2007 Guide Business As U Nusual Survey

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2007 Guide Business As U Nusual Survey

  1. 1. Business as UNusual The 2007 net impact student Guide to Graduate Business Programs
  2. 2. ��������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������� �� � �� ���������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������ �������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������� ����������������������������������� �� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������� � ���������������������������������������������� ��������������������� �������������������� ����������������������������������� � � ����� ����� ��������������������������������������������������������� ������������ ���������������������������������������
  3. 3. Business as UNusual The 2007 net impact student Guide to Graduate Business Programs The print edition of this guide was balanced out by Eco-Libris.
  4. 4. Business as UNusual: The 2007 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs is a publication of net impact 88 1st street, suite 200, san Francisco, California, usa http://www.netimpact.org © 2007 all rights reserved.
  5. 5. Table of ConTenTs Introduction about net impact i about the Guide i is Business school for You? v school stand-Outs v aggregate Responses v How You Can Get involved vi Part 1: school Profiles Bainbridge Graduate institute - MBa in sustainable Business 3 Carnegie Mellon university - Tepper school of Business 6 Claremont Graduate university - Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi ito school of Management 8 Columbia university - Columbia Business school 10 Columbia university - school of international and Public affairs 13 Cornell university - Johnson Graduate school of Management 15 Dalhousie university - Dalhousie Faculty of Management 18 Dartmouth College - Tuck school of Business at Dartmouth 20 Duke university - Fuqua school of Business 23 George Washington university - George Washington school of Business 26 Georgetown university - McDonough school of Business 29 Gordon institute of Business science - Pretoria university 32 Hanken - swedish school of economics and Business administration 35 Harvard university - Harvard Business school 37 Harvard university - Kennedy school of Government 39 HeC school of Management - Paris Master of Business administration 41 indiana university - Kelley Business school 44 inseaD - Master of Business administration 47 instituto de impresa - international MBa, MBa, MMM 50 Massachusetts institute of Technology - sloan school of Management 52 Monterey institute of international studies 54 new York university - stern school of Business 56 north Carolina state university - College of Management 59 northwestern university - Kellogg school of Management 60 Pennsylvania state university - smeal College of Business 64 Presidio school of Management 66 Purdue university - Krannert school of Management 69 school for international Training - Master of science in Management 71 simmons College - school of Management 74 Tufts university - The Fletcher school 77 university of alberta - school of Business 80 university of arkansas-little Rock - College of Business 82 university of British Columbia - sauder school of Business 83 university of California - Berkeley Haas school of Business 85 university of California - Davis Graduate school of Management 88 university of California - irvine Paul Merage school of Business 91 university of California - los angeles uCla anderson school of Management 93 university of Chicago - Graduate school of Business 96 university of Colorado - Boulder leeds school of Business 99 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007
  6. 6. university of Denver - Daniels College of Business 101 university of Geneva - international Organizations MBa 104 university of iowa - Henry B. Tippie school of Management 107 university of Maryland - Robert H. smith school of Business 110 university of Massachusetts - amherst isenberg school of Management 113 university of Michigan - Ross school of Business 115 university of Minnesota - Carlson school of Management 118 university of north Carolina - Chapel Hill Kenan Flagler Business school 120 university of Pennsylvania - The Wharton school 123 university of Rochester - simon Graduate school of Business 126 university of san Francisco - Masagung Graduate school of Management 128 university of southern California - Marshall school of Business 130 university of south Carolina - Moore school of Business 133 university of Texas - McCombs school of Business 135 university of utah - David eccles school of Business 137 university of Wisconsin - Madison school of Business 139 Yale university - school of Management 141 York university - schulich school of Business 144 Part 2: Ratings and aggregate Responses Rating Charts 147 aggregate Responses 159 Part 3: special advertising supplement MBaMath: Build the pre-MBa math and spreadsheet skills you’ll need a2 accepted.com: Your one stop shop for MBa admissions a3 ecolibris: Moving towards sustainable reading a4 university of Geneva inside front cover/top page Monterey institute of international studies a5 Haas school of Business at uC Berkeley a6 school for international Training a6 The Fletcher school Tufts university a7 Michigan Ross school of Business a8 Bainbridge Graduate institute a9 Graduate school of Management uC Davis a10 Presidio school of Management a11 Duke Fuqua school of Business a12 Marlboro College Graduate Center a13 nottingham university Business school a14 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  7. 7. About Net ImpAct InTRoduCTIon Net Impact’s mission is to make a positive impact on society by growing and strengthening a community of new leaders who use business to improve the world. Since 1993, we have supported a grassroots movement of student chapters to educate, inspire, and equip individuals with ideas and tools for using business for social good. As of August 2007, we have more than 150 student and professional chapters on 6 continents in 90 cities and 110 graduate schools. Our central office in San Francisco provides tools for member networking, organizes an annual conference, and manages programs to support members in combining business skills with values on their campuses, in their companies, or in their communities. Net Impact has chapters in schools that include the top 30 business programs (as ranked by Wall Street Journal), 22 international business programs, and 8 non-business graduate programs. Our student chapter leaders, usually elected by their classmates, are committed individuals who organize events and activities for their chapters while serving as a liaison to the larger Net Impact network. Student members participate in local chapter activities as well as activities with Net Impact Central, such as our annual fall conference, Issues in Depth conference calls, and online career resources. Net Impact also has a professional membership, which includes both business school graduates and other professionals working in socially responsible business and related industries. Our website is www.netimpact.org. About the GuIde The information in Business as UNusual: The 2007 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs was compiled from two sources: a qualitative survey completed by chapter leaders from 56 programs, and an online survey completed by 1264 student Net Impact members. This version is our second annual publication, and contains 44% more program descriptions than the first edition. Net Impact started the Guide in 2006 for several reasons. First, we received numerous inquiries from prospective business school applicants who wanted to know what MBA programs had to offer for those with social and environmental interests. Second, we heard from many of our chapter leaders that they wanted the chance to share the student perspective on how their program addresses these issues. Finally, we believed that the Guide would be a useful tool for business schools to compare themselves with their peers and develop more robust social impact curricula, career services, and support for student activities. Which schools are included in the school profiles? Net Impact asked each of the chapter leaders in our MBA and graduate school programs to complete a survey with information on their school curriculum, student activities, career services, and administrative support. You can find a full list of our student chapters at www.netimpact.org/chapters. We were pleased that 56 chapters completed the survey. What schools are included in the ratings? Net Impact sent an online survey to 3723 student chapter members. We included schools in the ratings that received more than ten responses,. A total of 1264 students answered the full survey. Note: since the survey was sent only to Net Impact members, and not to the student body as a whole, the opinions represent a sub-set of students who are committed to and interested in Net Impact issues. We asked students not to forward the survey to their classmates so we could ensure a consistency in type of respondents between schools. Who wrote the school profiles? Were they edited? did admissions offices submit any content? Net Impact chapter leaders wrote the school profiles, at times with input from other Net Impact students. Members of the Net Impact staff provided edits, focusing mostly on clarity, grammar, and consistency. Our goal was to keep as much of the students’ original language and writing as possible; in almost every case the profile published in the Guide is very close to the content the student submitted. Net Impact staff did insert quotes into the profile that were submitted by students in the online survey. Net Impact also contacted admissions officers from every program profiled in our Guide and invited them to review their program’s entry. We made factual edits and clarification edits based on their feedback. No alterations to the opinions and subjects of the students’ text were made based on admissions’ comments. To learn more about the process involved in creating and compiling the Guide, please email chapters@netimpact.org. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 i
  8. 8. What does the “At a Glance” box show? The “At a Glance” box contains the following information: - The number of full-time students, as reported by the Net Impact chapter leader(s) at that program - The percentage of full-time students at the program who are Net Impact members, based on numbers provided by the Net Impact chapter leader(s) at that program. - The Net Impact chapters’ self-reported percentage of “very active” members and “somewhat active” members - Three words that the chapter leader(s) chose, to characterize their program. - A quotation from one student survey respondent from the featured school, selected by Net Impact staff. - The names of chapter leader(s) who completed the chapter leader survey. In some instances the chapter leaders have provided their email addresses, and in most cases, these leaders wrote the school’s profile. - This is the number of students who took the all student survey. Please note that even if this number is more than ten, some of the sections may still not be included if fewer than ten students chose to respond to a particular question. how should I read the “data bars”? Many profiles include data in the bars that divide the profile into subsections. The data presented in these “data bars” were compiled from our spring 2007 survey of Net Impact members at the program being profiled. Data bars appear for schools that generated at least ten responses to the question to which each percentage corresponds. Percentages of 0% were omitted. cuRRIcuLum Program strengths: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked if applicants interested in international development, nonprofit management, community development, corporate responsibility, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship would have a positive experience at their program. Each area of study was rated on a 3-point scale. The three highest-rated areas of study are included as program strengths. Program strengths were required to receive an average rating of at least 2 out of 3 to be included Student support for social and environmental themes in curriculum: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate student enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The first number in the curriculum bar is the percentage of respondents who said that students at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Faculty support for social and environmental themes in curriculum: Each respondent to the all-student survey InTRoduCTIon was asked to rate faculty enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The second number in the curriculum bar is the percentage of respondents who said that faculty at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. StudeNt ActIVItIeS Student activity level: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate the activity level of their Net Impact Club on a five point scale from “inactive” through “one of the most active clubs at the program.” The most frequent response (the mode) is included as the activity level. Student support for social and environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate student enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The first number in the student activities bar is the percentage of respondents who said that students at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. ii Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  9. 9. Faculty support for social and environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate faculty enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. InTRoduCTIon The second number in the student activities bar is the percentage of respondents who said that faculty at their program are “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. cAReeR SeRVIceS & ALumNI Career Services: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their career services office. Ratings were done on a 3-point scale with “very helpful” being the highest rating. The first percentage in the career services and alumni bar is the percentage of respondents rating their career services as “very helpful.” Job/internship placement: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to indicate if they had found an internship or job that “utilizes their values and their business skills.” Respondents who did not have this as their end goal were asked to skip the question. The possible responses were, “no,” “somewhat,” “yes,” and “still looking.” Six or more responses were required for this section to be included. The percentages of respondents answering “yes” or “somewhat” were combined to get the second percentage in this box. Alumni Network: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their alumni network from “not at all helpful” to “very helpful.” Ratings were done on a 3-point scale with “very helpful” being the highest rating. The third percentage in this bar is the percentage of respondents rating their career services as “very helpful.” Prominent Alumni: chapter leaders were asked to name up to five prominent alumni. AdmINIStRAtIVe SuppoRt Administration support for social and environmental themes in curriculum: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their administration’s enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The first number in the administrative support bar is the percentage of respondents who said that the administration at their program is “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s curriculum. Administration support for social and environmental themes in extracurricular events and activities: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked to rate their administration’s enthusiasm about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “enthusiastic” being the highest rating. The second number in the administrative support bar is the percentage of respondents who said that the administration at their program is “enthusiastic” about social and environmental themes in their program’s extracurricular events and activities. ReASoNS to AtteNd Social and environmental leadership preparation for Net Impact members: Each respondent to the all-student survey was asked whether their program prepared Net Impact members for socially responsible leadership. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “strongly agree” being the highest rating. The first percentage in this box is the percentage of students who selected “strongly agree.” Social and environmental leadership preparation for the general student body: Each respondent to the all- student survey was asked whether their program prepared the student body as a whole for socially responsible leadership. Ratings were done on a 5-point scale with “strongly agree” being the highest rating. The second percentage in this box is the percentage of students who selected “strongly agree.” Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 iii
  10. 10. To sum it up: The chapter leader survey asked the chapter leader to choose from four statements about what type of student their program would be best for. Net Impact created icons to go with each statement to draw a comparison between the chapter’s development and the building of a house. The statements chapter leaders chose from are: someone interested in laying the foundation for social/environmental awareness at the program; someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/ environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth; someone interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body; someone interested in attending a school where students and faculty are on the forefront of social/environmental issues. how should I read the Ratings section? The Ratings section is not meant to give a definitive ranking of business programs; rather, the data presents a way to compare student opinions of their schools. When reviewing the data, please keep in mind the “n” for each school as programs included in the ratings had anywhere from 10 to 84 survey responses. Who funded the Guide? InTRoduCTIon Net Impact accepted no payments for including school profiles in the MBA Guide. Student writers submitted the published content voluntarily and without compensation from Net Impact. Paid advertisements from schools and businesses appear in a “Special Advertising Section” at the back of the Guide. Proceeds from the sale of these ads were used to publish 400 hard copies of the guide (available for sale at http://www.netimpact.org/bizschoolguide) and to market the Guide to new readers. If you find the Guide interesting or helpful and if you’d like to see us continue with similar projects, we encourage you to make a tax-deductible donation to Net Impact at www.netimpact.org/donate. If you are interested in advertising in the 2008 version of the Guide, please write to us at chapters@netimpact.org. What other information should I use to learn about what business schools are doing in these areas? We encourage you to take a look at publications from the Aspen Institute. Their Beyond Grey Pinstripes publication is a biennial survey and ranking of business schools, which spotlights innovative full-time MBA programs and faculty that lead the way in integrating issues of social and environmental stewardship into business school curricula and research. The information in Beyond Grey Pinstripes is provided by faculty and staff and thus complements the student perspective. To learn more about Beyond Grey Pinstripes and other Aspen institute publications, please visit www.beyondgreypinstripes.org. iv Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  11. 11. Another good resource is the Idealist.org Graduate School Fairs, which take place in major cities across the United States. See InTRoduCTIon www.idealist.org for more details. We also encourage you to speak with student members of Net Impact at programs that interest you. Each program’s admissions office will be able to put you in touch with them. IS buSINeSS SchooL FoR You? Today, business school is no longer just for future bankers, consultants, and corporate executives focused only on bottom- line financial results. More and more graduate business programs are recognizing the importance of training values-based leaders who understand the significance of a healthy environment, strong communities, and long-term sustainability. Many of today’s business schools have both required and elective courses that include discussion and assignments focusing on the triple bottom line (financial, social, and environmental).The students at business programs today include former and future nonprofit leaders, social entrepreneurs, public sector leaders, and corporate employees who are committed to helping their company make a positive net impact on the environment and society. Some of the recent alumni highlighted in this Guide include an ethics and compliance officer at Starbucks; the CFO of Citizen Schools, Inc; and the director of TransFair USA. Net Impact encourages individuals with all backgrounds and interests to apply to business school. The management, strategy, and financial skills taught in an MBA or similar program will be valuable for anyone who will manage people, programs, or an organization in all sectors. While strong grades, GMAT scores, and professional achievement are required to gain admission to top programs, admissions officers are increasingly aware of the importance of ‘Net Impact’ values and priorities among their business school classes. SchooL StANd-outS A number of MBA and graduate programs stand out in the Guide. Last year, programs were ranked by how many times they received a top-10 rating from their students. This year’s Guide foregoes an overall ranking and focuses instead on how programs performed in individual categories, as determined by aggregated student survey data. These category ratings can be found on pages 147-158. A cautionary note on the ratings: please be sure to take into account the number of respondents from each program as they differed widely between programs. Our goal with the ratings is not to give a definitive ranking, but rather to provide an easy way to compare how students assess their own programs. As you read through the school profiles, you will be impressed with the amount of activity that is going on today at business schools. As a preview, we are including some brief excerpts here: • UCLA’s Anderson School of Management collaborated with UC San Diego and Cal Tech to co-host the Clean Innovation Conference which attracted industry leaders and held a business-case competition. • The Duke and George Washington chapters collaborated for an international development career trek in Washington DC • The Net Impact chapter at HEC in Paris hosts an annual Sustainable Development Conference, which has become a compulsory part of the MBA program’s curriculum. • The School for International Training (SIT) has implemented wide-ranging campus greening projects including instating food composts, installing lights with timers in classroom, and working with campus vendors to sell only fair-trade coffee. • The University of California – Davis chapter worked with their administration to create a new class on sustainability and were able get it on the schedule for the following quarter. AGGReGAte ReSpoNSeS The all-student survey was emailed to a total of 3,723 students and yielded a 33% response rate, with 1,264 of those students answering the survey. The response rate was up 5% from the 28% response rate in 2006. The respondents consist of 724 first year students, 487 second year students, and 53 students who are in their third or fourth year. Although the majority of our respondents are in school in the United States, 30 students answered the survey from schools in Canada, 70 in Europe, 2 in Australia, and 10 in Africa. The 112 international respondents in 2007 is up 46% from 70 international respondents in 2006. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 v
  12. 12. Overall, most students are positive about how their program is incorporating social and environmental issues to date, while signaling that there are still opportunities for growth. Most students described their fellow students, faculty, and administration as supportive or enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in business school. As with 2006, each of the groups was described as slightly more enthusiastic about the themes in extracurricular activities than in curriculum. For more detail on the 2007 breakdown, please see pages 160-162. Students also told us whether they thought their program prepares students like themselves – Net Impact members with an interest in social and environmental issues – for ethical and socially responsible leadership. In 2007 85% of students agree or strongly agree that their program prepares Net Impact members for ethically and socially responsible leadership, exactly the same percentage as in 2006. When asked if their program prepares the general MBA/grad school population for ethical and socially responsible leadership, 68% agree or strongly agree a slight change from 70% in 2006. For more detail on the 2007 breakdown, please see page 159. On the career front, most programs were rated fairly well. Of the 744 students whose goal was to find an internship that utilized both their values and their business skills, 47% told us they did find an appropriate internship, with an additional 28% answering “somewhat” and 21% “still looking” in April. Of the 385 second year students with the same goal for a full-time job, 35% found a position, with another 27% answering “somewhat” and 35% still looking as of April. The majority of students called their fellow students, alumni networks, and career services staff somewhat or very helpful, with fellow students getting the most enthusiastic response. For more detail on the 2007 breakdown, please see pages 163-164. In terms of student club activity, 44% consider their chapter “one of the most active clubs at their program,” up from 36% last year; only 7% of students said their Net Impact chapter was less active than others at the school. 16% said their chapter had an average level of activity while 32% called their activity above average. Next StepS: hoW You cAN Get INVoLVed We hope that Business as UNusual: The 2007 Net Impact Student Guide to Graduate Business Programs will serve a variety of purposes. For readers considering graduate school, it demonstrates the breadth of opportunities to build business skills while cultivating social/environmental interests and career prospects. The Guide also provides insight into different programs to help applicants make an informed graduate school choice. Current students, faculty, and administration, can use information in the Guide to benchmark how their program compares to others, and to identify specific ideas and opportunities for improvement. InTRoduCTIon We think readers will be impressed with the wealth of classes, variety of student activities, and dedication of career services to incorporating social and environmental issues into the business school experience. If you did not see your program in the Guide this year and would like to see it in next year’s publication, please email us at chapters@netimpact.org. vi Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  13. 13. PaRT 1: sCHool PRofIles Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 1
  14. 14. baInbRIdge gRaduaTe InsTITuTe mbA IN SuStAINAbLe buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: ~150 ~67% of Bainbridge students are net impact members The school attracts very smart and interesting students, and great faculty 18% of those members are “very active” who are able to teach things at ” 80% are “somewhat active” Bainbridge that they often can’t teach anywhere else. This chapter in three words: collaborative, Sustainable, Visionary chapter leaders: Jean-Michel Toriel (jmtoriel@gmail.com) and andre Furin (drefur.bgi@gmail.com) n= 46 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of Corporate social Responsibility, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 96% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 93% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. B GI is the first graduate school with an MBA program fo- cusing on sustainable business. It incorporates action- learning and distance learning with a triple-bottom-line and share a passion for sustainability. One student notes that the school attracts “faculty [members] who are able to teach things at Bainbridge that they often can’t teach any- focus. All classes incorporate social justice, sustainable man- where else.” This makes BGI “an inspiring place to study, agement, green marketing, lean operations, values-based learn, and connect” writes another. entrepreneurship and intrapraneurship with strong leader- Guest speakers, executives and “entrepreneurs in resi- ship skills and diverse community building based on mutual dence”, are encouraged to join the students and participate respect. Every course infuses sustainability, environmental in our monthly intensives which are held in our Bainbridge and social responsibility with traditional MBA courses, like Island Gold LEEDS-standard facility, called Islandwood. finance and economics. The emphasis is on making a differ- We nearly have 100% membership in Net Impact which ex- ence, and “changing business for good” (BGI’s motto). All emplifies the values-driven mandate in business that BGI faculty and staff are innovators and pioneers in business stands for. sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: above average. 93% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 91% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. B GI strives to be at the forefront of sustainability in busi- ness and our community continues to lead the way. We are a new school, heading into the 6th year. We started our intensive, we have “community processing” time where the students are encouraged to participate in bettering the com- munity of BGI. One student reports that the BGI Net Im- Net Impact Chapter in the third year and we continue to grow pact chapter is “relatively inactive, but that is only because with the engaged community. In each monthly face-to-face everything that all students do at BGI is focused on sustain- Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 3
  15. 15. bAINbRIdGe GRAduAte INStItute, continued ability…We are very active in the work, just not through the meals and events. channel of Net Impact.” Last year, we won fourth place in the Leeds School of Busi- As we are already a “green” campus with exceptionally low ness Net Impact Case Competition. Our Vancouver-based emissions, due to the green buildings that host us at Island- students won a similar competition in that city with the Net wood, we still encourage greater reductions of our ecological Impact Chapters at UBC and Simon Fraser Universities. impacts. For instance, we measure our emissions and water This year, four teams emerged to participate in the Thun- use and are currently researching fair and efficient ways to derbird/Net Impact Competition, and one team made it to offset the emissions our students incur when they travel the final round. from as far away as Boston, Houston, Atlanta and Toronto. The BGI Chapter is beginning to organize a possible Net We encourage guests to participate in our Sustainable Impact event next year that would encourage widespread Speaker series. In addition, we have “Family Intensives” participation from all MBA programs with Net Impact chap- where we invite family members to participate in our classes, ters. CaReeR seRVICes & alumnI 41% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 67% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 33% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. F unding is available through grants for students and the community is currently engaged in developing a grant to further encourage greater diversity at BGI. for loans. Grants and/or scholarships covering all demon- strated financial need are extremely rare. All students have the opportunity to apply for student loans that are not based Phil Ronniger is a tremendous asset to our community and on financial need. heads the BGI Center for Work Transition and Redesign. He Before applying for a grant, you might first consider other leads Designing Your Future sessions on the first mornings sources of aid and/or loans aside from those that BGI may of each intensive. He remains at the intensives for face to be able to provide. The average BGI grant in the 2006-2007 face discussions as well as to assist in finding work or tran- year was $5,441 and ranged from $906 to $7,965 for a total sitioning to a more sustainable employment opportunity. of $168,673 in institutional grants. For the 2007-2008 aca- There is also a constant stream of postings for employment demic year, we anticipate a similar average award size and on our interactive community website, the Channel. range. The total amount of institutional grants awarded is We have fieldtrips or career treks before every intensive to expected to be between $217,500 and $261,700 depending businesses or non-profits. on the size of the class and its students’ financial need. BGI believes that no student with demonstrated financial need should be forced to borrow an unreasonable amount of prominent alumni money to fund their education. We will do everything pos- Michelle Knab (2006) - Manager, GoToMyPC Karin Borgerson (2006) - Community Leader, BGI sible to ensure that our students are not strapped with un- Eric Magnuson (2006) - Entrepreneur, Magnuson Consulting reasonable financial burden upon graduation. Don Wong (2006) - Director, Camp Mumba However, every aid recipient should still expect to apply Kevin Hagen (2005) - Sustainability Director, REI admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 96% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 89% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. J ill Bamburg, BGIs Dean, strongly encouraged full (100%) Net Impact participation and offered to assist members who could not afford the fee. BGI and Net Impact are virtual- by the students and faculty. This living system of an institu- tion constantly improves itself to deliver the most current content via world renowned experts.” Another adds that BGI ly aligned in values. One student writes that “The curriculum “is the only place that I have found that practices everything and the guiding principles of the institution are co-created it preaches.” Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  16. 16. bAINbRIdGe GRAduAte INStItute, continued Reasons To aTTend 91% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 76% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. T he strength of BGI is primarily the incredibly support- ive community. Faculty and staff members are extremely encouraging, knowledgeable and experienced in their fields. to express a uniform opinion. It is a diverse community of people who’ve all come together for many different reasons, with a singular guiding motivation: to learn and to make the Many of them are alumni who assist in bridging the faculty world a better place.” and staff with the students. This greatly expands and inte- grates the community’s core values. The curriculum speaks for itself. A few highlights: MGT 551 Foundations of Sus- tainable Business, MGT 553/MGT 554 Finance, Accounting to sum it up the Triple Bottom Line I, and II, MGT 567 Social Justice Business, MGT 564 Sustainable Operations Management, Bainbridge would be most fitting for someone interested MGT 568 Creativity Right Livelihood, MGT 566 Dal La- in attending a school where students and faculty are on Magna Series on Responsible Capitalism. the forefront of social/environmental issues. One student concluded, “Bainbridge is not a group of radi- cal environmentalists and socialists who’ve come together 284 Madrona Way NE, Suite 124, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110, USA • Phone: +1 206 855 9559 • E-mail: info@bgiedu.org Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007
  17. 17. CaRnegIe mellon unIVeRsITy teppeR SchooL oF buSINeSS aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 275 15% of Tepper students are net impact members The small program provides a strong 25% of those members are “very active” community focus and the cross campus collaboration provides opportunities not ” 55% are “somewhat active” available in most business schools. This chapter in three words: collaborative, Innovative, expanding chapter leaders: : Curtis stratman (stratman@cmu.edu) and Oren lieberman (olieberman@cmu.edu) CuRRICulum T he Tepper School continues to incorporate the themes of corporate social responsibility throughout the curricu- lum. While there are a limited number of courses that spe- credible asset to allow students to pursue their own interests and initiatives,” one wrote. The Heinz School of Public Policy and Management, in particular, provides a number of classes cifically focus on these topics, there are many opportunities in conjunction with the following programs: The Center for for discussion through seminars, speakers, and club activi- Economic Development, Institute for the Study of Informa- ties and events. The faculty and administration continue to tion Technology and Society, the National Consortium on be supportive of incorporating social topics into both formal Violence Research, and the Institute for Social Innovation. classroom curriculum and other student programs. These class resources are “at your fingertips,” wrote one sur- vey respondent. MBA students also have the option of ap- One of the strengths of the Tepper program is the ability plying to dual master degree programs in Public Policy and to take graduate courses anywhere across the CMU campus. Management, Healthcare Policy and Management, and Civil Several students surveyed cited this cross-campus collabora- and Environmental Engineering. tion as one of the programs greatest strengths. “[It’s] an in- sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Net Impact chapter at the Tepper School of Business has a mission to promote the education and understand- ing of business ethics and corporate social responsibility ulty Discussion Lunch Series, field trips, community involve- ment programs (along with Net Impact’s Service Corps), cross-campus collaborations (including the national Solar among MBA students and bring together other like-minded Decathlon competition, campus environmental greening, graduate students across Carnegie Mellon University. The and mixers with students involved with the Institute for So- chapter, founded in 2004, has established a solid foundation cial Innovation), and conferences. One student cited “activ- of contacts and events to connect students with activities in ism in the community” as Tepper’s greatest strength, adding almost any social interest. We have established numerous ac- that “Students have many opportunities to work with non- tivities to benefit our members and bring awareness to the profit organizations or to volunteer. Many students have larger student community including a Speaker Series, a Fac- been involved in at least one of these events.” 6 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  18. 18. cARNeGIe meLLoN uNIVeRSItY, continued CaReeR seRVICes alumnI T he small community at Tepper allows the Career Oppor- tunity Center (COC) to work with students individually on their specific goals. The COC also has a dedicated staff terested in these areas have been successful in securing posi- tions through postings sent to the school posting board. There is no formal program to support students pursuing member for students interested in careers within non-profit internships with nonprofits, but in the past the school has or governmental organizations. In addition, Tepper has an provided supplemental funds to students who have made in- entrepreneurship track that has worked with many students dividual requests. in starting socially focused businesses. While there are no companies that currently perform on- prominent alumnus David Gonzales (1975) - Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, Pepsico, Inc. campus interviews for CSR or non-profit jobs, students in- admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT T he Tepper administration has been supporting the Net Impact chapter as the driver of CSR awareness through the student community. They have provided opportunities also provided supplemental funds. “The strong faculty and administration support for any career pursuit that a student may have creates opportunities not equal anywhere else,“ to promote speakers that address social topics and they have wrote one student. Reasons To aTTend T he Tepper School of Business focuses on building leader- ship of thought and influence. In class, we take the lat- est concepts in management science and learn effective ways pursue his or her passion. Those interested in social themes will find the Tepper community to be an exceptional asset. of adopting them throughout our future careers. There are almost unlimited leadership opportunities in working with to sum it up the administration, in student government, and in club of- ficer positions. The curriculum tracks also expect their par- The Tepper school would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/ ticipants to take leadership roles in arranging conferences, environmental impact activities with opportunity for speakers, and networking events. In summary, Tepper is significant growth. looking for individuals who want to step up and make a dif- ference. Because of the small class size, every individual can 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA • Phone: +1 412 268 2269 Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 7
  19. 19. ClaRemonT gRaduaTe unIVeRsITy the peteR F. dRuckeR ANd mASAtoShI Ito SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 140 social/environmental impact themes are inte- 25% of Drucker net impact members are “very active” grated in our case analysis/discussion of business problems. and in instances when professors don’t 25% are “somewhat active” bring them up, one or more of the students always ” brings up the issues, which the class is very recep- tive to and appreciates. This chapter in three words: potential, Growing, Striving chapter leaders: Christina lam (christina.lam@cgu.edu) and Curtis Hall (curtis.hall@cgu.edu) CuRRICulum T he Drucker School of Management concentrates on the human side of management: ethics, organizational be- havior, human capital, and leadership. The School’s flexible for example. In addition to the courses offered at the Drucker School, students are welcome to take courses outside of the CGU curriculum and small size allow students to pursue social, campus. Claremont Graduate University, Keck Graduate environmental, and ethical issues – or any area of interest. Institute of Applied Life Sciences, and five highly regarded Students are here to study under Drucker’s legacy. One of undergraduate colleges—Pomona, Scripps, Claremont McK- the core leadership courses students can choose to take is enna, Harvey Mudd, and Pitzer colleges—comprise The Cla- “Drucker on Management” taught by Joseph Maciariello. remont Colleges, also know as the “5 Cs.” In addition, the The administration and faculty members are greatly sup- Claremont School of Theology and the Rancho Santa Ana portive of students’ pursuing dual degrees in such areas as Botanic Garden are affiliated with the Graduate University. politics and economics, behavioral and organizational sci- Because many of the 500 faculty members from the “5 Cs” ences, financial engineering, and arts and cultural manage- and affiliated institutions participate actively in the Graduate ment. The Drucker School is also enthusiastic to provide University’s programs, CGU students benefit from potential guidance for students pursuing dual degrees outside of the access to a faculty of far greater depth than the University “management” realm—in Women’s Studies and Education, could provide independently. sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he Drucker/CGU chapter of Net Impact is fairly new. Recently, it shared with Dartmouth the honor of being named School Chapter of the Year. When the leadership have a large conference in late September 2007. Current stu- dents seem to see Net Impact as an important student club on campus, though it is somewhat difficult to recruit mem- team graduated, the chapter slowed down its activity on bers. While the school is very much pro-Net Impact, many campus until this year. During the 2007 spring semester, the students are commuters and working students which limits chapter’s leadership has been working on pulling the chapter their participation in any afternoon activities. back up to speed, making the student body aware of the club This chapter is directly linked to the Drucker School Stu- and widening its membership net, targeting both MBA and dent Association and is a partner with other student clubs non-MBA students. such as the Management Consulting Association and the It is the chapter’s goal to plan out the rest of the calen- Marketing Association. In fact, our chapter is looking to oth- dar year and to bring in a couple more leaders to succeed er clubs to help co-sponsor events so as to increase student the current leadership by the spring semester. We hope to participation and enthusiasm. 8 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  20. 20. cLARemoNt GRAduAte uNIVeRSItY, continued CaReeR seRVICes alumnI T he Office of Career Management staff is very new to the interview preparation, and skills assessment. The Drucker school. They have been working to bring internships and School has also partnered with an outside career placement opportunities of all kinds to Drucker students. company to expand our career placement and search services The OCM staff usually work one-on-one with students in to students. finding opportunities and have been receptive to students’ Since CGU is part of the Claremont Consortium, students requests for more postings in the realm of socially respon- are welcome and encouraged to attend the “5C’s” career cen- sible business. They have also been helpful with finding and ter workshops and conferences as well. co-sponsoring guest speakers for all of the student clubs, in- cluding Net Impact. The OCM is also a sponsor of the Alumni Mentor Pro- prominent alumni Richard Park (2005) - Management Consultant, Deloitte Consulting gram which matches current MBA students with a Druck- Scott Collins (2005) - Admissions Coordinator, Drucker School of Management er alum in their choice of field. In addition to this pro- Michael Crooke - Principal/Founder, Revolution gram, OCM offers workshops such as resume building, admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT O ur new dean, Ira Jackson, is a major supporter of Net Impact. His presence and public support of our club has been helpful in bringing in members and boosting participa- asked for more monetary support to expand and increase participation for the upcoming fall semester, and we have been approved for a bigger budget . They are committed to tion at events. seeing Net Impact and the other student clubs succeed and The administration is supportive of our chapter here, sug- expand. The word “no” is not in their vocabulary. In fact, they gesting ideas and cheerleading us when we have events. We are big proponents of “Yeah! Go for it.” Reasons To aTTend T he Drucker School of Management would be an ideal place for a student interested in building up a solid base of ethical and dynamic leadership skills, diving into activities relating to the social responsibility, and embracing Drucker’s phi- losophies on innovation and the knowledge worker. to sum it up The Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi ito school would be most fitting for someone interested in building upon an existing base of social/environmental impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. 160 East Tenth Street, Claremont, California 91711-6163, USA • Phone: +1 909 621 8069 • E-mail: admiss@cgu.edu Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 9
  21. 21. ColumbIa unIVeRsITy coLumbIA buSINeSS SchooL aT a glanCe “ Full-time MBa students: 1,300 24% of CBs students are net impact members The students and faculty are very eager 25% of those members are “very active” to support students who want to use their ” MBa for a socially responsible cause. 60% are “somewhat active” This chapter in three words: engaged, Strong, Forward-thinking chapter leaders: Cai steger (csteger08@gsb.columbia.edu) and Michael stone (mstone08@gsb.columbia.edu) n = 51 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, nonprofit management, and social entrepreneurship. 41% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 51% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. C olumbia Business School has a rigorous and stimulat- ing curriculum which weaves social and environmental themes into the core class offerings and is punctuated by the Individual, Business, and Society (IBS) Curriculum. The idea of this new initiative is to intertwine an element of so- cial consciousness into all courses for at least one full class highly-regarded electives which challenge students to apply session. For more information, see http://www0.gsb.colum- core business skills to real-world problems. bia.edu/leadership/curriculum/. The Social Enterprise Program has focused on developing Columbia Business School students are allowed to take up high-impact courses across four broad areas of study which to six graduate credits at any on-campus graduate school, in- include public and nonprofit management, international de- cluding the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), velopment and emerging markets, social entrepreneurship, the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preserva- and corporate social responsibility and sustainability. The tion, Columbia Law School, and Teachers College. students’ enthusiasm for this curriculum is reflected in high A number of thought leaders in social enterprise are facul- enrollment and student ratings. A student in our survey adds ty at the Business School including: Ray Horton, director of that “The Social Enterprise Program at Columbia is growing the Social Enterprise Program, Ray Fisman, research director quickly, and has tremendous school resources behind it. Be- of the Social Enterprise Program (whose research interests cause of that, an incoming student has a unique ability to include business in developing countries and corporate so- shape the future of the program and the school.” cial responsibility), Geoffrey Heal, professor of public policy A selection of courses include: Modern Political Economy, and business responsibility (whose research interests include The Private Sector and International Development, Global- corporate social responsibility and controlling the impact of ization and Markets: Reforming the International Econom- economic activity on the environment), Cathy Clark, adjunct ic Architecture, Business in Society: Doing Well by Doing professor (whose research interests include social investing Good?, Service Operations Management, Finance and Sus- and social capital markets), Bruce Usher, adjunct associate tainability, Social Entrepreneurship, Board and Executive professor (whose research interests include renewable ener- Management of Nonprofits, Education Leadership Consult- gy and the carbon markets) and CEO of EcoSecurities Group ing Lab, Corporate Governance, New Challenges in Health- Limited, the world’s leading climate change advisory firm, care Management, and Marketing Art, Culture and Educa- Jonah Rockoff, assistant professor, (whose research interests tion. This fall three new courses will be launched: Strategic include local public finance and the economics of education), Philanthropy, Credit Markets for Developing Economies, and Suresh Sundaresan, chair of the finance division (whose re- New Directions in Energy Marketing. For more information: search interests include microfinance and microinsurance). http://www0.gsb.columbia.edu/leadership/curriculum/ For more information: http://www2.gsb.columbia.edu/so- All courses in the core curriculum include an element of cialenterprise/academics/faculty/. 10 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  22. 22. coLumbIA buSINeSS SchooL, continued sTudenT aCTIVITIes student activity level in net impact compared to other clubs on campus: one of the most active clubs at the program. 9% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the extracurricular events and activities; 63% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. C olumbia Business School fosters a dynamic and intel- lectually stimulating environment filled with passion- ate students, active alumni, and supportive faculty and staff Management • Matt Flannery, CEO and Founder of Kiva.org • Fran Barrett, Executive Director and Founder, Commu- members who produce a variety of top-notch events and ac- nity Resource Exchange tivities that allow you to explore the breadth of social enter- • Mr. Mallam Nuhu Ribadu, Executive Director, Economic prise. and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) in Nigeria Students were exposed to over fifty social-enterprise re- • For more information: http://www2.gsb.columbia.edu/ lated events this year including large speaker events, panel socialenterprise/events/ discussions, intimate lunches and dinners with practitio- The “Individual, Business, and Society” (IBS) curriculum is ners, career treks, corporate visits, international study tours an integral part of the Business School’s larger aim to edu- and consulting projects. Highlights included the Social En- cate students for a lifetime. Orientation this year included a terprise Conference, the Social Enterprise Retreat, and the number of speakers dedicate to CSR, including Leon Cooper- Annual Social Enterprise Reception. Noteworthy speakers man ’67, Chairman and CEO of Omega Advisors, Inc.; Dotti included: Hatcher, Gap Inc.; Peter Knight, Generation Investment • Jim Sinegal, President and CEO, Costco Wholesale Corpo- Management; and Eric Eve, Citigroup Global Consumer ration Group. • Geoffrey Canada, President and CEO of Harlem Children’s Students are enthusiastic, open, and creative in their drive Zone to promote social enterprise issues on campus. One student • Lord John Browne, Group Chief Executive, BP plc writes that CBS has a “great network of alums and students • Steve Young, Global Executive Director of the Caux Round who are working in a variety of social fields; those that aren’t Table are also supportive of those that want to work in social en- • John Whitehead, Chairman of the Goldman Sachs Foun- terprise. We raised over $77,000 from students to subsidize dation summer internships for people working in the nonprofit and • William Browder, Founder and CEO of Hermitage Capital public sectors.” CaReeR seRVICes alumnI 37% of respondents described their career services as very helpful; 80% found jobs that utilize their values and skills; 63% of respondents rated their alumni network as very helpful. prominent alumni Rohit Aggarwala (2000) - New York City Director of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability, New York City Mayor’s Office of Operations Susan Henshaw Jones (1985) - President and Director, Museum of the City of New York Joyce Roche (1972) - President and CEO, Girls, Inc. Shari Berenbach (1990) - Executive Director, Calvert Foundation Daniel Nissenbaum (1988) - Senior Vice President, Head of Community Development, HSBC Bank USA C areer support is provided by the school in MBA Career Services, the Social Enterprise Club, and the Social Enterprise Program. Finding the perfect career in social enterprise requires Staff members in MBA Career Services and the Social Enterprise Program are devoted to supporting the career needs of social enterprise students. Each semester, we have panels a strong effort on the part of the student but there are extensive geared toward demystifying the non-traditional career search, resources at the school to support students in this process. One and our “Alumni and Mentoring” initiative brings in alumni student comments that, “I am overwhelmed by the support I’ve and professionals to advise students on the process. As the received, including enthusiasm from colleagues and faculty and population of social enterprise students has grown, Career financial support for my socially responsible internship.” Services has increasingly focused on the needs of the social Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 11
  23. 23. coLumbIA buSINeSS SchooL, continued cAReeR SeRVIceS ALumNI continued enterprise students. job opportunities, and are frequently contacted to provide Social Enterprise Club: The club has two devoted student informational interviews. positions for careers. The student representatives work in Internship support: There are two funds designed to support conjunction with the MBA Career Services and the Social students doing summer internships in public, nonprofit, or Enterprise Program to keep members informed of interesting social ventures. Both programs match or supplement salaries, job opportunities, to foster opportunities for informal offering up to $6,000 for the summer. networking, and to support a constant stream of organization Loan Assistance: For students entering the nonprofit or public and career information sessions. sectors, we have a loan assistance program, which guarantees Alumni: There is a strong social enterprise alumni pool that a minimum payout based on the student’s outstanding debt support and participate in club events, serve as mentors, post load. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT 7% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 3% of respondents say the administration is enthusiastic about social/environ- mental themes in extracurricular events and activities. T he social enterprise community receives significant sup- port from Columbia Business School’s administration on all levels. The bulk of this administrative support comes from the the students to bring high-quality events and activities to the social enterprise community. Furthermore, the dean’s office has highlighted the program in Social Enterprise Program, which has five dedicated administra- its fundraising efforts with the clearly stated goal of developing tors and an active faculty director. This team works jointly with a Social Enterprise Center. Reasons To aTTend 7% of respondents strongly agree their program adequately prepares net impact members for ethical and socially responsible leadership; 16% of respondents strongly agree their program ad- equately prepares all students for ethical and socially responsible leadership. C olumbia Business School tries to get all students to think about ethics and social impact through the Bern- stein Center for Ethics and Leadership and the Individuals, to sum it up Business and Society (IBS) curriculum. Because of this inte- The Columbia Business school would be most fitting for grated approach, students interested in social and environ- someone interested in refining and growing a mostly socially aware program and student body. mental issues feel like they’re part of something larger, and not on the fringe. The Social Enterprise Program has a staff that is committed to making Columbia Business School the top business school in the country for students interested in policies and green building. There’s also a push to develop a lot of careers with social impact. They’re open to ideas from students. affordable housing and to redevelop old industrial areas all over In addition, they help make events and new initiatives possible, the city. MBAs can be involved in all of this—both the Business and they generally help the student club meet its goals. It’s a very School and the Social Enterprise Program have great connections collaborative relationship. to alumni and other professionals working in these areas. A potential applicant should think about the amazing resourc- Columbia University is also a great resource for students who es, contacts, and opportunities available to them in New York want to learn about social and environmental innovation. CBS City. The city is home to thousands of nonprofit organizations has a relationship with the Earth Institute, led by Jeffrey Sachs, and NGOs in need financial, managerial and operational skills and with the Center for Environmental Research and Conserva- and leadership. And “everyone wants a b-school intern,” writes tion. Students can take advantage of courses and events at The one student. NYC also has an expansive healthcare and human School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (Urban Plan- services system, and is home to many corporate headquarters. ning), the School of Public and International Affairs and the Mail- NYC is poised to become a center for progressive environmental man School of Public Health. Uris Hall, 3022 Broadway, New York, New York 10027, USA • Phone: +1 212 854 5553 12 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  24. 24. ColumbIa unIVeRsITy SchooL oF INteRNAtIoNAL ANd pubLIc AFFAIRS aT a glanCe Full-time students: 850 18% of siPa students are net impact members 14% of those members are “very active” 47% are “somewhat active” “ siPa has a very diverse curriculum, which is great because students have such wide access to many different types of courses focused on social ” and environmental issues. This chapter in three words: transforming, Growing, Networking CuRRICulum T he Master of International Affairs (MIA) and Master of Public Administration (MPA) programs at SIPA offer a number of concentrations that can be applied to using include the School of Business, the School of Journalism, the School of Law, the School of Public Health, the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, and the School of business for social and/or environmental impact. Social Work. Dual-degree programs for MPA students can be The following concentrations are a sample of concentrations arranged with the School of Law, the School of Public Health, offered: the School of Social Work, the London School of Economics, • Economic and Political Development (EPD) and Sciences Po. • Environmental Policy Studies (EPS) One student describes SIPA’s curriculum as “very diverse” • Human Rights (HR) but adds that “I think that having adequate coursework • International Energy Management and Policy (IEMP) preparation in finance is also very important, and while these • Social Policy courses are offered at SIPA, they are not required. Therefore, • Urban Policy the burden is really on the student to make sure that they There are a number of elective courses offered at SIPA that select the appropriate mix of classes so that they graduate incorporate social and environmental themes. Furthermore, with the right skills.” Another student who combined studies through the business school, students can take courses in on environmental and energy policy with quantitative and social entrepreneurship, nonprofit board management, and finance classes, writes “I really liked SIPA’s emphasis on finance and sustainability. building hard skills (through the quantitative work) while Dual-degree programs for MIA students can be arranged allowing students to become an expert in a specific policy- with some of the university’s professional schools. These based issue.” sTudenT aCTIVITIes T he SIPA Net Impact chapter officially kicked off in January 2007. These are the activities that we organized for spring 2007: In February, we held a club kick-off meeting Clearinghouse.” In April, we held a forum on Sustainability in Business and a brown bag discussion entitled “Gone Rural in Swaziland: Making a Sustainable Social Enterprise with with special guest speakers (SIPA Alum, Elya Tagar and the Development Impact” New York Professionals Net Impact Chapter), a monthly Our chapter collaborates with the Business School’s Social networking happy hour with two other SIPA student groups, Enterprise Club, the Columbia University Partnership and a brown bag discussion on “Human Rights and Supply for International Development, and other university Chain Management – A Discussion with the Fair Factories organizations. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 13
  25. 25. coLumbIA SchooL oF INteRNAtIoNAL ANd pubLIc AFFAIRS, continued CaReeR seRVICes alumnI C areer Services posts a number of jobs, many of which have a social and/or environmental focus. This is an area where Ca- reer Services has an opportunity to expand the number and type of jobs offered for students interested in these areas. admInIsTRaTIVe suPPoRT W e are a new chapter and we hope to have more engagement with the administration as the organization grows. The Sci- ence and Environmental Policy MPA program was instrumental in providing funding for our Forum on Sustainability in Business. Reasons To aTTend T he SIPA Net Impact chapter is unique in that it seeks to understand issues at the intersection of business to sum it up and policy, specifically focusing on three pillars: social entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility, and The Columbia school of international and Public affairs would be most fitting for someone interested sustainability. We have a board that is enthusiastic and in building upon an existing base of social/environmental committed to forming this new organization and laying impact activities with opportunity for significant growth. a foundation for future SIPA students interested in us- ing business and policy to make a social impact. 420 West 118th Street, Room 408, MC 3325, New York, New York 10027, USA • Phone: +1 212 854 6216 • E-mail: sipa_admission@columbia.edu 1 Business as UNusual: THe 2007 neT impacT sTudenT guide To graduaTe business programs
  26. 26. CoRnell unIVeRsITy JohNSoN GRAduAte SchooL oF mANAGemeNt aT a glanCe “ Full-time students: 511 The Johnson school is at the forefront 20% of Johnson net impact members are “very active” of research being done on how 20% are “somewhat active” business can proactively address ” emerging environmental and social concerns. This chapter in three words: Leadership, Vision, Access chapter leaders: Jeffrey Fuchs (jpf44@cornell.edu) and scott McClintock (scm7@cornell.edu) n = 47 CuRRICulum students identified their program’s strengths as being in the areas of International development, environmental sustainability, and social entrepreneurship. 66% of respondents say the students at their program are enthusiastic about social/environmental themes in the curriculum; 47% of respondents say the faculty at their program are enthusiastic. T he Johnson School has a strong curriculum relating to business opportunities and strategies in the realm of social, environmental, ethical, political, and international venture capital funding for low income markets. Students may elect to take up to 25% of their coursework outside the Johnson School. This affords them the oppor- issues. Many classes are taught by faculty associated with tunity to enroll in classes in any of Cornell’s nine colleges. the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise (www.johnson. Among the courses available are: sustainable agriculture, cornell.edu/sge), which was endowed by the late Samuel C. ecology, renewable energy, green building, public affairs, and Johnson to “enhance students’ understanding of global sus- international development. A document highlighting many tainability and prepare them to be leaders of ethical, equi- of these relevant courses can be downloaded at: http://fo- table, and economically and environmentally sustainable en- rum.johnson.cornell.edu/students/orgs/netimpact/. terprises.” A unique aspect of the Johnson School curriculum The Johnson School also offers dual degrees with Cornell’s is its immersions, which are electives taken in the second half other top programs including the School of Engineering, the of the first year. Immersions supplement lecture and case- Cornell Law School, the Cornell Institute of Public Affairs, based training with integrated experiential learning. The and the Cornell School of International Labor Relations. The Johnson School’s Sustainable Global Enterprise immersion, programs further add to the breadth of opportunities avail- taught by professors Stuart Hart and Mark Milstein, com- able to Net Impact members. bines traditional case and lecture based courses with field Stuart Hart, the Samuel C. Johnson Chair in Sustainable work to explore connections between global sustainability Global Enterprise, is one of the leading voices in the area and business strategy. The practicum component of the SGE of corporate strategy for social and environmental sustain- Immersion places students in multidisciplinary teams to ability. His book, “Capitalism at the Crossroads: Unlimited solve real problems and provide practical operational solu- Business Opportunities in Solving the World’s Most Difficult tions to participating companies struggling with social and Problems” was named by Strategy+Business as a Best Busi- environmental business challenges. MBA participation in ness Book of 2005. In addition, his article “Beyond Green- the SGE Immersion increased 70% from 2006 to 2007. Stu- ing: Strategies for a Sustainable World,” won the McKinsey dents have worked on a diverse range of assignments, includ- Award for Best Article in Harvard Business Review in 1997. ing projects related to distributed energy in Rwanda, market Professor Hart is widely sought out by top business leaders, feasibility studies of sports apparel for Muslim women, and and Johnson students have access to him on a regular basis. Published by net impact • Content submitted by current students in spring 2007 1

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