed urban communities initiative. in Durham, North Carolina. Professor Segars is the director Students have joined the Net Impact Curriculum Change of the Kenan Institute’s Center for Sustainable Enterprise Delegation and are using Caseplace.org and other resources and is considered an expert in the areas of innovation and to develop a list of possible case studies to add to one or two technology management, specifically as they relate to design core courses. The school also recently added a custom core for sustainability. class in sustainable enterprise to encourage more students 120 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 132. uNIVeRSItY oF NoRth cARoLINA-chApeL hILL, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 51% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 37% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he KFBS Net Impact chapter is over seven years old and is well established. In 2001, it hosted the Net Impact na- tional conference. Our chapter focuses on integrating issues of many different groups. These include other student clubs (Con- sulting, Real Estate, Marketing, etc.), larger organizations (NC Sustainability, UNC Sustainability Coalition, WUNC, etc.), and sustainability, environment, and social equity into the overall other Net Impact chapters (Fuqua, NC State, Wake Forest, Tri- program as well as creating career opportunities for sustain- angle Professional). ability-minded students. We have many events over the course This year we hosted our second annual Sustainable Venture of the year that fall under the broad categories of professional Capital Investment Competition (SVCIC), which gives students development, networking and community, and awareness- from top sustainability-focused business schools a real-world building. Perhaps as a result of these efforts, “Sustainable en- venture capitalist experience, and fosters awareness of double- terprise and Net Impact are extremely well respected through- and triple-bottom-line evaluation techniques. out the Kenan-Flagler community, by all students as well as the We have dedicated resources to working with our UNC Sus- school administration” writes a student. tainability coalition, which facilitates our involvement with Some of our activities cross all these areas: our fall Career the Campus Greening Initiative project. We also have created Forum, for example, is an opportunity for students to build a club atmosphere of learning and community through our independent job search skills, meet other members, and learn brown bags, salons, and general club meetings. We are a sup- about career paths in sustainability. It is followed by a career portive and energetic group of students, and the club seeks to fair in February. provide a platform for discussion and networking. Additionally, our club works to build relationships with CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 40% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 70% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 63% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni A s interest in sustainability continues to grow, UNC Kenan-Flagler’s Career Management Cen- ter (CMC) has increased its level of coordination with Rebecca Swartz (2005) - Analyst, Global Compliance, Target Corporation Valerie Cook Smith (2002) - Manager of Environmental Affairs, Citigroup Brad Sparks (2004) - Senior Associate, Sustainability Services, KPMG LLP UNC’s Net Impact chapter to best serve students fo- Chris Strausz-Clark (2000) - Senior Financial Analyst, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Lindsay James (2003) - Manager of Sustainability Strategy, Interface Flor cused on non-traditional career searches. Net Impact, in conjunction with UNC’s Center for Sustainable Enterprise (CSE), also supplements existing CMC ser- Throughout the year, Net Impact offers a diverse set of work- vices. shops that are focused on non-traditional career searches, and In addition to the traditional on-campus career search services, organizes career treks to visit and network with local sustainable the CMC has recently developed a guidebook that helps students companies. The CSE is an invaluable resource that provides stu- to organize job searches using off-campus resources. The CMC has dents with direct connections to people and alumni in sustainabil- also appointed one of its associate directors as the point person ity fields via its mentorship program, its sustainability-focused for students seeking careers in sustainability. She is very enthusi- speaker series, its willingness to individually counsel students in astic about working with Net Impact to shape CMC’s services so their job search, and its award-winning CSE Consulting Program. as to better meet the needs of Net Impact’s membership. CSE summer associates are hand-picked from the first-year class Net Impact sponsors an annual Sustainability Career Forum in and provide business-specific, actionable recommendations that the fall to introduce students to individuals who have forged suc- address the triple bottom line of corporations and nonprofits. cessful careers in various sustainability fields. This year, Net Impact will focus on building a stronger rela- In the spring, CSE hosts an annual Sustainability Career Fair, tionship with CMC to best leverage Net Impact, CSE, and CMC’s which is a recruiting event that connects students to sustainabil- resources to support students involved in non-traditional career ity-minded companies seeking interns or full-time employees. searches. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 121
  • 133. uNIVeRSItY oF NoRth cARoLINA, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 52% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 55% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he support of our administration for sustainable enter- prise has grown with the interest of the student body. The budget of the Net Impact club is now over $8,000—one tion for applicants interested in sustainable enterprise. The admissions office consistently reaches out to Net Impact students to discuss the sustainable enterprise program with of the largest club budgets on campus. interested prospective students. For example, during the ad- Additionally, the Net Impact club continues to receive mitted students’ weekend, the MBA program office request- administrative support through the Center for Sustainable ed that a panel comprised of students, faculty members, and Enterprise (CSE). The CSE provides education, research, and administrators be organized. outreach to business students, executives, and organizations Sustainable enterprise has become a strong branding tool to help them benefit from the opportunities inherent in sus- for the school, and the administration has publicly stated its tainable enterprise. support for sustainable enterprise. An increased focus has been given to providing informa- Reasons To aTTend 78% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 33% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. K FBS is a strong program overall. The Net Impact chap- ter and our relationship with the Center for Sustainable Enterprise create an enriching learning experience and pro- do business. In addition, “Our program recruits many inter- national students who add a rich perspective to classroom discussions about sustainability,” adds one student. A distin- vide great professional development opportunities. The pro- guishing value of KFBS program is teamwork, and more than gram’s strength is its people. This program attracts a diverse ever this has been proven in the success of student teams at set of thoughtful individuals with whom you would want to case competitions. to sum it up The Kenan-Flagler school would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. Campus Box 3490, McColl Building, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3490, USA • Phone: +1 919 962 8301 • E-mail: mba_info@unc.edu 122 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 134. unIVeRsITy of PennsylVanIa the WhARtoN SchooL aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 1,600 7% of Wharton students are net impact members The students are motivated and passionate and surprisingly down to earth... i am 40% of those members are “very active” ” learning a ton and am so happy i decided 50% are “somewhat active” to come here. This chapter in three words: Inclusive, Growing, broad chapter leaders: andrée sosler (andree@wharton.upenn.edu) and samra Haider (samra@wharton.upenn.edu) n = 16 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 25% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 6% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. W harton and The University of Pennsylvania offer a wide variety of courses that relate to social and environ- mental themes. The core curriculum taken by all first year Through Field Application Projects, students team up with faculty members to solve business problems for organizations in their area of interest. Fels Institute programs partner stu- students includes a half-credit course on leadership and a dents with local nonprofits to provide a first-hand study of the quarter-credit course on business ethics. In addition, the organization’s governance, strategic planning, resource devel- core includes a number of cases that touch on issues of cor- opment, resource management, marketing, communications, porate social and environmental responsibility. More than and evaluation. twenty electives offer in-depth learning about social entre- A recent curriculum review found that over eighty gradu- preneurship (management), environmental sustainability ate-level courses related to these broad issues are offered out- (operations and information management), community re- side of Wharton through programs such as The Fels School investment (management), urban fiscal policy (finance), and of Government, the Graduate School of Education, the Law international development. Many of these courses have been School, the School of Social Policy and Practice, the School the result of students partnering with faculty to develop and of Design, and Urban Studies. Wharton students need nine- design a new piece of the curriculum. Included among our teen credits to graduate and can take twenty-one credits to- many distinguished faculty members in this area are: Thomas tal. Fifteen of these credits must be from Wharton courses, Donaldson, Mark O. Winkelman Professor of Legal Studies which leaves plenty of room to explore courses offered at other and Business Ethics, and William Laufer, Associate Profes- schools on campus. sor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics, and Director of the Wharton offers a major in Environmental Risk Manage- Carol and Lawrence Zicklin Center for Business Ethics. ment. Students can also choose to complement their Whar- Aligning with Wharton’s strong emphasis on experiential ton MBA with a Certificate in Public Finance or a Certificate in learning, social impact classes often have an out-of-classroom Nonprofit Administration from the Fels Institute of Govern- element that allows students to apply their learning in the ment at the University of Pennsylvania. Wharton is also in business world. The Global Consulting Practicum is a full- the process of developing a certificate program in conjunction semester class in which students consult for clients around with the School of Social Policy and Practice’s Nonprofit/NGO the world, including nonprofit or government organizations. leadership program. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 123
  • 135. uNIVeRSItY oF peNNSYLVANIA, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 38% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 13% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. F ounded in 1999, Wharton Social Impact (Wharton’s Net Im- pact Chapter) continues to gain increasing momentum; its membership has reached more than 100 students. Other clubs Wharton International Volunteer Program (WIVP), one of the most recognized student clubs on campus, sends teams of Wharton students to developing countries each summer for experienced a decrease in involvement this academic year; our two-to-four week consulting projects with small NGOs. club was noted as the sole exception to this trend. “The com- Wharton Community Consultants (WCC) provides consult- mitment of the students is extremely high,” writes one student. ing and advisory services to nonprofit and community organi- “While it is not advertised widely (due to the high degree of au- zations throughout the Philadelphia area. The organization is tonomy of the student body in these initiatives) the ‘culture’ is managed entirely by Wharton MBA and undergraduate stu- thriving.” dents who volunteer their time on behalf of the club. Wharton Social Impact (WSI) promotes an understanding Wharton Healthcare International Volunteer Project (WHIVP) of and commitment to education, social entrepreneurship, gives healthcare management students exposure to healthcare economic community development, corporate responsibility, challenges in the developing world and the opportunity to im- nonprofit management, business ethics, and environmental prove organizations’ strategy development. sustainability within the Wharton and University of Pennsyl- The Nonprofit Board Leadership Program (NPBLP) strives to vania community. Our main activities include the annual Social create an experiential learning environment for students that Impact Conference, speaker series, career treks, and network- also supports local nonprofits. NPBLP provides second-year ing events. MBAs with a greater sense of how their leadership skills can be Additionally, our chapter builds social and environmental used to make a significant contribution within the nonprofit awareness by encouraging other clubs to incorporate relevant sector. social impact programming into their content. During 2006- Wharton International Development Club helps students 2007, the technology, finance, marketing and energy confer- learn more about international development through a speaker ences included panels related to clean technology, double bot- series and a tailored microfinance course. tom line projects, microfinance, corporate social responsibility A number of additional community service programs (Re- and alternative energy. building Together, Say YES to Education, BIZ World, and oth- Beyond WSI, Wharton student clubs provide opportunities to ers) provide additional opportunities for students to serve make an impact in the local community and around the world. throughout the academic year. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 63% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 91% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 38% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni Tom Arnold (2005) - Chief Environmental Officer, Terrapass W Allison Myatt (2006) - Consultant, Bridgespan Group harton has a reputation for exceptional Ed Marcum (2001) - Deputy Executive Director, World Links career management resources, and there Philip Weinberg (2001) - Vice President of Strategy and Finance, Victory Schools is no exception when it comes to social impact Mailee Walker (2003) - Vice President, Wachovia & Communication Program Officer, Wachovia Foundation interests. While other career tracks may share the same Director, Alison Davis. career advisor, Wharton has dedicated an advisor solely to the Wharton students have access to the most well-stocked list social impact interests. This advisor understands the nonprofit serves with new social impact jobs surfacing every week for and public sectors, and knows socially responsible companies. both summer and full time positions. Wharton has a special arrangement with the MBA Nonprofit Each year students interested in social impact work visit po- Connection (MNC) whereby the Career Management Office tential employers on the job. This year Wharton Social Impact will cover the cost of an initial session with MNC’s Executive led an Education Career Trek in New York City. Additionally, 12 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 136. uNIVeRSItY oF peNNSYLVANIA, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued Wharton’s International Development Club led a career trek to Wharton has a loan forgiveness program to support students Washington, D.C. that choose to go into the nonprofit sector upon graduation. Wharton’s global alumni network includes hundreds of The Summer Public Internship Fund encourages and sup- alumni in careers directly related to social impact. Through our ports first-year students who wish to pursue careers in areas alumni informational portal, students are able to gain insight- that serve the public good by supplementing their summer ful information about socially responsible careers and develop salaries. The fund, financed primarily by fellow students pledg- contacts that will help them identify opportunities throughout ing a percentage of their summer salaries, represents an im- their careers. Our club also organizes on-campus panels and portant commitment by the Wharton community to those lunches with alumni working in social impact. students who work in the public interest. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 6% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 19% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he Wharton administration has supported numerous initiatives related to using business for social and en- vironmental impact. For example, Wharton started the into tying these efforts together and sharing this work in a cohesive way with the outside world. “Because our program is not as well developed as others, all the doors of possibil- first PhD program in the United States devoted to busi- ity are open here,” one student attests. “But you have to ness ethics, and Wharton has supported the development be the type of person who will take the initiative to make of a Nonprofit Leadership Education Program through the something happen.” School of Social Policy and Practice and the Fels School of Wharton faces a marketing challenge more than a lack of Government. attention or energy. However, as students, we have found While numerous activities and initiatives exist at all levels numerous resources and opportunities both within Whar- of the university, the administration has not put resources ton and across the University of Pennsylvania system. Reasons To aTTend 13% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership. A pplicants factoring the presence of social and environ- mental themes into their MBA decision-making process will find Wharton an exciting place to be. While Wharton rigorous analytics are reflected in the various components of our approach to social impact. The co-production philosophy here gives students a true voice in shaping our community. does not market the depth and breadth of its available op- Applicants who are passionate about demonstrating bottom- portunities, students with these interests will find a surpris- line results and who want to be part of the ongoing process ingly supportive community. These opportunities have been of development and improvement will fare well at Wharton. growing in recent years, and Wharton is at a tipping point in this area. Over the next few years, students will continue to to sum it up play a key role in shaping the distinctive features of Whar- The Wharton school is most fitting for someone ton’s social impact program. “People at Wharton are ‘do-ers’ interested in building upon an existing base so if you like being in an environment where you can make of social/environmental impact activities with things happen, this is the place for you,“ writes one student. opportunity for significant growth. Wharton’s expertise in global business, leadership, and 420 Jon M. Huntsman Hall, 3730 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6340, USA • Phone; +1 215 898 6183 • E-mail; mba.admissions@wharton.upenn.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 12
  • 137. unIVeRsITy of RoCHesTeR SImoN GRAduAte SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 250 Our VisiOn program is nothing like any other in the country and also our net 8% of simon students are net impact members impact chapter is dedicated to fostering 25% of those members are “very active” this relationship and we work across the ” 50% are “somewhat active” university and the community to make this happen. This chapter in three words: evolving, creative, energetic chapter leader: Raghu Gupta (raghu.gupta@simon.rochester.edu) CuRRICulum T he Simon Graduate program puts emphasis on leadership, ethics, communication skills, and creativity. These are in- corporated in case studies and in frequent guest lectures. The and often students take up a dual-degree path. The School is active in the Rochester community and receives funding for entrepreneurial projects to promote business within the Simon program has a student group called “VISION” which local community. Our club is organizing an Earth Day event specifically organizes events to serve this purpose. The Si- in collaboration with a local nonprofit organization; together mon curriculum is very flexible in terms of the specialization we will clean up Rochester’s bay area. sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Simon Net Impact chapter is now four years old. In the past we have organized debates on corporate so- cial responsibility and ethics. The club has been involved ner support from the student community. Net Impact is a niche club on campus and topics related to ethics, CSR and business in nonprofit organizations are becoming more in organizing on-campus blood donation sites and various popular now than ever. This paves a strong foundation for fundraising activities. We have become more involved with future events and participation in fields like csr, ethics and local organizations handling environmental issues to gar- environmental safety. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he University of Rochester has a definite advantage for providing an incentive for students to pursue such interests. individuals looking for careers with a social and/or envi- Students are given a full course fee waiver through VISION if ronmental focus. There are several nonprofit organizations, they participate in furthering the cause of CSR and ethics. such as NPR radio, that have come on campus this year. The Simon School also has a student-run group called prominent alumni VISION that emphasizes CSR and ethics through Martha Osowski (1984) - Director, Advancement Services, University of Rochester Alice Smith (1988) - President and CEO, Humane Society of Rochester their activities. This group awards educational credits John Buttrill (1983) - CEO, Greater Rochester Chapter, American Red Cross to both the organizers and participant of such events, admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he administration is most supportive in assisting stu- dents with arrangements of guest lectures, and events like earth day, blood drives, etc. They are also forthcoming pus. Simon Net Impact is committed to bringing guest lec- tures from nonprofit organizations in order to generate fur- ther interest in this sector. We aim to organize such events with financial assistance to organize these activities on cam- until they become a part of the MBA curriculum. 126 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 138. uNIVeRSItY oF RocheSteR, continued Reasons To aTTend T he general strengths of the program are its close inter- action with the local Rochester community which opens numerous avenues for a career in social and/or environmen- to sum it up tal safety. Through frequent guest lectures, the program pro- The simon school would be most fitting for someone vides opportunities for interaction with people successful interested in building upon an existing base of in the field of interest to Net Impact. The School is not shy social/environmental impact activities with opportunity about allocating funds to projects that both improve stu- for significant growth. dents’ learning experience and benefit the local community. 305 Schlegel Hall, Rochester, New York 14627-0107, USA • Phone: +1 585 275 3533 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 127
  • 139. unIVeRsITy of san fRanCIsCo mASAGuNG GRAduAte SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 300 usF has been consistently rated as a top 20% of usF students are net impact members community-involved university. its network and reach are really great considering its 20% of those members are “very active” ” size. also, its 150 year old history sets it 30% are “somewhat active” apart. This chapter in three words: Innovative, Inspiring, collaborative chapter leaders: lauren Travis (lTravis@usfca.edu) and Dan Zucker (DZucker@usfca.edu) n = 24 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of Corporate social Responsibility, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 46% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 29% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he curriculum at USF is unique in that the themes of service and social justice are woven into every class by virtue of our foundation as a Jesuit institution. While the course content in any other graduate program and have those courses count towards their MBA. There are not formalized dual-degree pro- grams, but the advising staff is very helpful in guiding students is not religious, the Jesuit imperative to be socially conscious as they create their own curricula. and aware is deeply ingrained in the values and mission of the The curriculum at USF is very flexible, and starting in 2007, University. Many core classes involve service projects with local students will have even greater access to electives and flexible nonprofits and small businesses, and professors are required to scheduling. This is based on the fact that the business school incorporate business ethics into each course. has both full- and part-time students. The additional advantage The Masagung School of Management is part of the larger to this is that working students bring their experience to the university, which also has graduate programs in environmental classroom and are able to apply their MBA knowledge directly science and nonprofit management. Students can take classes to their job. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 42% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 33% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T here are many opportunities for making a social impact at USF. The USF Net Impact Club has strong recognition among students, faculty members, and the administration. Impact workshop where we explored how we can each make a social impact on a daily basis. This year we also launched our Board Fellows program which encourages students to Our chapter was founded in 2004 and has been growing serve on nonprofit boards, and provides them the training steadily since. We place a great deal of focus on collaboration and support that they need. given our small school size and the limited student availability. Outside of Net Impact, we have a Business Volunteer Clubs often co-sponsor events, and we also partner with Association and we are a Challenge for Charity candidate. Career Services and other groups on campus. For Earth Day, This year we had the opportunity to volunteer for the Clinton for example, we collaborated with Bon Appetite, the school’s Foundation, the Special Olympics, and Project Homeless socially conscious food service provider, to create the first- Connect. Next year, we will collaborate with these groups to ever Sustainability BBQ. We also collaborated with our host Volunteer Day during New Student Orientation, and plans prominent leadership professors to create the first Make Your are underway to launch Service Corps. 128 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 140. uNIVeRSItY oF SAN FRANcISco, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 29% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 55% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 17% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alum Oren Jaffe (2006) - Business Development Manager, Social Compliance, Factory Assessments, Security Assessments, Bureau Veritas C areer Services is on board with helping students find careers in the CSR field. Given our mission and our location in the socially conscious Bay Area, there are a plenty of opportunities school size makes Career Services very accessible, and allows for one-on-one interaction and consultation with the career services director. Professors are also happy to engage with students on to make an impact through one’s career. Career Services actively career development, which is significant because many of them sponsors panels and events on careers in CSR and sustainable have industry experience in addition to their focus in academia. business, and the MBA Career website has postings for jobs in One student notes that alumni are a good resource too: “USF’s CSR-related positions in top Bay Area companies. The small network and reach is really great considering its size.” admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 25% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 25% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T here is a great amount of administrative support for Net Impact at USF. Our dean, Mike Duffy, has a solid commitment to corporate social responsibility, and speaks continue to improve in this area. One student writes that “There is more faculty support and administrative support for socially responsible students than there are students who wish frequently on the topic. The dean’s office has sponsored to pursue this.“ Another adds, “The support from the school attendance to the Net Impact Conference, and is engaged in and faculty is there; it is up to students to step up.” listening to suggestions from the students on how we can Reasons To aTTend 46% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 33% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he University of San Francisco Masagung School of Management is an ideal place to pursue a MBA with a social and/or environmental focus. Our location in the heart ongoing activities and create the change they want to see. Net Impact programs such as Board Fellows, Day on the Job, Make Your Impact, CSR Career Panels, and opportunities of San Francisco positions us well for interaction with some with the Business Volunteer Association are all ways that of the country’s leading CSR companies, and makes it easy students can engage in developing their interest in social and to participate in service learning projects. Our foundation environmental issues. in the Jesuit tradition, and our dean’s commitment to social responsibility, means that not only are there specific courses to sum it up in sustainability and social responsibility, but social justice The Masagung school would be most fitting for and social consciousness are infused into every class at every someone interested in building upon an existing level of the curriculum. The school’s approach to social and base of social/environmental impact activities with environmental themes is collaborative, innovative, and opportunity for significant growth. action-oriented, allowing students to both participate in 2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco, California 94117, USA • Phone: +1 415 422 2089 • E-mail: usfgsm@usfca.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 129
  • 141. unIVeRsITy of souTHeRn CalIfoRnIa mARShALL SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 440 9% of Marshall students are net impact members The usC community at large is very ” 60% of those members are “very active” socially conscious. 25% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: diverse, passionate, Results-driven chapter leaders: sam Reid (samuel.reid.2008@marshall.usc.edu) and Zelinda Welch (zelinda.welch.2008@marshall.usc.edu) CuRRICulum M arshall’s commitment to Corporate Social Responsibil- ity (CSR) is strong and getting stronger. Our new dean, Jim Ellis, sees school-wide commitment to CSR as a strate- like Toyota and the California Charter Schools. Elective syllabi are created by the professor and can be ad- justed based on student input. If there are enough requests gic imperative and is currently looking into a variety of ways to add a topic or case on social themes into a class, the profes- Marshall can take its existing programs to the next level. The sors will adapt their content accordingly. Marshall Net Impact leadership team met with Dean Ellis in Students are allowed to take up to nine units (two or three May 2007, and discussed a variety of potential actions, in- classes) in other graduate programs on campus such as the cluding endowing a Center for Corporate Social Responsibil- School of Public Policy. Faculty members support students ity, creating a Social Venture Capital Fund, hosting the global taking classes they feel will best build the MBA curriculum, as Net Impact Conference, and several other exciting ideas. long as guidelines for relevance and rigor are met. Similarly, Although the core curriculum does not have a stand-alone there is a three-year MBA/MSW (Masters In Social Work) class that focuses exclusively on social and environmental program that participating students highly recommend. themes, several weeks of our core “Global Leadership and Ac- USC Marshall’s Greif Center for Entrepreneurship is one of countability” course are dedicated to ethics and corporate so- the top five programs in the world. The entire entrepreneur- cial responsibility. In addition, social and environmental top- ship department and faculty are very open and have many ics are discussed intentionally and frequently in our general contacts in the world of social entrepreneurship. Addition- management, global economics and global strategy courses ally, many members of the strategy department faculty are through case discussions which focus on firms like Wal-Mart interested in CSR, and our first-term strategy professor, Ar- and GE. Guest speakers have also visited from organizations vind Bhambri, wrote his doctoral thesis on social issues. sTudenT aCTIVITIes M arshall Net Impact was founded in 2002 and has be- come one of the fastest-growing and most active clubs on campus. Club membership has grown by close to 100% any interested potential students and/or companies our way. When it comes to students, we use career fairs, club fairs, e- mail, our website, intra-club coordination, case debates and in each of the last two years, and over forty of the 120 newly our speaker series to ensure that our members and our entire admitted students who attended our Admit weekend joined community understand the issues. our mailing list and expressed strong interest in joining Net INSPIRING: Beyond informing, several of our events are Impact in the fall. Our strategy for the 2007-2008 year is focused on inspiring our membership and the Marshall com- focused on providing the Marshall community with three munity. Some highlights from this year included listening to things: information, inspiration, and action. Rick Ridgeway, Patagonia’s VP of Environmental Initiatives, INFORMING: We have created “talking points” documents Dr. Mark Albion, co-founder of Net Impact, and Thomas for our faculty, administration, admissions, and CRC con- Friedman, author of The World is Flat. We also provided in- tacts to keep them informed and to ensure that they direct spiration for our members through site visits such as our trip 130 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 142. uNIVeRSItY oF SoutheRN cALIFoRNIA, continued StudeNt ActIVItIeS, continued to see Toyota’s new LEED-certified buildings and our onsite stewardship by co-leading the effort to make all of USC’s fu- meeting with the CEO of Goodwill at their Los Angeles head- ture buildings LEED-certified. The list goes on. Marshall Net quarters. Impact is full of passionate, driven, socially-minded leaders ACTING: Although our entire membership enjoys listen- with a passion for turning theory into action. ing to speakers and touring successful socially responsible Finally, we believe that Net Impact has the ability to drive businesses, we also have a gut-level desire to get our hands change through almost every club at Marshall. Our mem- dirty making a tangible difference. Our members learn about bers are currently building alliances through their leadership education reform through volunteering as after-school men- positions within the finance, real estate, entrepreneurship, tors and through teaching Junior Achievement classes. We strategy, consulting, and marketing clubs, while our leader- learn about nonprofit management by volunteering at Spe- ship team is forging alliances with other graduate schools cial Olympics events and we learn about environmental within USC and with the overall LA community. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he Marshall Career Resource Center (CRC) was complete- ate schools at USC, we will give our students both the real- ly re-structured in 2004 and it has become one of the life nonprofit experience and the contacts they will need to brightest highlights of the Marshall experience. Our career land their dream jobs. specialists are organized by career vertical, and Janice Nishi- Although Marshall is committed to helping students ex- yama is committed to serving Net Impact and all students pand their socially responsible career options, the combina- seeking employment in the nonprofit sector. Beyond Janice, tion of a young Net Impact Chapter and a recently re-orga- our marketing, entrepreneurship, and consulting vertical nized CRC means we still have some room for improvement. leads also funnel several nonprofit and socially responsible The amount of nonprofit job postings is growing every day, career and internship options our way. and after we implement our school-wide marketing strategy During the 2006-2007 year, the CRC helped organize ca- starting in the fall of 2007, student options will grow expo- reer treks to Hong Kong, New York, Silicon Valley and Las nentially. Vegas, and the Program Office heavily subsidized the large group of members who attended the annual Net prominent alumni Impact Conference at Northwestern University. Adam Miller (2005) - Director of Finance, California Charter Schools Association Beyond CRC related activities, we already have four Tala Abbasi (2006) - Director of Operations, Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) nonprofit companies lined up to work with us on pro- Shyno Chacko (2006) – Manager, Ashoka Tim Crane (2006) - Purchasing Manager, REC Solar bono consulting projects this fall. By partnering with Jordan Newman (2005) - Financial Product Manager, Sharp Solar the professional Net Impact chapter and other gradu- admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT O ur dean, vice dean, program director, dean of admissions and director of the Career Resource Center are all sup- portive of Marshall’s continued commitment to corporate cially minded candidates each year. Beyond lip service, our Program Office has approved mas- sive funding for student participation in the annual Net social responsibility. Our Program Office fought a two-year Impact Conference, and regularly supports our requests for battle to improve our recycling program, our new dean has speaker and event resources. Although our club is relatively listed CSR as one of his key strategic focus areas, and our ad- new, every possible indicator is pointing in our direction. missions team is admitting an increasing percentage of so- The 2007-2008 school year is going to be off the charts. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 131
  • 143. uNIVeRSItY oF SoutheRN cALIFoRNIA, continued Reasons To aTTend Marshall’s diverse set of strengths span several categories: the joint MBA/MRED program have set the standard for • Global Focus: the Pacific Rim Education project, the inter- real estate education for years. national exchange program, the high percentage of interna- • The Center for Effective Organizations: CEO is a global tional students, and the comprehensive global curriculum think-tank for organizational behavior, leadership and tal- combine to make Marshall’s global focus one of its most ent management, and the research faculty staffing CEO add powerful strengths. tremendous value through their cutting edge elective offer- • Community and Alumni: Marshall’s culture of collabora- ings. tion is one of the most team-focused MBA cultures in the nation. Students help one other to succeed, and spend more Students who are interested in social and environmental time building lifelong friendships than they do trying to themes should walk into Marshall with their eyes wide open. outdo each other. Once they graduate, Marshall students We have plenty of room for improvement, but the existing join the largest, most powerful, and most committed alum- Net Impact team is one of the most diverse, aligned, and ni network in the world. powerful groups on campus and with the support the admin- • Entrepreneurship: The Greif Center for Entrepreneurship istration and faculty, there’s no stopping us. The 2007-2008 is one of the most recognized and most highly ranked entre- school year will be a wild, wonderful, and meaningful ride. preneurship programs in the United States. The quality of the faculty, the size of the successful entrepreneur alumni pool, and the commitment to hands-on learning continues to sum it up to build and launch some of the most successful entrepre- neurs in the world. The Marshall school would be most fitting for • Real Estate: The Lusk Center for Real Estate also provides someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with one of most highly ranked specialty programs in the world. opportunity for significant growth. The Masters in Real Estate and Development (MRED) and 444 S. Flower St. Suite 1009, Los Angeles, California 90089-8204, USA • Phone: +1 213 740 8990 • E-mail: execed@marshall.usc.edu 132 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 144. unIVeRsITy of souTH CaRolIna mooRe SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 200 i chose to attend the Moore school 10% of Moore students are net impact members because of its international emphasis, with 80% of those members are “very active” the opportunity to learn a new language ” 20% are “somewhat active” and spend up to 6 months abroad on an internship. This chapter in three words: meaningful, Young, engaging chapter leaders: anand Deekaram (deekaram@gmail.com) and Kate White (Katherine_white@moore.sc.edu) n = 10 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, Corporate social Responsibility, and social entrepreneurship. 10% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 20% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. I n the first year of the program, the core curriculum includes courses such as Globalization and Corporate Social Respon- sibility, Leadership and Ethics, and Global Entrepreneurialism. in their assignments and during class discussions. There are several faculty members that specialize in social and environmental topics of relevance to business, including sus- Other core courses include discussions and case studies on the tainable manufacturing and operations management, environ- business aspects of international development, including busi- mental management, corporate social responsibility, business nesses targeting products and services at the bottom of the ethics, and “bottom of the pyramid” theory, particularly as it economic pyramid, corporate environmental responsibilities in relates to microfinance. developing countries, and appropriate behavior of corporate ex- The Moore School of Business administration and faculty pansion into developing countries and emerging markets. have collaborated with the university’s School of the Environ- For the students concentrating in international economic ment to bring courses on sustainable business and environmen- development, several relevant electives courses are offered on tal management to the business school. Such courses have been such topics as sustainable business, environmental manage- a success and increased collaboration is expected in the future. ment, and the economics of growth and development. Additionally, the Moore School of Business allows for students In courses that do not specifically address social and environ- to take courses in international development through the po- mental themes, students are encouraged to address these issues litical science department and vice versa. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: average. 10% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Moore School of Business Net Impact chapter has been ac- tive with developing the curriculum, linking business faculty with the School of the Environment, and organizing speakers growth. “There are endless possibilities for involvement,” writes one student. Any new enthusiastic student would be welcome as a leader for the chapter. Finding enthusiastic students who show and tours on such topics as microfinance, green building, organic initiative and can step up to leadership roles is of utmost impor- wine production, etc. tance seeing as there is little overlap between first and second- The chapter has a structured action plan divided into several year students due to Moore’s unique first year schedule. pillars of action. The chapter is currently placing a priority on “While there are a few diehard old-school business students, by helping students find relevant career opportunities. and large my cohort is receptive to [Net Impact] issues,” writes The chapter is relatively new and there is a lot of opportunity for one student. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 133
  • 145. uNIVeRSItY oF South cARoLINA, continued CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 30% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 100% found internships that utilize their values and skills; 30% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni T he IMBA career services are very open to students’ needs and demands. Recently, they have Laura Lee Clinton (1998) – International HR Consultant, CARE Marci Eggers (2003) – Associate Director of Marketing for South America, The Nature Conservancy Katie Brownrigg (2006) – Senior Analyst, Development Associates, Inc. Melissa Lumpkin (2006) – Accion International involved recruiting in areas of Julie Driver – Program Manager for Fellows/USA, Peace Corps international development and have sponsored representation at such development banks, and microfinance institutions. Based on Net career conferences as the Idealist job fairs and Net Impact Impact’s current focus on helping students find relevant career conferences. Internships are a fundamental part of the Moore opportunities, the chapter has been working closely with the experience and several students have had internships with offices of career services and alumni relations. nongovernmental organizations, environmental organizations, admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 20% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum T he administrative staff of the Moore Business School is very approachable and has shown interest in increasing the inclusion of sustainability and environmental issues in as electives. “Our program offers the chance for a student to try to make major changes to the existing curriculum,” writes one businesses. This has been evidenced by the recent addition student. “The program is not too big, therefore your voice of ethics and corporate social responsibility courses to the never gets drowned out….But the overall student body has core curriculum, and the offering of other relevant courses not pushed the [issues] enough.” Reasons To aTTend 10% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 20% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he Moore School of Business International MBA Program is unique for several reasons, the main one being its international focus. Just about every course addresses These international opportunities pave the way for students to study social and environmental themes from a global perspective. content from a global perspective. The program does a superior job of preparing any student from any country to to sum it up conduct business in any part of the world. Another very The Moore school would be most fitting for someone unique aspect of the program is its focus on a long, intense, interested in building upon an existing base of social/ and required internship. Interns are spread all over the world environmental impact activities with opportunity for and during that time, classmates experience what it is like significant growth. to have a truly global network spread across six continents. 1705 College Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 USA • Phone: +1 803 777 4346 • E-mail: gradadmit@moore.sc.edu 13 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 146. unIVeRsITy of TeXas mccombS SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 520 11% of McCombs students are net impact members We are in the process of spawning a major sustainability track here which is an exciting 20% of those members are “very active” process that should be fruitful for all stu- ” 65% are “somewhat active” dents. This chapter in three words: Active, passionate, Ambitious chapter leaders: Christopher Jensen (christopher.jensen@mba08.mccombs.utexas.edu) and nicole Roberts (nicole.roberts@mba08.mccombs.utexas.edu) CuRRICulum CuRRICulum provides the flexibility to The MBA curriculum at McCombs focus on all issues of sustainable development, and the ex- tent to which this important topic permeates the curriculum There is a contingent of students and leading faculty members who are pushing to see better representation of these themes in our curriculum, namely through the creation of a sustainability grows every semester. The core curriculum features occasional track. MBAs may also take several classes offered by UT’s oth- cases that focus on social and environmental themes, and we er outstanding graduate departments; this allows students to are pushing to make these issues a part of everyday discussion. take classes on almost any related topic from world-renowned The electives provide a much more concrete opportunity for faculty. Students may also earn a dual degree with the public students to incorporate social and/or environmental themes policy program, the law school, or the environmental sciences into their education. We have recently added the first formal program, among others. It is exciting to take part in the growth class on sustainability to our lineup of ethics and CSR classes. of the social and environmental curriculum at McCombs. sTudenT aCTIVITIes S tudents at the University of Texas exhibit an extraordinary level of involvement in campus activities, and this is no less true at McCombs. Students can join organizations of nearly beque event to raise awareness about Net Impact and the en- vironment, as well as an Austin-wide Sustainability Summit, a 400+ person event to be held in the winter. We work closely every imaginable description, in almost any facet of business with other campus organizations on many of our events, and or recreation. Alternatively, they can create their own. The try to make them available to all McCombs or UT students. We Net Impact chapter at McCombs, which hosted the 2003 Net also attempt to connect our students with careers in social or Impact National Conference, has approximately sixty students environmental realms through career treks and job postings. and is growing. We are one of the most active organizations Through our events, we have created strong, positive awareness at McCombs, and we organize dozens of activities each year. about our organization and the themes that we represent. Currently, we are planning a community-wide sustainable bar- CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI N et Impact is working closely with our career services of- companies focused on these values. Our Net Impact chapter fice to bring forward additional resources for students organizes career treks to local companies, to give members seeking careers with a social or environmental focus. Our more exposure to the local entrepreneurial spirit, which is career services team provides listings for both full-time and often social and environmental in focus. internship opportunities all around the country. We are beginning to build relationships with companies prominent alumni that are socially or environmentally focused, and our Graeme Martin (2006) - Environmental Products, Shell Trading Fred Wu (2007) - Senior Consultant, CLEAResult Consulting Inc. best resource is the Austin community with its many Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 13
  • 147. uNIVeRSItY oF texAS, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he administration at McCombs is responsive to student re- quests and initiatives, which allows us to be major catalysts for change within the program. The administration supports our ter for Customer Insight and Marketing Solutions at McCombs recently launched an initiative on sustainability and we have sev- eral faculty members who work passionately on the subject. We Net Impact chapter by helping us push forward our curriculum are currently working with the administration to build a sustain- goals, promoting our events, and locating resources. The Cen- ability track for future McCombs students. Reasons To aTTend T he strength of McCombs is leadership. McCombs seeks to create influential business leaders through organizations like Net Impact, where students actively participate in shaping the fu- to sum it up ture of the school while also developing their personal leadership The university of Texas would be most fitting for skills. McCombs is a tight-knit community, with tremendous someone interested in building upon an existing base of alumni connection and networking opportunities. McCombs, social/environmental impact activities with opportunity along with the entire University of Texas campus, is working to- for significant growth. ward creating a triple bottom line learning culture. 1 University Sta B6000, Austin, Texas 78712-0201, USA • Phone: +1 512 471 5921 136 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 148. unIVeRsITy of uTaH dAVId eccLeS SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 120 17% of utah students are net impact members i have found that the [latter Day saints] popu- 60% of those members are “very active” lation tends to be more interested in ethics and ” social issues. (i’m not a member of the church 40% are “somewhat active” and am not from utah.) This chapter in three words: Growing, potential, motivated chapter leaders: laura lincoln (llincoln77@yahoo.com) CuRRICulum CuRRICulum are not a core focus of our Issues of sustainability and business program, but there are students and faculty members who are interested in them. Students who want to become engaged in changes in the future. Net Impact provides the primary outlet for students interested in CSR, etc. Some coursework is available through the schools of Urban Planning and Public Policy. Utah these issues will not find much in the way of coursework to ex- is a conservative and religious state that lags behind the rest of pand their knowledge. A new course on ethics and business was the country in following trends, so it may be a while before these added this semester, which opens the door to more curriculum issues filter into the business school’s curriculum and research. sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Net Impact chapter at the Eccles School was formed about ten years ago, but was dormant for a few years, and has really become more active in the last two years. The outgoing leader- In the coming year, we plan to organize several on-campus panel discussions (topics include public transit, microfinance, and alternative energy) as well as company visits. We will try ship team has been the most active to date, and the incoming to co-host some of these events with other student clubs (the leadership team hopes to capitalize on the growth and energy Graduate Business Student Association, WorkNet, the National that currently exists. The chapter does not have a formally articu- Association of Women MBAs) to boost participation. Student lated strategy, but our goals for the coming year focus on expand- awareness of Net Impact and its core issues is lower than at many ing awareness in the business school and successfully recruiting a other schools, but it is increasing. The conservative orientation larger number of first-year students. of many students is a hurdle, but not an insurmountable one. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI T he career services office at the Eccles School is not particu- larly useful for students interested in socially responsible business. However, a recent change in staffing may help to does offer a nonprofit consulting course and a Board Fellows program, both of which help students make contacts in the nonprofit sector. Few students at the Eccles School seem to be alleviate this problem and make the career services office more interested in nonprofit careers, however. Socially responsible effective overall. The school has a strong reputation locally, businesses are not yet common in Utah, and finding them but it is not clear if this has translated to any interest from does not seem to be a high priority for the career services of- nonprofits and/or socially responsible businesses. The school fice, though “career treks” are supported. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 137
  • 149. uNIVeRSItY oF utAh, continued admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he director of Masters Programs at the Eccles School is very supportive of the Net Impact chapter. He has given the chapter funding to attend the annual Net Impact conference, and he attends many of Net Impact’s events. It is unclear if the school gives special priority to applicants with social or environmental interests, although having these interests is a great differentiator for ap- plicants since it is not very common. Reasons To aTTend T he strengths of the Eccles School program lie in its small size, high-quality faculty and overall friendliness and generosity of the students. A potential applicant with interest in social and/or environmental themes should be ready and willing to work hard to promote awareness of these issues among students and faculty members, and he or she should be prepared for an environment that is far from “preaching to the choir.” However, it is very rewarding to introduce fellow students to these topics for the first time and see them respond positively. to sum it up The eccles school would be most fitting for some- one interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. Kendall D. Garff Bldg, 1645 E Campus Center Drive, Room 101, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA • Phone: +1 801 581 7676 138 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 150. unIVeRsITy of wIsConsIn-madIson SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 231 9% of Wisconsin students are net impact members The town of Madison is a community that prides 25% of those members are “very active” itself on being socially and environmentally ” 15% are “somewhat active” aware. This clearly rubs off on the members of our program. This chapter in three words: energized, Growing, challenging chapter leaders: Tim staton (staton@wisc.edu) and Katy McMurry (mcmurry@wisc.edu) CuRRICulum CuRRICulum University of Wisconsin- In many ways the curriculum at the Madison is probably similar to any other business school in this guide. However, our program introduces some unique Students are encouraged to take classes outside the School of Business, as many of the social and sustainable coursework is offered through the Engineering, Sociology, and Environmental characteristics. For example, applicants apply not to a general Studies Institute. Several faculty members have a personal MBA program, but to one of thirteen career specializations interest in sustainability, which they incorporate into course offered. This focused approach allows the student to get material as well as their research. Certificates in Energy, in-depth knowledge regarding their chosen career, and also Air Resources, and Transportation are offered through the allows them to tailor the specifics of their coursework to their Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Sciences. A personal interests. Almost all of the courses on social and certificate in Sustainable Business is scheduled to be offered environmental issues are offered outside of the core program. in the future. sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Net Impact chapter at University of Wisconsin-Madi- son is currently a small group of individuals who are look- ing forward to increasing overall school membership and throughout the university’s various graduate schools. Becom- ing a member of the School of Business chapter means that you would be actively involved in forming and implementing participation. Due to our small membership base, we focus the strategy for Net Impact over the coming years. on co-sponsoring events with other student organizations CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI prominent alum T he Career Services group at UW-Madison is exceptional. They have an excellent network of existing company connections, and are willing Andrew Kotila (2007) - Energy Consultant, Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corp. to pursue new contacts if students ask. They also network, ability to easily establish new connections, and the maintain the extensive alumni database, to which all MBA extensive Alumni database provide for a very rich base of students have full access. The combination of the existing employment options. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he administration at the UW-School of Business is supportive of Net Impact’s message and goal, but currently considers us to be like many of the other School of Business student groups. It is our goal to raise the awareness of the Net Impact message within the administration through recruiting more students. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 139
  • 151. uNIVeRSItY oF WIScoNSIN, continued Reasons To aTTend T he Net Impact chapter at University of Wisconsin-Madison is currently a small group of dedicated individuals who are look- ing to increase Net Impact’s presence. We are passionate about mative group without pre-existing boundaries or limits. This is a group for free-thinking and progressive business students who want to push for change and have an impact on one of the best business and the good that it can and needs to do. We are a for- institutions in the nation. to sum it up The university of Wisconsin-Madison school of Business would be most fitting for someone interested in laying the foundation for social/environmental awareness at the program. 3150 Grainger Hall, 975 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA • Phone: +1 608 262 4000 • E-mail: MBA@bus.wisc.edu 10 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 152. yale unIVeRsITy SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 413 44% of Yale students are net impact members at Yale, you won’t be the guy or girl who does net impact. You’ll be one of many 50% of those members are “very active” ” and you’ll be defined about what your 30% are “somewhat active” deeper interests are. This chapter in three words: comprehensive, energetic, essential chapter leaders: Katya levitan-Reiner (katya.levitan-reiner@yale.edu) and allyson Fish (allyson.fish@yale.edu) n = 35 CuRRICulum CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and environmental sustainability. 74% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the cur- riculum; 54% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Yale School of Management is guided by its mission to “educate leaders for business and society.” In fall 2006, SOM introduced a new and innovative core curricu- Yale SOM offers numerous electives that address social and environmental themes. These include: Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations, Corporate Social Responsibility, lum. Rather than teaching management concepts in sepa- Social Venture Management, Microfinance and Economic De- rate, single-subject courses like finance or marketing, Yale velopment, Public and Private Management of the Environ- approaches the teaching of management in an integrated ment, and Business Ethics: Succeeding without Selling your way — the way in which most managers must function every Soul. day in order to achieve success. As a result, “it is not as if A number of our faculty members are active in social and en- these themes have been tacked on in the form of electives vironmental fields including Sharon Oster (Frederic D. Wolfe only,” writes one student. Social and environmental themes Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship and Director are woven into the core curriculum through cases and class of the Program on Social Enterprise), Gary Brewer (Frederick discussions. As an example, one of the organizational per- K. Weyerhauser Professor of Resource and Management), and spectives on state and society focuses on the way managerial Edward Kaplan (William N. and Marie A. Beach Professor of decisions are affected by governmental and societal needs Management Sciences and Professor of Public Health). and interests. Additionally, the new curriculum includes an Finally, SOM students have the option of taking courses or international experience. Trips enable first-year students to pursuing a joint degree elsewhere at Yale University. Joint explore social and environmental topics in a range of coun- degrees can be pursued through The School of Epidemiology tries including South Africa, Costa Rica, Japan, and India. and Public Health, The School of Forestry and Environmental One student adds, “The curriculum includes many examples Studies, Yale School of Medicine, Yale Law School, and the Yale from the nonprofit world. My fellow students are also very Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, which offers classes in enthusiastic about these issues.” international relations. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 11
  • 153. YALe uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 71% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 49% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. Y ale is a small, tight-knit, and diverse community that em- bodies the mission of the school to develop leaders for society and business. Half of the student body receives Net nonprofits or socially responsible businesses. • Program for Social Enterprise newsletter: A newsletter for alumni and potential employers highlighting the social en- Impact’s weekly newsletter and many students attend Net terprise activities of the school and student body. Impact events. “At Yale, you won’t be the guy or girl who • Global Social Enterprise: Twenty students participated in does Net Impact,” says one student. “You’ll be one of many a semester-long course that culminated in a two-week trip to and you’ll be defined about what your deeper interests are.” Brazil to provide pro-bono consulting to five nonprofit orga- The SOM Net Impact Club functions as an umbrella organi- nizations. zation, coordinating activities relating to social and environ- • Carbon Offset Initiative: Students, faculty members, mental themes with students, faculty and staff members, and alumni, and staff joined together to raise $7,000 and make other clubs on campus. the first-year students’ International Experience to eight dif- Net Impact organized or co-sponsored many activities last ferent countries 100% carbon neutral. Our offset purchases year, including: led to investments in renewable energy production and other • The Future of Philanthropy Conference: A day of stimulat- greenhouse gas reduction strategies around the world that ing and informative discussion that explored the innovation prevented the release of two million pounds of gases into the and changing landscape of philanthropy. atmosphere. • Net Impact Business and Society Panels: A panel series • Global Social Venture Competition: SOM hosted regional with CSR leaders from the private sector. This year’s guests semi-finals for this social enterprise business plan competi- included leaders from Gap, Microsoft, and Pratt & Whitney. tion. • Yale SOM Net Impact Case Competition: Seventy percent • Education Conference: This event brought together peo- of first-year students participated in this business case com- ple from nonprofits, foundations, policy institutes, charter petition with a social and/or environmental focus. Finalists schools, school districts, and private sector organizations to competed before judges, who were consultants from leading discuss issues of educational inequity and the role of leader- consulting firms. ship in education. • Meet the Other Firms: An event, co-sponsored by the Yale • SOM Outreach: Ten student teams were matched with lo- Career Development Office, in which second-year students cal nonprofits to deliver pro-bono consulting services. who pursue public interest internships share their experienc- • Board Service: Students were matched with over twenty es with first-year students who are considering careers with local nonprofits for non-voting positions on their boards. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 23% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 40% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 46% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni T he Yale School of Management is committed to Neal Keny-Guyer (1982) - Chief Executive Officer, Mercy Corps Linda A. Mason (1980) - Chairman & Founder, Bright Horizons Family Solutions supporting students interested in pursuing ca- Gail Harrity (1982) - Chief Operating Officer, Philadelphia Museum of Art reers in areas of social/environmental impact. SOM’s Seth Goldman (1995) – TeaEO, Honest Tea E. Kyle Datta (1989) - Managing Director, Research and Consulting, Rocky Mountain Institute Career Development Office (CDO) has a dedicated pro- fessional whose role it is to assist students in pursuing internships and full-time employment in the nonprofit to resources at Yale and beyond for specific career tracks are and public sectors. Additionally, the CDO partners with Net also offered. In addition, the CDO facilitates students’ use of Impact to offer events and resources to students, including a outside consulting services such as MBA Nonprofit Connec- “Meet the Other Firms” day. Career treks and written guides tion and Commongood Careers. 12 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 154. YALe uNIVeRSItY, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued Yale SOM is a leader in making it financially possible for stu- bursement for their annual debt repayment on need-based dents to pursue internships and careers in the nonprofit and loans. Alumni can apply within ten years after graduation and public sectors. The Internship Fund provides financial support both U.S. and international students are eligible. to students who pursue summer internships in the public or Yale SOM is highly regarded by socially responsible business- nonprofit sectors om the summer between their first and sec- es and nonprofits. We were ranked as the number one MBA ond years of study. Since the Fund’s inception, approximately program for corporate social responsibility by the Wall Street twenty percent of each class has received funding. The school Journal in 2006. also provides an extremely generous loan forgiveness program. The Yale SOM alumni base in the social and environmental Eligible graduates with incomes of $72,300 or less who work fields is strong. Graduates serve as mentors, professional con- for government or nonprofit organizations receive full reim- tacts, and often as hiring managers for SOM students. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 60% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 63% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he administration at the Yale School of Management is dedicated to creating an environment that educates lead- ers who approach business with a holistic viewpoint, under- School of Management. A seminar series highlights the work of researchers and professionals in the international nonprof- it or socially responsible arenas. The program staff provides standing both the management and societal reasons for busi- resources and support to student clubs and events that are fo- ness decisions. The mission of the school is to create leaders cused on social enterprise. for business and society, and the administration is unwavering • Yale Center for Business and the Environment: This joint in their commitment to this, as is shown by their introduction program of Yale SOM and the Yale School of Forestry provides of the new curriculum. a focal point for research, education, and outreach to advance Highlights: business solutions to global environmental problems. • Program for Social Enterprise and Program on Nonprofit • Yale Center for Corporate Governance: The center spon- Organizations: These focus on nonprofit and socially respon- sors research and discussion centered on the idea that corpo- sible enterprises by bringing university-wide research to the rations can and should better serve society. Reasons To aTTend 69% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 37% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he program is focused on empowering students to take ini- tiative and leadership within the school and the commu- nity. Social and environmentally-focused activities and events ment in social and environmental themes. The ethos of social responsibility is pervasive throughout campus. The percentage of students who are interested in social and environmental is- at the school range from conferences and lectures to pro-bono sues is very high. This culture is reinforced by the alignment of consulting (both locally and internationally) and volunteering Net Impact’s goals with the mission of SOM. for local, nonprofit board service. The new curriculum has been developed with a focus on val- to sum it up ues and ethics in business, with particular attention paid to the The Yale school of Management would be most effect of business on society. This curriculum integrates mul- fitting for someone interested in attending a school tiple viewpoints to provide a holistic approach to conducting where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/ business for the betterment of society. environmental issues. Potential applicants should consider SOM’s culture of engage- 135 Prospect Street, Box 208200, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8200, USA Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 13
  • 155. yoRk unIVeRsITy SchuLIch SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 550 schulich has the best reputation for sus- 9% of York students are net impact members tainability among Canadian schools and ranks in the top tier in the world. This at- 30% of those members are “very active” tracts a large group of students who are ” 30% are “somewhat active” passionate about the subject, which leads to fantastic networking opportunties. This chapter in three words: passionate, impressive people chapter leader: ian Howard (ihoward06@schulich.yorku.ca) n = 14 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of nonprofit management, Corporate social Responsibility, and environmental sustainability. 29% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 43% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. G lobal, innovative, and diverse, the Schulich School of Busi- ness at York University prepares its students to meet the needs of social and environmental stewardship in a rapidly- cultural matters, and the intersection of business and social issues between countries. In addition, Schulich offers a num- ber of MBA specializations that deal specifically with social changing world. The school has been a pioneer in integrating and environmental impact management, including Business social impact management and environmental management and Sustainability, Arts and Media Administration, Nonprofit into its core curriculum and elective courses. The concept of Management and Leadership, and Health Industry Manage- sustainability underpins all Schulich’s graduate management ment. programs, beginning with the required core course “Skills for Schulich has been a leader creating programs pertaining Leadership and Governance” and the orientation activities to social impact and environmental impact management. In surrounding the MBA Launch Week for incoming students. 2000, Schulich established the Sustainable Enterprise Acad- Many of the program’s core and elective courses contain ma- emy, one of North America’s premier executive education terial specifically relevant to social impact and environmental centers dedicated to providing management training in sus- management issues. Electives in this area include Accounting tainability issues for senior-level executives. In 2005, Schulich and Accountability in the New Economy, Management Prac- joined forces with the Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS tices for Sustainable Business, Business Strategies for Sustain- (GBC), the world’s pre-eminent business organization leading able Business, Environmental Economics for Business, Ethics the fight against HIV/AIDS, to create a pilot program in which and Social Responsibility in Business, Environmental Ethics: Schulich MBA students help to develop HIV/AIDS strategies Policy and Management Perspectives, and Sustainable Value for multinational corporations working in Africa and other Creation. In addition to the electives, MBA students can take AIDS-stricken regions of the world. courses at the Faculty of Environmental Studies. Schulich’s faculty members are among the world’s leading The Schulich School of Business takes a broad, stakeholder researchers in the fields of business ethics, corporate gover- approach to management education. Since its inception in nance, and sustainability. These faculty members include Dirk 1966, the School has offered management training to meet Matten, Hewlett-Packard Chair in Corporate Social Respon- the specific needs of organizations in the private, public, and sibility, and Andrew Crane, George R. Gardiner Professor of nonprofit sectors. The School offers a diverse range of gradu- Business Ethics. In addition, the school houses a number of ate and undergraduate degrees, including a Master of Public research institutes and centers, including Transparency Inter- Administration (MPA) degree, an International MBA (IMBA) national Canada, Inc., a business corruption watchdog organi- degree and an International BBA (IBBA) degree, all of which zation, and the Canadian Business Ethics Research Network focus heavily on business issues related to public policy, cross- (CBERN). 1 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  • 156. YoRk uNIVeRSItY, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 64% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities. 43% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. E stablished in the fall of 2002, the Schulich chapter of Net Impact is the largest Net Impact chapter in Canada and one of the most active clubs at Schulich. The chapter is • Welcome BBQ: A welcome social for our new members in the fall. • Career Networking Reception: An evening reception to interdisciplinary and includes students from the School of network with industry professionals working in progressive Business, Faculty of Environmental Studies, and Osgoode Law companies and nonprofits, co-sponsored by the Faculty of Hall, providing a broad perspective. Other clubs that Net Impact Environmental Studies and Schulich Career Center. is linked with include the Nonprofit Management Association, • Sustainability in Action: A one day conference with and the Arts and Media Club. workshops showcasing professionals who have careers in In addition, Schulich is home to York Sustainable Enterprise sustainability. Consultants (YSEC), Canada’s first student-run consultancy • Clean Energy Case Competition: A sponsored competition that provides research and advisory services in the area of looking at issues in renewable and clean energy. sustainable business. The organization combines the skills • Terry Fox Run: A fundraiser fun run to raise money for of past and present students from York University’s MBA cancer research. and Masters of Environmental Studies programs. Despite • Movie screening: A special showing of a relevant climate diverse professional backgrounds, YSEC’s consultants share a change documentary followed by speaker panel. common aim: to advance social, environmental, and economic • Speed Networking: A focused networking session that is sustainability by promoting responsible business practices. similar to speed dating for students interested in environmental Strategic planning is an important component of the and social careers. club’s success. Each summer, the new executive team meets • Speaker Series: A monthly series, covering topics ranging several times to brainstorm and create a strategic plan for the from social entrepreneurship to corporate CSR strategy to upcoming year’s events and initiatives. The retreats are often supply chain management. held at nearby companies, and are part career trek and part • LEEDs case competition: for the past two years Schulich has planning session. Past sites include Zerofootprint, Diageo, and taken second place at the LEEDs Net Impact case competition. Starbucks. Net Impact at Schulich enjoys a favorable reputation among Every year is busy for our chapter. Examples of past events students and its members often win student awards for include: involvement and leadership. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 33% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 29% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni T he Schulich Career Development Centre (CDC) utilizes an industry sector-focused model for its career counselors and outreach specialists. The non- Michelle Chislett (2006) - Director, Solar Projects, SkyPower Garrick Ng (2004) - Vice President of Sustainability, Innovolve Ashley Hegland (2006) - Account Manager, CSR and Sustainability, Edelman, Hong Kong profit sector is important to the Schulich School and Katherin Bohr (2000) - Vice President, Canadian Business for Social Responsibility Lara Korba (2004) - Managing Partner, Stakeholder Research Associates its students. One full-time professional is dedicated to counseling students focused on careers in the non- profit sector. In addition, a number of online resourc- and government departments recruit the country’s brightest and es and employment networking events are available for students best-trained MBA and MES students, who come complete with a wishing to pursue this career path. sustainability mindset. The CDC, along with the Faculty of Environmental Studies at The alumni office at Schulich can connect interested students York, funds the major sustainability related career event of the to alumni who are working in the field. Net Impact is currently year, the Sustainability Career Networking Reception. It is at this working on strengthening the alumni network by engaging them event that Canada’s leading sustainable companies, nonprofits more proactively. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 1
  • 157. YoRk uNIVeRSItY, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI, continued In terms of financial awards, the Schulich School of Business is dents who plan to pursue a Business and Sustainability special- pleased to offer the following scholarships and bursaries intend- ization. Recipients will have been active in their community and ed for MBA Students who wish to pursue a CSR or sustainability have demonstrated leadership either in the workplace or through related field: extracurricular activities. • Marshall A. Cohen Entrance Award for Nonprofit Manage- • The O&Y Award for Outstanding Achievement and Leader- ment Program, presented to three incoming MBA students en- ship in Business Ethics and Good Governance, presented to a rolled in the Nonprofit Management and Leadership Program. student who has demonstrated outstanding achievement and • Union Gas MBA Award, presented to incoming MBA stu- leadership in area of business ethics and good governance. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 43% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 57% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/ environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he school is building on its reputation as a leader in the business and sustainability field and tends to attract stu- dents with those interests. Environmental Studies helped make our career event a success. Net Impact also enjoys good relations with the Sustainable Enterprise Academy, Schulich’s CSR-related executive educa- The faculty and administration are very supportive of student- tion program. Funding is available through the program, and in run initiatives. There are staff at Schulich who are dedicated to return, Net Impact members edit and publish the SEA Newslet- help with planning of events, and they often give insightful ad- ter, a bimonthly review of journal articles in the field. vice during the planning stage. On-site catering staff help with In addition, students have received special bursaries to help larger events that require food. cover the cost of attending events such as the Net Impact con- Interested professors often drop by Net Impact events and of- ference, and the Leeds Case Competition. fer their time as guest speakers and emcees. Extensive collabo- The dean is a big supporter of the chapter. We continue to ration with the Career Development Center and the Faculty of work together to help build on the brand of the school. Reasons To aTTend 64% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 14% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. S tudents interested in social and environmental issues natural- ly congregate at the Schulich School of Business. The school’s reputation as a leader in the area attracts applicants interested mix with environmentally minded students. Toronto is rapidly becoming a hub for sustainability and the number of businesses in social and environmental fields has in a broad range of related topics including renewable energy, grown recently. Many innovative employers are looking for en- microfinance, international development, corporate governance, vironmentally-minded students. Employment potential in social social enterprise, nonprofit management, and socially respon- and environmentally related careers is good, but jobs are often at sible investment. smaller, less established companies. Mainstream companies are Coursework is strong in related areas with electives in business slowly waking up to the emerging trend. and sustainability, international development, environmental For applicants interested in social or environmental issues, economics, and nonprofit management. With two newly-ap- Schulich will not disappoint. pointed professors in corporate social responsibility, there should be some new coursework in this area. Students can get by without to sum it up heavy exposure to social or environmental themes, but for those interested, there is a rich selection of electives to choose from. Each year, Schulich attracts a growing number of applicants inter- The schulich school would be most fitting for someone interested in refining and growing a mostly socially ested in social and environmental issues; the networking poten- aware program and student body. tial is amazing. Students at the Faculty of Environmental Studies often take electives at Schulich, so there is a great opportunity to U.S. and Canadian students: (416) 736-5060 • International students: +1 416 736 5059 E-mail: admissions@schulich.yorku.ca 16 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs