Laboratories of Innovation (Families for Excellent Schools)

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  • LaurenOut of curiosity, I’m wondering how comfortable folks in the room were with the CCSS prior to the pre-readings for today. Here’s a question similar to one we asked school leaders earlier in the year.On a scale of 1-5, how would you have rated your personal understanding of the Common Core State Standards prior to the pre-readings?Vote by show of hands.Good to know…thanks for your willingness to dive into the Common Core with us for a little while this morning!
  • My name is Mike D’Auria, and I am an associate Chief Operating Officer for USI NYCWe have 20 schools here in NYC, throughout Brooklyn, and I manage our Directors of Operations across our 12 middle schoolsVery excited to get to talk to you about how we manage school operations and leadership here at Uncommon
  • As a brief introduction, I mentioned our Brooklyn schools, but Uncommon as a whole currently serves just under 10K kidsWith 1200 staff In 38 schoolsIn 5 regions
  • While this is not the purpose of tonight, I would be remised to not mention results quickly. There are certainly many ways to measure this, and as we continue to shift to Common Core our understanding here just continues to evolve, but there are 5 points that I will quickly highlight as they are relavent to this work and all our schools and Are both great points of pride, but also humble us knowing that there is so much more work to be done:
  • I started this work as a DOO at WCCS – tours and secret suace.We know in schools there is none. While we believe strongly in (below)The quote we always use: So knowing that we are looking for 100 1% solutions, or what often feels like 1000 1/10 % solutions, we know how hard it is to manage and stay focused on these in schools with everything going on. And we looked at some institutional issues with that in the common model. Normal school like the one I grew up in with a superhero Ppal – just not enough, we believe in a dual leader model, so I want to make the case for that briefly tonightQUICK BIG PICTURE MESSAGING (the 5 most important things to say)Effective teaching.Coaching and developing both teachers and leadersRigor and joy.Structure and systemsUsing data
  • Misconception that schools are simple – schools feel like these. INCREDIBLE complex. We know teaching is stressful, but there are SO many other stressorsTHERE IS JUST A LOT GOING ON IN SCHOOLS Having the right supplies From desks to pencils to projectorsGetting paid and benefitsNegotiating the facilitiesKnowing who to go to with questionsKnowing who is going to be in your classFamily contact informationAccess to technologySick and personal daysProperly analyzing and interpreting data
  • And there is a really unique balance of this work. There is a lot of work that is non- and there is this business side of running a schoolBut you always have to have the special context of making this work for teachers/students/familiesThere is no real experience that sets you upWe don’t see a real backgroundYou are the COO of the schoolCOOCFOExternal officerHR Marketing managerCIOPurchasing and negotiatorFacilities managerCommunications directorGreat DOOs have a really special and unique skill set. They need to be operational gurus and have a host of tactical business and operational skills, and then need to be able to apply those skills in the really unique and special setting of a school and understand all those implications. While there is no particular background, it takes a gritty, motivated, smart, dynamic person, who can learn fast and will be the only one in the school with these skillsJOB DESCRIPTION - Take aways from some of the big things that they do Budget meeting (finance) Facilities meeting Ops team meeting (management) Building council Vendor call (negotiation) Data analysis Process planning Community engagement Certification meetings (compliance) School tour Kick off open enrollment period Website update call with marketing Family communication
  • “Without great teachers nothing else matters”
  • Digging in, lets look at what a DOO schedule looks like in one of our schools There is a lot on here Blue – school meetings Green – external meetings with vendors, community, auditorss Dark – stafff Purple – faciltyLots of the stuff we saw before Red – studentsBring back this balanceSo with all this work going on, we want to dig into how and who does it. So lets start with what work looks like for our DOOs. We are going to take a look at a real week for a real DOO. And I will start by saying 2 things: 1) there is truly no average day, and no two weeks are alike, so while this is representative, each week is different 2) this is what a calendar looks like going into the week, but we also know that in schools lots of unplanned things happen, and part of the DOOs job is to be able to handle those as they come up, reprioritize their work and protect the rest of the schoolTake a moment to look at this schedule - any immediate reflections?? there is a lot here. By way of background, what skills or experience do you think would set a DOO up for this work?There is no real experience that sets you upWe don’t see a real backgroundYou are the COO of the schoolCOOCFOExternal officerHR Marketing managerCIOPurchasing and negotiatorFacilities managerCommunications directorGreat DOOs have a really special and unique skill set. They need to be operational gurus and have a host of tactical business and operational skills, and then need to be able to apply those skills in the really unique and special setting of a school and understand all those implications. While there is no particular background, it takes a gritty, motivated, smart, dynamic person, who can learn fast and will be the only one in the school with these skillsJOB DESCRIPTION - Take aways from some of the big things that they do Budget meeting (finance) Facilities meeting Ops team meeting (management) Building council Vendor call (negotiation) Data analysis Process planning Community engagement Certification meetings (compliance) School tour Kick off open enrollment period Website update call with marketing Family communication
  • ObservationsFeedback meetingsBlock and tackleOn the other hand, while the job is no less complex or challenging, there are fewer pathways to being a great Principal with Uncommon. You need a lot of teaching experience and experience coaching and growing teachers and managing students. A Principal needs to be trained and excellent at a very particular skill set, and as you will notice, a really large portion of a Principals schedule is going to be observing classes and meeting with teachers. While DOO backgrounds vary, the Principal has fewer paths - In most cases, they have taught - They have been trained in a very specific skill set - Identifying great teaching - Developing teachers to get better - Managing students and student cultureWe believe a Principal should be able to spend as much time as possible Observing classes Meeting with teachers Being with students in the school
  • These are two drastically different jobs with very different skill sets and background requirements. Cant combine these schedules, it is too muchBoth these schedules are already super humanIn a common school these are often combinedWhen you put them together, things get sacrificed Not going to be compliance, facilities, finance – the doors literally cant remain open without theseIt is going to be observations and feedback.Teachers don’t grow and perform less effectivelyStudents learn lessOf all a DOO does – nothing is more important than being able to take care of all the operational stuff so that Principals and Teachers can focus just on directly serving students all the time
  • So there are lots of different possible structures that we can think about. Some schools go with an AP or teams of APs. You could make an argument that much of this work could be done remotely or does not require an intimate knowledge of a school. So why do we believe in the dual leader model. This work is about people:This is the bulk of the workTeachers who are happy, cared for, and supported are betterIf you cant figure out your healthcare or how to go to the doctor, it is hard to focus on lesson planningWith that – a huge piece of the DOO job is customer service, and it takes an Uncommon understanding of the details of these people and attention to this detail Stories about the best schools and lack of communication Every letter we send home Every communication we have Students and familiesSick studentFrustrated parentCreating systems that respond to our schools needs
  • We are the "techies" and the "stage managers" so that teachers and students can be the stars of the play.  WCCS ops exists to serve others so that teachers can focus on instruction and students can focus on learning.   We are the offensive line - blocking and tackling.  We make sure people have what they need; know what they need to know; use their time in the most effective ways possible.  We are all about problem solving.Our operations teams do the little things that let the show go on in each teachers classroom.
  • New School in Bushwick--90% from the neighborhood--93% FRP--23% ELL--15% IEP--97% 1’s and 2’s on 8th grade exams
  • 91% of parents to pre-opening orientation82% of parents to parent/teacher conferencesStrong relationships with not just parents, but also co-located schools and community organizationsShoe leather and listening--went to every community org we could find, and then said “tell us what you want.” --Kept showing up to build credibility--”No roots too grassy.” Info sessions in parent homes, recruiting in laundromats, bodegas, you name it. Everything in Spanish too.
  • --Made a point of reaching out to colocated schools--Share space with a middle school—made a point of reaching out to recruit their students.
  • Painting project--Collaboration between the two schools--Builds trust, familiarity, helps to talk through all potential pitfalls of shared space
  • --Individual calls--positive feedback (each teacher makes two positive phone calls per week)--openness to feedback from parents

Transcript

  • 1. Laboratories of Innovation: NYC charters share what works #forNYCkids
  • 2. Mitch Brenner Assistant Principal - KIPP Academy Middle, Character Education - KIPP
  • 3. Positive Emotions Engagement Relationships Meaning A ccomplishment
  • 4. “When we talk about culture, we're talking about all the little micro moments - the little interactions - that every single person has in the building.” Ian Willey
  • 5. 20,000
  • 6. Micro-moments • Any of the 20,000 moments in a day when we have the chance to build more positive relationships and increase the positivity ratio
  • 7. 55:38:7
  • 8. 2.5 : 1 4.3 : 1 ~5 : 1
  • 9. The Triangle Character Behavior Language Growth Mindset November 26, 2013 | 9 Constructive Responding
  • 10. Effort Good Strategies Proactive Help Seeking
  • 11. Positive Emotions Engagement Relationships Meaning A ccomplishment
  • 12. Maria Williams Debate and Public Speaking Teacher at three Success Academy middle schools Coach of the Success Academy Harlem West Debate Team
  • 13. Mike D’Auria Associate Chief Operating Officer for Uncommon New York City, Grades 5-8
  • 14. Leading school operations November 20th, 2013
  • 15. Who we are 9,900 Scholars 1,200 Staff 78 School Leaders 38 Schools 5 Regions 3 States 16
  • 16. How are our students doing? Every Uncommon school in every region outperformed the district in which it is located on both the ELA and Math exams. 93% of cohorts with us for at least 2 years in grades 3-8 closed the achievement gap in Math. Uncommon high school students in New York City and Newark outperformed white students nationally on all three sections of the SAT. 81% of students who took an AP exam scored at least a 3 on at least one exam. About 80% of Uncommon 12th grade graduates are either enrolled in or have graduated from a 4-year college. 17
  • 17. There is no secret sauce “At Uncommon Schools, we do not believe that there is a panacea that makes a school work. Nor do we pretend that what we do is “rocket science.” We work hard and use common sense, because elevating student achievement and transforming lives requires constant attention to hundreds of different elements – not one, magical 100% solution but rather one hundred, individual 1% solutions.” 18
  • 18. How common schools feel 19
  • 19. What operations looks like at Uncommon Schools The business of schools • Create and manage a $5M budget • Oversee large scale facilities • Manage HR for 40+ employees • Contract with hundreds of vendors and service providers • Manage hundreds of thousands of dollars of technology • Develop a marketing and community engagement strategy • Steward relationships with media, institutional funders and politicians 20
  • 20. It takes more than great instruction to run excellent schools. 21
  • 21. A week as an Uncommon Director of Operations Monday 6:30 - 7:00 7:00 - 7:30 7:30 - 8:00 8:30 - 9:00 9:00 - 9:30 9:30 - 10:00 10:00 - 10:30 10:30 - 11:00 11:00 - 11:30 11:30 - 12:00 12:00 - 12:30 12:30 - 1:00 1:00 - 1:30 1:30 - 2:00 2:00 - 2:30 2:30 - 3:00 3:00 - 3:30 3:30 - 4:00 4:00 - 4:30 4:30 - 5:00 5:00 - 5:30 Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Meeting with building staff (Custodian, Security, Cafeteria) Facility Walkthrough Arrival School tour to Board member Meeting with Director Community meeting Meeting with COO of Special Projects Check in with tech at Brownsville rec service provider center Shared Space Ops Team Meeting Building Council Bathroom duty 8th Grade Book Club Call with Marketing team on website Certification check in Meeting with Office Certification check in Manager Cover Math Class Facility walkthrough Lunch Facility walkthrough Lunch Recess Lunch Call with copy Data analysis for Wed Dismissal Planning for machine vendor staff PD upcoming week Bathroom duty Family disciplinary Prep benefits Kickoff Staff Meeting and PD meeting for staff PD Planning for Report Set up CM Card Conferences Dismissal Financial Audit Board Call Brooklyn monthly DOO meeting Dismissal Meeting with Principal 5:30 - 6:00 6:00 - 6:30 Community meeting Dismissal Leadership team meeting Facility Walkthrough 22
  • 22. A week as an Uncommon Principal Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 6:30 - 7:00 7:00 - 7:30 7:30 - 8:00 8:30 - 9:00 9:00 - 9:30 9:30 - 10:00 10:00 - 10:30 10:30 - 11:00 11:00 - 11:30 11:30 - 12:00 12:00 - 12:30 12:30 - 1:00 1:00 - 1:30 1:30 - 2:00 2:00 - 2:30 2:30 - 3:00 3:00 - 3:30 3:30 - 4:00 4:00 - 4:30 4:30 - 5:00 5:00 - 5:30 Arrival Teacher Feedback School tour to Board member Teacher Feedback Classroom 5-8 Reading Observations Taxonomy Conference Teacher Feedback Teacher Feedback Classroom Observations Meeting with Grade level leader Managing Director meeting Classroom Cover Reading Class Observations Student Support Team Classroom meeting Observations Lunch Lunch Recess Dismissal Classroom Observations Bathroom duty Dean of Students Check in Staff Meeting and PD Classroom Detention Coverage Observations Dismissal Dismissal Dean of Curriculum Instructional Leader Meeting with DOO check in Meeting 5:30 - 6:00 6:00 - 6:30 Teacher Feedback Teacher Feedback Joint classroom Observations Teacher Feedback Teacher Feedback Lunch Joint classroom Observations Bathroom duty Joint classroom Observations Dismissal Teacher Feedback Teacher Feedback Community meeting Dismissal Leadership team meeting Lesson plan review 23
  • 23. Separate skill sets for separate roles Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 6:30 - 7:00 Friday Meeting with building staff (Custodian, Security, Cafeteria) 7:00 - 7:30 7:30 - 8:00 Facility Walkthrough Arrival 8:30 - 9:00 9:00 - 9:30 9:30 - 10:00 10:00 - 10:30 10:30 - 11:00 11:00 - 11:30 11:30 - 12:00 Meeting with COO Ops Team Meeting School tour to prospective Board member Check in with tech service provider Bathroom duty Certification check in Facility walkthrough Meeting with Office Manager 12:00 - 12:30 12:30 - 1:00 8th Grade Book Club Lunch Lunch 1:00 - 1:30 1:30 - 2:00 Call with copy machine vendor Data analysis for Wed staff PD 2:00 - 2:30 2:30 - 3:00 Family disciplinary meeting Prep Open Enrollment Kickoff for staff PD 5:00 - 5:30 5:30 - 6:00 Dismissal Brooklyn monthly DOO meeting Financial Audit Board Call Shared Space Building Council Meeting Certification check in Community meeting at Brownsville rec center Call with Marketing team on website re-design Cover Math Class Facility walkthrough Recess Dismissal Lunch Planning for upcoming week Bathroom duty Staff Meeting and PD 3:00 - 3:30 3:30 - 4:00 4:00 - 4:30 4:30 - 5:00 Meeting with Director of Special Projects Planning for Report Card Conferences Set up community meeting Community meeting Dismissal Dismissal Meeting with Principal Leadership team meeting 6:00 - 6:30 Facility Walkthrough Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 6:30 - 7:00 7:00 - 7:30 7:30 - 8:00 8:30 - 9:00 9:00 - 9:30 9:30 - 10:00 10:00 - 10:30 10:30 - 11:00 11:00 - 11:30 11:30 - 12:00 12:00 - 12:30 Classroom Observations Grade level leader meeting Classroom Observations Classroom Observations Lunch 1:30 - 2:00 Classroom Observations 2:00 - 2:30 Bathroom duty 2:30 - 3:00 3:00 - 3:30 3:30 - 4:00 4:00 - 4:30 4:30 - 5:00 5:00 - 5:30 Arrival School tour to prospective Board member Classroom Observations Cover Reading Class Student Support Team meeting 12:30 - 1:00 1:00 - 1:30 Meeting with Managing Director Detention Coverage Dismissal Dean of Curriculum and Instruction check in Dean of Students Check in Lunch Recess Dismissal Teacher Feedback Meeting Teacher Feedback Meeting Joint classroom Observations Teacher Feedback Meeting Teacher Feedback Meeting Lunch Joint classroom Observations Bathroom duty Staff Meeting and PD Teacher Feedback Meeting Teacher Feedback Meeting Joint classroom Observations Classroom Observations Dismissal Instructional Leader Meeting Dismissal Community meeting Dismissal Meeting with DOO Leadership team meeting 5:30 - 6:00 6:00 - 6:30 Teacher Feedback Meeting Teacher Feedback Meeting 5-8 Reading Taxonomy Conference Call Teacher Feedback Meeting Teacher Feedback Meeting Lesson plan review Less teacher observation and feedback, less teacher development, less student learning 24
  • 24. When Principals and teachers do operations work, students learn less. 25
  • 25. People are our most valuable assets, we invest in serve them well Everythin g else Staff Happy teachers who have what they need serve students better Excellent customer service takes an uncommon attention to detail in everything you do Interestingly enough, for all of its success, the Disney theme show is quite a fragile thing. It takes just one contradiction, one out-of-place stimulus to negate a particular moment’s experience…tack up a felt-tip brownpaper-bag sign that says “Keep Out”…take a host’s costume away and put him in blue jeans and a tank top…replace that Gay Nineties melody with rock numbers…place a touch of artificial turf here…and a surly employee there…it really doesn’t take much to upset it all. What’s our success formula? It’s attention to infinite detail, the little things, the little minor, picky points that others just don’t want to take the time, money, or effort to do. As far as our Disney organization is concerned, it’s the only way we’ve ever done it….its been our success formula. We’ll probably be explaining this to outsiders at the end of our next two decades in the business. 26
  • 26. Operations make schools run, leaders make schools great. 27
  • 27. How Uncommon schools feel 28
  • 28. It takes more than great instruction to run excellent schools. When Principals and teachers do operations work, students learn less. Operations make schools run, leaders make schools great. 29
  • 29. Arthur Samuels Executive Director, MESA Charter High School
  • 30. MESA Charter High School
  • 31. Who we are
  • 32. Relationships
  • 33. Co-located schools
  • 34. Collaborative Projects
  • 35. Back to shoe leather and listening
  • 36. Morgan Altman Math Instructional Coach at Girls Prep Bronx
  • 37. A Best Practice in Teaching and Learning Math Number Talks
  • 38. What is a Number Talk? • It is a short routine where students engage in conversations around purposefully crafted computation problems • Problems are designed to elicit specific strategies that focus on number relationships and number theory • Students learn to solve problems accurately, efficiently, and flexibly
  • 39. Key Components of Number Talks • Classroom environment and community • Classroom discussions • Teacher’s role • The role of mental math • Purposeful computation problems
  • 40. Students Have the Opportunity to… • Clarify their own thinking • Consider and test other strategies to see if they are mathematically logical • Investigate and apply mathematical relationships • Build a repertoire of efficient strategies
  • 41. Why do We Use Number Talks? • Number talks are one approach we use to support our girls in developing fluency…with understanding • Fluency allows our students to access and grapple with more complex mathematics
  • 42. What does Fluency Look Like? • Rather than seeing a symbol and automatically setting up a procedure students will consider the numbers and operation together • Students will break numbers apart and put them back together, find friendly numbers to work with and compensate, apply properties of operations and knowledge of number relationships
  • 43. For Example… • Take a minute to mentally solve 32 x 17 • How did you solve? • Can you find a second way? • What strategy and/or model did you use?
  • 44. Here is How Students Might Solve
  • 45. Here is another way…
  • 46. One more way…
  • 47. Resources We Often Use • Number Talks Helping Children Build Mental Math and Computation Strategies, Grades K-5 (Parrish) • Math in the City, Mini Lessons. (Fosnot, Uittenbogaard)
  • 48. Mery Melendez and Shamona Kirkland Parents and Organizers at Families for Excellent Schools
  • 49. Harlem Town Hall
  • 50. Harlem Town Hall
  • 51. Bed-Stuy Town Hall
  • 52. Mayoral Forum
  • 53. What innovation would you like to see the next Mayor support all schools in implementing?
  • 54. THANK YOU