18 Oct '13 BKC-IH Methodology Day: Bridging the gap between primary and secondary grammar learning by Olga Goncharova
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18 Oct '13 BKC-IH Methodology Day: Bridging the gap between primary and secondary grammar learning by Olga Goncharova

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18 Oct '13 BKC-IH Methodology Day: Bridging the gap between primary and secondary grammar learning by Olga Goncharova

18 Oct '13 BKC-IH Methodology Day: Bridging the gap between primary and secondary grammar learning by Olga Goncharova

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  • {"16":"This is another useful way of encouraging logical deduction, and incorporates movement, which is appealing to many learners of this age who need to see differences in word order and structure between their own language and English in a more than purely visual form. Polly, Jack and Daisy are characters from the children’s coursebook and you need to imagine that they would be easily visible to the children on the board. They already know the vocabulary for family members. Get four students to come to the front of the class and give each child a large word card, which they read and then hold in front of them. Tell them to try to physically organise themselves to make a logical sentence. It’s likely they will not succeed on the first go, so you’ll need to physically guide them into the correct order and position. Once they have done this, get the the rest of the class to tell you which character this sentence refers to. Then get the children to stick the word cards on the board in the correct order. You can then ask them what they notice about the word order ie in English the person comes first, followed by family relation. The process can then be repeated with other children.\n","5":"Then get them to tell you the other words as you underline them. From this you can help shape a rule from them, in doing so ...\n","22":"The children are now given a worksheet which is a controlled practice written execise. What makes this worksheet intrinsically motivating is they are writing about themselves. It is controlled in as much as they don’t need to change the adjective into a comparative. However, there is challenge in terms of applying an appropriate comparative adjective to two people, and also, they need to remember to include ‘is’ and ‘than’ in each sentence.\nThis activity is followed up by a homework drawing and writing activity, where students draw two people in the class and then write a caption to describe the picture eg: Diana is fatter than Mariana.\n","11":"In this activity, the presentation focus is on word order of wh questions in the present simple. The aim is to get students to notice and generate patterns, and again to familiarise children with relevant and useful metalanguage.\nImagine these are word cards on the board. Carol Read suggests getting two children to come up to the board and choose any cards they like and arrange a question ...\n","17":"From this, students can then look at this grammar table, copied from the coursebook.\n","6":"You can teach them some useful metalanguage: ‘vowel’ and ‘consonant’, as well as reinforcing the vowel sounds ‘a, e, i, o, u’. It’s useful they at first understand this type of language as it will help them to make logical guesses about the grammar of further nouns they meet. Eventually, through repeated exposure to hearing ‘vowel’ and ‘consonant’, they’ll be able to say it for themselves, so that you’ll be able to ask of a new word: ‘ a envelope or an envelope?’ ‘an’ ‘Why?’ ‘Because ‘e’ is a vowel’.\n","12":"Present / Past Simple\n","18":"You can hand out cards with these words on and ask students to come up and stick them in the correct place on the board. So now here we have some full circle and we are back to the original grammar table we were so critical of at the beginning of the session... \n","7":"In this activity, I’d like you to assume that the children have met these coursebook characters before, and they are fully familiar with colours and clothes. You can ask the children to match a green sentence to each person, according to the colours and clothes they are wearing. \n","2":"In order to lay the foundations for understanding and learning aspects of grammar, it is above all important to give children exposure to language in meaningful contexts which engage them in practising and using English for purposes which they can relate to and enjoy.\nThe holistic learning of language chunks plays an important role in fostering children’s enthusiasm for learning English. \nIt also provides them with a potentially rich, internal language resources as they grow older and are encouraged (or expected) to pay attention to grammatical features and apply more explicit analytical skills to the way they learn. \nAs Ss grow older, they develop the ability to notice and analyze lg forms and functions more explicitly.\n","19":"Ask them to look at the table and tell them yhereare four ways we make plurals in English. Elicit the first one and write ‘s’ in the first column. Now ask them to look at the other words and see if they can work out the other three rules. \n","8":"From this, you can direct their attention to the words ‘his’ and ‘her’, and ask what they notice about ‘his’ and ‘her’: which people have ‘his’ and which people have ‘her’.\n","3":"Here is one example that makes a useful starting point for this kind of approach. Choose concrete nouns that the children are already familiar with, and ask them to look at the pictures and see if they can guess why certain words have been grouped together. You can encourage them also to read the instructions silently.\n","20":"Finally, students can then try to apply these rules and complete their table with plurals written in the correct column. To help them with the irregular ones, you could tell them that there are five irregular nouns and see if they can guess which ones they might be. Elicit or show them these and add these to the fourth column. They should now be able to get on and classify the rest of the nouns for themselves.\n","9":"... like this.\n","15":"After this, you can start building the present continuous. Show everyone an envelope containing slips of paper with activities on. Take one out, mime it and elicit the activity, adding ‘you’re ...’ – eg ‘you’re smiling’. Get one participant to come to the front, make sure they understand what to do and then get the others to guess. \nThis process is then repeated. To ensure your students use full and conrrect sentences, you can award points – one for the class when they say the full and correct sentence, one point for the teacher if the sentence is incorrect in some way. This encourages them to think about the grammar as well as simply getting the core message out.\n","4":"If necessary, you can underline an example from each as a clue.\n","21":"The adjectives are already known and the preceding activity has seen two children come to the front of the class and the teacher has elicited a difference between them eg. Chris is taller than Anka. This process has been repeated with other children and different comparative adjectives. \n","10":"To finish the activity, you can hold up one of the character cards and elicit sentences about that character from the board, remembering to choose either ‘his’ or ‘her’. This process is repeated with the other character cards.\n"}

18 Oct '13 BKC-IH Methodology Day: Bridging the gap between primary and secondary grammar learning by Olga Goncharova 18 Oct '13 BKC-IH Methodology Day: Bridging the gap between primary and secondary grammar learning by Olga Goncharova Presentation Transcript

  • Bridging the gap between primary and secondary grammar learning Olga Goncharova, BKC-IH Moscow 2013
  • Language awareness with YL: understanding how English works • Implicit learning of grammar patterns: YL learn unanalysed chunks of language and phrases in a holistic way through lesson routines, songs, rhymes, stories, games • Observe and notice patterns and introduce elements of grammar analysis. • Students construct and use patterns. • Explicit grammar rules.
  • Grammar Detectives There’s an elephant, an egg an apple and an umbrella in Box 1. Why? There’ s a cat, a shoe, a hat and a banana in Box 2. Why?
  • Grammar Detectives There’s an elephant, an egg an apple and an umbrella in Box 1. Why? There’s a cat, a shoe, a hat and a banana in Box 2. Why?
  • Grammar Detectives There’s an elephant, an egg an apple and an umbrella in Box 1. Why? There’s a cat, a shoe, a hat and a banana in Box 2. Why? What’s the rule? The words in Box 1 start with .................... (...., ...., ...., ...., ....) The words in Box 2 start with .................... (...., ...., ...., ...., .... etc)
  • Grammar Detectives There’s an elephant, an egg an apple and an umbrella in Box 1. Why? There’s a cat, a shoe, a hat and a banana in Box 2. Why? What’s the rule? The words in Box 1 start with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) The words in Box 2 start with a consonant (b, c, d, f, g, h, j etc)
  • Using Logical Deduction Alison Simon His trousers are grey. Her hair is brown. Her jacket is red. Tim Caroline His shoes are black. Happy Street 2 new ed, Stella Maidment & Lorena Roberts, OUP
  • Using Logical Deduction Alison Simon Her jacket is red. His trousers are grey. Tim Caroline His shoes are black. Her hair is brown.
  • Using Logical Deduction his = boy / man Alison Her jacket is red. Tim her = girl / woman Simon His trousers are grey. Caroline His shoes are black. Her hair is brown.
  • Using Logical Deduction ..... jacket is purple, pink and black. ..... t-shirt is blue and white. ..... bag is grey. ..... trousers are pink. ..... trousers are blue. ..... shoes are white. ..... skirt is blue. ..... hair is black. ..... trousers are grey. ..... hair is brown. ..... t-shirt is white. ..... tights are red.
  • Colour-coding do What to they go ? live ? When she school for does do get up ? breakfast he Where you does How have ?
  • Color-coded grammar words • Red: Question words • Pink: Auxiliaries • Yellow: Subjects • Green: Verbs • Blue: Prepositions • Purple: Nouns
  • Sentence scramble • Sts choose a long sentence from one of their grammar exercises, e.g. 2nd conditional. • Sts write one word/punctuation sign on each piece of paper. • They mix up the pieces of paper and move on to another st’s seat to unjumble his/her sentence. • When Sts finish, they check with the St who made the sentences Extra challenge: • Sts add one extra piece of paper with a word that doesn’t fit into the sentence. Sts have to reorder the sentences and spot the ‘intruder’ word.
  • Discover the question • 1 student – with his back to the board • Teacher writes a question on Wb • Other students answer in short sentences  Sts are encouraged to actively listen out for grammar as this is the key to guessing the question correctly
  • Photos 1 2
  • Using Logical Deduction 2 She They are Daisy’s is parents Jack’s mum Happy Street 2 new ed, Stella Maidment & Lorena Roberts OUP
  • Using Mime, Movement and Gesture
  • Using Mime, Movement and Gesture am / ’m are / ’re are not / aren’t is not / isn’t are / ’re are not / aren’t am not / ’m not is / ’s
  • Classifying s boy - boys lunch - lunches potato - potatoes class - classes wish - wishes box - boxes baby - babies child – children foot – feet
  • Classifying s es yies irregular boy - boys lunch - lunches potato - potatoes class - classes wish - wishes box – boxes baby - babies child – children foot – feet person – people man – men woman – women tooth – teeth mouse - mice bus friend car bananas cat beach fox glass man woman story table foot city pen day tooth shirt mouse country bike tomato person tree flower lady prince princess
  • Personalisation Everyone’s Different!! younger shorter taller bigger smaller older thinner longer
  • Personalisation Everyone’s Different!! younger shorter taller bigger smaller thinner older longer How many sentences can you make about the teachers/students at your school? Eg: Olga’s shorter than everybody else in Teacher Training. Vova ……………………………………………………………. Dima ……………………………………………………………. Ira’s hair …………………………………………………..
  • Personalized gap-fill • T. writes 5-7 sentences on the board which contain the target structure with gaps for Sts to fill in. Use Sts’ names and details about them (less challenging:  write the words they must use at the top of the board) • Sts copy down the sentences, filling in the gaps • Sts decide if the sentences are true or false.  E.g. Vova’s parents _______ from Moscow. • Good for:  tenses, adjectives, adverbs, comparatives, modals
  • Thank you very much for coming!