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Focusing on Students in a Data-
Driven World
Carol Corbett Burris, Ed.D.
Principal of South Side High School
Rockville Cen...
2
q 44%	
  of	
  the	
  NY	
  students	
  who	
  entered	
  9th	
  
grade	
  in	
  2008	
  were	
  economically	
  
disad...
There is an inverse relationship between the
% of low SES students and graduation rates
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
L...
Low-SES students can do well if they are in
well–resourced schools that are not
overwhelmed by poverty
5
How	
  do	
  we	
  provide	
  
our	
  students	
  with	
  the	
  
enriched	
  and	
  
engaging	
  curriculum	
  
that	
 ...
6
ü  Place-­‐based	
  learning	
  provides	
  students	
  with	
  
background	
  knowledge	
  which	
  in	
  turn	
  prom...
7
8
DIRECTIONS	
  FOR	
  CLOSE	
  READING	
  From	
  http://
www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/[iles/High-­‐School-­‐
Exemplar...
Read and summarize
Having crumbled to 214 all out, with Jonathan
Trott's 84 not out the glue across an otherwise
brittle E...
10
ü  Place-­‐based	
  learning	
  provides	
  an	
  invaluable	
  
opportunity	
  to	
  expand	
  student	
  vocabulary....
11
Theme	
  	
  vocabulary	
  
•  Lighthouse	
  
•  Historic	
  
•  Shoals	
  
•  Route	
  
•  Conical	
  
•  Breakwater	
...
Words of a Feather
route
shoals
shallow
buoy
Give students
sentence starters
Link all four words
together to build one
sen...
13
ü  Place-­‐based	
  learning	
  provides	
  us	
  with	
  experiential	
  	
  
“texts”	
  that	
  we	
  can	
  use	
  ...
Designing lessons using
Blooms as a guide
15
Text	
  B:	
  
Washington	
  
Crossing	
  the	
  
Delaware	
  	
  
1.  Describe	
  the	
  dress	
  and	
  condition	
  ...
16
1.  What,	
  according	
  to	
  Whitman	
  is	
  the	
  true	
  
monument	
  to	
  honor	
  Washington?	
  
2.  The	
  ...
Jigsaw Assignment
Provide	
  evidence	
  how	
  each	
  
text	
  portrays	
  Washington	
  as	
  a	
  
great	
  and	
  her...
Designing lessons using
Blooms as a guide
19
Here	
  is	
  the	
  choice	
  that	
  confronts	
  us…..	
  
	
  
	
  
“Other	
  than	
  giving	
  the	
  brief	
  
de...
20
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[THVInstitute13] Focusing on Students in a Data-Driven World

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Presentation given by Carol Burris at Teaching the Hudson Valley's 2013 Summer Institute, "Placed-Based Learning & Common Core".

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Transcript of "[THVInstitute13] Focusing on Students in a Data-Driven World"

  1. 1. Focusing on Students in a Data- Driven World Carol Corbett Burris, Ed.D. Principal of South Side High School Rockville Centre, NY
  2. 2. 2 q 44%  of  the  NY  students  who  entered  9th   grade  in  2008  were  economically   disadvantaged   q 42%  of  all  of  the  2010  births  in  NYS  were  to   single  mothers   q 44%  did  not  attend  pre-­‐school   q  In  NYS  big  cities  75%  were  economically   disadvantaged   q  70%  of  all  birth  in  the  Bronx  were  to   single  mothers    
  3. 3. There is an inverse relationship between the % of low SES students and graduation rates 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Low  Needs   Average   Needs   High   Needs   rural   High   Needs   urb/sub   High   Needs   NYC   High   Needs  Lg   City   % poverty % grad rate all §  Effects  of   individual   poverty     §  Effects  of   concentrated   poverty  
  4. 4. Low-SES students can do well if they are in well–resourced schools that are not overwhelmed by poverty
  5. 5. 5 How  do  we  provide   our  students  with  the   enriched  and   engaging  curriculum   that  they  deserve  in  a   time  of  data  driven   reform?   “The gravest threat posed by all these reforms is that they encourage teachers to forego real teaching for test prep”. Gary Rubenstein, Ed Leadership July 2013  
  6. 6. 6 ü  Place-­‐based  learning  provides  students  with   background  knowledge  which  in  turn  promotes   transfer,  thereby  deepening  and  accelerating   learning.     Why  place-­‐based  learning   matters…..  
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. 8 DIRECTIONS  FOR  CLOSE  READING  From  http:// www.parcconline.org/sites/parcc/[iles/High-­‐School-­‐ Exemplar-­‐Lincoln-­‐Gettysburg-­‐Address.pdf       “Other  than  giving  the  brief  de[initions  offered  to  words   students  would  likely  not  be  able  to  de[ine  from  context   (underlined  in  the  text),  avoid  giving  any  background   context  or  instructional  guidance  at  the  outset  of     the  lesson  while  students  are  reading  the  text  silently.   This  close  reading  approach  forces  students  to  rely   exclusively  on  the  text  instead  of  privileging     background  knowledge  and  levels  the  playing  [ield  for   all  students  as  they  seek  to  comprehend  Jacques’   soliloquy.”  
  9. 9. Read and summarize Having crumbled to 214 all out, with Jonathan Trott's 84 not out the glue across an otherwise brittle English innings, the tourists were back in the contest when Paul Collingwood's brace had the hosts wobbling at 100 for five at the turn of the 21st over. From:http://russonreading.blogspot.com/2013/05/does-background- knowledge-matter-to.html 9
  10. 10. 10 ü  Place-­‐based  learning  provides  an  invaluable   opportunity  to  expand  student  vocabulary.     Why  place-­‐based  learning   matters…..  
  11. 11. 11 Theme    vocabulary   •  Lighthouse   •  Historic   •  Shoals   •  Route   •  Conical   •  Breakwater   •  Portholes   •  Catwalk   •  Cistern   •  Buoy   •  Navigational  hazards   •  Obsolete   •  Erected   •  Navigate     •  Shallow   1883  Lighthouse  at   Kingsland  Point  Park  
  12. 12. Words of a Feather route shoals shallow buoy Give students sentence starters Link all four words together to build one sentence, or two related sentences.
  13. 13. 13 ü  Place-­‐based  learning  provides  us  with  experiential     “texts”  that  we  can  use  to  develop  our  students’   analytical  and  evaluative  thinking.       Why  place-­‐based  learning   matters…..  
  14. 14. Designing lessons using Blooms as a guide
  15. 15. 15 Text  B:   Washington   Crossing  the   Delaware     1.  Describe  the  dress  and  condition  of  the  soldiers.   2.  Explain  why  you  know  the  crossing  was  dif[icult.   3.  How  does  the  artist  use  light  ,  shadowing,  color  and   other  techniques  to  create  setting?   4.  What  is  the  artist’s  opinion  of  Washington?  Justify  your   opinion.   5.  Write  the  story  this  painting  tells.    
  16. 16. 16 1.  What,  according  to  Whitman  is  the  true   monument  to  honor  Washington?   2.  The  original  title  was,  “Ah,  Not  This   Granite  Dead  and  Cold”.    Which  title  is   better?  Explain  why.     3.  What  is  Whitman  telling  the  reader  with   the  insertion  of  a  question  mark  in  the   poem?  What  is  the  function  of  the     parenthesis?   4.  To  what  extent  does  Whitman  see   George  Washington  as  an  archetype,   rather  than  a  [lesh  and  blood  hero?   Include  evidence  from  the  text  to  make   your  argument.     Text  C:   Washington's   Monument,   February,   1885  by  Walt   Whitman  
  17. 17. Jigsaw Assignment Provide  evidence  how  each   text  portrays  Washington  as  a   great  and  heroic  leader.   Decide  which  of  the  three   makes  the  best  case  and   explain  why.  
  18. 18. Designing lessons using Blooms as a guide
  19. 19. 19 Here  is  the  choice  that  confronts  us…..       “Other  than  giving  the  brief   de[initions  offered  to  words   students  would  likely  not  be  able   to  de[ine  from  context   (underlined  in  the  text),  avoid   giving  any  background  context  or   instructional  guidance  at  the   outset  of    the  lesson  while   students  are  reading  the  text   silently.  This  close  reading   approach  forces  students  to  rely   exclusively  on  the  text  instead  of   privileging     background  knowledge  and  levels   the  playing  [ield  for  all  students  .”     David  Coleman     “When  I  am  tempted  to   compromise  on  what  I  know   is  good  instruction,  I  will   think  back  to  letters  I've   received  from  students  over   the  years.  Although  I   certainly  can't  claim  to  have   inspired  every  student  I've   taught,  I  know  from  these   notes  that  I  have  inspired   some.  When  a  student   writes  to  me  that  she  used   to  hate  math  and  now  she   likes  it,  I've  gotten  all  the   merit  pay  I  need.”  Gary   Rubenstein  
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