0
Dr Phil Reeves - Managing Director, Econolyst Ltd, UK The 3D for Development Challenge                           -Buchares...
Session 1 – the background (1-hour +)•   Personal introduction•   What is 3D Printing & Additive Manufacturing•   What is ...
About Econolyst• Econolyst is a UK based  consultancy dedicated to the  Additive Manufacturing & 3DP  sector• Established ...
What we do at Econolyst• Help companies implement 3DP & AM  technology (from design to retail)• Deliver AM focused trainin...
Things that keep my office busy• Helping the world largest jet engine maker (GE) use AM• Helping a global sports brand (Ni...
So what is 3D Printing &additive manufacturing?                     Slide 5 of 62
Agreeing terms – setting the context Additive Manufacturing is the manufacture     of ‘end-use’ component parts using  Add...
What is a 3D printing systems3DP processes are automated systems thattake 2-dimensional layers of computer data   and rebu...
Agreeing terms – what’s in a name• AM is also refereed to as:  –   Generative Manufacturing – Germany  –   eManufacturing ...
How does the 3D Printing process chain work?•   Start with a 3D geometry•   Generate STL file•   Orient parts to optimum b...
How does ALM differ from traditional manufacturingThere are Four fundamental manufacturing principles:• Subtractive    – M...
So what is the current state  of the art in 3DP/AM in           2012?                        Slide 11 of 62
We have an ever increasing range of technologies                    High end                                  Mid range–  ...
Today we have a ‘pallet’ of around 200 materials           Organic              Ceramic                 Polymeric         ...
So what drives companies to      adopt AdditiveManufacturing (or be interested)?                            Slide 14 of 62
The core business drivers to AM adoption 1.   Economic low volume production 2.   Increased geometric freedom 3.   Increas...
Lets consider these drivers  with some case studies                       Slide 16 of 62
1. Enabling low volume production• Enabled the economic manufacture  of low volume complex geometries  and assemblies  – R...
Example – unit volumes of 1• Bentley is a subsidiary of Volkswagen• Vehicles from $250K - $1M• In-house polymeric and meta...
Example – Low volume production• Problem – customer with limited mobility  needed a reversed dashboard• Production substra...
Example – Low volume production                Images courtesy of Bentley                                             Slid...
2. Maximising design complexity & capability• AM enables the production of highly  complex geometries with little if no  c...
Example – Delphi Diesel Pump• Conventional product manufactured by  cross drilling an aluminium die casting• Multiple mach...
With AM - Design the product around the holes                                         Slide 23 of 62
Example – conceptual Diesel Pump• Produce the part as one piece using  Selective Laser melting on Aluminium               ...
3. Increasing part functionality• AM enabled multiple functionality to  be manufactured using a single  process  – Replaci...
Example – surface design for bone ingress              Material:   Ti6Al4V              Build time: 16 cups in   Implants ...
Example – Heat dissipation surfaces                                      Slide 27 of 62
Example – Energy absorption                              Slide 28 of 62
4. Product Personalisation• Individual consumer centric  products, with customer input  –   Medical devices  –   Consumer ...
Case study - Hearing aids• Produced using personal data from  each individual patient  –   Produced using scan data  –   2...
The personalisation can be by the consumer• www.makielab.com                                             Slide 31 of 62
The Internet lets everyone become designers• Some web offering allow us to become the  designer in an AM supply chain  – D...
There are lots of new interfaces GoogleSketch UP                                   Slide 33 of 62
There are lots of new interfaces                                   Slide 34 of 62
5. Life cycle sustainability• Product lifecycle improvements in  economic and environmental  sustainability  –   Reduced r...
Case study – aerospace cabin component                                    Slide 36 of 62
A very different approach to design                                      Slide 37 of 62
Design optimisation for AM production                                   Topologically                                    o...
Example – How does the weight compare                             Scenario 1 – Machined from                              ...
To establish sustainability you have to establish lifecycle boundary conditions                       Slide 40 of 62
Environmental benefit over product lifecycle  Process       Raw         Manufacture   Distribution   Usage       Life cycl...
So how do our lifecycle CO2 compare                         Scenario 1 – Machined                            from solid (1...
Sunday Times 13th Feb 2011                Slide 43 of 62
Example – life cycle economic benefits• 0.49Kg saving per monitor arm• $1,500 per annum in fuel savings (todays  prices)• ...
This is a step change in design thinking                                           Slide 45 of 62
6. Supply chain realignment• New lean yet agile business models  and supply chain  – Distributed manufacture  – Manufactur...
Stockless supply chains – low barriers $50.00 each 60,000 month $36M P/A                                         Slide 47 ...
Integration with other data sources               $6.2-million (6-machines)                                           Slid...
There are online printing portals to buy & sell                                        Slide 49 of 62
These portals have volume traffic                                    $44 average                                    price ...
So what are people designing & sharing                                         Slide 51 of 62
But what do you do with the data? – Home 3D Printing                 Makergear  Start-up             Growing        Establ...
MakerBot – the ‘market leader’•   Less than 3-years old•   Business based on open source•   6700 machines sold in 2011•   ...
So what are people making                            Slide 54 of 62
These machines are based on open-source                                   Slide 55 of 62
Other supply chain opportunities for all                                           Slide 56 of 62
Is there a market?1985 – 2010 = 45,000 machines   2011 = 15,000 machine   2012 = 45,000 machine  2013 = 200,000 machines  ...
The money will also be in the data & content                                           Slide 58 of 62
So is AM the newManufacturing revolution  for the digital age?                     Slide 59 of 62
Not yet - the harsh reality• Of the 200+ products, components, parts &  business models we have looked at over the last  7...
BUT…. We can dream …….                         Slide 61 of 62
Dr Phil Reeves - Managing Director, Econolyst Ltd, UK               Questions                                Econolyst Ltd...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

3D printing for Development Hack Day in Bucharest, session 1

514

Published on

The rise of 3D printing has been compared to the beginning of the industrial era in how deeply it might impact our society. TechSoup, EESTEC and TechforTrade host Dr. Phil Reeves for a 3D printing hack day.

Published in: Technology, Business
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Free Download : http://gg.gg/114bb

    Hey Guyz and girls, Today I am gonna show you perfact tool, Remember This video is old, But the download link with hack is brand new. Its very simple to using this tool and here are some instructions in video. Please REDOWNLOAD. Don't Forget to Comment Subscribe & Rate My Video :)

    Virus Scan :- This file has been scanned with avast! Antivirus. -- Status: FILE IS CLEANN.

    Copyright © 2014. All Rights Reserved
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
514
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "3D printing for Development Hack Day in Bucharest, session 1"

  1. 1. Dr Phil Reeves - Managing Director, Econolyst Ltd, UK The 3D for Development Challenge -Bucharest -www.econolyst.co.ukFriday 22nd June 2012 - Romania
  2. 2. Session 1 – the background (1-hour +)• Personal introduction• What is 3D Printing & Additive Manufacturing• What is the current state-of-the-art in 3DP/AM• What drives companies to use this technology – Economics, geometries, environment, personalised products, increased functionality, new supply chains• The growth of low-end / home consumer 3DP Slide 1 of 62
  3. 3. About Econolyst• Econolyst is a UK based consultancy dedicated to the Additive Manufacturing & 3DP sector• Established 2003• Built on almost 20-years of AM experience• Clients in the UK, Western Europe, Scandinavia, Benelux, USA, Israel, India, Middle East & Far East, Africa Slide 2 of 62
  4. 4. What we do at Econolyst• Help companies implement 3DP & AM technology (from design to retail)• Deliver AM focused training & conferences• R&D project management & delivery• AM software development — Establishing supply chain Carbon footprints — Developing AM part cost and value models Slide 3 of 62
  5. 5. Things that keep my office busy• Helping the world largest jet engine maker (GE) use AM• Helping a global sports brand (Nike) to use AM• Helping Indias largest jewellery retailer (Tanqish) implementing direct metal printing of precious metal into 150 shops• Advising one of the worlds largest chains of high street chemist (Boots) on how to use 3DP (glasses, hearing aids, drugs)• Advising VC’s and Private Equity companies on investment in AM• Advising the UK government on investment strategies to support AM R&D• Advising the UK Ministry of Defence on AM/3DP capabilities to support security and warfare out to 2030 Slide 4 of 62
  6. 6. So what is 3D Printing &additive manufacturing? Slide 5 of 62
  7. 7. Agreeing terms – setting the context Additive Manufacturing is the manufacture of ‘end-use’ component parts using Additive Layer Manufacturing processes Slide 6 of 62
  8. 8. What is a 3D printing systems3DP processes are automated systems thattake 2-dimensional layers of computer data and rebuild them into 3D solid objects Slide 7 of 62
  9. 9. Agreeing terms – what’s in a name• AM is also refereed to as: – Generative Manufacturing – Germany – eManufacturing - Germany – Constructive Manufacturing - Germany – Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) – Scandinavia & EADS – Direct Digital Manufacture (DDM) – USA – Freeform Fabrication (FFF)– USA – Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) – USA – 3D Printing (3DP)- Global – Rapid Manufacturing – Global (historic) Slide 8 of 62
  10. 10. How does the 3D Printing process chain work?• Start with a 3D geometry• Generate STL file• Orient parts to optimum build direction• Generate support structures• Slice part & supports Link to Video horizontally• Consolidate, deposit or cut out layer• Index machine down (or up) by one layer thickness Slide 9 of 62
  11. 11. How does ALM differ from traditional manufacturingThere are Four fundamental manufacturing principles:• Subtractive – Material is successively removed from a solid block until the desired shape is reached (2.5M BC – Hominids)• Fabricative – Elements or physical material are combined and joined (6,000 BC – Western Asia)• Formative – Mechanical forces and, or heat are applied to material to form it into the desired shape such as bending, casting and molding (3,000 BC – Egyptians)• Additive – Material is manipulated so that successive pieces of it combine to make the desired object (1984 – Californians) Slide 10 of 62
  12. 12. So what is the current state of the art in 3DP/AM in 2012? Slide 11 of 62
  13. 13. We have an ever increasing range of technologies High end Mid range– Stereolithography IPro (3D) – 3D Printing (Voxeljet)– Selective Laser Sintering (3D & EOS) – Stereolithography Viper SLA (3D)– FDM Fortus (Stratasys) – Polyjet Eden (Objet)– Connex (Objet) – 3D Projet (3D systems)– Perfactory XE (Envisiontec) – Perfactory (Envisiontec) Lower end (desk-top) Very low end (home users) – 3D Printing (Z-Corp)– Ultimaker – Ultra Z-Printer (Envisiontec / Z-Corp)– Bits-from-Bytes (3D) – 24/30 (Objet)– MakerBot – FDM Dimension (Stratasys)– UP personal printer – UPrint (HP / Stratasys)– Fab@Home – Laminated Objet Manufacture (Mcor)– PrinterBot – V-Flash (3D Systems) Slide 12 of 62
  14. 14. Today we have a ‘pallet’ of around 200 materials Organic Ceramic Polymeric Metallic materials materials materials materials Waxes Alumina ABS Aluminium Tissue / cells Mullite Polyamide (nylon) Tool Steel Zirconia Filled PA Titanium Silicon Carbide PEEK Inconel Beta-Tri calcium Phosphate Thermosetting epoxies Cobalt Chrome Ceramic (nano) loaded epoxies Copper Silica (sand) PMMA Stainless steel Plaster Polycarbonate Gold / platinum Graphite Polyphenylsulfone Hastelloy ULTEM Aluminium loaded polyamide Slide 13 of 62
  15. 15. So what drives companies to adopt AdditiveManufacturing (or be interested)? Slide 14 of 62
  16. 16. The core business drivers to AM adoption 1. Economic low volume production 2. Increased geometric freedom 3. Increased part functionality 4. Product personalisation 5. Improvised environmental sustainability 6. New supply chains and retail models Slide 15 of 62
  17. 17. Lets consider these drivers with some case studies Slide 16 of 62
  18. 18. 1. Enabling low volume production• Enabled the economic manufacture of low volume complex geometries and assemblies – Reduces the need for tooling (moulds / cutters) – Reduced capital investment & inventory – Simplifies supply chains & reduced lead times Slide 17 of 62
  19. 19. Example – unit volumes of 1• Bentley is a subsidiary of Volkswagen• Vehicles from $250K - $1M• In-house polymeric and metallic AM capacity Slide 18 of 62
  20. 20. Example – Low volume production• Problem – customer with limited mobility needed a reversed dashboard• Production substrate produced by RIM• Manual modification time consuming• Solution – Laser Sintered AM part with leathers and veneers veneers Images courtesy of Bentley Slide 19 of 62
  21. 21. Example – Low volume production Images courtesy of Bentley Slide 20 of 62
  22. 22. 2. Maximising design complexity & capability• AM enables the production of highly complex geometries with little if no cost penalty – Re-entrant features – Variable wall thicknesses – Complex honey combs – Non-linear holes – Filigree structures – Organic / genetic structures Slide 21 of 62
  23. 23. Example – Delphi Diesel Pump• Conventional product manufactured by cross drilling an aluminium die casting• Multiple machining operations• Multiple post processing ops (chemical deburring, hole blanking, pressure testing)• Final product prone to leakage Slide 22 of 62
  24. 24. With AM - Design the product around the holes Slide 23 of 62
  25. 25. Example – conceptual Diesel Pump• Produce the part as one piece using Selective Laser melting on Aluminium Slide 24 of 62
  26. 26. 3. Increasing part functionality• AM enabled multiple functionality to be manufactured using a single process – Replacing surface coatings & textures – Modifying physical behaviour by designing ‘mechanical properties’ – Embedding secondary materials (optical / electrical) – Grading multiple materials in a single part Slide 25 of 62
  27. 27. Example – surface design for bone ingress Material: Ti6Al4V Build time: 16 cups in Implants (production) 18 hours • Accetabular cups Images Courtesy of ARCAM – www.arcam.com Slide 26 of 62
  28. 28. Example – Heat dissipation surfaces Slide 27 of 62
  29. 29. Example – Energy absorption Slide 28 of 62
  30. 30. 4. Product Personalisation• Individual consumer centric products, with customer input – Medical devices – Consumer goods – Cultural & emotional artefacts – Online design tools – Co-creation Slide 29 of 62
  31. 31. Case study - Hearing aids• Produced using personal data from each individual patient – Produced using scan data – 20 million made every year by 3DP – Lower cost than traditional – Every one is different – Improved fit for the user – Lots of medical applications using bdy scan data, CT & MRI data Slide 30 of 62
  32. 32. The personalisation can be by the consumer• www.makielab.com Slide 31 of 62
  33. 33. The Internet lets everyone become designers• Some web offering allow us to become the designer in an AM supply chain – Digital Forming.com – Jujups.com This is a pall point pen – Sculpteo.com – Landprints.com This is a bedside light This is a lemon squeezer Slide 32 of 62
  34. 34. There are lots of new interfaces GoogleSketch UP Slide 33 of 62
  35. 35. There are lots of new interfaces Slide 34 of 62
  36. 36. 5. Life cycle sustainability• Product lifecycle improvements in economic and environmental sustainability – Reduced raw material consumption – Efficient supply chains – Optimised product efficiency – Lighter weights components – Reduced lifecycle burden Slide 35 of 62
  37. 37. Case study – aerospace cabin component Slide 36 of 62
  38. 38. A very different approach to design Slide 37 of 62
  39. 39. Design optimisation for AM production Topologically optimisedMachine from solid billet Complex lattice Slide 38 of 62
  40. 40. Example – How does the weight compare Scenario 1 – Machined from solid (0.8Kg) Scenario 2 – Selective Laser melted lattice (0.31 kg) Scenario 3 – Selective Laser melted optimised design (0.37 Kg) Slide 39 of 62
  41. 41. To establish sustainability you have to establish lifecycle boundary conditions Slide 40 of 62
  42. 42. Environmental benefit over product lifecycle Process Raw Manufacture Distribution Usage Life cycle Materials CO2 CO2 CO2 Kg CO2 CO2 Machining 100Kg 2 Kg 5 Kg 43,779 Kg 43,886 SLM lattice 16 Kg 5 Kg 1 Kg 16,238 Kg 16,260 SLM optimal 18 Kg 7 kg 2 Kg 20,339 Kg 20,366• Example based on 90M km (Long haul) application Slide 41 of 62
  43. 43. So how do our lifecycle CO2 compare Scenario 1 – Machined from solid (100%)Scenario 2 – Selective Laser melted lattice (37%) Scenario 3 – Selective Laser melted optimised design (46%) Slide 42 of 62
  44. 44. Sunday Times 13th Feb 2011 Slide 43 of 62
  45. 45. Example – life cycle economic benefits• 0.49Kg saving per monitor arm• $1,500 per annum in fuel savings (todays prices)• $45,000 over 30-year aircraft life• Product life span 5-7 years (estimate)• Life-cycle economic saving $6.5K - $9K• Machined part - $500• SLM Part - $2,500• Capital investment repaid in 2-years….  Slide 44 of 62
  46. 46. This is a step change in design thinking Slide 45 of 62
  47. 47. 6. Supply chain realignment• New lean yet agile business models and supply chain – Distributed manufacture – Manufacture and the point of consumption – Demand pull business models – Stockless supply chains – Chainless supply chains (home manufacture) Slide 46 of 62
  48. 48. Stockless supply chains – low barriers $50.00 each 60,000 month $36M P/A Slide 47 of 62
  49. 49. Integration with other data sources $6.2-million (6-machines) Slide 48 of 62
  50. 50. There are online printing portals to buy & sell Slide 49 of 62
  51. 51. These portals have volume traffic $44 average price of products Slide 50 of 62
  52. 52. So what are people designing & sharing Slide 51 of 62
  53. 53. But what do you do with the data? – Home 3D Printing Makergear Start-up Growing Established Slide 52 of 62
  54. 54. MakerBot – the ‘market leader’• Less than 3-years old• Business based on open source• 6700 machines sold in 2011• $1,749 per machine• 20,000 machines this year Slide 53 of 62
  55. 55. So what are people making Slide 54 of 62
  56. 56. These machines are based on open-source Slide 55 of 62
  57. 57. Other supply chain opportunities for all Slide 56 of 62
  58. 58. Is there a market?1985 – 2010 = 45,000 machines 2011 = 15,000 machine 2012 = 45,000 machine 2013 = 200,000 machines 2014 = 800,000 machines 2015 = 3.2-million Moores law? Slide 57 of 62
  59. 59. The money will also be in the data & content Slide 58 of 62
  60. 60. So is AM the newManufacturing revolution for the digital age? Slide 59 of 62
  61. 61. Not yet - the harsh reality• Of the 200+ products, components, parts & business models we have looked at over the last 7-years, 90% were not immediately suited to AM. – Piece part economics – Production throughput – Mechanical property limitations – Surface finish Next session – Part accuracy – Process variance – Quality assurance & validation Slide 60 of 62
  62. 62. BUT…. We can dream ……. Slide 61 of 62
  63. 63. Dr Phil Reeves - Managing Director, Econolyst Ltd, UK Questions Econolyst Ltd The Silversmiths Crown Yard Wirksworth Derbyshire, UK DE4 4ET +44 (0) 1629 824447 phil.reeves@econolyst.co.ukwww.econolyst.co.ukFriday 22nd June 2012 - Romania
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×