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Tipping lecture. Western etiquette.
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Tipping lecture. Western etiquette.

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Western Etiquette, Lecture Two.

Western Etiquette, Lecture Two.

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    Tipping lecture. Western etiquette. Tipping lecture. Western etiquette. Presentation Transcript

    • Tipping/Gratuity Etiquette Unit 3
    • What is a Gratuity?
      • A gratuity is also known as a tip
      • A gratuity is a voluntary extra payment made to certain service sector workers in addition to the advertised price of the transaction.
      • a tip is never legally required, and its amount is at the discretion of the patron being served
    • North America
      • In North America it is usually expected that you tip after you have been served or waited on
      • When workers are doing a service for you
      • Example: if you buy a large television and someone takes it out of the store for you and puts it into your car (a small tip of a dollar or two would suffice)
    • Case Study
      • (add from unit one)
    • People You Would Tip
      • Restaurant servers (waitress, waiter)
      • Taxicab Drivers
      • Hair Dressers
      • Nail Salon Workers
      • Baristas
      • Bartenders
      • Live Bands, Street Bands
      • Airport Luggage Carriers/Delivery Boys
    • Restaurant Gratuity
    • Restaurant Servers
    • Restaurant Servers
      • Tipping is customary in restaurants offering traditional table service
      • Tipping is up to the discretion of the patron however; 10-15% is what was expected in the 1980
      • Since then the tipping norm has gone up to 15-20%
    • Restaurant Servers (cont’d)
      • If you have really enjoyed your service you can tip a higher percentage to show your appreciation
      • People who work in the restaurant and serving industry tend to tip more by nature
      • These individuals also tend to heavily scrutinize the service that they are being given
    • Restaurant Severs (3)
      • Servers expect the same quality of service that they give when serving but are also understanding of common situations that would make the service not as sharp (very busy, double sat, triple sat)
    • Why Tip in a Restaurant?
      • In North America, Servers are paid minimum wage or below minimum wage because they are expected to receive tips
      • Servers have to ‘Tip-Out’ to other areas of the restaurant once their shift is done (the kitchen, the dishwasher, the hostess, bartenders)
      • If they don’t get tipped from you they end up losing money
    • Auto Gratuity
    • Auto gratuity (‘Auto-grat’)
      • Auto gratuity is expected for large groups of people who go to a restaurant to dine (6 or more)
      • Auto gratuity is usually from 18-20% of the bill after taxes
      • It used to be that you tip on the amount before taxes but due to ‘tip-outs’ that idea has shifted to after taxes
    • Why ‘Auto-grats’ are expected
      • Auto gratuities are expected because the server is spending an ample amount of time on waiting your table
      • This takes away from the service they give other tables
      • Lack of service from other tables that your table should make up
    • Auto Gratuity (cont’d)
      • Auto gratuity standards are usually labeled on the menu so that you are aware
      • The server will also tell you about the ‘auto-grat’ policies and standards
      • Auto-grat will automatically be placed on the bill for you
    • Auto Gratuity (3)
      • A customer may choose to include an extra tip for the server over and above the service charge
      • If service is very poor customers may try to negotiate an alternate service charge with management.
    • Bayshore Inn
      • This is one of the places I used to work as a server
      • http:// www.watertonlakeslodge.com/waterton_maps_location.htm
    • Let’s Order…And Tip!
      • http://www.bayshoreinn.com/_cabinet/1/Full_Dinner_2011%5B1%5D.pdf
      • How much would we tip on this meal
    • Bartenders
    • Bartenders
      • Bartenders don’t usually serve you food unless you order a meal at the bar therefore; the tips are not very large
      • Bartenders really depend on tips because the tips make up for most of their income
      • Because people buy drinks so frequently bartenders may not receive large tips but they receive tips often
    • Bartenders (Cont’d)
      • If you pre-tip a bartender you will get better service
      • When you order a drink, it is commonplace to leave a dollar or two dollars behind depending on how generous you are
      • If you order more than one drink, two dollars is usually better
    • Bartenders (3)
      • Some exceptions to tipping the bartender 1-2 dollars (15% on large bills)
      • Starting a tab
      • Some tricks that bartenders use that you should avoid falling into
    • Hairdressers
    • Hairdressers
      • It is not necessary to tip hairdressers however if you really like your hair, it is nice to give them some extra money to show your appreciation
      • If the person owns their own shop sometimes it is okay to not tip
      • If someone works for a chair hair salon the tipping average is 5-10 dollars per visit
    • Nail Salons
    • Nail Salons
      • When you get a manicure or pedicure most people tip 5 dollars after the services have been completed
      • If your feet have been in really bad shape, it is nice to give a little extra for the extra time and effort they put into to making your feet look nice
    • Baristas
    • Barista
      • A barista (from the Italian for "bartender") is a person, usually a coffee-house employee, who prepares and serves espresso -based coffee drinks.
      • Tipping a barista is not required however; you will often find a tip that that you can throw loose change from you purchase into
    • Airport Luggage
    • Airport Luggage
      • Someone helping you with your luggage from the baggage claim
      • Tips of 1-2 dollars are required for the lifting of your luggage and the pushing of your luggage cart
      • If you are feeling generous or if you have a large amount of luggage you can give more
    • Food Delivery
    • Food Delivery
      • Delivery is normally made with an automobile , motor scooter , or bicycle .
      • tipping for pizza delivery is customary
      • mounts vary widely (typically suggesting around 15% of the bill or at least $3)
      • $1–2 for short distances, $2–3 for longer distances, and $5 or more for large orders
    • Live Bands/Street Bands
    • Live Bands/Street Bands
      • It is not necessary that you tip a live band that you go to see in a show because usually the cover you pay goes to paying the band
      • In New Orleans, Louisiana there are a lot of musicians and people who play music on the street
    • Live Bands/Street Bands (cont’d)
      • It is nice to give a dollar or two to help out struggling artists that are entertaining you
      • If you believe that the music is excellent, you can tip more to show your support
      • Example of Street Music in New Orleans
      • (Show Video)
    • Tips on Tipping