Fahrenheit 451 “ The Hearth and the Salamander”
Reflect <ul><li>In your journals, write what you believe Juan Ramon Jimenez meant when he said “If they give you ruled pap...
Metaphor <ul><li>Direct comparison without using “like” or “as” </li></ul><ul><li>“With the brass nozzle in his fists, wit...
Protagonist <ul><li>The main character (plot revolves around them) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Doesn’t necessarily have to be go...
Dystopia <ul><li>A society that is ruled by a controlling government (often pretending to be a utopia: a society where eve...
Characterization <ul><li>Tools the author uses to create a character </li></ul><ul><li>Direct Characterization : author ex...
Setting <ul><li>Time and place in which a story takes place </li></ul><ul><li>Inferences? </li></ul>
Simile <ul><li>A comparison between two unlike things, using “like” or “as” </li></ul><ul><li>“There was only the girl wal...
Irony <ul><li>The opposite of what is expected to happen </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fireman </li></ul></ul>
Narrator (Point of View) <ul><li>The perspective from which the story is told. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>First person: “I”, “m...
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The Hearth and the Salamander

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Literary terms for the first part of Fahrenheit 451

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The Hearth and the Salamander

  1. 1. Fahrenheit 451 “ The Hearth and the Salamander”
  2. 2. Reflect <ul><li>In your journals, write what you believe Juan Ramon Jimenez meant when he said “If they give you ruled paper, write the other way”. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Metaphor <ul><li>Direct comparison without using “like” or “as” </li></ul><ul><li>“With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history” (3). </li></ul>
  4. 4. Protagonist <ul><li>The main character (plot revolves around them) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Doesn’t necessarily have to be good </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Guy Montag </li></ul><ul><li>Impressions? </li></ul><ul><li>Antagonist : The character who opposes the main character (does not have to be bad) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Dystopia <ul><li>A society that is ruled by a controlling government (often pretending to be a utopia: a society where everything is truly perfect) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually in war </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People suffer (some may not be aware of their suffering because they’ve never known anything different or they’ve been brainwashed) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Living in fear </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Characterization <ul><li>Tools the author uses to create a character </li></ul><ul><li>Direct Characterization : author explicitly describes character, “‘I’m seventeen and I’m crazy’” (7). </li></ul><ul><li>Indirect Characterization : “At the last moment, when disaster seemed positive, he pulled his hands from his pockets and broke his fall by grasping the golden pole” (4). </li></ul>
  7. 7. Setting <ul><li>Time and place in which a story takes place </li></ul><ul><li>Inferences? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Simile <ul><li>A comparison between two unlike things, using “like” or “as” </li></ul><ul><li>“There was only the girl walking with him now, her face bright as snow in the moonlight…” (7) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Irony <ul><li>The opposite of what is expected to happen </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fireman </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Narrator (Point of View) <ul><li>The perspective from which the story is told. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>First person: “I”, “me”, “my” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Third person: “he”, “she”, “they” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Third person omniscient: all seeing and all knowing (knows characters’ thoughts and feelings </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Third person limited: does not know characters’ thoughts and feelings </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It is possible to have a third person limited omniscient. In this case, the narration is in third person and we only know Guy Montag’s thoughts and feelings </li></ul></ul></ul>

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