Tsunami
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Tsunami

on

  • 167 views

ss

ss

Statistics

Views

Total Views
167
Views on SlideShare
166
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.onlydoo.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Tsunami Tsunami Document Transcript

  • Tsunami – The killer sea wave The name ‘tsunami’ is Japanese. It means harbor wave. Tsunamis used to be called tidal waves, but they actually have nothing to do with the tides. The sudden displacement of huge amounts of water causes tsunamis. Most happen as a result of an undersea earthquake. If the earthquake is powerful enough, the sudden movement of the ocean floor at a tectonic plate boundary can cause the water above to surge upwards then fall back. The energy created then races under the surface of the water and forms the series of waves, known as a wave train, of a tsunami. What causes a tsunami? A tsunami is usually caused by a powerful earthquake under the ocean floor. This earthquake pushes a large volume of water to the surface, creating waves. These waves are the tsunami. In the deep ocean these waves are small. As they approach the coast these waves get bigger and more dangerous. Tsunami waves can cause tremendous damage when they reach land. A tsunami can also be triggered by a volcanic eruption, landslide, or other movements of the Earth’s surface.
  • Tsunamis can affect an area larger than most other volcanic effects; greater than 25 km. These waves are great in size and power when heading towards land or boats but are miniscule out in open water. (Thorarinsson, S. 1979.) (Latter, J.H. 1981.) Deposits from tsunamis are generally thin layers of sand that go much further than the original tide’s edge. These sand deposits are taken from the tidal zone and transported inland during the occurrence of the tsunami. As the water recedes, it drags along sediments from inland back into the water source. The deposits are poorly sorted and many times contain pumice and lithic grains from the eruption. What are the effects of a tsunami? Tsunami effects The effects of a tsunami are devastating. They are one of the world's worst natural disasters that can hit a country. Tsunami damage is first caused by the immense force of the tidal wave hitting the shoreline. Tsunami flooding then continues to cause damage for several more weeks. The effects of the tsunami on the country during this period range from destruction and damage, death, injury, millions of dollars in financial loss, and long lasting psychological problems for the inhabitants of the region. The initial impact of the tsunami is often publicized across the world through the news media. However, the actual effects continue for many years after the natural disaster strikes. For many of the people affected, they will never forget the terrifying ordeal of being caught in a tsunami. The scars that are inflicted on the land can be present for decades to come, and this only serves as a reminder to people living in the area of the terrible losses caused by the tsunami, and the lingering danger that yet another killer tidal wave could strike at any moment with very little warning.
  • Tsunami damage and destruction A tsunami's tidal waves batter the shoreline and can destroy anything in their path. This includes boats, buildings, houses, hotels, cars, trees, telephone lines - and just about anything else in their way. Once the waves have knocked down infrastructure on the shore the waves continue inland for many more miles - obliterating yet more buildings and homes. As the water rushes across the land it can sweep away yet more trees, gardens, garages, cars and other man made equipment. Boats have often been hurled into the sky and iron parking metres have been bent to the ground, demonstrating the sheer power of the water. Tsunamis often hit poorer and less-developed countries around South Asia that are close to the ''ring of fire'' in the pacific ocean - a area with high seismic activity. Because these countries are poor their buildings are not built strongly to withstand natural disasters such as Tsunamis. This means that when the water hits the buildings they are easily washed away. The water leaves a trail of destruction that looks like an enormous bomb has exploded in the area. Entire towns and villages are often destroyed in minutes. Disease effects of Tsunami Tsunamis flood the areas closest to the coast. This can cause disease to spread in the stagnant water. Illnesses such as malaria form when water is stagnant and contaminated. This can cause more death and sickness. Disease can also spread from the dead bodies that begin to rot on the ground once the water has subsided. This was the case in Indonesia in 2004. In fact, one BBC security guard actually burned the corpse of a baby because it had become infested with maggots and the risk of disease spreading caused a risk to the television crew. Often the infrastructure such as sewage and fresh
  • water supplies for drinking are damaged from the tsunami. This makes it more difficult for people to stay healthy and for diseases to be treated. In these conditions for diseases are likely to spread. Terrorist attack A surprise attack involving the deliberate use of violence against civilians in the hope of attaining political or religious aims. Terrorism is the use of violence and intimidation to achieve political ends. Terrorists want to change the way governments and politicians behave. They do not do this by voting or by trying to convince people of their arguments. They do it by frightening people into behaving the way the terrorists want. All terrorist acts involve violence or the threat of violence. These violent acts are usually committed by nongovernmental groups or individuals who are either part of or officially serving in the military, law enforcement agencies, intelligence agencies, or other governmental agencies of an established nation. Terrorists attempt not only to create panic but also to weaken confidence in the government and the political leadership of the target country. The Effects of Terrorism Terrorism has occurred throughout history, but today the world is experiencing a global rebirth of attacks. Today it no longer affects only small societies, such as isolated third world countries who fell victim to regular terrorist attacks, but the whole world is becoming more familiar with Arab and Muslim names. The terrorist violence that is on the rise today has informed citizen all over the world about different types of terrorism. Also with the resurgence the world is experiencing of terrorism, the Nation's have been to do what they can to eliminate terrorism. 9/11 WTC attack 26/11 Mumbai Attack
  • Indian Musician Pandit Hari Prasad Chaurisiya M.S. Subalaxmi What is Traditional Dance? Traditional dancing can be another term for folk dance, or sometimes even for ceremonial dance. The term ‘Traditional’ is more frequently used when the emphasis is on the cultural roots of the dance. A Traditional dance will therefore have arisen from a people’s cultural traditions, for example, the folk dances of indigenous populations of Europe. However, dances that have a ritual origin or purpose are not usually considered to be Traditional dances. These are known as ‘Religious dances’ instead. Traditional dancing is generally more of a social activity rather than competitive, but it is normally choreographed. Depending on the dance type itself, Traditional dancing can be either partnered or solo, and are mainly danced in formation. Traditional dances are taught both as a form of dance and as a way to keep a part of a specific culture alive in new generations. They are sometimes used in ceremonies or as a ceremonial honor but are more often than not practiced unchoreographed and as a social activity rather than a competitive one. Dances that were used in rituals are usually not considered traditional dance and are instead considered a form of culturally religious dancing.
  • Indian Musician Pandit Hari Prasad Chaurisiya M.S. Subalaxmi What is Traditional Dance? Traditional dancing can be another term for folk dance, or sometimes even for ceremonial dance. The term ‘Traditional’ is more frequently used when the emphasis is on the cultural roots of the dance. A Traditional dance will therefore have arisen from a people’s cultural traditions, for example, the folk dances of indigenous populations of Europe. However, dances that have a ritual origin or purpose are not usually considered to be Traditional dances. These are known as ‘Religious dances’ instead. Traditional dancing is generally more of a social activity rather than competitive, but it is normally choreographed. Depending on the dance type itself, Traditional dancing can be either partnered or solo, and are mainly danced in formation. Traditional dances are taught both as a form of dance and as a way to keep a part of a specific culture alive in new generations. They are sometimes used in ceremonies or as a ceremonial honor but are more often than not practiced unchoreographed and as a social activity rather than a competitive one. Dances that were used in rituals are usually not considered traditional dance and are instead considered a form of culturally religious dancing.