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CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing
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CAN I USE THIS?—A Mnemonic for Usability Testing

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Often, usability testing does not receive the attention it deserves. A common argument is that usability issues are merely “training issues” and can be dealt with through the product's training or …

Often, usability testing does not receive the attention it deserves. A common argument is that usability issues are merely “training issues” and can be dealt with through the product's training or user manuals. If your product is only for internal staff use, this may be a valid response. However, the market now demands easy-to-use products—whether your users are internal or external. David Greenlees shares a tool he has developed to generate test ideas for usability testing. His mnemonic—CAN I USE THIS?—provides a solid starting point for testing any product. C for Comparable Product, A for Accessibility, N for Navigation … David shares how he has used this mnemonic on past projects while the training argument took place around him, and how they realized product improvements and greater user acceptance. Learn how you can quickly and effectively use this mnemonic on any project so you can give usability testing the attention it deserves.

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  • 1.       rent Session    Presented by:  David Greenlees      Brought to you by:      340 Corporate Way, Suite   Orange Park, FL 32073  888‐2 T6  Concur 4/8/2014    12:45 PM          “CAN I USE THIS?   A Mnemonic for Usability Testing”      Innodev Pty Ltd              300, 68‐8770 ∙ 904‐278‐0524 ∙ sqeinfo@sqe.com ∙ www.sqe.com 
  • 2. David Greenlees Innodev Pty Ltd   David Greenlees has been testing software for more than ten years, many spent in one of Australia's largest government departments. More recently David has undertaken a consultant role in multiple organizations. A vocal and valued member of the context-driven testing community, he is extremely passionate about the betterment of the software testing craft. David has published several articles and blogs regularly at Martial Tester and Hello Test World. In 2012 David founded the Australian Workshop on Software Testing, Australia's only peer conference. Currently he is authoring a book on the subject of software testing and martial arts, his passion outside of work. Follow David on Twitter @MartialTester.  
  • 3. CAN I USE THIS? A Mnemonic for Usability Testing David Greenlees – Innodev Pty Ltd
  • 4. Who am I? ~David Greenlees~
  • 5. Australian
  • 6. snakes, spIders & insects
  • 7. Husband & father
  • 8. martIal artist
  • 9. relatively New to speaking
  • 10. testing Software for 12 years
  • 11. member of the Context‐ driven testing community
  • 12. brown‐belt in the miagi‐do  School of software testing
  • 13. Enthusiastic about the  betterment of our craft
  • 14. love asking ?s
  • 15. why i love Testing?
  • 16. why i love Usability?
  • 17. member of the Context‐driven testing community Australian relatively New to speaking snakes, spIders & insects why i love Usability? testing Software for 12 years Enthusiastic about the betterment of our craft why i love Testing? Husband & father martial artIst brown‐belt in the miagi‐do School of software testing love asking ?s 
  • 18. Why? CAN I USE THIS?
  • 19. Lynn McKee – Quality Perspectives
  • 20. Usability Debt OZTeser Magazine, Issue 1
  • 21. Comparable Products/Features
  • 22. Compatibility Context
  • 23. Accessibility
  • 24. bbc.co.uk
  • 25. Accuracy
  • 26. Navigation
  • 27. Can I Use This? Yes You Can
  • 28. Needs Analysis Nielsen, Jakob
  • 29. Intuitive
  • 30. Users
  • 31. Usability is subjective; Usability  Testing not so much…
  • 32. Standards
  • 33. ISO 9241‐151:2008 Ergonomics of human‐system interaction ‐‐ Part 151:  Guidance on World Wide Web user interfaces “ISO 9241‐151:2008 provides guidance on the human‐centred  design of software Web user interfaces with the aim of increasing  usability.” “The recommendations given in this part of ISO 9241:2008 focus on  the following aspects of the design of Web user interfaces: high‐ level design decisions and design strategy; content design;  navigation and search; content presentation.”
  • 34. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines  (WCAG) 2.0 “Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 covers a wide  range of recommendations for making Web content more  accessible. Following these guidelines will make content accessible  to a wider range of people with disabilities, including blindness  and low vision, deafness and hearing loss, learning disabilities,  cognitive limitations, limited movement, speech disabilities,  photosensitivity and combinations of these. Following these  guidelines will also often make your Web content more usable to  users in general.”
  • 35. Emotions
  • 36. Reservoir of Goodwill Steve Krug – Don’t Make Me Think
  • 37. Usability Matrix of Emotions stickyminds.com How the Usability Matrix of Emotions Can Benefit Your Software Testing
  • 38. Efficiency Errors Ethnographic research
  • 39. Trunk Test Steve Krug – Don’t Make Me Think
  • 40. Site ID (What site is this?) Page Name (Where am I?) Sections (Are the sites major sections outlined?) Local Navigation Where am I? (is there a "You are here?) How can I search?
  • 41. Training Tools Travis, david
  • 42. David Travis - Userfocus
  • 43. Heuristic Evaluation
  • 44. 10 Usability Heuristics for User Interface Design • Visibility of system status • Match between system and the real world • User control and freedom • Consistency and standards • Error prevention • Recognition rather than recall • Flexibility and efficiency of use • Aesthetic and minimalist design • Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors • Help and documentation Jakob Nielsen – Nielsen Norman Group
  • 45. Hallway testing
  • 46. Instructions & Help Text
  • 47. Satisfaction
  • 48. Questions
  • 49. David Greenlees Principal Test Consultant – Innodev Pty Ltd @MartialTester martialtester.wordpress.com @Useology useology.com

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