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Linear Correlation
 

Linear Correlation

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Types, indications of correlations, types of variables, linear correlation, strength, direction and significance

Types, indications of correlations, types of variables, linear correlation, strength, direction and significance

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    Linear Correlation Linear Correlation Presentation Transcript

    • 05/04/14 Dr Tarek Amin 1 Investigating the Relationship between Two orMore Variables (Correlation) Professor Tarek Tawfik Amin Public Health, Faculty of Medicine Cairo University amin55@myway.com
    • The Relationship Between Variables Variables can be categorized into two types when investigating their relationship: Dependent: A dependent variable is explained oraffected by an independent variable. Age and height Independent : Two variables are independent if the pattern of variation in the scores forone variable is not related orassociated with variation in the scores forthe othervariable. The level of education in Ecuadorand the infant mortality in Mali
    • Techniques used to Analyze the Relationship between Two Variables Method Examples I- Tabularand graphical methods: These present data in way that reveals a possible relationship between two variables. II-Numerical methods: Mathematical operations used to quantify, in a single number, the strength of a relationship (measures of association). When both variables are measured at least at the ordinal level they also indicate the direction of the relationship. Bivariate table for categorical data (nominal/ordinal data) Scatter plot for interval/ratio. Lambda, Cramer’s V (nominal) Gamma, Somer’s d, Kendall’s tau-b/c (ordinal with few values) Spearman’s rank order Co/Co. (ordinal scales with many values) Pearson’s product moment correlation (Interval/ratio) These techniques are called collectively as Bi-variate descriptive statistics
    • Correlation: indications o Correlational techniques are used to study relationships. o They may be used in exploratory studies in which one to intent to determine whether relationships exist, o And in hypothesis testing about a particular relationship.
    • Correlations techniques used to assess the existence, the direction and the strength of association between variables.
    • Pearson Correlation (Numeric, interval/ratio) The Pearson product moment correlation coefficient (rorrho) is the usual method by which the relation between two variables is quantified. Type of data required: Interval/ratio sometimes ordinal data. At least two measures on each subjects at the interval/ratio level. Assumptions: The sample must be representative of the population. The variables that are being correlated must be normally distributed. The relationship between variables must be LINEAR.
    • Directions of Correlations on ScatterPlot Positive Negative No Correlation Non-linear(Curvilinear(
    • 05/04/14 Dr Tarek Amin 8 Relationships Measured with Correlation Coefficient The correlation coefficient is the cross products of the Z-scores. [ ]( )nzXzYr ∑= Where: ZX= the z-score of variable X ZY= the z-score of variable Y N= number of observations
    •  Because the means and standard deviations of any given two sets of variables are different, we cannot directly compare the two scores.  However, we can, transform them from the ordinary absolute figures to Z-scores with a mean of 0 and SDof 1.  The correlation is the mean of the cross- products of the Z-score foreach value included, a measure of how much each pair of observations (scores) varies together. Tips
    • Correlation Coefficient (r) The correlation coefficient r allows us to state mathematically the relationship that exists between two variables. The correlation coefficient may range from +1.00 through 0.00 to – 1.00.  A + 1.00 indicates a perfect positive relationship,  0.00 indicates no relationship,  and -1.00 indicates a perfect negative relationship.
    • I-Strength of the Correlation Coefficient How large r should forit to be useful? In decision making at least 0.95 while those concerning human behaviors 0.5 is fair. The strengths of r are as follow: 0.00-0.25 little if any. 0.26 -0.49 LOW 0.50- 0.69 Moderate 0.70 - 0.89 High 0.90 – 1.00 Very high .
    • II-Significance of the Correlation The level of statistical significance is greatly affected by the sample size n. If r is based on a sample of 1,000, there is much greaterlikelihood that it represents the r of the population than if it were based on 10 subjects.
    • ‘ With large sample sizes rs that are described as demonstrating (little if any) relationship are statistically significant’ Statistical significance implies that r did not occurby chance, the relationship is greaterthan zero.
    • - The correlation coefficient also tell us the type of relation that exists; that is, whetheris positive ornegative. - The relationship between job satisfaction and job turnoverhas been shown to be negative; an inverse relationship exists between them. When one variable increases, the other decreases. - Those with highergrades have lowerdropout rates (a positive relationship). Increases in the score of one variable is accompanied by increase in the other. III- Direction of correlation
    • Relationships Measured by Correlation Coefficients: When using the formula with Z-scores, ris the average of the corss-products of the Z-scores. [ ]( )nzXzYr ∑= A five subjects took a quiz X, on which the scores ranged from 6to 10 and an examination Y, on which the scores ranged form 82to 98. Calculate r and determine the pattern of correlation?
    • 05/04/14 Dr Tarek Amin 16 Formula forcalculating correlation coefficient r. [ ]( )nzXzYr ∑=
    • A perfect positive relationship between two variables. Subjects X (quiz) Y (examination ) zX zY zX*zY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 82 86 90 94 98 -1.42 -0.71 0.00 0.71 1.42 -1.42 0.71 0.00 0.71 1.42 2.0 0.5 0.0 0.5 2.0 mean X= 8, SD=1.41 mean Y= 90 sd=5.66 ∑zXzY= 5.00 r= ∑zXzY/n = 5.00/5 = +1
    • Positive Correlation 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 0 5 10 15 X score Yscore
    • Perfect negative relationship Subjects X Y zX zY zXzY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 98 94 90 86 82 -1.42 -0.71 00.0 0.71 1.42 1.42 0.71 0.00 -0.71 -1.42 -2.0 -0.5 0.0 -0.71 -2.0 Mean X =8 SD= 1.41 Mean Y= 90 SD= 5.66 zXzY= -5.00∑ [ ]( )nzXzYr ∑= - =5.0/5-=1.0
    • Negative Correlation 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 0 5 10 15 X score Yscore
    • No relationship Subjects X Y zX zY zXzY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 94 82 90 98 86 -1.42 -0.71 0.00 0.71 1.42 0.71 -1.42 0.00 1.42 -0.71 -1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 -1.0 Mean X= 8 SD= 1.41 Mean Y= 90 SD= 5.66 zXzY= 0.00∑ r=0.00/5=0.00
    • No Correlation 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 0 5 10 15 X score Yscore
    • The following table is SPSS output describing the correlation between age, education in years, smoking history, satisfaction with the current weight, and the overall state of health fora randomly selected subjects. Overall state of health Satisfaction with current weight Smoking history Education in years Subject's age 1.000 . 434 Subject's age Pearson Correlation Sig.(2 tailed) N .022 .649 419 Education in years Pearson Correlation Sig.(2 tailed) N -.108* .026 423 .143** .003 432 Smoking history Pearson Correlation Sig.(2 tailed) N -.009 .849 440 .033 .493 424 -.077 .109 432 Satisfaction with current weight Pearson Correlation Sig.(2 tailed) N 1.000 . 444 .370* .000 443 -.200* .000 441 .149** .000 425 -.126** .009 433 Overall state of health Pearson Correlation Sig.(2 tailed) N *Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2-tailed(. ** Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).
    • Figure (1): Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in relation to serum ferritin level among cases and controls. Ferritin (log) 2.82.62.42.22.01.8 HOMA-RI 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 Controls Sickle Total Population r=0.804, P=0.0001
    • Figure (2): 1,25 (OH) vitamin D in relation to body mass index among obese and lean controls. Body mass index 5040302010 VitaminDlevel 100 80 60 40 20 0 Lean Obese Total Population r= -.166, P=0.036
    • 05/04/14 Dr Tarek Amin 26 Thank you