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One size fits all? or How many references are enough? Looking at Reading Lists in the wider context (Linda Jones, University of Portsmouth)
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One size fits all? or How many references are enough? Looking at Reading Lists in the wider context (Linda Jones, University of Portsmouth)

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One size fits all? or How many references are enough? Looking at Reading Lists in the wider context (Linda Jones, University of Portsmouth) …

One size fits all? or How many references are enough? Looking at Reading Lists in the wider context (Linda Jones, University of Portsmouth)
How can reading lists be tailored to cater for students at levels from Foundation to Doctorate? What specific advantages do they have for visually impaired/dyslexic students? How can we best cater for Distance Learners? How can we adapt reading lists for large cohorts? Does it always have to be reading?
At a point when our use of reading list software is becoming embedded should we start to look at how lists can be used to promote information literacy to both staff and students? How do we foster confidence in talking about reading lists to both staff and students across our whole staff. A brief presentation on the University of Portsmouth's experience will be supplemented with a workshop activity designed to stimulate consideration and discussion of reading lists as tools to address problems around accessibility and how reading lists relate to information literacy frameworks at a variety of levels and in a variety of subject areas.

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  • 1. One size fits all?Looking at Reading Lists in the widercontext.
  • 2. Staff Development•.LIBRARY STAFFSession Title: LIBRARY UPDATE SESSION:SUPPORTING OUR STUDENTS: THE VALUE OF READING LISTS(based on students FAQ)Presenters: Linda Jones + Graduate InternWho the session is aimed at: All Library staffMaximum number of participants: 15A quick overview of the Reading List Leading Change ProjectWhat the student and lecturer see in n Aspire reading listHow reading lists can help the library in Collection ManagementHow the library can add value to reading lists.Use of a few scenarios to look at reading lists and their impact.
  • 3. What are the benefits for staff and students?Ensure recommendreading is available in theUL or accessible onlineAccessibility of the information; includingpreviews on Google Books or linkingdirectly to an e-resource, where availableAnnotations help to provide clarity for thestudent. What is essential reading, whatchapter should I read?Seamless links within Moodle to sectionsof the list for different weeks or seminarsIntegration of video, text and other resources,including library databases or e-books collections toencourage students to research independentlyAn available list enables us to acquire alternativeformats for visually impaired studentsDyslexic students have easy links to the resource andwhere available, e-books and journals can be usedwith specialist softwareAcademic Staff & WebDevelopers
  • 4. Creating anExemplar List
  • 5. Subject Pages
  • 6. Link to Levels of Information LiteracyPromoting embeddingindividual guides
  • 7. 91%9%HESA Disability statistics 2011-12NoknowndisabilityKnownto have adisabilityAdditional Support
  • 8. 48%13%11%9%8%4%3%2% 2%Disability by TypeA specific learning difficulty Another disability, impairment or medical conditionA long-standing illness or health condition Mental health conditionTwo or more conditions A physical impairment or mobility issuesDeaf or a serious hearing impairment Social communication/Autistic spectrum disorderBlind or a serious visual impairment
  • 9. Hitting the Mark?In the mythical land of average…• ~ 15,000 students in a university• ~ 675 students are ‘Print impaired’• Assume 3 core texts per learner.2025 requests/yractual median value = between 5 and 15
  • 10. Are we hitting the mark?or scratching the surface?
  • 11. References• Library maths http://www.slideshare.net/LindaJones4/library-maths• Bombshell books• Big crocs, little crocs illstration from Holaday98’s flickrstream• Scratch from doc(q)man ’s flickrstream• Smack in the middle from Ogimogi’s flickrstream• Extracts from UoP website and training courtesy of colleaguesGreta Friggens and Anne Worden• Statistics on disability HESAhttp://www.hesa.ac.uk/index.php/content/view/1973/239• Alternative Format statistics CLAUD Research on alternativeformats across presented at E-books and Accessibility UglyDuckling or Adolescent Swan? Feb 2013http://www.jisctechdis.ac.uk/techdis/events/detail/2013/ebook13022013Thoroughly recommend the presentations from this event.