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The Flipped Learning Model, as explained by Jo Kori, UK Learning Consultant for Tata Interactive Systems (TIS) on the 29th and 30th Jan at the Learning Technologies 2013 event in UK.

The Flipped Learning Model, as explained by Jo Kori, UK Learning Consultant for Tata Interactive Systems (TIS) on the 29th and 30th Jan at the Learning Technologies 2013 event in UK.

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  • I’m Jo Kori, UK Learning Consultant for Tata Interactive Systems (TIS).To set the scene for why I’m talking to you about the flipped learning model today I’ll explain a little about myself and my role.I have worked as an instructional designer for nearly 15 years. When I’m brought in at the beginning of a project, I conduct a training needs analysis to ensure a proposed solution will answer the learning and evaluation needs of the client.
  • My background includes PGCE at M-level and I use pedagogical research and educational learning models to ensure there is a sound learning and evaluation structure.
  • I have found that educational learning models when applied to blended learning, for example, helps with: Clarifying the learning approach Giving the solution a clear shape - often in visual form, such as a diagram and Providing assurance of best practice in areas of evaluation and accreditation Here is a diagram of one of those models - the flipped learning model - which we’re going to take a closer look at.
  • Technology-based educational research increasingly has to respond to the fact that there are now many students (‘digital natives’)who have not known life without the internet, and do not see technology as something separate from their lives, or from learning. Online social communications are a huge factor that cannot be ignored.
  • Flipped learning is a more recent technology-based educational learning model which took off around 2007.Many educators are familiar with this model which is also known as flipped classroom. So what is flipped learning and why is it useful to consider it within the context of training?
  • Flipped learning inverts traditional teaching methods, delivering instruction online outside of class and moving ‘homework’ into the classroom.The educator’s role changes from being the ‘Sage on the Stage’ to the ‘Guide on the Side’.
  • Within the educational context, students watch lectures and access online information at home at their own pace, communicating with peers and educators via online discussions.Concept engagement takes place in the classroom with the help of the instructor.
  • There are two key factors driving increased adoption of the flipped learning model within education in the US which are filtering through to the UK.
  • The traditional one-size-fits-all model of education often results in limited concept engagements and severe consequences – drop outs, having to relearn etc.
  • The availability of online video and increasing student access to technology has paved the way for flipped learning (classroom) models.
  • I have found the flipped learning model useful in clarifying some of the larger and more complex blended learning solutions I have had to consider.Let’s go through a TIS training example. A client wants three stages of training for their new employees Each stage is of increasing complexity and further challenges understanding of the core concept There is internal accreditation for each level The training is to take place over a 6-9 month period and the employees will be out in the field during that time.
  • At TIS we can talk to our client about an exciting blended learning solution using: Mobile learning Online interactive learning assets Virtual classrooms Use of the client’s VLE to post responses to activities and peer sharing/social communication This all sounds good as a set of ingredients – but we need to define the recipe.
  • A theoretical framework is what will help us define the recipe.Educational (or learning) technology and activity learning have been identified as being needed. They are two key components of the flipped learning model and they both influence learning environments in fundamental ways.
  • So using the flipped learning model I can sharpen the clarity of the proposed solution. Here is a reminder of the model.
  • So this is the first stage of the solution: Information and Concept exploration.To help manage expectations in terms of evaluation and accreditation for this particular example, I’ve also included a comparative pedagogic definition of levels alongside the solution.
  • The second stage of the solution: Experiential engagement.
  • The third stage of the solution: Demonstration and application.
  • Reflection and evaluation: this allows learners to progress beyond the training.
  • There were a few questions from the audience: Q: What duration would be advised for applying a flipped learning model to a blended learning solution?A: I gave the duration for the example project (6-9 mths) but explained that this wasn’t fixed – clearly the duration depends on the amount of content to be covered and the number of learners. Q: The concept of the flipped learning model – is this new?A: No, I can match it to a combination of other learning models that were defined a lot earlier in the 20th century – but the technologies and people’s use of them are new, and the flipped learning model accommodate this in terms of best practice. Q: We didn’t realise TIS invested in this kind of research/learning consultancy – is this something new?A: Tata has always invested extensively in R&D in all areas of its services. For example, the specialist teams for Simulations/TOPSIM, Mobile/Tablet Apps, Serious Games, 3D Animations, Portal and Custom Apps, and Products such as LMS, PTS and Cybertest have 40% of their time put aside for R&D. As the largest e-learning company in the world we need to be continuously aware of developments and be able to respond accordingly. That’s why we’re able to offer products such as LEARNow©, our own mobile authoring tool which uses responsive design technology – we see R&D as essential, to ensure we can answer specific issues in a timely fashion.

Flipped Learning Model Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Jo Kori BA (Oxon) MA RCA UK Learning Consultant Tata Interactive SystemsFlip your training!
  • 2. Pedagogical research means finding out moreabout how learning takes place so that educatorscan direct their energies into approaches which aremore likely to be successful.
  • 3. Pedagogical research means finding out moreabout how learning takes place so that educatorscan direct their energies into approaches which aremore likely to be successful.Learning models provide educators with anorganised system for creating an appropriatelearning environment, and planning instructionalactivities.
  • 4. ONLINE 1 Information/concept exploration [e.g. Video lectures; Podcasted lectures; Content-rich websites; Online chats]LIVE EXPERIENCE
  • 5. ONLINE 1 Information/concept exploration [e.g. Video lectures; Podcasted lectures; Content-rich websites; Online chats] 2 Experiential engagement [e.g. Hands on activities; Games; Online chats; Experiments]LIVE EXPERIENCE
  • 6. ONLINE 1 Information/concept exploration [e.g. Video lectures; Podcasted lectures; Content-rich websites; Online chats] 2 Experiential engagement [e.g. Hands on activities; Games; Online chats; Experiments] 3 Demonstration and application [e.g. Through personalised projects and presentations]LIVE EXPERIENCE
  • 7. ONLINE 1 Information/concept exploration [e.g. Video lectures; Podcasted lectures; Content-rich websites; Online chats] 4 Reflection/Evaluation 2 Experiential engagement [e.g. Blogging; Reflective [e.g. Hands on activities; Games;Podcasts; Reflective vodcasts] Online chats; Experiments] 3 Demonstration and application [e.g. Through personalised projects and presentations] LIVE EXPERIENCE
  • 8. “Our current 18 year old students have not known life without the internet, and donot see technology as something separate from their lives, nor from learning.” University of Wolverhampton
  • 9. What is flipped learning? Why apply it to training?
  • 10. The Traditional Classroom The Flipped ClassroomThe teacher’s role: Sage on the Stage The teacher’s role: Guide on the Side LECTURE TODAY ACTIVITY TODAY Homework WATCH Reading and questions due tomorrow Lecture online tonight! INVERSION
  • 11. The Traditional Classroom The Flipped ClassroomThe teacher’s role: Sage on the Stage The teacher’s role: Guide on the Side LECTURE TODAY ACTIVITY TODAY Homework WATCH Reading and questions due tomorrow Lecture online tonight! INVERSION
  • 12. The Traditional Classroom The Flipped ClassroomThe teacher’s role: Sage on the Stage The teacher’s role: Guide on the Side LECTURE TODAY ACTIVITY TODAY Homework WATCH Reading and questions due tomorrow Lecture online tonight! INVERSION
  • 13. WHAT FLIPPED LEARNING DOES Students watch lectures and access online information at home at their own pace, communicating with peers and teachers via online discussions Concept engagement takes place in the classroom with the help of the instructor
  • 14. WHAT FLIPPED LEARNING DOES Students watch lectures and access online information at home at their own pace, communicating with peers and teachers via online discussions Concept engagement takes place in the classroom with the help of the instructor
  • 15. Factors driving theincreased adoptionof the flippedlearning modelwithin education
  • 16. Poor learningoutcomes
  • 17. Prevalence ofonline video
  • 18. Prevalence ofonline videoAdults who have viewed an online educational video2007 15% of internet users2010 30% of internet users
  • 19. Training example
  • 20. Training example3 stages of training
  • 21. Training example3 stages of trainingEach stage of increasing complexity and challengesunderstanding of core concepts
  • 22. Training example3 stages of trainingEach stage of increasing complexity and challengesunderstanding of core conceptsInternal accreditation for each level
  • 23. Training example3 stages of trainingEach stage of increasing complexity and challengesunderstanding of core conceptsInternal accreditation for each levelTraining to take place over a 6-9 month period
  • 24. Training example3 stages of trainingEach stage of increasing complexity and challengesunderstanding of core conceptsInternal accreditation for each levelTraining to take place over a 6-9 month periodEmployees will be out in the field during that time
  • 25. Solution ingredients
  • 26. Solution ingredientsMobile learning
  • 27. Solution ingredientsMobile learningOnline interactive learning elements
  • 28. Solution ingredientsMobile learningOnline interactive learning elementsVirtual classroom
  • 29. Solution ingredientsMobile learningOnline interactive learning elementsVirtual classroomVLE posts and social communication
  • 30. Solution ingredientsMobile learningOnline interactive learning elementsVirtual classroomVLE posts and social communication
  • 31. A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
  • 32. ONLINE 1 Information/concept exploration [e.g. Video lectures; Podcasted lectures; Content-rich websites; Online chats] 4 Reflection/Evaluation 2 Experiential engagement [e.g. Blogging; Reflective [e.g. Hands on activities; Games;Podcasts; Reflective vodcasts] Online chats; Experiments] 3 Demonstration and application [e.g. Through personalised projects and presentations] LIVE EXPERIENCE
  • 33. 1 Information/concept explorationTraining example Pedagogic levelLearning assets created Level 1/2Stage 1 core concepts are created as m-learning Ask the learner to reflectnuggets and are infographic in style back the core information they have been deliveredLearning anytime, anywhereEmployees can access the m-learning nuggets whereverthey are and as many times as they likeIf they don’t have phone access, they can access thelearning nuggets through the LMSEmployees are asked to keep a ‘learning journal’ to notedown their use of these core concepts when out in thefield
  • 34. 2 Experiential engagementTraining example Pedagogic levelEmbedded learning Level 3/4After 3-6 months employees are given online access to Learners need to showStage 2 simulations where their responses are evaluated evidence of embeddedwithin a number of different parameters and feedback is knowledge and the abilitygiven to apply core knowledgeThe employee should be able to see how their learningjournal is useful in helping them understand how the coreconcepts are embedded within their practice
  • 35. 3 Demonstration and applicationTraining example Pedagogic levelExtended learning Level 5/6After 6-9 months employees are given online access to There should be a moreStage 3 complex scenarios/dilemmas sophisticated and personalised applicationA group of employees visit the first stage of a of knowledge - learnersscenario/dilemma through the VLE and are asked to post can, in sometheir response/what they would do next subjects, problem-solve complex situations andAfter a period of time another stage is posted on the VLE dilemmasand a response asked for, and so on
  • 36. 4 Reflection / EvaluationTraining example Pedagogic levelReflection Level 7Employees are encouraged to share similar experiences Some learners will movewith peers (their learning journal will help with this), or up to Level 7, whichreflect on what they have been through involves debate and thought processesThe emphasis is less on just ‘getting it right’ and more on a beyond the establishedsharing a mature learning experience system of knowledge – in some cases, evidence of thought leadership
  • 37. ANY QUESTIONS?Visit Tata Interactive Systems at Stand 39