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Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
Chagall#1 071710
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Chagall#1 071710

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THE ART OF CHAGALL (Part 1) …

THE ART OF CHAGALL (Part 1)
THE ART OF CHAGALL is a survey of the early life and art of this quintessential Jewish artist. From his birth in Vitebsk, an East European village (shtetl), he goes to St. Petersburg to study art and then to Paris. There he encounters the avant-garde aesthetics of Modernism. It has a powerful impact upon him and his future development. The beginnings of an exciting life!

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  • THE ART OF CHAGALL Moshka (to his parents) Shagal was born in Vitebsk, Russia He was born on the lucky day of triple seven: 7/7/87 His was a Chassidic Jewish family He attended HEDER as a young child He recited a D’VAR TORAH to his parents every Shabbat
  • OUTSKIRTS OF VITEBSK , e. 20 th c. Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.        
  • THE CHAGALL FAMILY HOUSE Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall & the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli. This brick house on Pokrovskaya Street in Vitebsk Marc lived there from the age of 3 to 28 The name “ SHAGAL ” in Russian means “he/you/I walked” It refers to a striding step Chagall often represented this as striding upward on a diagonal Segal is also a Hebrew acronym for an “Assistant Levi”
  • CHAGALL’S PARENTS on the day of their engagement, Vitebsk, 1886 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.        
  • CHAGALL’S PARENTS Harshav, B. (2004). Marc Chagall… Stanford, CA. Stanford Univ. Press Marc Chagall’s parents were Yikheszkel/Zakhar and Ite-Feyge Shagal His mother wears a rich shawl She probably received as a wedding gift from her husband Yikheszkel was photographed without a hat Going bareheaded was considered a secular attitude He displayed his philosophy while posing for a “modern” photograph  
  • THE CHAGALL FAMILY -Vitebsk, e. 1900 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Sisters: Anna, Maroussia, Rosa Back: Marc, Zina, Uncle Neuch, Lisa, Maria THE CHAGALL FAMILY -1910 Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall & the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli. Marc was the eldest of nine children His mother was 16 when he was born This photograph was taken just before he left for Paris in 1910 There is a Chassidic belief that God exists throughout life This gives a religious intensity to all the characters he depicts
  • CHAGALL AND HIS FRIEND , Avikdor Mekler, c. 1906 CHAGALL, 1906 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.        
  • YURY PEN Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. As a schoolboy, he copied drawings from newspapers or elsewhere He took the name of the 18th c. painter of the Mohilev synagogue Haim, the son of Isaac Segal, became his surrogate grandfather C. 1900-He studied with Yury Moyseevitsh (Yehuda) Pen’s Art School   1906: Chagall took a job retouching negatives after finishing his studies Attended Yury (Yehuda) Pen school for a few months Chagall said about Pen: honest, hard-working artist, my first professor, who left a lasting impression Pen was so kind that he didn’t make Chagall pay for his studies A friend suggested that they continue their studies in St. Petersburg Winter 1906-07: They left for St. Petersburg      
  • CHAGALL IN ST. PETERSBURG , June 17, 1910 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc.   Chagall was in St. Petersburg without a residence permit He had no means to support himself His father gave him 27 kopeks, which didn’t last long C. said: “There were days when I collapsed from exhaustion and hunger” He did retouching for a photographer and worked as a sign painter He failed the entrance exam for Baron Stieglitz’s School of Arts and Crafts This would have given him a resident permit as a student      
  • LEON BAKST, 1910 (1907?) Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli. Director of the Zvantseva School of Art in St. Petersburg, 1907 Courtesy Comite Marc Chagall, Paris     1909-Chagall studied with Leon Bakst at the St. Petersburg Academy Color became an abstract entity It had no relation to any realistic representation of figures 1908: Through Yury Pen, Chagall contacted Ilya Ginsburg He referred Chagall to Baron David Ginzburg The baron offered Chagall a monthly allowance of 10 rubles   Paints his first major canvas, THE DEAD MAN Chagall sees this as the starting point of his career    
  • THE DEAD MAN, 1908-11 Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli This gouache must’ve been a preliminary work for the oil painting 1909: Zadkine said: “ His room was cluttered with paintings all over the walls and piled up in every corner. The paintings resembled signs for a dressmaker’s studio, a hair salon, or a tobacconist, but there was nevertheless something primitive and natural about them, something that was astonishing, touching, and made you smile.”
  • THE DEAD MAN- 1908/1911 Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli Oil on canvas, 68.2 x 87 cm. Musee national d’art moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris It is interesting to notice the changes Chagall made from the earlier work Two different dates are given for the two works June 1908: Chagall called up for military service Petitions were submitted for an extension of his deferment Deferment of 2 years is granted based on his having “ shown brilliant results at school”   1910: Chagall worked w/Bakst on set design for Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russe
  • SELF-PORTRAIT WITH BRUSHES, 1909 Haftmann (1973). Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas. 22 1/2 x 18 7/8/57x 48 cm. Kunstammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf 1907-10: Chagall lived in St. Petersburg As a Jew, he needed a permit to live there He painted this when he was 22 years old 1910-he was due to be called into the military and moved to Paris The aesthetics of Cubism and Orphism influenced him there Chagall based this work on early 17 th c. paintings He added an ironic smile He wears an extremely confident look At 22, he sees himself as the “Artist” He regards the viewer with skepticism and an air of superiority This is when he about to break out of his early environment It is a psychological self-revelation at the beginning of his career
  • THEA BRACHMAN and BELLA ROSENFELD Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Chagall met Bella (Berta) Rosenfeld through a friend from Vitebsk      
  • BERTA ROSENFELD (later BELLA), Vitebsk Harshav, B. (2004). Marc Chagall… Stanford, CA. Stanford Univ. Press. This is a photograph of Berta Rosenfeld in Vitebsk Bella was 17 She was the daughter of Frida-Alta Leviente and Shmul-Neoukh Rosenfeld Her father was a financially successfully businessman Her father owned several jewelry shops
  • BELLA ROSENFELD and BROTHERS Harshav, B. (2004). Marc Chagall… Stanford, CA. Stanford Univ. Press. Berta is on the left and her brothers are: Abrasha, Aharon, Yakov, Israel, and Mendel All are secular
  • BELLA ROSENFELD, Vitebsk, April 1911 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Her father was considered a rich Vitebsk merchant He was not in favor of Berta marrying Chagall, a struggling artist Marc spent much energy and time proving her father wrong He wanted to become a financial success to prove his worth
  • MY FATHER - 1910 Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall & the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli. Oil on canvas. 80 x 42.2 cm. Musee national d’art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris Chagall wrote his autobiography, titled: MY LIFE In it, he tells of the difficulty with his parents He wanted them to allow him to become a painter He also comments about his attitude from childhood He wanted to escape the confines of a provincial Jewish family As a schoolboy, he copied drawings from newspapers or elsewhere He took the name of the 18th c. painter of the Mohilev synagogue Haim, the son of Isaac Segal, became his surrogate grandfather C. 1900-He studied with Yury Moyseevitsh (Yehuda) Pen’s Art School 1909-Chagall studied with Leon Bakst at the St. Petersburg Academy Color became an abstract entity It had no relation to any realistic representation of figures
  • VITEBSK , 1911 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Pencil, ink and gouache on paper 6 ¾ x 9 1/8” (17.1 x 23.1 cm) Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, Musee national d’art moderne/Centre de creation industrielle, dation 1988 This painting shows the artist with his curly hair and brush and palette He is remembering/dreaming of his hometown The curving onion domes on its churches are a powerful image They contrast with the angular building, fence, and outhouse in the front
  • STREET MUSICIANS , 1907 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Gouache and india ink on paper 11 5/8 x 9 1/8 in. (29.7 x 23 cm) Private collection, Paris This early work captures a familiar event for Chagall It also shows his technical and academic skills
  • RED NUDE , 1909 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas 33 1/8 x 45 5/8 in. (84 x 116 cm) Private collection, Paris This oil painting on canvas displa ט s his interest in composition Note the repetition of curves and forms It also indicates his interest in modernism rather than naturalism  
  • FIGURE IN FRONT OF BLUE VAULT , 1910 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Gouache on paper 10 5/8 x 15 ¼ in. (27 x 40 cm) Private collection, Paris An ongoing interest in the basic tenets of modernism The figure is almost incidental to the overall arrangement of shapes There is a flattening of forms The contrast between the semi-circle and strong angle of the knees The painterly application of paint is an indication of the hand of the artist
  • NUDE WITH COMB , 1911-12 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Ink and gouache on paper 13 1/8 x 9 ¼ in Private collection, Paris May 1911: Chagall goes to Paris via Berlin He moves into Studio at 18, impasse du Maine He often meets up with Bakst, who continues to support him June 1911: Chagall paints I AND THE VILLAGE TO RUSSIA, DONKEYS AND OTHERS DEDICATED TO MY FIANCEE 1911: Chagall submits paintings in the Salon d’Automne; all are rejected Chagall submits 3 works to the World of Art society in St. Petersburg Only one is accepted This painting is a clear example of analytical cubism The various parts of the figure are analyzed geometrically
  • NUDE IN THE GARDEN, 1911 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas 13 x 15 7/8 in. (33 x 40.5 cm) Private collection, Paris This is a much more lyrical and poetic painting The fact that both were done around the same time is revealing It shows that Chagall had many aspects to his personality Like a good student, he was exploring various approaches The flattening of forms and repetition of curves are aspects of modernism
  • THE POET WITH BIRDS, 1911 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas 28 ½ x 39 in. (72.4 x 99 cm) The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, bequest of Putnam Dana McMillan This is another example of Chagall’s emotional and romantic side Repetition of parallel lines contrast with the pattern of bird footprints Chagall’s imagination must’ve been stimulated by his dreaming
  • I AND THE VILLAGE , 1911 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oil on canvas. 75 1/4 x 59 1/4/191 x 150.5 cm The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund His friend Blaise Cendrars named this work: I AND THE VILLAGE The life of Peasants came from the cycle of the seasons This was the domain of the ‘holy fool’ There peasants and animals lived side by side Animal life was the link between humans and the universe Cows and horses had names The miller expected the cow to recognize him The expression “there’s no such thing” was never heard Instead, people would say, “Who knows?” This painting encapsulates that idealized view of the world His clear red background recalls the tradition of large ikons The disc was a strong element in the composition This painting is both human and universal with many contrasts It is a synthetic reality Chagall’s disdain for convention brought a new world into art
  • IMPASSE DU MAINE Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. This is the street where Chagall’s Paris studio is located It’s on the verso of a postcard sent by Chagall to Alexander Romm The date was December 1911        
  • CHAGALL IN PARIS, 1911 Chagall in front of the fountain of the Observatoire Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Notice that Chagall is dressed in a suit, vest, shirt and tie He wears a jaunty hat to complete his distinctive persona        
  • PHOTOGRAPH OF CHAGALL IN THE STUDIO -Anonymous, 1911 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art He rented a studio and sub-let one room to help pay the rent After 1 year he moved to a cheaper location, near slaughterhouses The next year, he exhibited in Berlin at an international show From this he gained much prominence His paintings then appeared in Paris and other European capitals His meteoric rise to fame affixed him in the annals of modern art He worked out his own response to Cubism and other styles Among them were his good friends, Robert and Sonia Terk Delaunay 1914-He applied to the Russian consulate for a 3 month permit He wanted to visit Russia after the opening of his Berlin exhibition He wanted to attend his sister’s wedding and to see Bella again
  • THE CANOPY , 1912 Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli Gouache on paper, 21.5 x 23.5 cm Private collection Winter 1912: Chagall moved to a studio at 2. Passage de Dantzig This is part of La Ruch complex, where many artists live There he meets, Modigliani, Archipenko, Soutine, Shterenberg Chagall socializes with poets: Cendrars, Max Jacob, Salmon, Apollinaire He shows several paintings at the Salon des Independants Chagall sends 3 works to the Salon d’Automne Romm said an entire wall in the Cubist room was devoted to Chagall’s work Jakov Tugendhold wrote the 1st serious critique of Chagall’s work i The article appeared in “The Paris-Nouvelles” Koenig wrote a serious critique in “Friend” This was a Yiddish newspaper in St. Petersburg   Chagall was smitten by Bella, but he had left his fiancée in Vitebsk His thoughts turned to marriage and the establishing of his own family
  • THE WEDDING , 1910/1911 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli Oil on linen 19 1/8 x 74 1/8 in. (99.5 x 188.5 cm) Musee national d’art moderne, Centre George Pompidou, Paris Chagall, M. (1965). My Life. London: Peter Owen. p. 35 Asa young boy, he would view his town from the little window of their attic, by crouching right down He saw a woman hurrying to a wedding There she will weep over the fate of the bride Chagall said he liked wedding musicians, the sounds of their polkas an waltzes He liked to weep a little when the badchan sing and cried in his high voice: “Bride, bride! Thank what awaits you!”  
  • THE BIRTH -Marc Chagall, 1910 Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli Oil on canvas, 27 x 40 cm Kunsthaus, Zurich Chagall was familiar with the birthing of a baby at home He wrote that the day he was born was an auspicious one A great fire broke out in the little house near the road behind the prison This was on the outskirts of Vitebsk They carried the bed with the mother and baby in it to a safer place Marc was considered a ‘stillborn,’ as he did not breathe once he was born They plunged him into a bucket of cold water and he began to breathe This painting depicts what must’ve been a regular occurrence in Vitebsk
  • THE BIRTH , 1911 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas 18 1/8 x 14 1/8 in. (46 x 36 cm) Private collection, Paris This painting was done just one year later Here the work reflects a modernist sensibility That is a big contrast from the naturalistic documentary approach That was taken in the earlier work
  • THE CEMETERY -Marc Chagall, 1911 Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli Oil on canvas 69.3 x 100 cm Musee national d’art moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris Crowded placement of the upright gravestones was frequent in E. Europe It is an indication of the limited space provided for Jewish burials Ohels, or small buildings were built for special rabbis Shapes in the sky repeat those of the cemetery site
  • CEMETERY GATES, 1917 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oil on canvas. 34 1/4 x 26 7/8 in/87 x 68.6 cm. Private Collection Two verses from Ezekiel 37: 12-14 are written over the gateway These are the gates to the Jewish cemetery They state that Ezekiel will open graves and restore the people He will bring them to the land of Israel He will put his spirit into them and they shall live The words on the gateposts are illegible This painting is a memorial to all who died in the Pale of Settlement Those were the 16 provinces of Russia Jews were restricted to those areas before the 1917 revolutions Chagall focused on the gates and picket fence that lead into the cemetery The fragmented sky repeats the angles of the gate and its pediment
  • THE VIOLINIST , 1911 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oil on canvas. 37 1/4 x 27 1/4 in/94.5 x 69.5 cm Kunstammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf This is a subject that Chagall did repeatedly Chagall himself had learned the instrument He always remained a music lover He often played records while he painted A strolling fiddler always played at jewish weddings Thus, the couple in the background may recall just such a day The violinist is more eloquent than realistic He functions not as a ‘real’ person But as a means of transcending everyday life  
  • THE FIDDLER, 1912-13 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. 74 x 60 5/8 in/188x 158 cm. Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, dienst verspreide Rijkskollekties; donated by P.A. Renault The fiddler with one foot on the roof recalls “Fiddler on the Roof” His sad song recalls the groans and lamentations of the soul Past youth, dead love, and lost liberty are also remembered The houses and church tower suggest memories of Russia His green face is seen as inebriation through a slang expression It is painted on a white tablecloth with a checked pattern The grid prevents the viewer from ‘seeing’ a traditional perspective The small person with 3 heads symbolizes the Russian 1905 uprisings This fiddler functions on many levels
  • THE PINCH OF SNUFF , 1912 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oil on canvas. 50 3/8 x 35 1/2 in/128 x 90 cm. Private Collection There are three artworks by Chagall on this subject This one was shown in Berlin in June 1914 The main difference is the letters in the Star of David The letters In the oil versions (like this one) signify “death” The writing on the pages in the book is in Yiddish This may refer to a saying: “It’s not worth a pinch of snuff” I.L. Peretz wrote a story ‘A Pinch of Snuff’ This points towards the series of Jews that he painted from life That was after Chagall returned to Vitebsk
  • JEW AT PRAYER- 1912-13 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oil on canvas. 15 3/4 x 12 1/4 in. /40 x 31 cm. The Israel Museum, Jerusalem Chagall’s paintings of Jews began in Paris This painting is very stylized The holy man is carried away and has lost all personal identity He bends over his holy book, but barely needs to read it He knows the words by heart The Torah case on the left is covered with cabbalistic signs Chagall wrote that his father went to synagogue at 6 AM everyday There he prayed for one dead soul or another He recalled how his father dressed all in white on Yom Kippur Chagall said he looked like the prophet Elijah This is one of Chagall’s most expressionistic paintings He seems to grope towards the devotion of those close to him
  • ADAM AND EVE/TEMPTATION , 1912 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas. 63 1/4 x 42 7/8 in/160.5 x 109 cm. St. Louis Art Museum Gift of Morton T. May One of the first works he exhibited in Berlin was ADAM AND EVE This painting was exhibited in the Salon des Independants in 1913 It is a stylistic development related to Cubists’ works Unlike the Cubists, he silhouetted the two figures and the tree He indicated a low horizon with quirky little animals Apollinaire, poet and art critic, said that it reveals An impressive sense of color A daring talent A curious tormented soul  
  • INTRODUCTION, 1912-13 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Gouache on paper 9 ¼ x 6 ½ in. (23.5 x 16.5 cm) Archiv Baumeister, Stuttgart This small gouache was done in Paris In addition to signing his name, Chagall dated it 1912-13 and wrote Paris It is not clear what he meant by the beheaded figure It does appear to somehow be a type of self-portrait Also, the right hand has seven fingers on it It may have been a study for the next image
  • SELF-PORTRAIT WITH SEVEN FINGERS, 1912 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Sed-Rajna, G. (Ed.). (1997). Jewish Art. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc Portrait is done in a cubist/folk art style No visually identifiable Jewish connection On the left, Paris is seen through a window Chagall dreams of Vitebsk and its churches, in the upper right To add his Jewish identity to this split He labels these landscapes in Yiddish The Yiddish provides a clue to the meaning of his seven fingers The number “seven” has powerful apotropaic Jewish meaning Intensity, passion, & commitment characterized effort by 7 parts Chagall wanted to be a 100% painter Note his dress—like a successful businessman Chagall showed seven fingers to indicate his total commitment Jewish identity visualized through a Yiddish idiom at the top Mit all-eh zibn zakhn
  • CALVARY/GOLGOTHA, 1912 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas 68 ¾ x 75 ¾ in. (174.5 x 192.4 cm) The Museum of Modern Art, New York,, acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest, 1949 March 1913: Apollinaire introduces Chagall to Herwarth Walden Walden is a renowned avant-garde collector Walden is also the founder of the Berlin gallery Der Sturm September 1913: Chagall sends 3 canvases to Walden CALVARY is purchased by B. Kohler  
  • SELF-PORTRAIT, 1914 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oil on paperboard. 113/4 x 10 1/2 in/30 x 26.5 cm Philadelphia Museum of Art. The Louis E. Stern Collection This is one of a series of self-portraits His confident approach is like the self-portrait with brushes His earlier paintings were at Der Sturm gallery in Berlin or Paris The colors are subdued, similar to 17 th c. paintings The seriousness is in the heroic tradition of Western art The tip of a white flower indicates that the plant is probably a lily 1929-this work and another self-portrait were in a magazine That issue was devoted entirely to his work
  • JEW IN BRIGHT RED, 1914/1915 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Sed-Rajna, G. (Ed.). (1997). Jewish Art. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Oil on canvas. 19 3/8 x 31 5/8 in. (100 x 80.5 cm.) Russian Museum, St. Petersburg (copyright A.D.A.G.P.) The Jew in Bright Red is actually dressed in black Yet his long, full beard, mustache and hair are all bright red The house and rooftops behind him emphasize this vibrant color Notice the triangles in the window and the green glove These are probably the impact of Cubism Chagall learned this aesthetic while in Paris Yet his earliest experiences encompass the entire composition Chagall placed Hebrew writing as a circular surrounding shape
  • THE PRAYING JEW (RABBI OF VITEBSK), 1914 Compton, S. (1985). Chagall. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oil on canvas. 41 x 33in/104 x 84 cm. Museo d’arte moderna, Venice This is probably the earliest painting of Jews in 1914-15 It was done from Life Chagall married realism and abstraction Black and white are the colors of an orthodox Jew at prayer The black stripes of the tallit are structural elements Chagall repeated this composition multiple times This one is in Philadelphia There is also one in Chicago and one in Switzerland
  • Sketch for FEAST DAY (RABBI WITH LEMON) , 1914 Foray, J-M. (2003) Marc Chagall. NY: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Gouache and watercolor on paper 16 7/8 x 135/8 in. (42.7 x 34.4 cm) Private collection, Paris
  • THE RABBI WITH THE ETROG, 1914 Korn, I. (1996). A Celebration of Judaism in Art . New York: Todtri. Oil on canvas. Kunstaamlung Nordrhein-Westphalen, Dusseldorf This is the festival day of Sukkot The etrog/citron and lulav are its symbols Palm branch is tied with myrtle and willow The small figure on top of the rabbi’s head is open to interpretation Some say it is his soul from which he separated and turned away
  • WEDDING, 1918 Compton, S. (Ed.) (1998). Chagall: Love and the Stage 1914-1922. London: Merrell Holberton. Oil on Canvas. 100 x 119 cm. State Tretiakov Gallery, Moscow Marc Chagall was a man of passion He was a man of fierce loves Foremost was his love of art It unlocked a world wider than the one into which he was born When Chagall returned to Vitebsk from Paris He married his fiancée, Bella Rosenfeld in 1915 Marc and Bella are the subject of this painting It affirms a love for his culture Notice the fiddler in the tree on the right And the table set for family inside the house   1917 was a momentous year in Russia The October Bolshevik victory followed the February Revolution This was commemorated a year later in Vitebsk Chagall, as Commissar for the Arts, organized a grand celebration Malevich arrived at the school shortly and taught total abstraction A theatre commission allowed the Chagall family to leave for Moscow 1922-Chagall left the Soviet Union for Berlin Bella and his daughter Ida joined him there At this time he learned the printmaking technique of etching  
  • MARC AND BELLA DURING WORLD WAR I Harshav, B. (2006). Marc Chagall & the Lost Jewish World . NY: Rizzoli. 1914-He returned to Russia for an intended 3 month visit The outbreak of WWI prolonged his stay there He married his sweetheart, Bella Rosenfeld, at this time   Marc and Bella during WWI
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    • 1. THIS MATERIAL IS FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    • 2. Myrna Teck, Ph. D. Independent Scholar The Art Of
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    • 52. It is said that the love of Art cannot be taught It can only be CAUGHT
    • 53. So I hope I’ve made the ART OF contagious for you today!

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