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Detective  Descriptive’sWriting Workshop       Topic: Descriptive Words   Concept: Creativity and Expression            By...
Table of Contents                                                                                 Chapter   PageInstructio...
Instructional Setting                        3
Part I: Community, School, and Classroom contextsCommunity:       The school is located in a retirement community with a p...
summer as an effort by teachers in the valley to continue exposing the students to great literatureand the joy of reading....
provide supplementary instruction in the areas of reading and math instruction for students. TheTitle I reading specialist...
One of my favorite features at this school is the morning announcements. After the mainannouncements and Pledge of Allegia...
on the day of the week) for 40 minutes. When they return to the room they spend several minutesfinishing math and then mov...
two hours away. One of the subjects he was most looking forward to this year is math, eventhough he sometimes struggles.  ...
Student Seven is a student from a large family. She is generally a happy student andrarely causes a disturbance. She is ov...
journal. He is one of three students pulled out in the morning for ELL instruction. He is alsopulled out of the classroom ...
that her dad is involved in her life at this time. She is obsessed with superheroes, especiallyBatman.       Student Sixte...
reading so I can do better today.” He is close to his mom, with whom he lives. His dad is also inhis life, and they both w...
Bibliography:http://www.city-data.com/city/Grants-Pass-Oregon.htmlhttp://www.greatschools.net/modperl/browse_school/or/491...
Family Communication Plan                            15
Dear First Grade Families,       My name is Mrs. Grant and I am a student teacher in your son/daughters firstgrade classro...
Dear First Grade Families,       These past two weeks I taught my work sample unit on descriptive words toyour child. The ...
Unit Rationale                 18
Writing is a form of communication that can convey many thoughts and ideas. It isimportant for a good writer to use descri...
objects color. However there are many different ways an object can be described and this idea iswhat students will discove...
Unit Outline               21
Detective Descriptive’s Writing Workshop                                  Topic: Descriptive Words                        ...
Benchmark EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a                       real object, person, place, or even...
Support StandardsStandards: English Language Arts      Common Curricular Goal: Communicate supported ideas across the subj...
   Do we have to use descriptive words in our writing?     What can be considered a descriptive word?     What makes wr...
Assessment Plan                  26
Final Performance Task: GRASPSImagine that you are a detective. Several students around Riverside School havebeen seen per...
GRASPS                        Students will effectively use descriptive words to create a selfGoal:                       ...
Final Performance Task Rubric         Descriptive Word         Self Description          “Caught”                Clues    ...
Prior Knowledge InventoryWriting samples—Students will complete a writing sample about an object. The object will beplaced...
me the student‟s skill in easily creating a description of an item. It will also assess the vocabularythe student possesse...
together to determine who was “caught being good”. Each description will need to include atleast three physical features a...
Stuffed cow the students‟ wrote about:Contents of the paper bag:Ribbon, mint tin, post-it note, spoon, rock, seed starter-...
Descriptive Word Checkhard     Cat     shiny     pink     shoebasket   Soft    book      dull     bigcandy    Blue    body...
Detective Descriptive’s    Dictionary of  descriptive words                          35
Smells         36
Tastes         37
Sounds         38
Textures           39
Colors         40
Shapes         41
Emotions           42
Sizes        43
My 100 Collection1._______________________________________________________________________________________________________...
Details WebFill out this details web to help you organize your ideas.                                                     ...
Learning Plan                46
Learning ObjectivesPre-lesson: Pre-write about a stuffed cow, descriptive word choice, and „what‟s in the bag‟activity.Tue...
Instructional Strategies:BrainstormingGames: Word sortsStorytellingVisualsCooperative learningStandards being addressed:EL...
   Special attention: EW and RG. Make sure these two are on task.      Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they r...
Manipulatives, experiments, labs, and modelsCooperative LearningStandards being addressed:MA.01.AR.01: Sort and classify o...
   Monitor RG‟s work to make sure he is completing the graphic organizer and writing.       Partner him with classroom he...
Objective 2: Students will solve the mystery of the students „caught being good‟ by listening tothe descriptions being rea...
Lesson 1: Clicker Clues!Grade Level: 1Subject areas: WritingMaterials needed:Turning Point Software and ClickersComputerPr...
Selection of Instructional Strategies:     Technology: I will be using the clicker technology because the students get re...
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 I have a dog. My dog is big. She is fluffy. She isn‟t spotted. Her fur is all the same color. She has pointy ears....
1st Vote:   2nd Vote:   3rd Vote:   4th Vote:   5th Vote:   6th Vote:   Final Vote:1st Vote:   2nd Vote:   3rd Vote:   4th...
Part 4: Reflection        After overcoming several technical difficulties, this lesson was a success! I had planned to use...
I know that students met the objectives through my observations and their responses during theclassroom activity. The stud...
Lesson 2: Tools of the TradeGrade Level: 1Subject areas: Writing/VocabularyMaterials needed:24 “Detective Descriptive‟s Di...
Benchmark EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a                      real object, person, place, or event...
to complete the mad lib.Close 10:50     5. Students will come to the carpet and share their version of the story.10 minute...
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A Day At The Zoo!Today I went to the zoo. I saw a ____________(adjective)_____________(noun) jumping up and down in its tr...
The Great New Toy!There is a new toy on the market that has everyone saying____________(Exclamation)! It is called the ___...
In The Jungle!I walk through the color jungle. I take out my___________(adjective) canteen.Theres a ________(adjective)par...
Part 4: Reflection       This lesson was a little rough for me. The students seemed to enjoy getting to movearound from st...
I teach this lesson again, I will plan for two or three stations a day, instead of the eight that thestudents participated...
Lesson 3: 100th Day CollectionGrade Level: 1Subject areas: WritingMaterials needed:Each students‟ “100” collectionDictiona...
reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to       audience and purpose across...
   Work one on one with students as needed.      Special attention: EW and RG. Make sure these two are on task.Part 2: P...
My 100 Collection Clues:My objects are round.My objects are small.My objects are red, orange, yellow, brown, blue, and gre...
My 100 Collection1._______________________________________________________________________________________________________...
Part 4: Reflection       Students were excited for this lesson! The 100th day of school was a very big deal for thefirst g...
secret. I feel that this would help students by letting them have their item at their desk withoutfear of a classmate seei...
Lesson 4: Monsters, Monsters Everywhere!Grade Level: 1Subject areas: ArtMaterials needed:Where the Wild Things Are by Maur...
Common Curricular Goal: Apply the use of ideas, techniques and problem solving to       the creative process and analyze t...
4. Have each student write their name on the back of the drawing and               place the drawing on top of their desk ...
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant
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Transcript of "Work sample first grade detective descriptives writing workshop tasha grant"

  1. 1. Detective Descriptive’sWriting Workshop Topic: Descriptive Words Concept: Creativity and Expression By: Tasha Grant First Grade Writing Unit Winter 2008
  2. 2. Table of Contents Chapter PageInstructional Setting………………………………………………… 1 3Family Communication Plan……………………………………….. 2 15Unit Rationale………………………...…………………………….. 3 18Unit Outline…………………………...……………………………. 4 21Assessment Plan……………………………………………………. 5 26Learning Plan……………………………………………………….. 6 46Lesson 1: Clicker Clues!.…………………………………………… 7 53Lesson 2: Tools of the Trade……………………………………….. 8 62Lesson 3: 100th Day Collections……………………………………. 9 80Lesson 4: Monsters, Monsters Everywhere!...................................... 10 87Lesson 5: Science Detectives……………………………………….. 11 93Lesson 6: The Mystery Begins……………………………………... 12 103Lesson 7: The Usual Suspects……………………………………… 13 108Lesson 8: Mrs. Gove‟s class, in the cafeteria, with the napkin…….. 14 111Post Assessment Data Display……………………………………... 15 117Assessment Analysis……………………………………………….. 16 124Summary of Student Growth………………………………………. 17 127Analytical Essay……………………………………………………. 18 141Resources…………………………………………………………… 19 145Appendix A: Pre-assessment Work Samples………………………. 20 147Appendix B: Formative Assessment Work Samples……………….. 21 156Appendix C: Final Performance Task Work Samples……………… 22 165 2
  3. 3. Instructional Setting 3
  4. 4. Part I: Community, School, and Classroom contextsCommunity: The school is located in a retirement community with a population of 34,237. The city islocated in the valley of the Rogue River and much of the community and its activities revolvearound this feature. The economy of the area was at one time based upon the timber industry buthas since diversified to include a mix of light manufacturing, secondary wood products, retailtrade, tourism, and recreation and service based industries. The climate in the area is mild; withtemperatures ranging from the mid 20‟s to high‟s right above 100. This mild climate and outdoorinspired living led the community to be featured in a national magazine as one of the top tenplaces to retire and since then the retirement population has boomed. This population boomfueled the expansion of the medical and retirement facilities in the valley. Another result of thesteadily increasing retirement population was an increase in housing prices to the point where theaverage family in the area cannot afford to purchase a home. The average home price in the areais $231,700 an increase of over 200% since 2000 when the average home sold for $111,200. Themedian household income is $37,400. The racial composition is as follows: White, non-Hispanic—90.1%; Hispanic—5.4%; Two or more races—2.9%; Native American—2.5%; otherrace—1.6% (total can be greater than 100% because Hispanics could be counted as other races).Based upon the information from the City-Data website, it is easy to conclude that thecommunity is not that diverse. The community is served by six elementary schools, two middle schools, and two highschools. For the past one and a half years the library has been closed due to lack of funding.This has put a burden on the community in many ways. A makeshift library was created this past 4
  5. 5. summer as an effort by teachers in the valley to continue exposing the students to great literatureand the joy of reading. Thanks to the hard work of many community members, the libraryrecently reopened. Another resource in the valley is the vast population of retired people. Manytimes these folks are looking for opportunities to help out in the community and would love tocome to the school and be involved in reading with students.School Setting: The mission of the school is to create “a community dedicated to academic success,social responsibility, and the pursuit of lifelong learning.” The guiding principles are to providea caring environment that enhances self worth, guiding children to make responsible decisions,that each individual has unique talents, prepare students to appreciate and contribute to ourmulticultural, diverse, global society, set high standards, and that families are partners ineducation. The school has 17 classroom teachers, a P.E. teacher, a music teacher, a special edteacher, and a reading specialist for a total of 21 teachers. All of the teachers except the specialed teacher are female. The school has 390 students, 74% of whom qualify for free or reducedprice lunches. The racial composition of the school is as follows: 82% white, non-Hispanic;16% Hispanic; 2% American Indian; <1% Asian/Pacific Islander; <1% Black, not Hispanic.There is a slight difference in the racial composition of the school as compared to thecommunity. This difference is mainly between the White, non-Hispanic totals and the Hispanictotals. I believe that the cause of this discrepancy is the fact that the school is one of twoelementary schools in the district that has programs for ELL students. The school is alsorecognized as a Title I school, which means that the school receives additional funding to 5
  6. 6. provide supplementary instruction in the areas of reading and math instruction for students. TheTitle I reading specialist and trained instructional assistants work with students both in individualclassrooms and in the reading room. A speech therapist visits the school on a regular basis towork with students who are referred for services. The child development specialist visits theschool several days a week to teach lessons on positive interactions and consult individually withstudents. The school day lasts from 8:00 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. Students are given a 45 minute lunch,of which 15 minutes is allotted for eating and 30 minutes for recess. There is also a 10 minutemorning recess. Students also are out of the main classroom for music and P.E. They attend oneor the other every day. In the fourth grade students are given the option to participate in stringinstruments, and in fifth grade they can choose to play band instruments. These programs are inaddition to the regular music classes. The school is a Positive Behavior School (PBS). This means that the emphasis is oncreating proactive strategies to encourage positive school environments. Strategies used at thisschool include „Caught Slips‟ in which the teacher marks a box stating whether the behavior wasresponsible, respectful, safe, or for helping others. The slip then gets entered into drawings forrandom things, like books or lunch with the principal or teacher. Read at Home is a school wide program to encourage students to read at home everynight throughout the year. Each student chooses a book and takes it home where they read to anadult for at least 15 minutes each night. The adult then signs a slip that is returned with thestudent stating the book that was read and whether or not the student had trouble reading.Throughout the year students can earn classroom parties, t-shirts, and other prizes. 6
  7. 7. One of my favorite features at this school is the morning announcements. After the mainannouncements and Pledge of Allegiance, the composer of the week is announced with a shortstatement about the composer or music. Then a five minute piece of classical music is playedover the intercom. I feel that this sets the mood for the rest of the morning.Classroom Setting: I am currently student teaching in a first grade classroom. There are 25 students rangingin age from six to eight years old. Three students are ELL students, and one of the ELL studentsis from a home with deaf/mute parents. One student is only in the class for a short time duringthe morning calendar/story time and in the afternoon for 30 minutes following lunch time,always with a special ed teacher or assistant. There are 10 girls and 14 boys in the classroom.The desks in the classroom are arranged in random groups around the room—four to a group.The classroom is controlled chaos. There is organization, but it is very difficult to see. Theteacher has been in the same classroom for some time (I believe for 9 years now). The daily schedule places a heavy emphasis on reading and math. The day begins withseatwork in the students‟ count-to-100 journal, and then the class moves to the carpet forcalendar time. Following calendar, a story is read to limit the reading instruction missed by thethree ELL students. The students then spend 90 minutes in a reading block before recess in themorning. After recess they spend 30 minutes writing in their journals and then the students go tolunch. After lunch the students have their „double dose‟ of reading instruction. The mostintensive students go to the reading room for another 35 minute lesson. Students in theclassroom spend the time working on grammar and spelling. After „double dose‟ the studentsthen move on to math. During the middle of math, students leave for P.E. or music (it depends 7
  8. 8. on the day of the week) for 40 minutes. When they return to the room they spend several minutesfinishing math and then move to the carpet for sharing.Part II: Individual Learners and Adaptations Student One is a student who comes from a split household. Her mother is in prison andshe lives with her dad and grandmother as well as two brothers. She is slightly overweight anddoes not seem to have clothes that fit her properly. The clothes that she does have do not appearto be washed, and the CT has taken her jacket to be washed on one occasion. She is in theintensive group of readers. At the start of the year, she could recognize few letters and lettersounds. She attended kindergarten at the same school and would have been in the kinder-plus(five days a week instead of just two) class if she had better attendance. She seems to makeprogress as long as she makes it to class on time. She gets frustrated easily, especially whengoaded by other students. Student Two is one of three ELL students in the classroom. He is a well adjusted studentand is in the second highest reading group. He is currently working with the speech therapisttwice a week. In some instances he needs quiet to complete work and if the room is not quiet hegets frustrated and upset. He likes playing sports like football and soccer, which could signal thathe is a kinesthetic learner. He has recently been saddened by the fact that his dad has moved toTexas to find work. Student Three is a quiet student. He is in the intensive reading group and is makingsteady progress. He goes to the Title 1 room for instruction every day after lunch for half anhour. He always has a ready smile. He comes from a large family (he is one of eight children),although I believe he has only a few siblings at home. He speaks of visiting his brothers in a city 8
  9. 9. two hours away. One of the subjects he was most looking forward to this year is math, eventhough he sometimes struggles. The next student is Student Four. Student Four is only in the classroom briefly during themorning routines. The rest of his day is spent in the special ed classroom. While he is in theclassroom, he always has an assistant with him. He has a difficult time paying attention andsitting still, and on a few occasions, trouble controlling his temper. His brain development is atabout a three year old level. The goal for Student Four is to increase his time spent in themainstream classroom. The rest of the students are reminded of how to model behavior forStudent Four, and it is amazing to see them acknowledge him when he is acting appropriatelyand ignore him when he is causing a disturbance. Student Five is another student in the most intensive group. She is currently undergoingassessment for learning disabilities. She has vision problems and requires her glasses for reading.At the beginning of the year she recognized just three letters and no letter sounds. She seems tohave difficulty with memory (per her mom, who is actively helping to diagnose what is causingStudent Five‟s difficulties). Twice a week she meets with a speech therapist. She is in the Title 1room during writing group for one on one instruction. She is an only child. Student Six is the son of one of the teachers at the school. He is a benchmark student andis happy to do his work. He recently moved to the highest reading group and is continuing to dowell. Every once in awhile he can get a little chatty and cause the students around him to get alittle rowdy. He is the oldest child in his family, with a new little brother on the way, and both ofhis parents are very involved in creating his success. 9
  10. 10. Student Seven is a student from a large family. She is generally a happy student andrarely causes a disturbance. She is overweight and has mentioned that it is painful to sit criss-cross on the carpet in the morning. Although she works hard, she often struggles during reading.She is in the third highest reading group. Her family came to the open house and conferences. Student Eight is a shy student. He comes out of his shell when given responsibility.Lately he has been acting out at school. I believe this could be due to the fact that he recentlybecame a big brother. He has one older brother as well. His parents are divorced, and I believe helives with his father. In his journal he writes about his grandparents a lot. He is a student that is atbenchmark. Student Nine is an outgoing student who likes to be around her friends. She is atbenchmark and completes her work quickly as long as she is not distracted by her friends. Sherecently became a big sister for the second time and is enjoying it immensely. She completes herread-at-home while reading to her new little brother. Her mom volunteers in the classroom oncea week, and both of her parents are active in her education. Student Ten is an exceptional, hard working student. She works quietly and is rarely offtask. Her family seems like they are always on the go, and because of this she is about 25 booksbehind in the read-at-home program. She is in the second highest reading group. She likes to tellstories about her life and often talks about the horses her family races. Student Eleven comes from an interesting background. Both of his parents are deaf-mute,and a translator is brought in for conferences and open house nights. He learned to speak fromthe TV and his older sibling. He is quiet and most of the time has a difficult time followingclassroom instruction. He often seems confused by the directions and lost when writing in his 10
  11. 11. journal. He is one of three students pulled out in the morning for ELL instruction. He is alsopulled out of the classroom twice a week for speech instruction. Student Twelve is one of the most interesting students in the classroom. He is anemotional guy who often has difficulty controlling his behavior. When upset and frustrated hewill often cry and cause a disruption in the class. He is in the intensive reading group, howeverhe reads quite well. There are two reasons he was placed in this group—It is a boost to hisconfidence and he does very poorly on the nonsense word fluency timed test that is one of theplacement indicators at this school. He does best with one on one interaction. I believe that this isdue to the fact he recently became an older brother after being the only child for six years. It wasrecently discovered that he will be a big brother again soon. He is especially volatile when inclose proximity to Student Seventeen. He likes to be moving around. Student Thirteen is in the highest reading group. She is more than willing to read toanyone who will listen. Her parents are highly involved in her education, and her mom is in theclassroom during writing several days a week. Student Fourteen is another student in the highest reading group. He is a happy studentwho excels at all tasks placed in front of him. His parents are not involved at school, althoughthey do seem to support his academics at home. Student Fifteen is a fun student who always seems to be moving in hyper-drive. She hasone speed and that speed is fast. She has a difficult time focusing if there is too much noise, soshe often uses noise blockers. Because she is distracted easily, she is often finishing worksheetsduring recess. She would be a very successful student if she could focus on finishing her work.She is currently in the third highest reading group. She is raised by her mom and I don‟t believe 11
  12. 12. that her dad is involved in her life at this time. She is obsessed with superheroes, especiallyBatman. Student Sixteen is one of the quietest students in the classroom. He seems wary of adultsand does not want to let people into his world. He is in the most intensive reading group and ismaking progress, however he has little support at home. Student Seventeen is an engaging student. He is one of the most disruptive students inthe classroom and is on a behavior plan. Every day he takes a notebook home with a note to hisparents detailing his day. His parents are divorced but his time is split equally between the two(i.e. he may fall asleep at his mom‟s and wake up at his dad‟s). His attention has increasedsteadily since the beginning of the year. He is a benchmark student when he focuses oncompleting his work and not drawing in his notebook. Student Eighteen is a student who is more concerned with her extracurricular activitiesthan her schoolwork. Her family is very busy with activities for her older sister and her. Almostevery morning she has an excuse for why she has not done her read-at-home. She is close tostudent three and she helps whenever he is in the classroom. She is a benchmark student. Student Nineteen is an excellent student. She is supported by her parents who help her tosucceed. She seems to deeply ponder ideas and sometimes these ideas cloud her emotions. All ofthe girls want to be her friend and it can cause problems when all of the girls are crowded aroundher desk begging her to be their partner. Student Twenty is a sweet student who wants to increase his knowledge. He is in the topreading group and is one of the few students who chooses to read chapter books when given thechoice. When I asked him if he wanted to read to me he answered “Yes, I want to improve my 12
  13. 13. reading so I can do better today.” He is close to his mom, with whom he lives. His dad is also inhis life, and they both work with him on his reading. Student Twenty-One is a student who loves music. Whenever music is playing in theclassroom he is moving to the beat. He is in the third highest reading group and often struggles.He talks about his mother frequently and I have only heard him mention his dad on a fewoccasions. Student Twenty-Two is a student who gets bored easily and does not like to follow therules. She is constantly wandering the room and needs direction to get back on task. She is one ofthe more advanced students in the classroom and I believe that she needs a more challengingenvironment. When she gets frustrated she will complain and throw a fit. She and her sister areraised by their father. She rarely gets to visit her mother (a week in the summer and several daysover Christmas vacation). Student Twenty-Three is a student who is happy to get his work done. He is in theintensive group for reading. He is raised by his dad and his grandparents. All of them came tothe open house with him, and they all seem to be happy just like the student. Student Twenty-Four is the third ELL student, and is the shyest student in the classroom.He struggles with worksheets but easily succeeds with a little help. He has a large family and Idon‟t believe that either of his parents speaks English. He can get emotional at times, and if hefeels that the work is too difficult, he will complain of a stomachache. 13
  14. 14. Bibliography:http://www.city-data.com/city/Grants-Pass-Oregon.htmlhttp://www.greatschools.net/modperl/browse_school/or/491#from..Tab 14
  15. 15. Family Communication Plan 15
  16. 16. Dear First Grade Families, My name is Mrs. Grant and I am a student teacher in your son/daughters firstgrade classroom. This opportunity is the last step I will take before receiving myMaster of Arts Degree in elementary education from Southern Oregon University and I’mvery excited to be here at Riverside. I have been in the classroom observing and workingwith Mrs. Gove since the beginning of the school year and will be working with yourchild until the middle of March. The last two weeks of February I will begin teaching a unit on descriptive words.This writing unit will help your child discover how he or she can use descriptive words toenhance their writing. As the time nears, I will be sending home specific activities thatyou can do with your child to support this skill. Please feel free to contact me at anytime with any questions or concerns. Youcan contact me by phone at 218-0099, or by email at tashagrant8@hotmail.com. I’m looking forward to getting to work with you and your child in the upcomingweeks. We will have many wonderful experiences and opportunities to learn and grow inthe days ahead.Sincerely,Mrs. Grant 16
  17. 17. Dear First Grade Families, These past two weeks I taught my work sample unit on descriptive words toyour child. The kids had a blast learning how to enhance their writing, and I had ablast watching the connections being made in their brains! The students participated in several projects over the past two weeks. They createdtheir own “Descriptive Word Dictionary” full of words to describe shapes, colors, sounds,smells, tastes, and textures. They also got to “get their hands dirty” when we examinedrocks, sand, and gemstones. The students’ final project was to write clues aboutthemselves. I put these clues together into a book that we read as a class. They werevery excited to see their pictures and guess who wrote each clue. If you would like to discuss your child’s results from this unit, please feel free tocontact me at anytime with any questions or concerns. You can contact me by phone at218-0099, or by email at tashagrant8@hotmail.com.Sincerely,Mrs. Grant 17
  18. 18. Unit Rationale 18
  19. 19. Writing is a form of communication that can convey many thoughts and ideas. It isimportant for a good writer to use descriptive words in their writing. This allows the reader toform a picture in their head based on the writer‟s description. In this unit on descriptive words Iwill teach the first graders the importance of using descriptive words in their writing. Expression and creativity will be explored as students develop their understandings ofadjectives and how these types of words can enhance writing. Creativity in writing is animportant concept for students. As this concept develops, the students will begin expanding theirword choice and expressing themselves in a more fluid way. These concepts are important for students so that they may become successful writers. Asthese skills develop, their writing will become more interesting to read. This will fuel thestudents‟ desire to write more stories. As this desire increases it will encourage the student tobecome a better reader with a larger vocabulary so that they may continue to write more stories.Students will expand their knowledge of diversity as they study descriptive words. Literature willbe incorporated into the unit that will show students the many ways descriptive words can beused. Special emphasis will be put on the descriptive words that are used to describe the differentcharacteristics of people. Whether a person is big or small, short or tall, this unit will emphasizehow every person is special for many reasons. The enduring understandings of this unit show students how communication caneffectively be used. At this point in the year students have been writing daily in their journal forfour days a week. The writing is developing, but there are few if any descriptive words used. If astudent is choosing to describe an object, the word choice is most often limited to describing the 19
  20. 20. objects color. However there are many different ways an object can be described and this idea iswhat students will discover throughout the course of the unit. My unit design reflects my personal philosophy of education. I will utilize my love oftechnology for the first lesson to fully engage the students in the unit. From there I will leadstudents on an adventure to discover how descriptive words can enhance our writing. I believethat students will learn best when presented with a project that relates directly to their lives. Inthis unit, students will be working together on a project that relates to the Positive BehaviorSystem in place at the school. 20
  21. 21. Unit Outline 21
  22. 22. Detective Descriptive’s Writing Workshop Topic: Descriptive Words Concept: Expression Grade Level: 1st gradeFocus StandardsStandards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas, including relevant examples, facts, anecdotes, and details appropriate to audience and purpose that engage reader interest; organize information in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas, sentences, and paragraphs; and use precise words and fluent sentence structures that support meaning. Standard: Writing Benchmark EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.Knowledge Skills*Vocabulary: learn different adjectives and *Evaluate and edit writing to includedescriptive words to use when writing descriptive words*Placement of descriptive words in *Communicate using descriptive words insentences writing*Word choice—when to use which word to *Support main ideas with descriptivemake the most sense wordsImplied or Stated Understandings/Big Ideas*Descriptive words help the reader to create a picture of a person, place, or thing*Focused descriptions support the main idea*A variety of words is the key to making writing interestingStandards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Write narrative, expository, and persuasive texts, using a variety of written forms—including journals, essays, short stories, poems, research reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to audience and purpose across the subject areas. Standard: Writing Applications: Expository Writing (K-3) 22
  23. 23. Benchmark EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or event using words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.Knowledge Skills*Vocabulary: words that describe how *Use the five senses to describe objects,something looks, feels, smells, tastes, or people, places, or eventssounds *Express ideas*Five senses: touch, taste, hear, smell, seeImplied or Stated Understandings /Big Ideas*Words can appeal to our senses*Descriptive words should be used in all of our writingStandards: Science Common Curricular Goal: Understand structure and properties of matter Standard: Matter Benchmark SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.Knowledge Skills*Physical properties—weight, size, color, *Analyze objects based upon physicaltexture propertiesImplied or Stated Understandings /Big Ideas*Every object has physical propertiesStandards: Career Related Learning Common Curricular Goal: Develop skills to assess personal characteristics, interests, abilities, and strengths. Standard: Career Development Benchmark 1: Demonstrate career development skills in planning for post high school experiences.Knowledge Skills*Positive characteristics people can have *Identify positive characteristics in self.Implied or Stated Understandings /Big Ideas*Self assessment (using descriptive words) can build self esteem. 23
  24. 24. Support StandardsStandards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas using oral, visual, and multi-media forms in ways appropriate to topic, context, audience, and purpose; organize oral, visual, and multi-media presentations in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas and elements; use language appropriate to topic, context, audience, and purpose; and demonstrate control of eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, inflection, gestures, and other non-verbal techniques. Standard: Speaking Benchmark EL.01.SL.05: With guidance, use descriptive words when speaking about people, places, things, and events.Standards: Mathematics Common Curricular Goal: Patterns and Functions: Understand patterns, relations, and functions. Standard: Algebraic Relationships Benchmark MA.01.AR.01: Sort and classify objects using one or more attributes by observing relationships.Standards: Arts Common Curricular Goal: Apply the use of ideas, techniques and problem solving to the creative process and analyze the influence that choices have on the result Standard: Create, Present, and Perform Benchmark AR.03.CP.02: Explore aspects of the creative process and the effect of different choices on one‟s work.Standards: Career Related Learning Common Curricular Goal: Select and use appropriate communication strategies in family, school, community, and workplace settings. Standard: Communication Benchmark 1: Demonstrate effective communication skills to give and receive information in school, community, and workplace.Enduring Understandings: Students will understand that:  Communication is enhanced through the use of descriptive words.  All objects can be described.  A good description helps readers visualize what the writer is describing.  Descriptions that include the five senses help the writer to express ideas and immerse the reader into the story.  Descriptive words captivate and engage the audience.Essential Questions:  How do descriptive words make our writing better? 24
  25. 25.  Do we have to use descriptive words in our writing?  What can be considered a descriptive word?  What makes writing great?Task Analysis:Students will know:  Words that can be used to describe the five senses (taste, look, feel, smell, and sounds)  Words that can be used to describe physical properties (weight: heavy, light; colors; size (large, small); texture (smooth, rough)  That descriptive words come before the noun in the sentence (the blue cat; the smelly garbage)Students will be able to:  Choose effective words to convey the description  Evaluate and edit writing to include descriptive words  Read a description and then choose the picture to match  Think critically about their writing  Describe themselves using self assessmentStudents will understand the following Big Ideas:  A variety of words is the key to making writing interesting  Self assessment (using descriptive words) can build self esteem.  Every object has physical properties  Descriptive words should be used in all of our writing  Words can appeal to our senses  A variety of words is the key to making writing interesting  Focused descriptions support the main idea  Descriptive words help the reader to create a picture of a person, place, or thing 25
  26. 26. Assessment Plan 26
  27. 27. Final Performance Task: GRASPSImagine that you are a detective. Several students around Riverside School havebeen seen performing good deeds, but nobody caught a good enough glimpse ofthese students to determine who will receive the caught slip. In each instance ablurry picture was taken of the student. The teachers and staff have narrowed downthe students and think they are all from a specific classroom: room #7, Mrs. Gove‟sclass. It is your job to write a description of yourself to aid in the investigation.After every description is finished, the class will work together to determine whowas “caught being good”. 27
  28. 28. GRASPS Students will effectively use descriptive words to create a selfGoal: description. You are a detective gathering clues to help solve the mystery. You willRole: attempt to discover which students were „caught being good‟ around the school.Audience: The teachers, staff, and your classmates at Riverside. Around the school, several good deeds have been performed but no one knows who did it. Brief glimpses of these special students have led theSituation: teachers to believe that the students are from this classroom. The teachers want to discover who these special students are so that they can reward the students with “caught slips” for their actions. You need to write a description of yourself that includes at least threeProduct, clues to your identity. These clues need to include a description of yourPerformance, and appearance (how you look) as well as a description of your personalityPurpose: (how you act). Once all of the descriptions are completed we will work together to name the student that the clue is describing. Your description should include: At least two clues about your appearance--remember to be specific! At least one clue about your personality. Are you always happy, serious,Standards and quiet? Include it in your description!Criteria for Success: A description of what and where you were “caught” around the school. You will be expected to collaborate with your classmates and use the clues provided to make decisions. 28
  29. 29. Final Performance Task Rubric Descriptive Word Self Description “Caught” Clues Choice Clues Description Clues ParticipationScore3 Description Description Student clearly Always stays includes obvious includes 3 or more described what they standing if clue details like hair and clues about the were “caught” applies to self eye color and not so identity of the doing, including and/or sits down if obvious details, like student. where it happened. clue does not apply. personality description.2 Description Description Student included Sometimes stays includes only includes 2 clues that they were standing if clue obvious details like about the identity of caught but did not applies to self hair and eye color. the student. include details. and/or sits down if clue does not apply.1 Description lacks Description Student did not say Never stays clear identifying includes 1 clue they were caught in standing if clue details about the about the identity of the clues. applies to self student. the student. and/or sits down if clue does not apply. 29
  30. 30. Prior Knowledge InventoryWriting samples—Students will complete a writing sample about an object. The object will beplaced at the front of the class, so that every student is writing about the same object. I will tellthe students to describe this object so that somebody who couldn‟t see it would be able to draw apicture of the object. Through this assessment, I want to know how students are usingdescriptive words in their writing currently. I want to know the type of words students use,whether or not the students are placing the words in the correct place in the sentence, andwhether or not they are choosing the best words for their description. This assessment will helpme to determine which students will need the most help in the writing groups. It will alsouncover potential misunderstandings about descriptive words (either the types of words that aredescriptive or the placement of these words in the sentence). At the end of the unit, I will havestudents repeat this process and then compare their two descriptions. This will show them howthey have improved over the two weeks and help them to build their confidence in their writingabilities.Word choice—This pre-assessment will see students choosing the descriptive words from a listof grade appropriate words at my desk on a one-on-one basis. I will go through and highlight thewords the students know as descriptive words at this time. As a modification, for some students Iwill be reading the list of words. This assessment will help me to determine each student‟scurrent vocabulary of descriptive words. It will also help me to determine if there is a certaintype of descriptive words that I do not need to touch on (such as colors). I will use this same listat the end of the unit to determine what the students have learned over the course of the unit.What’s in the bag?—I will ask the students (on an individual basis) to feel an item in a bag andthen describe the item to me. I will record the words each student uses on a list. This will show 30
  31. 31. me the student‟s skill in easily creating a description of an item. It will also assess the vocabularythe student possesses.Formative AssessmentsDescriptive word dictionary—Students will create a dictionary of descriptive words. It will beorganized into several sections. This dictionary will show what words students are learning andbecome a tool that they can use in their everyday writing. I will be looking for a developingknowledge of descriptive words.100th day collection clues—Every student will bring a collection of 100 items (all of the sametype) to school. They will then write descriptive clues about the items and have the otherstudents try to guess which collection is theirs. The students will be asked to write three cluesabout the item. Students will assess the quality of the clues as they are trying to determine whichclues describe which collection. This will show me if the skills of each student are increasing asthey learn more about descriptive words.Pre-write graphic organizers—Students will fill in a bubble graphic organizer aboutthemselves. Each bubble will have a different feature about themselves that they will write aboutin their final performance task.Summative AssessmentFinal performance task—Imagine that you are a detective. Several students around RiversideSchool have been seen performing good deeds, but nobody caught a good enough glimpse ofthese students to determine who will receive the caught slip. In each instance a blurry picturewas taken of the student. The teachers and staff have narrowed down the students and think theyare all from a specific classroom: room #7, Mrs. Gove‟s class. It is your job to write a descriptionof yourself to aid in the investigation. After every description is finished, the class will work 31
  32. 32. together to determine who was “caught being good”. Each description will need to include atleast three physical features and one personality descriptor.Writing samples—Students will re-write about the same object that they wrote about for thepre-assessment. This will show me how their descriptive writing abilities have improved over thecourse of the unit. It will also allow students to see how their writing has improved.Word choice—Students will be assessed to see how many more words they can choose from thelist compared to at the beginning of the unit. 32
  33. 33. Stuffed cow the students‟ wrote about:Contents of the paper bag:Ribbon, mint tin, post-it note, spoon, rock, seed starter-dehydrated dirt, dried cranberries,chocolate chips, magnet, plastic baggie, duct tape (sticky side out) 33
  34. 34. Descriptive Word Checkhard Cat shiny pink shoebasket Soft book dull bigcandy Blue body sour roundfish Sweet seed dog housered Fast picture sticky roughhot Ball purple bat pillow 34
  35. 35. Detective Descriptive’s Dictionary of descriptive words 35
  36. 36. Smells 36
  37. 37. Tastes 37
  38. 38. Sounds 38
  39. 39. Textures 39
  40. 40. Colors 40
  41. 41. Shapes 41
  42. 42. Emotions 42
  43. 43. Sizes 43
  44. 44. My 100 Collection1.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________2.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________3.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________4. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________5.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 44
  45. 45. Details WebFill out this details web to help you organize your ideas. 45
  46. 46. Learning Plan 46
  47. 47. Learning ObjectivesPre-lesson: Pre-write about a stuffed cow, descriptive word choice, and „what‟s in the bag‟activity.Tuesday, February 17thLesson 1: Clicker Clues!Using Turning Point and the clicker technology, I will read several short sentences about mydog, with the students trying to choose which dog is mine from a series of photos of differentdogs. The first sentence will be “my dog is cute.” Next sentence will be a little bit moredescriptive, and so on. After the slideshow, we will have a discussion about what descriptivewords are and why they are needed in our writing.Objective 1: The students will identify the descriptions in the slideshow, through use of theclicker technology, that allow them to determine the answer to the question “which dog is mydog?”Objective 2: Students will share with a classmate the different types of descriptive words thatthey know.Instructional Strategies:TechnologyBrainstorming and DiscussionStandards being addressed:SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.Modifications/Adaptations:  Use Turning Point chart to make sure every student is participating.  Read questions aloud so that every student has the opportunity to understand question.  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to classWednesday, February 18thLesson 2: Tools of the TradeIn this lesson students will create a “toolbox” of descriptive words that they can refer tothroughout the unit. After creating the dictionary, students will use the new words in their dailywriting journal.Objective 1: Students will create an 8 page dictionary of descriptive words (under the headings:smells, tastes, sounds, textures, colors, shapes, looks, sizes) with at least 3 descriptive words perpage.Objective 2: Students will write in their journal and highlight all of the descriptive words in theirwriting. 47
  48. 48. Instructional Strategies:BrainstormingGames: Word sortsStorytellingVisualsCooperative learningStandards being addressed:EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or eventusing words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.Modifications/Adaptations:  Pair students who have difficulty reading with students who can help them out.  Repeat directions as needed.  Spend extra time with groups that are not getting it.  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to classThursday, February 19thLesson 3: 100th day CollectionStudents will bring a collection of 100 items to school in a paper bag and then will write three tofive clues about their collection. The students will then share their clues with the whole class.Objective 1: Students will be able to describe their collection using three to five different typesof descriptive words in their journal.Objective 2: Students will listen to their classmates‟ clues and then using the clues make a guessabout what kind of item is being described.Instructional Strategies:VisualsWriting and journalsStandards being addressed:EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or eventusing words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.EL.01.SL.05: With guidance, use descriptive words when speaking about people, places, things,and events.Modifications/Adaptations:  Have starter prompts available for writing the clues: My objects are… or My 100 collection has…  Work one on one with students as needed. 48
  49. 49.  Special attention: EW and RG. Make sure these two are on task.  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to class.Friday, February 20thLesson 4: Monsters, Monsters Everywhere!I will read a description of a monster one sentence at a time and have students take the time todraw what I have read. After the entire monster is done, students will walk around the room in aconga line to look at every picture. We will have a discussion about how all the monsters lookeddifferent.Objective 1: Students will be able to construct a drawing using pencil and crayon on white paperthat corresponds to the description read out loud.Objective 2: Students will compare and contrast the different drawings in a whole classdiscussion.Instructional Strategies:Drawing and ArtworkMovementStandards being addressed:EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or eventusing words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.EL.01.SL.05: With guidance, use descriptive words when speaking about people, places, things,and events.Modifications/Adaptations:  Repeat the instructions for creating the monster as needed.  Have a written set of instructions posted on screen.  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to class.Monday, February 23rdLesson 5: Science DetectivesStudents will make observations and use student-made rules to build an understanding of solidearth materials (rocks, sand, and gemstones).Objective 1: Students will create rules to sort and classify the different earth materials.Objective 2: Students will be able to describe the different earth materials on a graphic organizer.Objective 3: Students will write two to three sentences about one of the materials from theirgraphic organizer, highlighting the descriptive words that they have used.Instructional Strategies:Brainstorming and DiscussionGraphic Organizers 49
  50. 50. Manipulatives, experiments, labs, and modelsCooperative LearningStandards being addressed:MA.01.AR.01: Sort and classify objects using one or more attributes by observing relationships.SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.Modifications/Adaptations:  Monitor RG to make sure he is completing work  Monitor frustration level of EW. Partner with helper if needed (EC or TT are good partners for him.)  Ask questions to groups as needed: What color? How does it feel in your hand? How big or little is it?  Provide starters for writing (My rock is… or The gem has… or The sand is…)  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to classTuesday, February 24thLesson 6: The Mystery begins…Students will be told that several kids in our classroom have been seen around school beingespecially respectful, responsible and helpful. The teachers who saw these actions did not get aclear look at the student, but they really want to find out who it was so that the student can getthe caught slip. Each student will have to write a self description to aid in the investigation. Toget started, each student will create a graphic organizer today. After the graphic organizer iscomplete students will start writing about themselves.Objective 1: Students will complete a graphic organizer listing four or more different detailsabout themselves.Objective 2: Students will apply the information gathered in their graphic organizer to the firstdraft of their self description.Objective 3: Students will identify the descriptive words that I have used in the sample by raisingtheir arm whenever I read a descriptive word.Instructional Strategies:Graphic OrganizersWriting and JournalsVisualsProject-based learningStandards being addressed:EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or eventusing words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.Modifications/Adaptations: 50
  51. 51.  Monitor RG‟s work to make sure he is completing the graphic organizer and writing. Partner him with classroom helper if needed. If he finishes, he earns a couple of minutes drawing.  Check with EW periodically to gauge frustration level. Partner him with classroom helper if needed.  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to classWednesday, February 25thLesson 7: The Usual Suspects…Students will be learning about adjectives that can be used to describe their personalities. Theywill continue writing their descriptions of self.Objective 1: Students will identify the words in the read-a-loud story that are descriptive of thecharacters during class discussion.Objective 2: Students will edit their writing from the previous day to include at least 4descriptive words.Instructional Strategies:Brainstorming and DiscussionStorytellingWriting and JournalsProject-based learningStandards being addressed:Standard: Career DevelopmentBenchmark 1: Demonstrate career development skills in planning for post high schoolexperiences.EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or eventusing words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.Modifications/Adaptations:  Monitor RG‟s work to make sure he is completing the writing. Partner him with classroom helper if needed. If he finishes, he earns a couple of minutes drawing.  Check with EW periodically to gauge frustration level. Partner him with classroom helper if needed.  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to classThursday, February 26thLesson 8: Mrs. Gove‟s class, in the cafeteria, with the napkin…Students will reveal their clues and the students will work together to decide which kids werecaught being good around school.Objective 1: Students will read the typed version of the other students‟ descriptions in front ofthe class. 51
  52. 52. Objective 2: Students will solve the mystery of the students „caught being good‟ by listening tothe descriptions being read.Instructional Strategies:Project-based learningRole playsVisualization and guided imageryStandards being addressed:EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or eventusing words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.EL.01.SL.05: With guidance, use descriptive words when speaking about people, places, things,and events.Modifications/Adaptations:  Repeat directions to ES, DT, NG, and BC as they return to class  Monitor RG and EW‟s carpet time behavior. If needed give them jobs (holding up the pictures) or remove to desk.  I will help students who have a difficult time reading the other student‟s self descriptions.  I will walk around the room to help students fill out the self evaluation. 52
  53. 53. Lesson 1: Clicker Clues!Grade Level: 1Subject areas: WritingMaterials needed:Turning Point Software and ClickersComputerProjectorScreenPowerPoint presentation: My DogPart 1: RationaleFocus and purpose:The purpose of this lesson will be to introduce descriptive words and the importance of thesewords in our writing.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Identify the descriptions in the slideshow, through use of the clicker technology, that allowed them to determine the answer to the question “which dog is my dog?”.  Share with a classmate the different types of descriptive words that they already know and use.State Content Standards:Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas, including relevant examples, facts, anecdotes, and details appropriate to audience and purpose that engage reader interest; organize information in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas, sentences, and paragraphs; and use precise words and fluent sentence structures that support meaning. Standard: Writing Benchmark EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: Understand structure and properties of matter Standard: Matter Benchmark SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical propertiesAssessments:PowerPoint clicker responsesObservations of students 53
  54. 54. Selection of Instructional Strategies:  Technology: I will be using the clicker technology because the students get really involved when using the clickers and it is easy for all students to participate, no matter their level.  Brainstorming and Discussion: This strategy will help students construct their own meaning of descriptive words in a way that makes the most sense in their own mind.Modifications and adaptations:  Make sure to partner students who have a difficult time staying on task are partnered with a peer who will keep them on task. Students to keep an eye on: Rylin, Ethan, Trinity, Maizy.  Repeat directions individually as needed.  Use Turning Point chart to make sure every student is participating.  Read questions aloud so that every student has the opportunity to understand question.Part 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Descriptive words are important to use in our writing.Open 10:15 1. Students participate in slideshow where they are voting on which dog10 minutes is my dog. Each slide will show a sentence that is a little more descriptive about my dog and then each student will choose which dog they think is mine. After each guess we will look at how the class answered-more specifically, did they all choose the same dog, or was it all random?Body 10:25 2. Have students come sit on carpet. Write a sentence from slideshow on5-8 minutes the white board. Read each sentence to the kids and have them turn to a friend and tell the friend which word in the sentence told them which dog to pick. Regroup after each sentence and have kids share which word they chose. Underline this word in the sentence. Continue with all of the sentences from the slide show. 3. Tell students that each of the words that we have chosen to underline is a type of word called “descriptive words” or “adjectives”. This means that these words can be used to make a noun (person, place, or thing) or event more specific.Close 10:30 4. Students will write in their journals about a topic of their choice. They15-20 will be encouraged to go into greater detail about their topic.minutesPart 3: Resources 54
  55. 55. 55
  56. 56. 56
  57. 57. 57
  58. 58.  I have a dog. My dog is big. She is fluffy. She isn‟t spotted. Her fur is all the same color. She has pointy ears. Her fur is golden. 58
  59. 59. 1st Vote: 2nd Vote: 3rd Vote: 4th Vote: 5th Vote: 6th Vote: Final Vote:1st Vote: 2nd Vote: 3rd Vote: 4th Vote: 5th Vote: 6th Vote: Final Vote:1st Vote: 2nd Vote: 3rd Vote: 4th Vote: 5th Vote: 6th Vote: Final Vote:1st Vote: 2nd Vote: 3rd Vote: 4th Vote: 5th Vote: 6th Vote: Final Vote:1st Vote: 2nd Vote: 3rd Vote: 4th Vote: 5th Vote: 6th Vote: Final Vote:1st Vote: 2nd Vote: 3rd Vote: 4th Vote: 5th Vote: 6th Vote: Final Vote: 59
  60. 60. Part 4: Reflection After overcoming several technical difficulties, this lesson was a success! I had planned to use theTurning Point software and the clickers to have the students vote on which dog they thought was mine.However, when I transferred the slide show from my computer to the classroom computer, the slideshowwas just a black screen on every slide. Luckily I had planned for this eventuality. I had created a basicslide show with just three screens instead of the ten that I had originally planned on (see the resourcesection). I had also typed up the statements that I wanted the students to vote on, as well as creating a slipof paper for the students to record each vote. The slip of paper for voting worked even better than usingthe clicker. This is because students could see how their voting changed as the description got morespecific. The students were engaged from the beginning. I believe that this is because I often tell storiesabout my dog in my journal examples that I share with the students. As I monitored the classroom, Inoticed that all of the students were actively participating in the voting. After all the voting wascomplete, students were able to choose which words in the statements were most helpful in making thedecision about which dog was mine. This led into a discussion about descriptive words very nicely. There are several things I would change if I were to teach this lesson again. The first thing wouldbe to make sure that the students were voting in pen or marker. I noticed that after hearing the final clue,students were changing their previous guesses to all match the final guess. It would be more beneficial tothe students to be able to see their first vote as compared to the final vote when discussing the statementsand the descriptive words. The second thing I would change would be to spend a little more timediscussing the different rounds of voting and comparing the different votes. This would have been easilypossible using the Turning Point system, but the low-tech version made this more difficult. It would havebeen nice to have a visual representation of each round of voting (as well as incorporating math into thislesson). My CT also made a great suggestion for the journal writing portion of the lesson. She said itwould be good for the students to go back and highlight the descriptive words in their writing. I plan onincorporating this into the students‟ future writing in this unit. 60
  61. 61. I know that students met the objectives through my observations and their responses during theclassroom activity. The students were able to determine—with 100 percent accuracy—which dog wasmine. They also shared with a friend what words helped them make a choice when they were voting. Iheard responses of „fluffy‟, „golden‟ fur, and „pointy‟ ears. One student responded that the word “dog”helped her to make the choice, and we were able to discuss why this wasn‟t the best choice (the dog is thenoun, every choice possible was a dog). I was left with questions about the voting. If I had been able to graphically represent the votes,would this have helped students to better understand how the descriptive words in the statements made iteasier to vote on the correct dog? 61
  62. 62. Lesson 2: Tools of the TradeGrade Level: 1Subject areas: Writing/VocabularyMaterials needed:24 “Detective Descriptive‟s Dictionary of Descriptive Words” booklets1 box filled with items of different textures1 box filled with cotton balls dipped in different smells, kept in Ziploc bags1 box filled with items of different tastes1 box filled with items that make different sounds1 box filled with items of different sizes1 box filled with items of different shapes1 box filled with pictures of people showing different emotions1 box filled with crayons of different colors3x5 cards for each box with the descriptive words for students to match to the items6 different mad-lib style storiesPart 1: RationaleFocus and purpose:Students will expand their vocabulary of descriptive words and create a dictionary of differentwords that they will be able to use in their writing.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Create an 8 page dictionary of descriptive words (under the headings: smells, tastes, sounds, textures, colors, shapes, looks, sizes) with at least 3 descriptive words per page.  Write in their journal and highlight all of the descriptive words in their writing.State Content Standards:Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: Understand structure and properties of matter Standard: Matter Benchmark SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Write narrative, expository, and persuasive texts, using a variety of written forms—including journals, essays, short stories, poems, research reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to audience and purpose across the subject areas. Standard: Writing Applications: Expository Writing (K-3) 62
  63. 63. Benchmark EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or event using words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.Assessments:Descriptive Word DictionaryHighlighting in journalSelection of Instructional Strategies:  Brainstorming: This strategy lets students‟ work together to build their vocabulary of descriptive words.  Games—Word sort: This strategy will have students matching a descriptive word with an item that visually represents the word. This will help students make the connection between the item and the word that describes it.  Storytelling: This strategy will reinforce the idea that descriptive words are meant to be used in our writing, while giving students examples of how this can be done.  Visuals: Students will examine the items in the boxes to make connections to the words that describe the items.  Cooperative learning: This strategy is important because it helps students learn from the peers and learn to work together in groups.Modifications and adaptations:  Pair students who have difficulty reading with students who can help them out.  Repeat directions as needed.  Spend extra time with groups are not getting it.Part 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Students will build their vocabulary of descriptive words inthis lesson.Open 10:15 1. Students will be sitting on the carpet and I will bring out the boxes of5 minutes items. I will demonstrate how the stations will work, with help from student volunteers. 2. I will demonstrate with descriptive words for sounds. We will record our findings in a larger version of their dictionary booklet. After, students will go back to their desk and start working at the stations.Body 10:20 3. Students will return to their desks and work as a group to explore the20-35 contents of the box or bag at their group. Each student will be responsibleminutes for recording the words in their dictionary. The students will have 2-4 minutes for each box before I signal to switch boxes. 4. After all the boxes have been completed, students will return to the carpet to discuss the next part of the lesson: completing the mad lib. We will complete one together before the students head to their writing group 63
  64. 64. to complete the mad lib.Close 10:50 5. Students will come to the carpet and share their version of the story.10 minutesPart 3: ResourcesDescriptive Word Stations: At each station, students will match the object or the picture to thecard that describes the item. Two of the stations have objects, and the rest are matching the wordcard to the picture card. The two stations with objects are textures and shapes. The other sixstations are: emotions, sizes, tastes, smells, and two color stations. Textures: Shapes:Descriptive Word Stations: 64
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  75. 75. A Day At The Zoo!Today I went to the zoo. I saw a ____________(adjective)_____________(noun) jumping up and down in its tree. Hehopped quickly through the large tunnel that led to its__________(adjective)__________(noun). I got some peanutsand passed them through the cage to a gigantic gray__________(noun) towering above my head. Feeding thatanimal made me hungry. I went to get a __________(adjective) scoop of ice cream. It filled my stomach.Afterwards I had to__________(verb) __________ (adverb) tocatch our bus. When I got home I begged my mom for a__________(adjective) day at the zoo. 75
  76. 76. The Great New Toy!There is a new toy on the market that has everyone saying____________(Exclamation)! It is called the ____________(Sound)____________(Adjective) ____________(Noun) box and will be in stores in____________(A Month). The ____________(Sound) ____________(Adjective)____________(Noun) box is a new gadget that lets you do just about anything!It ____________(Verb)s, it ____________(Verb)s, it even serves____________(A Drink)! It is easy to operate and requires no instructions! Youcan also have it custom made to be any size you want up to____________(Number) inches and ____________ (color) or glow in the darkwith no extra charge! The original product is pocketsized and____________ (color). There are ____________(Number) jacks on the productfor 6V DC power and for upgrades and addons. You can add headphones,____________(Plural Noun) , monitors, ____________(Plural Noun), and more, anduse them all at the same time! 76
  77. 77. In The Jungle!I walk through the color jungle. I take out my___________(adjective) canteen.Theres a ________(adjective)parrot with a _______________(adjective) ____________(noun)in his mouth right in front of me in the___________ (adjective)trees! I gaze at his _________(adjective)______________(noun).A sudden sound awakes me from my daydream! Apanther "s" _______________(verb) in front of my head! I_______________(verb) his _______________(adjective)breath. I remember I have a packet of _____________(noun)that makes go into a deep slumber! I _______________(verb) it away in front of the _______________(noun).Yes heseating it! I _______________(verb) away through the____________(adjective) jungle. I meet my parents at the tent.Phew; Its been an exciting day in the jungle. 77
  78. 78. Part 4: Reflection This lesson was a little rough for me. The students seemed to enjoy getting to movearound from station to station and playing the matching game. However I greatly underestimatedthe time that this lesson would take. In my lesson I estimated that creating the dictionary wouldtake about 20-25 minutes and then students would have time to write in their journals. This wasnot the case! As I was watching the students at the stations and the clock, I made a decision to letthe students stay at each station for longer than I had planned. This allowed the students to fullyexplore the different stations and record the words in their “Detective Descriptive‟s DescriptiveWord Dictionary”. This left no time for the students to write in their journal, which wassomething I was really aiming to have the students do each day. I believe that the stations wouldhave run more smoothly had I demonstrated step by step each station, showing the cards at eachstation and how the cards matched. I spent a lot of time going from station to station showingstudents how each station worked, or what card matched with what picture. Although thestudents did ok moving from station to station, the transitions could have been a little smoother.Several times groups of students ended up at the wrong station. The next time I do this type oflesson where students are moving around the room I will have the stations numbered anddemonstrate moving from station to station. I know that I met one of my objectives, but not the other. Every student that wasin class created the dictionary, and the next day I saw many of the students using theirdictionaries during journal time. I did not meet the second objective, mainly because we ran outof time. I enjoyed teaching this lesson even though there is a lot I would change. I believe thatchildren learn best when they explore their world creatively instead of sitting at their desk. When 78
  79. 79. I teach this lesson again, I will plan for two or three stations a day, instead of the eight that thestudents participated in during this short time. If the students were only at two or three stations aday they would have time to use their newly learned words in their writing on that same day. Ibelieve that this would put more emphasis on the words and help the students to gain a bettergrasp of how the words are to be used. After this lesson I was left wondering if students were really making the connectionsbetween the pictures and the words or if they were simply going from station to station andwriting down all of the words on the cards. 79
  80. 80. Lesson 3: 100th Day CollectionGrade Level: 1Subject areas: WritingMaterials needed:Each students‟ “100” collectionDictionary of Descriptive WordsWriting JournalsThe Secret Olivia Told Me by N. Joy100th Day Worries by Margery CuylerMy 100 collectionMy clues: My objects are round. My objects are small. My objects are red, orange, yellow,brown, blue, and green.Part 1: RationaleFocus and purpose: Students will begin using descriptive words in a structured writingassignment.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Describe their collection using three to five different types of descriptive words in their journal.  Listen to their classmates‟ clues and then use the clues to make a guess about what kind of item is being described.State Content Standards:Focus Standards:Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas, including relevant examples, facts, anecdotes, and details appropriate to audience and purpose that engage reader interest; organize information in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas, sentences, and paragraphs; and use precise words and fluent sentence structures that support meaning. Standard: Writing Benchmark EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Write narrative, expository, and persuasive texts, using a variety of written forms—including journals, essays, short stories, poems, research 80
  81. 81. reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to audience and purpose across the subject areas. Standard: Writing Applications: Expository Writing (K-3) Benchmark EL.01.WR.17: Write simple expository descriptions of a real object, person, place, or event using words that help the reader to see, feel, smell, taste, and hear what is being described.Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: Understand structure and properties of matter Standard: Matter Benchmark SC.03.PS.01: Describe objects according to their physical properties.Support Standards:Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas using oral, visual, and multi-media forms in ways appropriate to topic, context, audience, and purpose; organize oral, visual, and multi-media presentations in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas and elements; use language appropriate to topic, context, audience, and purpose; and demonstrate control of eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, inflection, gestures, and other non-verbal techniques. Standard: Speaking Benchmark EL.01.SL.05: With guidance, use descriptive words when speaking about people, places, things, and events.Standards: Career Related Learning Common Curricular Goal: Select and use appropriate communication strategies in family, school, community, and workplace settings. Standard: Communication Benchmark 1: Demonstrate effective communication skills to give and receive information in school, community, and workplace.Assessments:Written cluesObservationsSelection of Instructional Strategies:  Visuals: Students will be bringing in their own visual. This is important because it will be an object (100 of an object) that they will have chosen.  Writing and journals: Students will begin developing their ideas about using descriptive words in their writing.Modifications and adaptations:  Have starter prompts available for writing the clues: My objects are… or My 100 collection has… 81
  82. 82.  Work one on one with students as needed.  Special attention: EW and RG. Make sure these two are on task.Part 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Students will be exploring the use of descriptive words in theirwriting.Open 10:15 1. I will remind students of the story we read in the morning called “The10 minutes Secret Olivia Told Me.” We will discuss secrets and how it is important to keep a secret. 2. Next I will introduce the writing for the day. I will tell them that their object needs to stay a secret. I will model with my 100 objects. Students will be able to guess my object. 3. Students will be encouraged to use the dictionaries they created to get ideas for describing their objects.Body 10:25 4. The students will write in their journal, creating 3 or more clues about25-30 their object. I will circle the room, helping students with ideas if theyminutes need help. 5. When students are done, they will continue writing in their journal until the rest of the students are completed. 6. Students will now get the chance to be detectives! Students will take turns reading their clues while the rest of the class tries to guess what the student is describing.Close 10:50 7. We will have a discussion about the different clues. Questions: What10 minutes made an item easy to guess? (What kind of clues?) Would you have been able to guess what somebody brought in if they hadn‟t used color descriptive words? Shape descriptive words? (etc.)Part 3: ResourcesRead, Write, Think Lesson Plan: Descriptive Writing and the 100th day of Schoolhttp://readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view_printer_friendly.asp.?iid=891Cuyler, Margery (2000). 100th day worries. New York, New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.Joy, N. (2007). The secret olivia told me. East Orange, New Jersey: Just us Books, Inc. 82
  83. 83. My 100 Collection Clues:My objects are round.My objects are small.My objects are red, orange, yellow, brown, blue, and green.My collection has the letter “m” on it. 83
  84. 84. My 100 Collection1.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________2.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________3.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________4. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________5.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 84
  85. 85. Part 4: Reflection Students were excited for this lesson! The 100th day of school was a very big deal for thefirst graders and this lesson was built on that excitement. In this lesson students were able tomeet all of the objectives. Every student wrote clue after clue about their 100 collection. Eachstudent‟s description had at least three clues about their object. There wasn‟t enough time forevery student to share, but we made it through all but 6 of the students. Several aspects of this lesson went very well. Before the students went to their desks towrite the clues, I had a discussion with the students about secrets and how sometimes we don‟twant to tell because then it won‟t be a secret anymore. This was to prime students to not sharewhat their collection was before it was time to share on the carpet. The students were so excitedabout this that they wanted their privacy “offices” for when they were writing their clues. I washappy to oblige and the students got to work very quickly. When students were done writingtheir clues, I had them move to the carpet with their clues and they started sharing. Students didvery well at listening to the clues and making guesses based on the clues. I was also impressedwith the different types of descriptive words that students were using. Besides just describing thecolor, students were describing the shapes, smells, and textures of their objects. This showed methat they were meeting the objectives for this lesson. There were only a few things I would revise to make this lesson run more smoothly. Thefirst thing would be to set a timer during the clue writing time. Several students were notmotivated to get started. I feel that a timer would help these students get going. This would alsohelp me to keep the lesson moving. The next change I would make would be to have each 100collection placed in a paper bag. This would make it easier for students to keep their object a 85
  86. 86. secret. I feel that this would help students by letting them have their item at their desk withoutfear of a classmate seeing it. After this lesson I was left wondering if students would have been this excited aboutwriting if it hadn‟t been a secret to keep from their classmates. Did this aspect of the lesson makethe students more excited to participate? Does the back story behind a lesson make a lesson asuccess or a bomb? 86
  87. 87. Lesson 4: Monsters, Monsters Everywhere!Grade Level: 1Subject areas: ArtMaterials needed:Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice SendakMonster descriptionMy drawing of the monsterWhite paperCrayonsPencilsPart 1: RationaleFocus and purpose: Students will use their knowledge of descriptive words to draw a monsterbased upon the description that is read to them. After the drawings are completed, students willwalk around the “gallery” and look at other interpretations of the monster description. Studentswill then come to the carpet for a discussion about the differences observed in all of the differentdrawings.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Construct a drawing using pencil and crayon on white paper that corresponds to the description read out loud.  Compare and contrast the different drawings in a whole class discussion.State Content Standards:Focus Standards:Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas, including relevant examples, facts, anecdotes, and details appropriate to audience and purpose that engage reader interest; organize information in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas, sentences, and paragraphs; and use precise words and fluent sentence structures that support meaning. Standard: Writing Benchmark EL.01.WR.07: Use descriptive words when writing.Support Standards:Standards: Arts 87
  88. 88. Common Curricular Goal: Apply the use of ideas, techniques and problem solving to the creative process and analyze the influence that choices have on the result Standard: Create, Present, and Perform Benchmark AR.03.CP.02: Explore aspects of the creative process and the effect of different choices on one‟s work.Standards: Career Related Learning Common Curricular Goal: Select and use appropriate communication strategies in family, school, community, and workplace settings. Standard: Communication Benchmark 1: Demonstrate effective communication skills to give and receive information in school, community, and workplace.Assessments:ObservationsCompleted drawingsSelection of Instructional Strategies:  Drawing and Artwork: This strategy will allow students to see how descriptive words can be useful in creating a picture to the reader or listener.  Movement: I want students to have the experience of walking around an art gallery to compare and contrast the different interpretations of the monster description.Modifications and adaptations:  Repeat the instructions for creating the monster as needed  Have a written set of instructions posted on screenPart 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Written or oral descriptions can be used to create a picture inour heads or on a piece of paper. Each interpretation, though, will be a little different.Open 10:15 1. Have students meet me on the carpet after recess. Prepare students for5 minutes our art project. Tell students that they will be listening to my description of a monster, and as I am reading the “clues” the students will be recreating the monster on their own paper. Discuss the descriptive words that I will be using: colors, shapes, textures, etc.Body 10:20 2. Students will migrate back to their desks. Instruct students to take out20-25 crayons and a pencil. Make sure to tell students we will only be usingminutes crayons because the texture this will create in our drawing (makes the monster look more life-like). Have students leave pencil on name tag until after each clue is read. 3. Start reading the clues, waiting between each one before going on. Walk around classroom to make sure that each student is with me before continuing onto the next clue. 88
  89. 89. 4. Have each student write their name on the back of the drawing and place the drawing on top of their desk and have students line up at door. 5. Once students are lined up, lead them on a walk around the classroom to look at each students drawing, ending with students on carpet.Close 10:40 6. Show students my monster. Ask students to think about all of the20 minutes different drawings. Questions: What types of differences did you see in the drawings? Is it possible for everyone to draw the exact same picture? Or will there always be small differences? (If there is time, have students that did not get to share their 100 collection clues go today)Part 3: ResourcesSendak, Maurice (1963). Where the wild things are. New York, New York: Harper Collins.My monster drawing: 89

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