Fourth grade worksample -weather unit

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Fourth grade worksample -weather unit

  1. 1. Wild & Wacky Weather Topic: Weather Concept: Patterns By: Tasha Grant Fourth Grade Science Unit Spring 2009
  2. 2. Table of Contents Chapter PageInstructional Setting………………………………………………… 1 3Family Communication Plan……………………………………….. 2 11Unit Rationale………………………...…………………………….. 3 13Unit Outline…………………………...……………………………. 4 15Assessment Plan……………………………………………………. 5 26Learning Plan……………………………………………………….. 6 42Lesson 1: What Do You Know About Weather?....………………... 7 50Lesson 2: Weather Haikus…………………………………………. 8 54Lesson 3: What is Weather?............................................................... 9 59Lesson 4: Weather Tools…………………………………………… 10 65Lesson 5: Clouds…………………………………………………… 11 69Lesson 6: Water Wonders………………………………………….. 12 72Lesson 7: Weather Patterns and Seasons…………………………… 13 88Lesson 8: Looking into the Crystal Ball—Predicting the Weather.... 14 93Lesson 9: Extreme Weather………………………………………… 15 100Lesson 10: 3, 2, 1—You‟re On!......................................................... 16 110Lesson 11: Weather Wizards…..…………………………………… 17 118Post Assessment Data Display……………………………………... 18 125Assessment Analysis……………………………………………….. 19 128Summary of Student Growth………………………………………. 20 129Analytical Essay……………………………………………………. 21 136Resources…………………………………………………………… 22 139Appendix A: Samples of student work……..………………………. 23 140 2
  3. 3. Part I: Community, School, and Classroom contextsCommunity: The school is located in a retirement community with a population of 34,237. The city islocated in the valley of the Rogue River and much of the community and its activities revolvearound this feature. The economy of the area was at one time based upon the timber industry buthas since diversified to include a mix of light manufacturing, secondary wood products, retailtrade, tourism, and recreation and service based industries. The climate in the area is mild; withtemperatures ranging from the mid 20‟s to high‟s right above 100. This mild climate and outdoorinspired living led the community to be featured in a national magazine as one of the top tenplaces to retire and since then the retirement population has boomed. This population boomfueled the expansion of the medical and retirement facilities in the valley. Another result of thesteadily increasing retirement population was an increase in housing prices to the point where theaverage family in the area cannot afford to purchase a home. The average home price in the areais $231,700 an increase of over 200% since 2000 when the average home sold for $111,200. Themedian household income is $37,400. The racial composition is as follows: White, non-Hispanic—90.1%; Hispanic—5.4%; Two or more races—2.9%; Native American—2.5%; otherrace—1.6% (total can be greater than 100% because Hispanics could be counted as other races).Based upon the information from the City-Data website, it is easy to conclude that thecommunity is not that diverse. The community is served by six elementary schools, two middle schools, and two highschools. For the past one and a half years the library has been closed due to lack of funding.This has put a burden on the community in many ways. A makeshift library was created this pastsummer as an effort by teachers in the valley to continue exposing the students to great literature 3
  4. 4. and the joy of reading. Thanks to the hard work of many community members, the libraryrecently reopened. Another resource in the valley is the vast population of retired people. Manytimes these folks are looking for opportunities to help out in the community and would love tocome to the school and be involved in reading with students.School Setting: The mission of the school is to create “a community dedicated to academic success,social responsibility, and the pursuit of lifelong learning.” The guiding principles are to providea caring environment that enhances self worth, guiding children to make responsible decisions,that each individual has unique talents, prepare students to appreciate and contribute to ourmulticultural, diverse, global society, set high standards, and that families are partners ineducation. The school has 17 classroom teachers, a P.E. teacher, a music teacher, a special edteacher, and a reading specialist for a total of 21 teachers. All of the teachers except the specialed teacher and the ELL teacher are female. The school has 390 students, 74% of whom qualifyfor free or reduced price lunches. The racial composition of the school is as follows: 82% white,non-Hispanic; 16% Hispanic; 2% American Indian; <1% Asian/Pacific Islander; <1% Black, notHispanic. There is a slight difference in the racial composition of the school as compared to thecommunity. This difference is mainly between the White, non-Hispanic totals and the Hispanictotals. I believe that the cause of this discrepancy is the fact that the school is one of twoelementary schools in the district that has programs for ELL students. The school is alsorecognized as a Title I school, which means that the school receives additional funding toprovide supplementary instruction in the areas of reading and math instruction for students. The 4
  5. 5. Title I reading specialist and trained instructional assistants work with students both in individualclassrooms and in the reading room. A speech therapist visits the school on a regular basis towork with students who are referred for services. The child development specialist visits theschool several days a week to teach lessons on positive interactions and consult individually withstudents. The school day lasts from 8:00 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. Students are given a 45 minute lunch,of which 15 minutes is allotted for eating and 30 minutes for recess. There is also a 10 minutemorning recess. Students also are out of the main classroom for music and P.E. They attend oneor the other every day. In the fourth grade students are given the option to participate in stringinstruments, and in fifth grade they can choose to play band instruments. These programs are inaddition to the regular music classes. The school is a Positive Behavior School (PBS). This means that the emphasis is oncreating proactive strategies to encourage positive school environments. Strategies used at thisschool include „Caught Slips‟ in which the teacher marks a box stating whether the behavior wasresponsible, respectful, safe, or for helping others. The slip then gets entered into drawings forrandom things, like books or lunch with the principal or teacher. Read at Home is a school wide program to encourage students to read at home everynight throughout the year. Each student chooses a book and takes it home where they read to anadult for at least 15 minutes each night. The adult then signs a slip that is returned with thestudent stating the book that was read and whether or not the student had trouble reading.Throughout the year students can earn classroom parties, t-shirts, and other prizes. 5
  6. 6. One of my favorite features at this school is the morning announcements. After the mainannouncements and Pledge of Allegiance, the composer of the week is announced with a shortstatement about the composer or music. Then a five minute piece of classical music is playedover the intercom. I feel that this sets the mood for the rest of the morning.Classroom Setting: The fourth grade classroom that I am currently student teaching in consists of 16students. There are 5 boys and 11 girls in the classroom. There is one ELL student and 3 SpecialEducation students in the classroom. These four students are all absent from the classroom formost of the afternoon. The classroom itself is an inviting place. There is a small carpeted areawith a couch and rocking chair that functions as the class library and reading area. Plump pillowsline the couch and are thrown on the floor to create a soft place for students to curl up with abook. There are two horse-shoe shaped tables at the back of the classroom that are used mainlyfor reading group and when students are working together as groups. The desks are arranged intwo groups that are each shaped like a „C‟, with one group facing the other. There are 8 kids oneach side. There is a lot of time built in for silent reading throughout the day. After theannouncements, the day begins with half of the class participating in Strings and half of thestudents who are left in the classroom leaving for the computer lab to participate in ReadNaturally. This program is used to help increase their reading fluency. These students are gonefor 30 minutes. When they return, reading groups begin. There are three reading groups in thisclass: yellow, blue, and green groups. There is one assistant in the classroom during this time,and she works primarily with the green group. These students are the most intensive group andwork together. The students in the yellow and blue groups split their time between working 6
  7. 7. independently and working in a group with the teacher. After reading, the students participate inP.E. on Mondays and Wednesdays and music on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The class switchesevery Friday from P.E. to Music (one week is music, next is P.E.). When the students return tothe classroom they have writing time. Most of the time the students are writing using specificprompts that relate to what they are studying in science or social studies. The last hour beforelunch is spent studying math. The three fourth grade teachers work together to teach math. Thestudents are divided based upon their skill level in regards to math, and then they go to thespecific classroom for their level. The classroom that I am student teaching in caters to the highlevel students. Most of the students are identified as Talented and Gifted. After lunch thestudents come in from recess ready to listen to the read-aloud. This lasts for 15 to 20 minutesand helps to calm the students down for SSR (sustained silent reading), which lasts for fortyminutes. There is one student who leaves during this time to participate in Double Dose readinginstruction in the Title 1 room. Students can take their accelerated reader tests and read to anadult if needed during SSR. The final part of the day is spent on either science or social studies.There is 30 minutes allotted for these lessons, but often the same topic is discussed duringwriting.Part II: Individual Learners and Adaptations NA is a newer immigrant to this country. She arrived in California a little over a year agoand moved to our area prior to the start of this school year. She is learning English quickly. Shehas a sister who is also in the fourth grade. Much of her writing is stories from when she wasliving in Mexico. She is an extremely hard worker and is always trying to complete her work tothe best of her abilities. There are three reading and math groups; she is in the lowest readinggroup and the middle math group. She recently started Read Naturally to help improve her 7
  8. 8. fluency. She will not be in the classroom during most of this unit as she is in the ELL classroomfrom 11:35 until the end of the day at 2:15. AA is a student who aims to please. She is always asking how she can help around theclassroom. She is a former ELL student. She has very strict, protective parents who often forbidher from participating in field trips. Her family attends Jehovah‟s Witness services, so she doesnot participate in the flag salute in the morning or any sort of holiday celebration. She is in themiddle reading and math groups. AC is quiet and shy. She often has a thick book at her fingertips. She has a greattemperament and is a good leader in groups. She is in the highest reading and math groups. Sheis a dedicated student and hard worker. It is almost impossible to get her nose out of a book. Sheis a TAG student. She participates in strings every morning. Her family is involved in hereducation, and she is close to extended family (aunts, uncles, and cousins) as well. NC is a very smart student, but she struggles with staying on task. She is in the highestmath and reading groups and is a TAG student. If she applied herself she would be an even betterstudent. She frequently forgets her homework and “Read At Home” slips. MF is one of the success stories in this class. At the beginning of the year she was astruggling reader in the lowest group. At the start of this trimester she made the leap to thehighest reading group. She is doing well and she feels more challenged in this group. She is inthe middle group for her math instruction. She tends to be shy and quiet until she has somethingto share, and then she will speak up right away. RH is a student who tends to get excited easily. She can be silly at times, and if SS andshe are close to each other they are bound to be talking. She sometimes struggles with making 8
  9. 9. decisions. She is in the middle reading and math groups. She is interested in Goosebumps andalways chooses these books to read. TH struggles with completing his work. The apathy he shows for schoolwork issomething that is more often seen in older students. He is a Special Education student and spendstime out of the classroom every afternoon. He is in the lowest reading and math groups. Withguided, one-on-one help he is very capable of completing his work. TM is a student who needs constant attention. He is almost always off task. He hasADHD and receives medicine. He needs redirection frequently throughout the day. TM is also aSpecial Education student for math. He is in the lowest math group and the middle readinggroup. DM is a newer student at this school. He has been here for about 3 months now, and atthe beginning he was excelling. Recently though, his work has been slipping. He is struggling tomeet his reading goals. He is in the middle groups for reading and math. KM is a shy student who glows when she receives praise. She is a Special Educationstudent for math and reading. She is out of the classroom for the afternoon. She is in the lowestreading and math groups. KM exclusively reads non-fiction books. She has a sister in the fourthgrade too. CN is a responsible student. He can be counted on to finish his homework and workindependently at his desk. He is in the middle math and reading groups. His home life is not thegreatest. He wanted to go live with his dad but didn‟t tell his mom and step-dad. His step-dad hastreated CN in a rude manner. This week it was brought to our attention that his mom and step-dad are getting a divorce. 9
  10. 10. CR is a fun student to have in class. She is somewhat shy, but she is smart. She is alwayswilling to take on a challenge. CR is in the highest math and reading groups. She is also a TAGstudent. Her family is very involved in her education, although her dad is currently in training forthe Army. Her parents are divorced and have since remarried. SS is a student who is constantly trudging along. She struggles in reading and math, andis in the lowest groups in both of these subjects. Her family is working with the school to help SSsucceed. Although she often has difficulties, she does not allow this to affect her attitude. Sheseems to always have a positive, happy attitude. CS is one of the brightest students in class. The math and reading assignments are easilyunderstood and quickly mastered by her. She is in the highest math and reading groups and isalso a member of the TAG program at the school. Her family is always willing to lend a hand forclass activities and field trips. JT is a student who is constantly moving on hyper-drive. He is always in motion, even ifit is just his mouth. There tends to be problems between TM and him, but they are quicklysolved. JT is in the middle reading and math groups. He has insightful writing, but he often triesto get away with not doing his work. KV is a student with an impressive knowledge about vocabulary and random facts. Thisknowledge tends to make its way into the classroom in many ways, however most often shedominates the classroom discussion by blurting out her thoughts. She currently uses a trackingsystem that stays on her desk in which she makes a tally every time she blurts out. This hashelped to raise her awareness of times she is interrupting the class and stealing the think time ofother students. She is in the highest math and reading groups and is a member of TAG. 10
  11. 11. Dear Families, My name is Mrs. Grant and I am a student teacher in your son/daughter’sfourth grade classroom. This opportunity is the last step I will take before receiving myMaster in Teaching from Southern Oregon University, and I’m very excited to be here atRiverside. I spent the first part of the school year in a first grade classroom atRiverside, occasionally popping into the fourth grade to get to know the students. I havebeen in the classroom observing and working with Mrs. Seeley on a full time basis sincecoming back from spring break. I will be working with your child in this classroom untilthe end of the year. I will begin teaching a unit on “weather” the first week of May. This unit willhelp your child discover how weather is formed, the effects of weather, and how topredict and measure weather. In the weeks leading up to this unit, please take the timeto watch the weather forecast on the nightly news or read the weather page in thenewspaper. Please feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns. You can reach meby phone at 218-0099, or by email at tashagrant8@hotmail.com. I am looking forward to getting to work with you and your child in the upcomingweeks. We will have many wonderful experiences and opportunities to learn and grow inthe days ahead.Sincerely,Mrs. Grant 11
  12. 12. Dear Families, These past two weeks I taught my work sample weather unit to your child. Thekids had a blast learning about the different aspects of weather. The students participated in several projects over the past two weeks. They createdvarious art projects included a torn paper collage to match their weather haikus andbleach art cloud drawings. They also got to experience life as a drop of water as ittravelled throughout the water cycle. The students’ final project was to create a weatherbroadcast for another class that would be leaving on a field trip. Sadly I was unableto be in the classroom to see these presentations, but I heard from the substitute thattheir presentations were fabulous! Many of the students’ said that this was theirfavorite activity this spring. If you would like to discuss your child’s results from this unit, please feel free tocontact me with any questions or concerns. You can contact me by phone at 218-0099,or by email at tashagrant8@hotmail.com.Sincerely,Mrs. Grant 12
  13. 13. Weather influences every person on this planet. It can have a small impact that just dictateswhether you will wear shorts or pants. But for some people it can have a huge impact, often determiningif their family will survive the year or not. For both of these reasons it is important for students to studyand learn about weather. In this unit I will teach the fourth grade students the different aspects that makeup weather as well as simple ways to monitor and track the patterns of weather that they experience. Patterns in weather will be explored throughout this unit. We will look at the different seasonsthat are experienced around the world and how the sun influences these seasons. We will also look atpatterns in the water cycle and why these patterns continue to repeat. As this knowledge of patternsdevelops in the students they will be able to apply this knowledge to patterns that they notice occurringaround themselves. This concept is important for students to learn and understand because it can helpthem to make sense of the world around them. Recognition of these patterns will also help students topredict future weather patterns. This unit will lead to a greater awareness of the environment and how different actions that wetake can have an impact on the world. This can lead to discussions about the different values people holdin relation to the environment and how these values are (or are not) contributing to the idea of globalwarming. Students can also examine the diversity issues that arise from severe weather phenomena, suchas the horrific events of Hurricane Katrina, and how most people affected by this type of weather live inpoverty. Students could discuss how to educate the people affected by extreme weather (hurricanes,tornados, monsoons, droughts) so that the severity and length of recovery from these events could belessened. The enduring understandings of this unit will show students that weather is more than just what ishappening in the atmosphere. Throughout this unit students will be learning to analyze their surroundingsto find other ways of looking at an event or series of events. Patterns will be discovered in the manyaspects of weather. Students will also realize that even simple scientific events can invoke an emotionalresponse in people. This is important for students to learn because often more empathy is needed in ourworld when weather disasters occur. 13
  14. 14. My unit design reflects my personal philosophy of education. I will utilize mylove of technology to fully engage the students in the unit. I plan on using new technologythroughout the unit to allow the students to create their own understandings. From there I willlead students on an adventure to discover how weather affects each person‟s life. I believe thatstudents will learn best when presented with a project that relates directly to their lives. In thisunit, students will be working together to create a weather forecast to broadcast to otherclassrooms around the school for an upcoming week of weather. 14
  15. 15. Wild & Wacky Weather Topic: Weather Concept: Patterns Grade Level: 4th gradeFocus StandardsStandards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Knowledge Skills*Vocabulary of weather terms *Describe patterns of weather*time periods for different types of weather *Draw the water cycle(hurricanes in summer, snow in winter)*Water cycle*The sun‟s role in causing weatherImplied or Stated Understandings/Big Ideas*Patterns exist all around us.*Heating of the Earth‟s surface & atmosphere by the sun drives convection within theatmosphere and oceans producing winds and ocean currents.Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.01: Describe weather in measurable quantities including temperature, wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.Knowledge Skills*Tools to use—barometer, thermometer *Choosing which tool to use(Fahrenheit and Celsius), weather vane and *reading the measurementswind directions, anemometer and wind *Use readings to describe the weatherspeeds, rain gauge 15
  16. 16. Implied or Stated Understandings/Big Ideas*The same thing can be described and measured in different waysStandards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.02: Interpret data over a period of time and use information to describe changes in weather from day to day, week to week, and season to season.Knowledge Skills*Accurate measurements from a specific *Interpret dataperiod of time *Identify changes and patterns *Analyze and predict future weatherImplied or Stated Understandings/Big Ideas*Weather doesn‟t stay the same; it is constantly changing.Standards: Math Common Curricular Goal: Data Analysis and Predictions: Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data. Standard: Statistics and Probability Benchmark MA 04.SP.06: Predict the degree of likelihood of a single event occurring using words such as certain, impossible, most often, least often, likely, and unlikely.Knowledge Skills*Vocabulary—certain, impossible, most *Make predictions by examining patternsoften, least often, likely, and unlikely and studying the weather data collectedImplied or Stated Understandings/Big Ideas*Patterns that may not be obvious will become clear through statistical analysis anddisplay of data.Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Writing Applications: Narrative Writing: Write narrative, expository, and persuasive texts, using a variety of written forms—including journals, 16
  17. 17. essays, short stories, poems, research reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to audience to purpose across the subject areas. Standard: Writing Benchmark EL.04.WR.23: Write personal narratives: Include ideas, observations, or memories of an event or experience. Provide a context to allow the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience. Use concrete sensory details. Provide insight into why the selected event or experience is memorable.Knowledge Skills*Haiku form—5-7-5 *Visualization of a weather event*Details and words to describe weather *Recording and writing the details of the eventImplied or Stated Understandings/Big Ideas*Weather can be an emotional experienceStandards: Career Related Learning Common Curricular Goal: Integrate academic, technical and organizations knowledge and skills to work successfully in family, school, community, and workplace settings. Standard: Employment Foundations Benchmark 1: Identify uses of technology in home, community, and jobs.Knowledge Skills*Types of technology used at home and by *Identify the different uses of technologycommunities and meteorologists to track *Critical thinking about the different waysweather people can use the technologyImplied or Stated Understandings /Big Ideas*There are many different ways people can use technology to predict weather.Support StandardsStandards: Math Common Curricular Goal: Direct & Indirect Measurement: Apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements. Standard: Measurement Benchmark MA.04.ME.04: Read temperature measurements of thermometers with Fahrenheit and Celsius units and recognize 17
  18. 18. reasonable ranges of temperatures for different events (e.g. cold or hot day).Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.03.01: Identify effects of wind and water on Earth materials using appropriate models.Standards: Art Common Curricular Goal: Express ideas, mood and feelings through the arts and evaluate how well a work of art expresses one‟s intent. Standard: Create, Present, and Perform Benchmark AR.05.CP.03: Create, present and/or perform a work of art and explain how the use of essential elements and organizational principles shapes an idea, mood or feeling found in the work.Standards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Listen to and Read Informational and Narrative Text: Listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of informational and narrative text across the subject areas at school and on own, applying comprehension strategies as needed. Standard: Reading Benchmark EL.04.RE.05: Demonstrate listening comprehension of more complex text through class and/or small group interpretive discussions across the subject areas.Enduring Understandings: Students will understand that:  There are many different ways people can use technology to predict weather.  Natural events can invoke strong emotions.  Patterns that may not be obvious will become clear through statistical analysis and displaying of the data.  Weather doesn‟t stay the same; it is constantly changing.  The same thing can be described and measured in different ways.  Patterns exist all around us.Essential Questions:  What is weather?  Are there true patterns in nature? In weather?  Can weather be predicted accurately? 18
  19. 19. Task Analysis:Students will know:  The purpose of the sun in relation to weather.  What the atmosphere is (blanket of gases), as well as the different layers (Thermosphere, mesosphere, stratosphere, and troposphere).  The water cycle: precipitation, run off, evaporation, transpiration  How a cloud is formed  Identify different types of clouds (cirrus, cumulus, cumulonimbus, stratus)  Wind and its causes  Different types of weather: rain, sun, monsoon, hurricane, tornado, thunderstorms, etc.  Patterns of weather in different parts of the world (different seasons)Students will be able to:  Forecast the weather  Read the different tools to measure weather  Label the water cycle  Analyze past weather patterns to predict future weather patternsStudents will understand the following Big Ideas:  Patterns exist all around us, especially in weather.  Predictions are just that: predictions. They are rarely 100% accurate.  Weather can be seen as a good thing (helps plants to grow) or a bad thing (destroys communities). 19
  20. 20. Final Performance Task: GRASPS You are a meteorologist that recently moved to the Rogue Valley. You were asked by(insert teacher‟s name here) to do a special broadcast for her students to prepare them for theirupcoming field trip. (insert teacher‟s name here) has asked you to provide the students in herclassroom with information about the current day‟s weather (including high and lowtemperatures and any precipitation) and your forecast for the following day‟s weather (usingwords like „certainly‟ „likely‟ „unlikely‟ „impossible‟ „most often‟ and „least often‟). You will need to create and/or choose at least 2 props to go along with your clip,including but not limited to umbrellas, sunglasses, hats, rain jackets, rain boots. You will alsocreate large signs with pictures (sunny, cloudy, rainy, etc.) to visually show what the weatherwill be like for the following day. It will be helpful to write down a script of what you want tosay before getting in front of the camera. You can then either memorize what you will say orcreate cue cards to read as you present. Once you have your prediction and script ready, the film crew will record your broadcast. 20
  21. 21. GRASPS Your task is to present an accurate forecast of the weather to a specificGoal: audience around the school.Role: You are a meteorologist in the Rogue Valley. Your target audiences are the different classrooms around the school (3Audience: first grade classrooms, 3 second grade classrooms, 3 third grade classrooms, 3 fifth grade classrooms). Your challenge is to accurately present the following day‟s weatherSituation: forecast. You need to use the tools that you have learned about to record weather,Product, as well as your knowledge about patterns in weather, to help predict thePerformance, and weather for a specific day. You will then write a script and shoot a shortPurpose: digital clip that will be broadcast to the students around the school. Your clip will need to include :  Highlights about the current day‟s weather (including high and low temperatures and any precipitation).  Forecast for tomorrow using words like „certainly, likely,Standards and unlikely, impossible, most often, least often‟.Criteria for Success:  You will need to create/choose at least 3 props to go along with your clip, including but not limited to umbrellas, sunglasses, hats, rain jackets, rain boots, large signs with pictures you have drawn (sunny, cloudy, rainy, etc.). 21
  22. 22. Final Performance Task Rubric CATEGORY 4 3 2 1Performance Speaks clearly Speaks clearly Speaks clearly Does NOT speak and distinctly all and distinctly all and distinctly clearly and of the time and of the time but most of the time distinctly most of mispronounces mispronounces 1 and the time AND/OR no words. or more words. mispronounces mispronounces no words. more than 1 word.Predictions/Measurements All supportive Almost all facts One fact is No facts are facts are reported are reported reported reported accurately (3 of accurately (2 of accurately. accurately OR no 3). 3). facts were reported.Point of View - Purpose Newscast Establishes a The purpose is It was difficult to establishes a purpose at the somewhat clear figure out the purpose at the beginning, but but many aspects purpose of the beginning and occasionally of the newscast newscast. maintains that wanders from seem only slightly focus throughout! that focus. related. Cohesive newscast.Group Work The group The group The group Some members functioned functioned pretty functioned fairly of the group were exceptionally well. Most well but was often off task well. All members members listened dominated by one AND/OR were listened to, to, shared with or two members. overtly shared with and and supported The group (all disrespectful to supported the the efforts of members) was others in the efforts of others. others. The group almost always on group AND/OR The group (all (all members) task! were typically members) was was almost disregarded by almost always on always on task! other group task! members. 22
  23. 23. Prior Knowledge InventoryKWL Chart—Students will complete a KWL chart on weather. During the pre-assessmentphase the students will complete the section of the graphic organizer that applies to what theyalready know about weather and the section that asks what the students would like to learn aboutweather. This chart will be done individually and as a group. Individually, students will keep thechart in their science notebook. Once they have the chart completed for themselves, students willwrite two items from their “know” section and two items from the “want to know” section onPost-It notes. We will then create a classroom chart using these Post-It notes. This chart will behanging somewhere in the room, and at certain points throughout the unit I will have studentsexamine the chart and move items from the “want to know” section to the “learned” section. Thisdesign will help students to visually see what they are learning throughout the unit with theultimate goal to move every post it from the “want to know” to the “learned” section.Pre-Test—This pre-test will help me to assess what the students know about weather as we gointo the unit. The questions on the pre-test will be based upon the learning goals that I havecreated for this unit. I will mainly be looking for the identification of vocabulary terms andknowledge on the facts of weather. I will also be testing the students‟ knowledge of differenttypes of tools to help measure weather. The test will be administered using Turning Point Clickertechnology. This technology helps to reduce the test anxiety for most students and turns testingalmost into a game.Water Cycle Drawing—Students will be given a blank sheet of paper and asked to draw thewater cycle. I chose to include this as a pre-assessment because drawing is an easy way to modelthe water cycle, which is a major aspect of many of the different types of weather. 23
  24. 24. WeatherWhat do you What do youKNOW WANT TO LEARN What have you LEARNED 24
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  28. 28. Formative AssessmentsScience Journal—During the course of this unit, students will be keeping a science notebook.This notebook will have various graphic organizers and places for students to take notes duringlessons. The first page of the journal will be the KWL chart students completed as a pre-assessment. I will guide students back to this page at points throughout the unit so they canobserve and record what they are learning. Another aspect of this notebook will be a dailyweather log. Students will take turns observing and sharing with the class the current weathermeasurements for the temperature, precipitation, wind speed, humidity, barometric pressure, andcloud cover. These will be recorded twice a day, at 8:05 a.m. and at 12:35 p.m. In the nextsection of the students‟ notebook will be a glossary of weather terms. I will also includedrawings for students to label. These pages will have pictures of clouds, a drawing of the watercycle, and also a drawing of the layers of the atmosphere. Students will get to watch a Bill Nyethe Science Guy episode on the water cycle, so I will include a guided notes page for thestudents to record what they learn from watching the video.Poetry and Artwork—At the beginning of the unit students will explore the weather that theyhave experienced through poetry and artwork that they create. This will help students tounderstand that we feel weather physically (rain falling on our skin, sunshine warming ourfaces), but it can also affect us emotionally. 28
  29. 29. Weather Watch ChartDate Temperature Humidity Barometer Wind Precipitation Cloud Type 29
  30. 30. Weather VocabularyWhat is Weather?Air mass_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Air pressure__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Atmosphere___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Front________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Mesosphere___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Stratosphere__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Thermosphere_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Troposphere__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Clouds:Cirrus_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 30
  31. 31. Cumulus_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Cumulonimbus________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Stratus_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________The Water Cycle:Condensation_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Evaporation___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Precipitation__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Transpiration__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Water cycle___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 31
  32. 32. 1.______________ 2.______________ 3.______________ 12.______________4._______ 5._______ 11.______________ 6._______ 7.______________ 10.______________ 8.______________ Word Bank:a) Precipitationb) Snowc) Raind) Haile) Evaporation 9.______________f) Condensationg) Run-offh) Streams & riversi) Lakes, seas, and oceansj) Water vapork) Ice crystalsl) Water droplets 32
  33. 33. Cause EffectEarth’s axis istilted.The NorthernHemisphere ispointed awayfrom the sun.The SouthernHemisphere ofEarth is pointedtoward the sun. 33
  34. 34. Extreme Weather:____________________________What happens in this kind of weather?What time of the year is this weather most likely to occur?Where in the world does this type of weather occur?What should you do in this type of weather to protect yourself? 34
  35. 35. Water Wonders Score Card Name: ______________________________________________________________ Station Stop What Happens DestinationExample: Cloud Fall as rain Ocean1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. 35
  36. 36. Summative AssessmentPost-Test—The post test will be used to assess what facts and terms the students have learnedabout weather. I will use the same test as I used for the pre-test so that I can compare the scores.I will use Turning Point Clicker technology for this test.Water Cycle Drawing and paragraph—Students will draw and label the water cycle on ablank sheet of paper. This summative assessment will help me to determine if the studentsunderstand the water cycle and the different components that it is made of.Final Performance Task—You are a meteorologist that recently moved to the Rogue Valley.You were asked by (insert teacher‟s name here) to do a special broadcast for her students toprepare them for their upcoming field trip. (insert teacher‟s name here) has asked you to providethe students in her classroom with information about the current day‟s weather (including highand low temperatures and any precipitation) and your forecast for the following day‟s weather(using words like „certainly‟ „likely‟ „unlikely‟ „impossible‟ „most often‟ and „least often‟). Working with a partner, you will need to create and/or choose at least 2 props to go alongwith your clip, including but not limited to umbrellas, sunglasses, hats, rain jackets, rain boots.You will also create large signs with pictures (sunny, cloudy, rainy, etc.) to visually show whatthe weather will be like for the following day. It will be helpful to write down a script of whatyou want to say before getting in front of the camera. You can then either memorize what youwill say or create cue cards to read as you present. Your partner will be the cameraman for you,and you will be the cameraman for your partner. This task will allow the students to put to use everything they have learned aboutweather. 36
  37. 37. Student Interview—After the unit is completed I will interview the students to assess what theyhave learned and what they enjoyed during this unit. I will ask students to evaluate their ownperformance during the interview as well. 37
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  41. 41. What‟s the Weather?Take on the role of a weather forecaster. Observe and record current weather conditions. Then predictthe weather for the next day and write your own forecast. 1. Review the current weather conditions on your Weather Watch Chart and observe what you see happening out the window. 2. Fill in the chart with words that describe current weather conditions in nonstandard measures. Weather Forecast Temperature Humidity Air Pressure Wind Precipitation Cloud Cover 3. Use your observations to write a forecast for tomorrow‟s weather. Use words such as certain, impossible, most often, least often, likely, and unlikely. 41
  42. 42. Lesson 1: What do you know about weather?Students will work on their own and in groups to examine what they already know about weatherand what they want to learn about weather.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Complete a KWL graphic organizer on what they know and want to know aboutweather on the graphic organizer in their science journal.Objective 2: Create a group KWL graphic organizer using their own notes.Instructional Strategies:Brainstorming & discussionStandards being addressed:Focus Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Modifications/Adaptations:  The groups of desks in the classroom are organized in a way that there is an academically strong student who function as a leader at each group of desks to help keep students on task.Lesson 2: Weather HaikusStudents will examine their thoughts, feelings, and emotions associated with weather byexpressing themselves through haikus.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Compose a haiku on the subject of weather, based upon personal experience.Objective 2: Create a paper collage to illustrate haiku using the scraps of construction paper.Instructional Strategies:Brainstorming and discussionMetaphors, analogies, & similesVisualization & guided imageryStandards being addressed:Focus Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Benchmark EL.04.WR.23: Write personal narratives: Include ideas, observations, or memoriesof an event or experience. Provide a context to allow the reader to imagine the world of the eventor experience. Use concrete sensory details. Provide insight into why the selected event orexperience is memorable. 42
  43. 43. Modifications/Adaptations:  Students with difficulties in writing or recognizing syllable patterns will work one on one with the teacher.  For students who don‟t have time to get to the artwork, I have a coloring page with a haiku example and an illustration to color.Lesson 3: What is Weather?What is weather? What causes weather? Where exactly does weather take place? These are thequestions that will be addressed in this lesson.Students will be able to:Objective 1: identify how air masses affect weather in a group discussion. Objective 2: define weather terms (air mass, air pressure, atmosphere, front, mesosphere,stratosphere, thermosphere, and troposphere) in science journal.Instructional Strategies:Direct instructionVisualsWriting & journalsStandards being addressed:Focus Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Support Standards:Benchmark EL.04.RE.05: Demonstrate listening comprehension of more complex text throughclass and/or small group interpretive discussions across the subject areas.Modifications/Adaptations:  Work with students to create shorter definitions for the weather terms.  Keep eye on TM. He gets antsy during direct instruction. Make sure he is on task.  Check in often with NA. She is an ELL student and is not in the classroom for most science lessons.Lesson 4: Weather ToolsIn this lesson students will learn about the different ways that weather can be measured and thetools that can be used to accurately measure weather. Students will also be introduced to thechart in their science notebook to record the weather every day.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Identify, with 100% accuracy, the weather instruments verbally and list theirfunction in the science journal. 43
  44. 44. Objective 2: Choose the correct instrument to measure the different aspects of weather(precipitation, temperature, barometric pressure, and wind speed and direction) with 100 %accuracy.Instructional Strategies:TechnologyVisualsManipulatives, experiments, labs, and modelsStandards being addressed:Focus Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.01: Describe weather in measurable quantities including temperature,wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.Career Related Learning, Benchmark 1: Identify uses of technology in home, community,and jobs.Support Standards:Benchmark MA.04.ME.04: Read temperature measurements of thermometers with Fahrenheitand Celsius units and recognize reasonable ranges of temperatures for different events (e.g. coldor hot day).Modifications/Adaptations:  Ensure that each student is given an equal amount of time with each weather instrument.Lesson 5: CloudsClouds can be seen on most days, whether they are puffy, fanciful clouds or dark, scary stormclouds. In this lesson students will examine clouds and how they affect weather.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Draw the four main types of clouds (cirrus, cumulonimbus, cumulus, and stratus)using blue construction paper and bleach.Objective 2: Identify and define the four main types of clouds on artworkInstructional Strategies:Direct instructionDrawing and artworkVisualsStandards being addressed:Focus StandardsBenchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather. 44
  45. 45. Career Related Learning, Benchmark 1: Identify uses of technology in home, community,and jobs.Support StandardsBenchmark SC.05.ES.03.01: Identify effects of wind and water on Earth materials usingappropriate models.Modifications/Adaptations:  Circulate throughout the room, checking in with TM, TH, KM, and NA to check for understanding.Lesson 6: Water WondersStudents will review what they learned in the Bill Nye video about the water cycle and thenparticipate in the “Water Wonders” game. After the game, students will discuss how the gamewas a simulation of the water cycle through guided questions.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Draw and label the different stages of the water cycle (precipitation, evaporation,condensation, and runoff) in the science journal with no errors.Objective 2: Interpret and relate the outcome of the “Water Wonders” game to the water cyclethrough a guided whole class discussion.Instructional Strategies:Brainstorming and discussionGamesMovementStandards being addressed:Focus Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Support Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.03.01: Identify effects of wind and water on Earth materials usingappropriate models.Benchmark EL.04.RE.05: Demonstrate listening comprehension of more complex text throughclass and/or small group interpretive discussions across the subject areas.Modifications/Adaptations:  Pair TM, TH, NA, KM with CN, KV, CS, AC. Lesson 7: Weather Patterns/Seasons 45
  46. 46. In this lesson students will explore the weather patterns and seasons of Oregon, the Northwestregion, the United States, and the world.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Analyze the similarities and differences of weather patterns between the regions ona graphic organizer.Instructional Strategies:Direct instructionGraphic organizersVisualsStandards being addressed:Focus Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.01: Describe weather in measurable quantities including temperature,wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.02: Interpret data over a period of time and use information todescribe changes in weather from day to day, week to week, and season to season.Modifications/Adaptations:  Circulate throughout the room, checking in with TM, TH, KM, and NA to check for understanding.Lesson 8: Predicting the WeatherStudents will become predictors of the weather in this lesson.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Interpret the collected weather data to predict the weather for the different scenarioson the PowerPoint by talking with a friend and then voting as a class. Objective 2: Verbally predict the weather for the following day using words such as certain,impossible, most often, least often, likely, and unlikely.Instructional Strategies:Brainstorming and discussion;Project based and problem based instructionReciprocal teaching and cooperative learningTechnologyStandards being addressed:Focus StandardsBenchmark SC.05.ES.02.02: Interpret data over a period of time and use information todescribe changes in weather from day to day, week to week, and season to season. 46
  47. 47. Benchmark MA 04.SP.06: Predict the degree of likelihood of a single event occurring usingwords such as certain, impossible, most often, least often, likely, and unlikely.Modifications/Adaptations:  This lesson could be done using the clicker or by using a “think-pair-share” strategy.Lesson 9: Extreme WeatherIn this lesson, students will learn about the different types of weather and how it affects peoplearound the world.Students will be able to:Objective 1: Research the assigned type of extreme weather on the Internet and answer fourquestions: What happens in this type of weather? What time of the year is this weather mostlikely to occur? Where in the world does this type of weather occur? What should you do in thistype of weather to protect yourself? Objective 2: Summarize and give examples of their assigned type of extreme weather as a smallgroup in a presentation to the class.Instructional Strategies:Brainstorming and discussionReciprocal teaching and cooperative learningStandards being addressed:Focus Standards:Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.01: Describe weather in measurable quantities including temperature,wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.02: Interpret data over a period of time and use information todescribe changes in weather from day to day, week to week, and season to season.Modifications/Adaptations:  Pair TM, TH, NA, KM with CN, KV, CS, AC.Lesson 10: 3, 2, 1….You’re on!The final performance task will be introduced in this lesson. Students will then review differentweather broadcasts from around the nation and then discuss what they liked and disliked abouteach video clip. They will also work with their partner on the final performance task, makingdecisions about what features they liked and didn‟t, and what they would like to incorporate intotheir own broadcasts. Students will be given ideas for writing their script and will work withtheir partner to determine what they will say. 47
  48. 48. Students will be able to:Objective 1: review different clips of weather broadcasts to identify effective communication fora specific audience.Objective 2: Interpret the collected weather data to predict the weather for the following day on aworksheet.Objective 3: Predict the weather for the following day using words such as certain, impossible,most often, least often, likely, and unlikely.Instructional Strategies:VisualsProject based and problem based instructionStandards being addressed:Focus StandardsCareer Related Learning, Benchmark 1: Identify uses of technology in home, community,and jobs.Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weatherBenchmark SC.05.ES.02.02: Interpret data over a period of time and use information todescribe changes in weather from day to day, week to week, and season to season.Benchmark MA 04.SP.06: Predict the degree of likelihood of a single event occurring usingwords such as certain, impossible, most often, least often, likely, and unlikely.Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.01: Describe weather in measurable quantities including temperature,wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.Modifications/Adaptations:  Pair TM, TH, NA, KM with CN, KV, CS, AC.Lesson 11: Weather WizardsStudents will demonstrate what they have learned throughout the unit by taking the final test andpresenting their weather broadcast. 48
  49. 49. Lesson 1: What do you know about weather?Students will work on their own and in groups to examine what they already know about weatherand what they want to learn about weather.Grade Level: 4thSubject areas: Earth ScienceMaterials needed:Dry erase markers/whiteboard OR Elmo, pen, and paperKWL graphic organizerLarge KWL chartsPost-It notesTimerPart 1: RationaleFocus and purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to determine what the students know andwant to learn in this unit.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Complete a KWL graphic organizer on what they know and want to know about weather in their science journal.  Create a group KWL graphic organizer using their notes.State Content Standards:Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.01: Describe weather in measurable quantities including temperature, wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.Assessments:  KWL charts 49
  50. 50. Selection of Instructional Strategies:  Brainstorming & discussion—this strategy will allow students to explore what they already know before discussing what they want to learn as a class.Modifications and adaptations:  The groups of desks in the classroom are organized in a way that there is an academically strong student who function as a leader at each group of desks to help keep students on task.Part 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Weather affects our lives every day.Open 10:30 1. Introduce weather unit. Have students think about weather and how it affects people. Show KWL chart on Elmo and do a couple examples of things that are known and things we would like to know about weather.Body 2. Explain that each student will fill in their own KWL chart starting with what they already know about weather. Set timer for 5 minutes. 3. Have students move to the section titled “what you want to learn about weather”. Set timer for 5 minutes. 4. When timer goes off, have students discuss what they know and what they want to know in their table groups. 5. Give each group a stack of post-it notes and have them write a different thing they want to know about weather on each post-it. 6. Hand out giant KWL charts to each table and instruct students to post their notes on the appropriate section.Close 10:55 7. Each group will now present what they want to learn in the weather unit. 50
  51. 51. Part 3: Resources 51
  52. 52. WeatherWhat do you What do youKNOW WANT TO LEARN What have you LEARNED 52
  53. 53. Part 4: Reflection This lesson went very well if I was just looking for student involvement. Students wereready to participate from the very beginning and I encountered few behavior issues during thisthirty minute lesson. After the short introduction to KWL charts, the students were on their ownand they got right down to business. I walked around the room to monitor what each student waswriting. I asked several students questions to prompt more thought, but most students had theirheads down writing. I started passing out the Post-It notes and poster board KWL charts duringthe last minute of the individual KWL chart assignment and the students were instantly intrigued.As soon as I was finished giving the directions, students had their heads together at their tablegroups. Students were very involved in this lesson; however I don‟t feel as if my objectives weremet. The students were able to complete the task asked for in the objectives, but they did not puta lot of thought into their answers. The “want to learn” section had one to two word phrasessaying the students wanted to learn about „weather‟, „rain‟, or „thunderstorms‟. These responseswere generic, and I would have liked to see more specific answers. If I taught this lesson in thefuture I would set the expectations for the responses at the beginning. I am left wondering how Icould word the directions so that students would respond in a more thoughtful way. I believethat the problem is in the questions I ask to provoke thought in the students. If I change myquestioning strategies during this lesson, will I get a better response from the class? 53
  54. 54. Lesson 2: Weather HaikusStudents will examine their thoughts, feelings, and emotions associated with weather byexpressing themselves through haikus.Grade Level: 4thSubject areas: Writing, ScienceMaterials needed:Wabi Sabi by Mark Reibstein and Ed YoungDry erase markers/whiteboard OR Elmo, pen, and paperCloud background printer paperConstruction paper scrapsGluePart 1: RationaleFocus and purpose: Students will identify weather in their lives and the emotions theyassociate with it by writing a haiku.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Compose a haiku on the subject of weather, based upon personal experience.  Create a paper collage to illustrate the haiku using scraps of construction paper.State Content Standards:Focus StandardsStandards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Writing Applications: Narrative Writing: Write narrative, expository, and persuasive texts, using a variety of written forms—including journals, essays, short stories, poems, research reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to audience to purpose across the subject areas. Standard: Writing Benchmark EL.04.WR.23: Write personal narratives: Include ideas, observations, or memories of an event or experience. Provide a context to allow the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience. Use concrete sensory details. Provide insight into why the selected event or experience is memorable.Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather. 54
  55. 55. Support StandardsStandards: Art Common Curricular Goal: Express ideas, mood and feelings through the arts and evaluate how well a work of art expresses one‟s intent. Standard: Create, Present, and Perform Benchmark AR.05.CP.03: Create, present and/or perform a work of art and explain how the use of essential elements and organizational principles shapes an idea, mood or feeling found in the work.Assessments:  Haikus that use the correct syllable pattern on the topic of weather  Collage artwork illustrating haikusSelection of Instructional Strategies:  Brainstorming & discussion—Students will be given the opportunity to discuss the different types of weather and seasons before beginning to write. This will be done to spur their creative genius and provide inspiration.  Metaphors, analogies, & similes—A key part of the fourth grade writing curriculum this year was learning about metaphors, analogies, and similes. I will provide examples of haikus that use these figures of speech and encourage the students to create their own to use in their own haikus.  Visualization & guided imagery—In my examples I will have students close their eyes and visualize what I am reading. This will help students realize that these poems need to create a picture in the reader‟s mind.Modifications and adaptations:  Students with difficulties in writing or recognizing syllable patterns will work one on one with the teacher.  For students who don‟t have time to get to the artwork, I have a coloring page with a haiku example and an illustration to color.Part 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Weather can provoke an emotional response in people.Open 1:30 1. Introduce haikus. Use the book “Wabi Sabi”. Go over syllable patterns in haikus (5-7-5) and discuss how most often haikus are about nature. Explain that the author‟s purpose during writing a haiku is to transform a simple topic into something special.Body 1:35 2. Haikus often have a wide variety of descriptive words, both nouns and verbs that help to create a picture in the reader‟s mind. 3. The haikus you will be writing today will be on the topic of 55
  56. 56. weather. As a whole class, brainstorm a list of weather topics (clouds, rain, snow, etc). 4. Model Writing a Haiku a. The first step in writing a haiku poem is to choose a good topic. Haiku poems are generally written about nature. b. Encourage students to use their emotions and senses to brainstorm a list of nature-related topics. Subjects might include: different types of weather, clouds, landforms, water formations, seasons, etc. Record students suggestions on the board or overhead projector. c. Choose a topic from the generated list and write it on the board or overhead projector. d. Invite students to name words or phrases that describe the topic. Then, as a group, experiment with putting the words and phrases together to describe the topic in three lines according to the 5-7-5 syllable pattern. e. Model rearranging and rethinking word choices to match the syllable pattern. For example, if a chosen phrase has four syllables, but the pattern requires that it have five, model selecting a similar two-syllable word. f. Encourage them to use a dictionary or thesaurus to find synonyms or more interesting and precise words as necessary. 5. Give students time to work on creating their haikus. Before starting the writing, tell students that as they finish they can create a collage style piece of artwork like in the book “Wabi Sabi” to go along with their artwork. Show them the materials at the back tables available for them to work with.Close 2:05 6. Students read their poetry/share their artwork.Part 3: Resources 56
  57. 57. Part 4: Reflection This lesson was a resounding success! I started this lesson in the early afternoon on thefirst day of the Weather Unit. Because of other classes happening around the school I began thislesson teaching to seven students. The small group gathered their chairs in a circle around meand I began talking about haikus. Most of the students had heard about haikus before, but mostdid not remember the framework of a haiku (five syllables on lines one and three, seven syllableson line two). After telling the students what a haiku was I shared examples from the book WabiSabi and examples I had found on the internet. The students were very involved in this part ofthe lesson. A handful of students were confused about the syllables. After dismissing the otherstudents to work at their desks, I taught these students a mini-lesson on syllables. I circulatedthroughout the room frequently to make sure all questions were answered as quickly as possible. I met my objectives for half of the students in this lesson during the allotted time. Therest of the students were unable to finish in the time allowed for this lesson. Most students wereable to complete their haiku, but ran out of time before getting to complete the accompanyingartwork. In the future I would allow more time to complete this exercise. I became a little annoyed with myself during this lesson. As students finished theirhaikus, they would come to me for approval and to find out what to do next. I had forgotten togo over the art project while we were all sitting together. This meant that I had to explain the artproject over and over to each student as they finished their poem. In the future I will make surethat I explain all aspects of independent work before students return to their desks. I am left wondering if the students really thought about the weather as they were writingtheir haikus, or if they were just completing an assignment. If I were to teach this lesson again Iwould allot more time to a collective brainstorming session to create a list of topics that the 57
  58. 58. haikus could be written on. I believe that this would help students to make more connectionsbetween the emotions that weather evoke and the actual weather events. 58
  59. 59. Lesson 3: What is Weather?What is weather? What causes weather? Where exactly does weather take place? These are thequestions that will be addressed in this lesson.Grade Level: 4thSubject areas: Earth ScienceMaterials needed:Science TextsTeacher Edition Science TextPencilsWeather vocabulary worksheetKWL Charts from previous dayGlobePart 1: RationaleFocus and purpose: Students will learn about the atmosphere and the sun‟s purpose in regardsto weather.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Define weather terms (air mass, air pressure, atmosphere, front, mesosphere, stratosphere, thermosphere, and troposphere) on a worksheet.State Content Standards:Focus StandardsStandards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02: Describe patterns of seasonal weather.Support StandardsStandards: English Language Arts Common Curricular Goal: Listen to and Read Informational and Narrative Text: Listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of informational and narrative text across the subject areas at school and on own, applying comprehension strategies as needed. Standard: Reading Benchmark EL.04.RE.05: Demonstrate listening comprehension of more complex text through class and/or small group interpretive discussions across the subject areas. 59
  60. 60. Assessments:  Weather vocabulary worksheet  Walking around the room to read students answers to questions, using checklist to keep track of studentsSelection of Instructional Strategies:  Direct instruction—This lesson imparts many facts and definitions with the students. The clearest way to accomplish this is through direct instruction.  Visuals—Although I am using direct instruction, I will pull in many visuals to bring this lesson to life for the students.  Writing & journals—Students will be using their science journal to record thoughts that they have learned throughout the lesson.Modifications and adaptations:  Work with students to create shorter definitions for the weather terms.  Keep eye on TM. He gets antsy during direct instruction. Make sure he is on task.  Check in often with NA. She is an ELL student and is not in the classroom for most science lessons.Part 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Weather takes place in the atmosphere of Earth and is causedby the Sun.Open 1:35 1. Review KWL charts that were completed in lesson one. Ask5 minutes students to think about these questions: What is weather? What causes weather? Where does weather take place? After each question, give students a short period of time to jot down their ideas about the answers. Tell students to keep these questions in mind as we read.Body 1:40 2. Summarize pages D6-D9 about the atmosphere. Explain the20-25 atmosphere as the layer of air that surrounds our planet like aminutes blanket. It is made up of a mixture of gases, including oxygen which is what we breathe. These gases are the tiny particles that make up air. Air takes up space and has weight (have students take a deep breath to fill up their lungs—ask students if they could feel their chest moving—This is air taking up space in their lungs!) When all of these air particles are pressing on a surface— like the inside of the lungs—they cause air pressure. The atmosphere is made up of four layers. The uppermost, highest layer in the atmosphere is the thermosphere. The next highest layer is the mesosphere, the coldest layer in the atmosphere. When we see an airplane flying in the sky, most often it is flying in the stratosphere layer of the atmosphere. This layer contains 60
  61. 61. the most of the atmosphere‟s ozone, a kind of oxygen. The ozone helps to protect us from the sun‟s harmful rays. The layer closest to the Earth is the troposphere. Almost all weather happens in this layer. 3. Have students define terms on the Weather Vocabulary page. 4. Read pages D12-D17 together. Define the rest of the terms for day one on the Weather Vocabulary page.Close 2:05 5. Review the questions from the beginning of class. Ask students if5 minutes they want to change their answers and discuss the actual answers to these questions.Part 3: Resources 61
  62. 62. Weather VocabularyWhat is Weather?Air mass_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Air pressure__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Atmosphere___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Front________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Mesosphere___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Stratosphere__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Thermosphere_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Troposphere__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Clouds:Cirrus_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 62
  63. 63. Cumulus_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Cumulonimbus________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Stratus_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________The Water Cycle:Condensation_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Evaporation___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Precipitation__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Transpiration__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Water cycle___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 63
  64. 64. Part 4: Reflection This lesson began well and quickly fizzled. I began the lesson by asking students somequestions about weather. I recorded the answers on the overhead as students called them out. Ithen summarized the book so students didn‟t have to spend forever reading about theatmosphere. I used the globe and talked about the atmosphere being like a blanket that coversthe Earth. Students seemed to enjoy this (and when I asked students about the atmosphere at theend of the unit, most of them described it in this way). After this part, the lesson seemed tedious.I felt like the students were staring at me blankly or staring off into nowhere as the other studentsread. As I was talking about the different layers of the atmosphere I stumbled and mixed up myfacts. I caught myself, but this can be confusing to someone just learning about a topic. When itcame to defining the terms on the vocabulary page students worked at many different paces.Some students were as slow as molasses while others were finished before I had written thesecond definition on the overhead. Although this lesson seemed boring to both the students and me, I believe that I met theobjectives. Students were able to thoughtfully discuss the answers to their questions from beforethe lesson and compare their answers to their answers from after the lesson. It has become exceedingly clear, especially after this lesson that I do not do well in adirect instruction situation/lesson. I plan on observing some teachers that do well using directinstruction, and asking them to observe me, to determine what I can do to turn my directinstruction around. 64
  65. 65. Lesson 4: Weather ToolsIn this lesson students will learn about the different ways that weather can be measured and thetools that can be used to accurately measure weather. Students will also be introduced to thechart in their science notebook to record the weather every day.Grade Level: 4thSubject areas: Earth Science, MathMaterials needed:Weather tools worksheetWeather chartPencilsThermometerAnemometerBarometerRain gaugeWind vaneComputer with internet accessScience textbooksScience text—Teacher EditionPart 1: RationaleFocus and purpose: Students will get hands on experience with five different weather tools andlearn about measuring the different aspects of weather using these tools.Objectives:Students will be able to:  Identify, with 100% accuracy, the weather instruments verbally and label the instruments on a worksheet.  Choose the correct instrument to measure the different aspects of weather (humidity, precipitation, temperature, barometric pressure, and wind speed) with 100 % accuracy.State Content Standards:Focus StandardsStandards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.02: Interpret data over a period of time and use information to describe changes in weather from day to day, week to week, and season to season. 65
  66. 66. Standards: Science Common Curricular Goal: The Dynamic Earth: Understand changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth. Standard: Earth and Space Science Benchmark SC.05.ES.02.01: Describe weather in measurable quantities including temperature, wind direction, wind speed, and precipitation.Support StandardsStandards: Math Common Curricular Goal: Direct & Indirect Measurement: Apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements. Standard: Measurement Benchmark MA.04.ME.04: Read temperature measurements of thermometers with Fahrenheit and Celsius units and recognize reasonable ranges of temperatures for different events (e.g. cold or hot day).Assessments:  Weather tools worksheetSelection of Instructional Strategies:  Technology—I will be using the computer to introduce the final performance task and show students clips of weather broadcasts. This will help the students begin to think critically about the uses of the weather tools.  Visuals—The worksheet that the students will define the use of each tool on has pictures to match the definition. This is valuable because the shape of the tool can help to identify what it is used for.  Manipulatives, experiments, labs, and models—Students will get hands on experience using each of the tools.Modifications and adaptations:  Ensure that each student is given an equal amount of time with each weather instrument.Part 2: ProcedureConcept or rule to be discovered: Students will identify the weather instruments and what eachinstrument measures.Open 9:45 1. Show students a video clip of a weather broadcast. Ask students5 minutes how the meteorologist determines the weather to report.Body 9:50 2. Summarize science text pages D20-D21. Meteorologists are25 minutes scientists who study and measure weather conditions. Some of the 66
  67. 67. conditions that they monitor are the air temperature, air pressure, and wind speed and direction. 3. Introduce the different instruments. Start easy and get progressively more difficult: thermometer, wind vane, rain gauge, anemometer, hygrometer and barometer. Show students how each instrument is used and explain what it measures. Let each student examine the instruments closely. Have students fill in definitions for each of the instruments on the weather forecasting instruments page. 4. Have each table group practice taking the measurements. Monitor students to make sure that they are correctly using the instruments.Close 10:15 5. Go over the weather chart. Show students the link that we will use5 minutes to get the weather information and how we will record the information in our science journal.Part 3: Resourceshttp://www.weather.com 67

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