1. Green Manufacturing <br />“Green manufacturing involves making manufactured products and the manufacturing process safe...
2. Deconstruction<br />“Deconstruction is the process of carefully dismantling and removing useable materials from structu...
3. Reuse<br />“This subsector redistributes unwanted yet perfectly usable materials and equipment, including items from de...
4. Recycling<br />
5. Remanufacturing<br />
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Green

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Green

  1. 1. 1. Green Manufacturing <br />“Green manufacturing involves making manufactured products and the manufacturing process safer for the environment and human health” (Cha). <br />What does this mean? <br />Regarding Products<br />The use of less toxic or nontoxic materials<br />Post-consumer recycled content (containing materials that consumers have used and recycled)<br />Locally sourced materials (ex. Stone and granite from local quarries rather than imported from around the globe)<br />Products manufactured and used in renewable and energy efficient systems (ex. Gearboxes used in small-scale wind turbines)<br />Regarding Process<br />Improving operational energy efficiency<br />Onsite recycling <br />Employee occupational health and safety<br />
  2. 2. 2. Deconstruction<br />“Deconstruction is the process of carefully dismantling and removing useable materials from structures for reuse, recycling, and waste management” (Cha). <br />Examples and Advantages: <br />Maximizes the recovery of valuable building materials for reuse and recycling<br />Minimizes the amount of waste destined for landfills<br />Alternative to demolition<br />“Atypical 13,300 square foot commercial demolition project generates over 155 pounds per square foot or over 2 million pounds of waste;2 building-related projects in the U.S. alone generate an estimated 164 million tons of construction and demolition (C&D) material every year. Approximately 40%of this material is reused, recycled, or sent to waste-to-energy facilities, while 60 percent is sent to C&D landfills”<br />Susquehanna project experimenting with “paneling,” where large sections of row houses are removed intact for disassembly and reuse. <br />Unique architectural features such as a corner turret and radiators are retrieved from urban row houses and sold through local Susquehanna architectural salvage business. <br />Images courtesy of OSWER Innovation Project Success Story: Deconstruction<br />One Cleanup, Design for the Environment, and U.S. EPA. 2007. Draft Final Report, Waste and Materials Flow-Benchmark Sector Report: Beneficial Use of Secondary Materials—Construction and Demolition Materials.<br />
  3. 3. 3. Reuse<br />“This subsector redistributes unwanted yet perfectly usable materials and equipment, including items from demolished structures” (Cha). <br />Advantages<br />Keeps goods and materials out of the waste stream<br />Advances source reduction<br />Preserves the ‘embodied energy’ originally used to manufacture an item<br />Creates less air and water pollution than making a new product or recycling<br />Saves money in purchase and disposal costs<br />
  4. 4. 4. Recycling<br />
  5. 5. 5. Remanufacturing<br />
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