Social Media Speaks Out - July 2014

227 views

Published on

Copy of presentation made at Comcast on social media that looks at trends in SBI and how social media listening & engagement can be used to solve simple and complex problems.

Published in: Social Media
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
227
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Social Media Speaks Out - July 2014

  1. 1. Social  Speaks  Out     What  Companies  Need  to  Know  About     Social  Media,  Social  Networking  &     Social  Business  Intelligence   Stephen  J.  Andriole     Thomas  G.  Labrecque  Professor  of  Business  Technology   The  Villanova  School  of  Business   Villanova  University   Comcast  |  July  |  2014  
  2. 2. Agenda   ü     Some:     Ø     Defini;ons   Ø     Capabili;es   Ø     Examples   Ø     Prescrip;ons                        With  Ac(ve  Discussion    
  3. 3. Defini;ons   ü     Web  2.0     ü     Social  Media   ü     Social  Networking   ü     Social  Business  Intelligence  
  4. 4. Defini;ons   ü     Web  2.0     ü     Social  Media   ü     Social  Networking   ü     Social  Business  Intelligence  
  5. 5. Web  2.0  is  a  loosely  defined  intersecRon  of  web  applicaRon   technologies  that  facilitate  parRcipatory  informaRon  sharing,   interoperability,  user-­‐centered  design,  and  collaboraRon  on  the   World  Wide  Web.       A  Web  2.0  technologically-­‐enabled  site  allows  users  to   interact  and  collaborate  with  each  other  as  creators  (prosumers)   of  user-­‐generated  content  in  a  virtual  community,  in  contrast  to   websites  where  users  (consumers)  are  limited  to  the  passive   viewing  of  content  that  was  created  for  them.       Web  2.0  technologies  power  social  networking  sites,  blogs,   wikis,  video  sharing  sites,  hosted  services,  web  applicaRons,   mashups  and  folksonomies.     Web  2.0  
  6. 6. Web  2.0  can  be  described  in  3  parts:     Rich  Internet  applica;on  (RIA)  —  defines  the  experience  brought   from  desktop  to  browser  whether  it  is  from  a  graphical  point  of  view   or  usability  point  of  view.    Some  buzzwords  related  to  RIA  are  Ajax   and  Flash.     Web-­‐oriented  architecture  (WOA)  —  is  a  key  piece  in  Web  2.0,   which  defines  how  Web  2.0  applicaRons  expose  their  funcRonality  so   that  other  applicaRons  can  leverage  and  integrate  the  funcRonality   providing  a  set  of  much  richer  applicaRons  (examples  are:    Feeds,  RSS,   Web  Services,  Mash-­‐ups)     Social  Web  —  defines  how  Web  2.0  tends  to  interact  much  more   with  the  end  user  and  make  the  end-­‐user  an  integral  part.     Web  2.0  
  7. 7. Defini;ons   ü     Web  2.0     ü     Social  Media   ü     Social  Networking   ü     Social  Business  Intelligence  
  8. 8. Social  media  takes  on  many  different  forms  including  magazines,   Internet  forums,  weblogs,  social  blogs,  micro-­‐blogging,  wikis,  podcasts,   photo-­‐graphs  or  pictures,  video,  raRng  and  social  bookmarking.       There  are  six  different  types  of  social  media:    collabora;ve   projects  (e.g.,  Wikipedia),  blogs  and  microblogs  (e.g.,   TwiTer),  content  communi;es  (e.g.,  YouTube),  social   networking  sites  (e.g.,  Facebook),  virtual  game  worlds  (e.g.,   World  of  WarcraW),  and  virtual  social  worlds  (e.g.  Second   Life).         Social  media  includes:    blogs,  picture-­‐sharing,  vlogs,  wall-­‐posRngs,  email,   instant  messaging,  music-­‐sharing,  crowdsourcing  and  voice  over  IP,  to   name  a  few.     Social  Media  
  9. 9. Defini;ons   ü     Web  2.0     ü     Social  Media   ü     Social  Networking   ü     Social  Business  Intelligence  
  10. 10. Social  networking  is  an  online  service,  pla_orm,  or  site  that   focuses  on  building  and  reflec;ng  of  social  networks  or   social  rela;ons  among  people,  who,  for  example,  share   interests  and/or  ac;vi;es  and  people  with  similar  or   somewhat  similar  interests,  backgrounds  and/or  ac;vi;es   make  their  own  communi;es.         A  social  network  consists  of  a  representaRon  of  each  user  (o`en  a   profile),  his/her  social  links,  and  a  variety  of  addiRonal  services.     Most  social  network  services  are  web-­‐based  and  provide  means   for  users  to  interact  over  the  Internet,  such  as  e-­‐mail  and  instant   messaging.    Social  networking  allows  users  to  share  ideas,   ac;vi;es,  events,  and  interests  within  their  individual   networks.     Social  Networking  
  11. 11. Defini;ons   ü     Web  2.0     ü     Social  Media   ü     Social  Networking   ü     Social  Business  Intelligence  
  12. 12. Social  Business  Intelligence  is  the  analysis  of  social  media   data,  informa;on  &  knowledge  collected  from   various  social  media  and  social  networking  sites.       Social  business  intelligence  analysts  store  data  and  analyze  social   data  sets.    The  datasets  are  proprietary  or  accessible  to  other   analysts.    Users  can  create  new  and  interesRng  dashboards/   analyses  as  well  as  associated  insight  from  the  same  data  sets.       This  is  a  new  slant  on  business  intelligence  (BI)  where  the  explora-­‐   Ron  of  social  data  can  lead  to  serious  analysis  and  important   insight  that  the  iniRaRng  user  did  not  envisage/explore/anRcipate.     Social  Business  Intelligence  
  13. 13. Rela;onships  Among  the  Areas      Web  2.0  (Technologies)      Social  Media      (CollaboraRon  &  Sharing)      Social  Networking      (B2B,  B2C,  C2C,  E2E)      Social  Business  Intelligence      (Analysis  of  Social  Data)  
  14. 14. So  What  are  We  Taking  About?   Social  Speaks  Out  
  15. 15. Blogs:    Blogger,  LiveJournal,  Open  Diary,  TypePad,  WordPress,   Vox,  ExpressionEngine,  Xanga       Micro-­‐Blogging/Presence  Applica;ons:    fmylife,  Jaiku,  Plurk,   Twifer,  Tumblr,  Posterous,  Yammer       Social  Networking:    Bebo,  BigTent,  Elgg,  Facebook,  Geni.com,   GovLoop,  Hi5,  LinkedIn,  MySpace,  Ning,  Orkut,  Skyrock,  Plaxo,   Spoke,  Twifer       Social  Network  Aggrega;on:    NutshellMail,  FriendFeed       Events:    Upcoming,  Even_ul,  Meetup.com       Wikis:    Wikipedia,  PBwiki,  wetpaint   The  Range  of  Social  
  16. 16.     Social  Bookmarking:    Delicious,  StumbleUpon,  Google   Reader,  CiteULike       Social  News:    Digg,  Mixx,  Reddit,  NowPublic       Opinion  Sites:    epinions,  Yelp       Photo  Sharing:    Flickr,  Zooomr,  Photobucket,  SmugMug,   Picasa       Video  Sharing:    YouTube,  Viddler,  Vimeo,  sevenload       Crowdsourcing:    NineSigma,  InnocenRve       The  Range  of  Social  
  17. 17. Social  News:    Digg,  Mixx,  Reddit,  NowPublic       Opinion  Sites:    epinions,  Yelp       Photo  Sharing:    Flickr,  Zooomr,  Photobucket,  SmugMug,  Picasa       Video  Sharing:    YouTube,  Viddler,  Vimeo,  sevenload       Crowdsourcing:    NineSigma,  InnocenRve       Livecas;ng:    Ustream.tv,  JusRn.tv,  SRckam,  Skype       Audio  &  Music  Sharing:    imeem,  The  Hype  Machine,  Last.fm,   ccMixter,  ShareTheMusic   The  Range  of  Social  
  18. 18. Product  Reviews:    epinions.com,  MouthShut.com       Business  Reviews:    Customer  Lobby,  yelp.com       Community  Q&A:    Yahoo!  Answers,  WikiAnswers,  Askville,   Google  Answers       Media  &  Entertainment  Pla_orms:    Cisco  Eos       Virtual  Worlds:    Second  Life,  The  Sims  Online,  Forterra       Game  Sharing:    Miniclip,  Kongregate       Informa;on  Aggregators:    Netvibes,  Twine     The  Range  of  Social  
  19. 19. Agenda   ü     Some:     Ø     Defini;ons   Ø     Capabili;es   Ø     Examples   Ø     Prescrip;ons  
  20. 20. The  first  reason  is  reach:    Facebook  has  more  than   1,000,000,000  users  and  Twifer  has  over  400,000,000.     Almost  700,000,000  use  YouTube  monthly.    Facebook  is   sRll  growing,  and  Twifer  is  growing  even  faster.    In   addiRon  to  these  pla_orms  are  thousands  of  others  that   have  specific  missions  (like  travel,  sports,  poliRcs,  etc.).         The  second  reason  is  credibility:    we  know  that  just   about  everyone  believes  what  their  friends  tell  them   versus  what  a  paid  talking  head  tells  anyone.       Why  is  “Social”  So  Powerful?  
  21. 21. The  third  reason  is  ubiquity  and  pervasiveness:    the  stage  is  set   for  conRnuous  listening  –  and  the  analysis  of  what  we  hear.     We've  never  had  such  access  to  customers,  suppliers,   employees  and  compeRtors.    "Release-­‐and-­‐listen"  is  the  new   product/service  development  strategy.    "Listen-­‐or-­‐die"  is  the   new  customer  service  mantra.       The  fourth  reason  is  volume:    where  no  one  would  want  to   develop  a  corporate  strategy  based  on  a  few  posts  on  a  few   social  media  sites,  when  there  are  hundreds  of  thousands  of   posts  on  major  (and  minor)  brands,  products  and  services,  it's   easy  to  infer  senRment  and  trajectory  and  then  cra`  reacRve   and  proacRve  responses.       Why  is  “Social”  So  Powerful?  
  22. 22.             The  fi`h  reason  is  demographics:    while  social  media  has   been  embraced  by  all  age  groups,  generaRons  X  and  Y   are  major  parRcipants  and  will  conRnue  to  parRcipate   throughout  their  lives.    GeneraRon  Z  will  not   differenRate  social  media  from  media  of  any  kind  and   will  fully  and  seamlessly  integrate  social  media-­‐based   communicaRon  and  collaboraRon  into  their  personal  and   professional  lives.    Put  another  way,  the  future  is  about   social  media,  just  as  the  past  was  about  transacRonal   Web  sites,  email  and  –  way  back  when  –  paper.       Why  is  “Social”  So  Powerful?  
  23. 23.         Myth              Reality:    Scope       Myth:    Social  is  (Only)  Facebook  &  Twifer       Reality:    Social  is  a  Wide  &  Deep  Internal  &  External   CommunicaRons  Channel:                     Social  Media/Networking  Myths   Crowdsourcing     LivecasRng   Audio  &  Music  Sharing   Product  Reviews   Business  Reviews   Community  Q&A   Media  &  Entertainment     Virtual  Worlds     Game  Sharing     InformaRon  Aggregators   Blogs/Micro-­‐Blogging   Social  Networking     Social  Network  AggregaRon   Events     Wikis   Social  Bookmarking   Social  News   Opinion  Sites   Photo  Sharing     Video  Sharing      
  24. 24.         Myth              Reality:    Par;cipants       Myth:    Social  is  for  Kids  Having  Fun         Reality:    Social  is  for  Everyone:       The  Average  Social  Network  User  is  37  Years  Old   The  Average  LinkedIn  User  is  44   The  Average  Twifer  User  is  39   The  Average  Facebook  User  is  38   The  Most  Engaged  Social  Media-­‐ites  are  18  -­‐  34   90%  of  Consumers  Online  Trust  RecommendaRons  From  People  They  Know     44%  of  Moms  Use  Social  Media  for  Product  Recommenda(ons   73%  Trust  Online  RecommendaRons     85%  of  Consumers  Look  for  an  Independent  Review  Online  Before   Purchasing     Only  14%  of  People  Trust  AdverRsing     Social  Media/Networking  Myths  
  25. 25.           Myth              Reality:    Purpose       Myth:    Social  Data  Has  Nothing  to  Do  With  Business       Reality:    Social  Media/Networking  is  a  Powerful  New  Business  Channel     Deep  Market  Research   Brand  and  MarkeRng  Intelligence   CompeRRve  Intelligence   Product  InnovaRon  &  Life  Cycle  Management   Customer  Service  &  Social  Customer  RelaRonship  Management   ReputaRon  Management   Threat  Tracking  ...     Social  Media/Networking  Myths  
  26. 26.                                     Social  @  Work   Deep  Ver;cal  Market  Research     What  are  the  Social  Market  Research  Ques9ons  Social  Business   Intelligence  Can  Answer?           ü     What  are  the  product  &  service  trends  in  my  industry?   ü     Where  does  my  company  stand  in  the  marketplace?   ü     What  does  the  compeRRve  landscape  look  like?   ü     What  are  the  major  regulatory  issues  I  face?   ü     What  do  people  love/hate  about  our  industry?   ü     How  should  I  respond  in  real-­‐(me  (in  and  beyond  social),              near-­‐real-­‐(me  &  longer-­‐term?    
  27. 27.                                     Social  @  Work   Brand/Marke;ng  Intelligence     What  are  the  Brand  &  Marke9ng  Intelligence  Ques9ons  Social   Analysis  Can  Answer?             ü     What  are  they  saying  about  our  products  &  services?   ü     What  products  do  they  love/hate?    Why?   ü     What  are  they  saying  about  our  company?   ü     Has  senRment  changed  over  Rme?   ü     Why  do  customers  buy  from  us?   ü     How  should  I  respond  in  real-­‐(me,  near-­‐real-­‐(me  &                longer-­‐term?  
  28. 28.                                     Social  @  Work   Compe;;ve  Intelligence       What  are  the  Compe99ve  Research  Ques9ons  Social  Analysis   Can  Help  Answer?           ü     Who  are  our  major  and  minor  compeRtors?   ü     What  are  our  customers  saying  about  them?   ü     What  are  they  saying  about  us?   ü     Who  are  we  compared  to?   ü     Who's  number  1?    Why?   ü     How  should  I  respond  in  real-­‐(me,  near-­‐real-­‐(me  &                longer-­‐term?  
  29. 29.                                     Social  @  Work   Internal  Efficiencies       How  Can  Internal  Efficiencies  Be  Improved  with  Social?           ü     What  do  employees  think  about  the  company,  its                leadership,  brand,  compeRRveness  &  strategy?   ü     What  do  partners  &  suppliers  think  about  the  company’s                  leadership,  brand,  compeRRveness  &  strategy?   ü     What  best  pracRces  can  be  discussed  &  documented                    among                supply  chain  parRcipants  &  corporate  partners?   ü     What  best  pracRces  can  be  discussed  &  documented                among  employees?  
  30. 30.                                     Social  @  Work   Product  Innova;on  &  Life  Cycle  Management       What  are  the  Product  Innova9on  &  Life  Cycle  Management   Ques9ons  Social  Data  Analysis  Can  Help  Answer?             ü     Which  new  products  have  excited  our  customers?   ü     Which  features  work  for  them?    Which  do  not?   ü     Which  features  should  we  introduce  first?   ü     What  new  products  do  our  customers  want?   ü     Which  do  they  hate?   ü     How  should  I  respond  in  real-­‐(me,  near-­‐real-­‐(me  &                longer-­‐term?    
  31. 31.                                     Social  @  Work   Customer  Service  &  Customer  Rela;onship   Management  (CRM)       What  are  the  Social  Customer  Service  Ques9ons  Social  Analysis   Can  Help  Answer?             ü     What  do  our  customers  like  about  our  customer  service?   ü     What  services  do  they  like  the  least?   ü     What  are  the  "standard"  complaints  about  our  service?   ü     What  are  customer  service  "best  pracRces"?   ü     What  do  they  like  most  about  our  compeRtors  customer  s            service?   ü     How  should  I  respond  in  real-­‐(me,  near-­‐real-­‐(me  &  longer-­‐                term?  
  32. 32.                                           Social  @  Work   Reputa;on  Management  &  Threat  Analysis       What  Threats  Should  Your  Company  Track?       ü     What  complaints  are  appearing  over  and  over  again?   ü     What  are  Moms  threatening  to  do  to  us?   ü     What  are  the  greatest  threats  we  face?   ü     What  will  the  government  do  next?   ü     What  crises  are  likely  to  explode?   ü     How  should  I  respond  in  real-­‐(me,  near-­‐real-­‐(me  &                longer-­‐term?    
  33. 33.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #1    All  Social  Data  is  Not  Created  Equal         ü     Huge  Signal/Noise  Problem  (1,000,000  to  10,000)     ü     Most    Consultants  Only  Sample  Social  Data   ü     “Good”  Social  Data  is  Filtered  According  Age,  Gender,                LocaRon,  Etc.   ü     Social  Data  Should  Be  Structured  for  AddiRonal  Use   ü     Authors  Should  Be  Profiled  by  Influence  …  
  34. 34.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #2    Social  Data  Must  Integrate         ü     Social  Data  Must  Be  Structured  for  IntegraRon   ü     IntegraRon  Targets  Include  Customer  RelaRonship  Manage-­‐              ment  (CRM),  Business  Intelligence  (BI),  Enterprise  Resource              Planning  (ERP)  and  Other  Pla_orms   ü     IntegraRon  Also  Assumes  Process  IntegraRon  …  
  35. 35.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Media   #3    Social  Data  Can  Be  Modeled         ü     Social  Data  Can  Predict  Events  &  CondiRons   Ø     Corporate  Performance   Ø     Epidemics   Ø     ElecRons   Ø     Revenue   Ø     Crises  …  
  36. 36.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Media   #3    Social  Data  Can  Be  Modeled         ü     Social  Data  Can  Predict  Events  &  CondiRons   Ø     Corporate  Performance   Ø     Epidemics   Ø     ElecRons   Ø     Revenue   Ø     Crises  …  
  37. 37.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   Tweets  have  already  been  used  to  measure  movie   senRment  and  box-­‐office  revenue  with  amazing  accuracy.     Note  the  work  of  Asur  and  Bernardo  who  predicted  the   movie  “Dear  John”  would  earn  $30.71  million  at  the  box   office  on  its  opening  weekend.    It  actually  generated   $30.46  million.    For  the  movie  “The  Crazies,”  they   predicted  a  $16.8  million  opening:    it  generated  $16.07   million.    According  to  the  authors  of  the  NaRonal  Science   FoundaRon-­‐supported  study,  "we  use  the  chafer  from   Twifer.com  to  forecast  box-­‐office  revenues  for  movies.    We   show  that  a  simple  model  built  from  the  rate  at  which   tweets  are  created  about  par;cular  topics  can  outperform   market-­‐based  predictors.”  
  38. 38.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #4    Social  Deriva;ves         ü     Social  Data  Can  Provide  1st,  2nd  &  Nth  Order  Insight     ü     Cosmopolitan  Magazine   ü     Involved  Viewer  RaRngs  …  
  39. 39.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #5    Social  is  Internal/External/Ac;ve/Passive                                                           Engaging  with   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners       Engaging  with   Customers  &   CompeRtors     Listening  to   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners     Listening  to   Customers  &   CompeRtors   Internal   External   Passive   Ac;ve  
  40. 40.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #6    Social  Data  &  Real-­‐Time         ü     Real-­‐Time  is  Important  to  Selected  Listening              ObjecRves,  Like  Threat  Alerts  &  Crisis  Management   ü     But  Real-­‐Time  Requires  Powerful  Technology  –  that              Most  Social  Data  Analysts  Do  Not  Have  
  41. 41.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #7    Man/Machine  Synergism         ü     Social  Data  Needs  InterpretaRon  Around  VerRcal              Contexts   ü     Machines  Can  Learn  &  Improve  –  But  Not  Replace              Subject  Mafer  Experts  (SMEs)  
  42. 42.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #8    Acquisi;on  &  Sourcing  
  43. 43.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #8    Acquisi;on  &  Sourcing  
  44. 44.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #9    Measurement         ü     Social  Pilots  Need  to  Be  Measured  for  TCO  &  ROI       ü     DisRnguish  Between  Short-­‐Term  &  Longer-­‐Term              TCO  and  ROI  Metrics  &  Adapt  CalculaRons  to              IniRal  Social  IniRaRves  &  Longer-­‐Term  ConRnuous              Listening/Engagement  Requirements  as  the  Social                  Channel  Inevitably  Becomes  Permanent  
  45. 45.                                           10  Things  About  Social  Data   #10    Strategy           ü     IdenRfy  the  Business  ObjecRves  &  Requirements              Wide  &  Deep  Enough  to  Support  the  Development              of  a  Viable  Social  Investment  Strategy       ü     IdenRfy  the  QuesRons  Whose  Answers  ConsRtute              a  Strategy       ü     Adapt  the  Strategy  to  Investment  Results  
  46. 46. Agenda   ü     Some:     Ø     Defini;ons   Ø     Capabili;es   Ø     Examples   Ø     Prescrip;ons  
  47. 47. Examples     ü     Apple   ü     Diabetes   ü     Aetna   ü     Coca  Cola   ü     IVR  …    
  48. 48. Agenda   ü     Some:     Ø     Defini;ons   Ø     Capabili;es   Ø     Examples   Ø     Prescrip;ons  
  49. 49. Prescrip;ons   ü     “Social”  is  About  Listening  &              Engaging  Employees,  Suppliers,              Partners  &  Clients  Through  a  New              Communica;ons  &  Collabora;on              Channel  
  50. 50. Prescrip;ons:    Internal  Vs  External                                                         Engaging  with   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners       Engaging  with   Customers  &   CompeRtors     Listening  to   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners     Listening  to   Customers  &   CompeRtors   Internal   External   Passive   Ac;ve    Social  is  Internal/External/Ac;ve/Passive  
  51. 51.                                                       Engaging  with   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners       Engaging  with   Customers  &   CompeRtors     Listening  to   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners     Listening  to   Customers  &   CompeRtors   Internal   External   Passive   Ac;ve    Where  Should  Companies  Invest  in  SBI?   Prescrip;ons:    Internal  Vs  External  
  52. 52.                                                       Engaging  with   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners       Engaging  with   Customers  &   CompeRtors     Listening  to   Employees,   Suppliers  &   Partners     Listening  to   Customers  &   CompeRtors   Internal   External   Passive   Ac;ve   Prescrip;ons:    Internal  Vs  External    Where  Should  Companies  Invest  in  SBI?  
  53. 53.                                           Prescrip;ons  –  Pilots   Requirements   Strategy  &      Tac;cs        Implementa;on           Pilot  Projects   à      SpecificaRon  of  Social  Requirements  …     SpecificaRon  of  Social  Investment     ObjecRves  &  IniRal  TCO  &  ROI  Metrics   IdenRficaRon  &  PrioriRzaRon  of     Candidate  Pilot  Projects     Objec;ves        &  Metrics   à   Develop  Selected     Project  Plans   à   DescripRon  of  IniRal  Social  Strategy  &  Social   TacRcs  as  Principles  &  Projects     à   à  
  54. 54. Social  Speaks  Out     What  Companies  Need  to  Know  About     Social  Media,  Social  Networking  &     Social  Business  Intelligence   Stephen  J.  Andriole     Thomas  G.  Labrecque  Professor  of  Business  Technology   The  Villanova  School  of  Business   Villanova  University   Comcast  |  July  |  2014  

×