Governing Agile Teams: Disciplined Strategies to Increase Agile Effectiveness

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Many organizations have successfully adopted agile on a subset of their projects, while, at the same time, struggled to do so across entire departments. A common challenge is the need to overhaul the IT governance strategy so that it will work with agile teams. This is a serious issue for governance bodies with little or no practical agile experience, particularly when experience shows that traditional governance strategies increase the risk of failure on agile projects. Scott Ambler introduces The Disciplined Agile Delivery framework for managing and monitoring enterprise agile teams. This framework goes beyond offering an IT governance strategy to provide advanced strategies such as development intelligence and the goal-question-metric measurement approach. Learn the do’s and don’ts of governing agile teams, how governance fits in and enhances the agile project lifecycle, how to measure agile teams, and most importantly, why teams should demand good governance.

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Governing Agile Teams: Disciplined Strategies to Increase Agile Effectiveness

  1. 1.     AW2 Session  6/5/2013 10:15 AM                "Governing Agile Teams: Disciplined Strategies to Increase Agile Effectiveness"       Presented by: Scott Ambler Scott Ambler + Associates             Brought to you by:        340 Corporate Way, Suite 300, Orange Park, FL 32073  888‐268‐8770 ∙ 904‐278‐0524 ∙ sqeinfo@sqe.com ∙ www.sqe.com
  2. 2. Scott Ambler Scott W. Ambler + Associates Scott Ambler works with organizations worldwide to help them improve their software processes. Scott is the founder of the Agile Modeling (AM), Agile Data (AD), Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD), and Enterprise Unified Process (EUP) methodologies and creator of the Agile Scaling Model (ASM). He is the coauthor of twenty-one books, including Refactoring Databases, Agile Modeling, Agile Database Techniques, The Object Primer 3rd Edition, The Enterprise Unified Process, and Disciplined Agile Delivery. Scott is a senior contributing editor with Dr. Dobb’s Journal. Visit his home page ScottAmbler.com and his Agility@Scale blog.  
  3. 3. Governing Agile Teams Reality over Rhetoric © Scott Ambler + Associates 1
  4. 4. The Survey Results Shared in This Presentation • All surveys were performed in an open manner • The questions as they were asked, the source data, and a summary slide deck can be downloaded free of charge from Ambysoft.com/surveys/ © Scott Ambler + Associates 2
  5. 5. Agenda • • • • • What is governance? Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) Agile governance strategies Measuring agile teams Parting thoughts © Scott Ambler + Associates 3
  6. 6. Defining governance Governance establishes chains of responsibility, authority and communication in support of the overall enterprise’s goals and strategy. It also establishes measurements, policies, standards and control mechanisms to enable people to carry out their roles and responsibilities effectively. You do this by balancing risk versus return on investment (ROI), setting in place effective processes and practices, defining the direction and goals for the department, and defining the roles that people play with and within the department. © Scott Ambler + Associates 4
  7. 7. A Quick Show of Hands… Is your governance strategy designed to enable you or to control you? © Scott Ambler + Associates 5
  8. 8. Governance Should Address a Range of Issues • • • • • • • • • • • • • Team roles and responsibilities Individual roles and responsibilities Decision rights and decision making process Governing body Exceptions and escalation processes Knowledge sharing processes Metrics strategy Risk mitigation Reward structure Status reporting Audit processes Policies, standards, and guidelines Artifacts and their lifecycles © Scott Ambler + Associates 6
  9. 9. Potential Scope of Governance Corporate Information Technology Delivery/ Development Operations IT Investment Data Infrastructure (Services, Cloud…) Security © Scott Ambler + Associates 7
  10. 10. Why is Effective Governance Important? • Effective governance should help agile delivery teams to: – Regularly and consistently create real business value – Provide appropriate return on investment (ROI) – Deliver consumable solutions in a timely and relevant manner – Work effectively with their project stakeholders – Work effectively with their IT colleagues – Adopt processes and organizational structures that encourage successful IT solution delivery – Present accurate and timely information to project stakeholders – Mitigate risk © Scott Ambler + Associates 8
  11. 11. Survey Says: How Do You Rate Your IT Governance Program? Too early to tell 6% 8% Generally helps 36% 19% Neither helpful nor harmful Generally harmful Don't Know 11% 20% No IT governance Program Source: DDJ State of the IT Union July 2009
  12. 12. Survey Says: IT and financial governance, including capitalization and budgeting processes, have been addressed and there is an officially recognized agile path Highly agree 7% Agree 17% Neutral 28% Disagree 31% Highly disagree Don't Know 13% 5% Source: DDJ State of the IT Union November 2011 © Scott Ambler + Associates 10
  13. 13. Why Traditional Governance Strategies Won’t Work Traditional assumptions that conflict with agile: – You can judge team progress from generation of artifacts – Delivery teams should work in a serial manner – You want teams to follow a common, repeatable process – Projects should be driven by senior IT management © Scott Ambler + Associates 11
  14. 14. Principles of Agile Governance Collaboration over conformance Enablement over inspection Continuous monitoring over quality gates Transparency over management reporting © Scott Ambler + Associates 12
  15. 15. Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) is a process decision framework The key characteristics of DAD: – People-first – Goal-driven – Hybrid agile – Learning-oriented – Full delivery lifecycle – Solution focused – Risk-value lifecycle – Enterprise aware © Scott Ambler + Associates 13
  16. 16. The Scrum Construction Lifecycle © Scott Ambler + Associates 14
  17. 17. Extending the Scrum Lifecycle for Solution Delivery © Scott Ambler + Associates 15
  18. 18. A Governed Agile Lifecycle © Scott Ambler + Associates 16
  19. 19. DAD Milestones Milestone Fundamental Question Asked Stakeholder consensus Do stakeholders agree with your strategy? Proven architecture Can you actually build this? Project viability Does the project still make sense? Sufficient functionality Does it make sense to release the current solution? Production ready Will the solution work in production? Delighted stakeholders Are stakeholders happy with the deployed solution? © Scott Ambler + Associates 17
  20. 20. Enterprise Awareness Enables Governance But we’re not there yet: • Governance is an enterprise concern Are you inputting your time? • Activities which appear to be waste at the team level prove valuable at the enterprise level Yes - Valuable 16 Yes - Waste of time 21 No • Disciplined agile teams optimize the “enterprise whole”, not just the “team part” What do you mean? 15 3 Results from a May 2013 opinion poll on the Agile and Lean Software Group on LinkedIn © Scott Ambler + Associates 18
  21. 21. DAD Practices that Support Governance • “Standard” agile practices: – Coordination meeting – Iteration demonstrations – All-hands demonstrations – Retrospectives – Information radiators/Visual management • Disciplined practices: – Risk-value lifecycle – Explicit light-weight milestones – Follow enterprise development guidelines – Work closely with enterprise professionals – Development intelligence via automated dashboards © Scott Ambler + Associates 19
  22. 22. Measuring Agile Teams • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Talk to people; don’t manage to the metrics Measure teams, not individuals Collect several metrics Trends are better than scalar values Empirical observation is important but limited Prefer automated metrics Some metrics must be gathered manually Prefer pull versus push reporting Beware scientific facades Measure the value of your metrics program Be prepared to educate people The value of many metrics diminishes over time If you collect no metrics at all you’re flying blind If you collect too many metrics you may be flying blinded © Scott Ambler + Associates 20
  23. 23. Goal Question Metric (GQM) The GQM process: 1. Develop a set of corporate, division and project business goals for productivity and quality 2. Generate questions that define those goals as completely as possible in a quantifiable way 3. Specify the measures needed to be collected to answer those questions and track process and product conformance to the goals 4. Develop mechanisms for data collection 5. Collect, validate and analyze the data in real time to provide feedback to projects for corrective action 6. Analyze the data to assess conformance to the goals and to make recommendations for future improvements © Scott Ambler + Associates 21
  24. 24. Some potential goals • We should invest in IT wisely • We should provide a healthy work environment to staff • Teams should deploy in a timely manner • Teams should provide real value to stakeholders • We should reduce overall technical debt over time • Team should produce solutions that of sufficient quality • We should comply to appropriate industry regulations © Scott Ambler + Associates 22
  25. 25. Potential Metrics • • • • • • • • • • • • Acceleration Activity time Age of work items Blocking work items Build health Business value delivered Change cycle time Code quality Defect density Defect trend Effort/cost projection Iteration burndown • • • • • • • • • • • Lifecycle traceability Net present value (NPV) Ranged release burndown Release burndown Return on investment (ROI) Risk mitigation Stakeholder satisfaction Team morale Test coverage Time invested Velocity © Scott Ambler + Associates 23
  26. 26. Goal: Spend IT Investment Wisely Questions Potential Metrics 1. How effective is the investment in IT activities? 1. Business value delivered, net present value (NPV), return on investment (ROI) 2. Effort/cost projection 2. What future spending do we require? 3. Is productivity increasing? 3. Acceleration, business value delivered, velocity (trend) © Scott Ambler + Associates 24
  27. 27. Goal: Deploy in a Timely Manner Questions Potential Metrics 1. Is the team working at a sufficient pace? 1. Release burndown, ranged release burndown 2. Is the team working together effectively? 2. Team morale, stakeholder satisfaction, blocking work items 3. Age of items, ranged release burndown 3. Are changing requirements putting the release date at risk? © Scott Ambler + Associates 25
  28. 28. Goal: Reduce Technical Debt Questions Potential Metrics 1. What is our current level of technical debt? 1. Code quality, defect density 2. Are we improving quality over time? 2. Build health, defect trends, test coverage © Scott Ambler + Associates 26
  29. 29. Survey Says: Agile teams are judged primarily on traditional IT and cost-based metrics Highly agree 9% Agree 39% Neutral 29% Disagree Highly disagree Don't Know 14% 6% 4% Source: DDJ State of the IT Union November 2011 © Scott Ambler + Associates 27
  30. 30. Survey Says: Agile teams are judged primarily on business value creation Highly agree 13% Agree 41% Neutral 24% Disagree Highly disagree Don't Know 14% 5% 3% Source: DDJ State of the IT Union November 2011 © Scott Ambler + Associates 28
  31. 31. Development Intelligence • • • • Tools should be instrumented to automatically log important activities and thereby facilitate generate of metrics Metrics are displayed in (near) real-time on a project dashboard Should be non-intrusive to the team Benefits – Transparency to all stakeholders, increasing trust – Increased team effectiveness with visibility into what team members are working on, status of builds – Information that can be used to assess effectiveness and justify process changes – Keeps team focused on delivering on their commitments to the stakeholders © Scott Ambler + Associates 29
  32. 32. IT Intelligence • • • Automated dashboard that summarizes the status for all of IT Shows the entire portfolio: – Potential/suggested endeavors – Ongoing development endeavors – Operational solutions Drill down into: – Project details – Operational details – Support details © Scott Ambler + Associates 30
  33. 33. Survey says: Do your project teams collect metrics to enable project monitoring by senior management? No 26% Yes, majority manual 51% Yes, majority automated Don't Know 19% 4% Ambysoft 2009 Governance
  34. 34. © Scott Ambler + Associates 32
  35. 35. We’re In a Different Environment Moore’s Adoption Curve The farther to the right an organization, the greater the chance they’re focused on governance © Scott Ambler + Associates 33
  36. 36. We Need To Change The Way We Think About Governance © Scott Ambler + Associates 34
  37. 37. Agilists Must Demand Agile Governance Observations: • Agile teams are being governed today • In many organizations the governance strategy is misaligned with agile • You deserve to be governed effectively • When you provide a coherent governance strategy to senior management you are much more likely to be governed effectively © Scott Ambler + Associates 35
  38. 38. Principles of Agile Governance Collaboration over conformance Enablement over inspection Continuous monitoring over quality gates Transparency over management reporting © Scott Ambler + Associates 36
  39. 39. Got Discipline? DisciplinedAgileConsortium.org DisciplinedAgileDelivery.com ScottAmbler.com © Scott Ambler + Associates 37
  40. 40. Thank You! scott [at] scottambler.com @scottwambler AgileModeling.com AgileData.org Ambysoft.com DisciplinedAgileConsortium.org DisciplinedAgileDelivery.com ScottAmbler.com Disciplined Agile Delivery Disciplined Agile Delivery © Scott Ambler + Associates 38
  41. 41. Material for this presentation is taken from chapter 20 of Disciplined Agile Delivery © Scott Ambler + Associates 39
  42. 42. Presentation Description Many organizations have successfully adopted agile on a subset of their projects, while, at the same time, struggled to do so across entire departments. A common challenge is the need to overhaul the IT governance strategy so that it will work with agile teams. This is a serious issue for governance bodies with little or no practical agile experience, particularly when experience shows that traditional governance strategies increase the risk of failure on agile projects. Scott Ambler introduces The Disciplined Agile Delivery framework for managing and monitoring enterprise agile teams. This framework goes beyond offering an IT governance strategy to provide advanced strategies such as development intelligence and the goal-question-metric measurement approach. Learn the do’s and don’ts of governing agile teams, how governance fits in and enhances the agile project lifecycle, how to measure agile teams, and most importantly, why teams should demand good governance. © Scott Ambler + Associates 40

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