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Bringing local foods to schools by land and by sea

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Presentation by Amy Winston and Amanda Beal highlighting farm to school efforts and efforts to connect farm and fishing communities through policy, marketing, infrastructure and consumer education.

Presentation by Amy Winston and Amanda Beal highlighting farm to school efforts and efforts to connect farm and fishing communities through policy, marketing, infrastructure and consumer education.

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  • 1. Bringing Local Foods to Schools: By Land & By Sea Taking Root National Farm to Cafeteria Conference Detroit, MI May 17-19
  • 2. Bringing Local Foods to School: By Land and By Sea AMY WINSTON, PH.D. NATIONAL FARM TO SCHOOL NETWORK & COASTAL ENTERPRISES, INC ARW@CEIMAINE.ORG
  • 3. Atlantic Ocean State of Maine Coastal Counties
  • 4. Settlement Pattern: A Century of Growth in Lincoln County, 1891-2007
  • 5. Agriculture 292 farms in 2002 (up 4% from 1997) 30,618 acres cultivated in 2002 (up 2%) Avg. farm size 105 acres (down 1%) Market Value $7.5M (up 10%) Avg. $25, 829 per farm (up 6%)
  • 6. Public Health In Maine (CDC): Obesity rates have risen 100% in 17 years (from 12% of Mainers in 1990 to 26% in 2006). 59% of Maine residents overweight or obese. About 25% of Maine high school students are overweight. 36% of Maine kindergartners have BMI in the 85th percentile. Maine Child Health Survey (MCHS) Children entering kindergarten in 2003 Preliminary Data: 18% with BMIs 85-94% (“at risk for overweight”) 15% with BMIs greater than 95% (“overweight”) 33% have high BMIs!
  • 7. The Costs: Economic Impact of Chronic Disease Over $2 billion in health care dollars every year in Maine (Chenoweth et al. 2006) Adult obesity in Maine estimated to cost 11% of the State’s medical expenditures $6.7 billion in total health costs in Maine $1.4 billion in direct treatment and $5.3 billion in indirect costs Obesity raises individual health care costs by 36%/medication costs by 77% Direct costs of obesity/physical inactivity account for 9.4% of U.S. health care expenditures (2001, JAMA) FMI: DeVol, Ross, and Armen Bedroussian, An Unhealthy America: The Economic Burden of Chronic Disease, Milken Inst., Oct. 2007 (chronicdiseaseimpact.org) Farm to School Impacts: Student Impacts (diet, knowledge, attitudes, behavior, choices) Institutional Impacts Impacts on School Food Service Viability Increase in School Meal Participation Increase in Local Food Procurement Impacts on Farmers
  • 8. “Our future rests on our being able to take care of our kids, teach them how to take care of the land, how to nourish themselves, and how to gather at the table. That is where our culture is passed on to the next generation.” -Alice Waters
  • 9. “Farm - and Fish - to School as Economic Development” Taking Root - Detroit, May 18 2010 Amy Winston, Ph.D. Coastal Enterprises, Inc. (CEI) Northeast Regional Lead, National Farm to School Network email: arw@ceimaine.org tel. 207/882-7552
  • 10. Bringing Local Foods to School: By Land and By Sea BRETT TOLLEY NORTHWEST ATLANTIC MARINE ALLIANCE BRETT@NAMANET.ORG
  • 11. Small scale vs. large scale Figure 1. Schematic illustration of the duality of large and small scale fisheries prevailing in most countries of the world (statistics are global). Adapted from graph in Pauly (2006).
  • 12. CSF Drop off
  • 13. Bringing Local Foods to School: By Land and By Sea AMANDA BEAL MAINE’S EAT LOCAL FOODS COALITION & CULTIVATING COMMUNITY AMANDA@CULTIVATINGCOMMUNITY.ORG
  • 14. By Land & By Sea: Connecting Maine’s Farming & Fishing Communities PARTNERS PENOBSCOT EAST RESOURCE CENTER NORTHWEST ATLANTIC MARINE ALLIANCE ISLAND INSTITUTE MAINE SEA GRANT/UNIVERSITY OF MAINE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION MAINE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MAINE ORGANIC FARMERS AND GARDENERS ASSOCIATION MAINE FARMLAND TRUST FOOD FOR MAINE’S FUTURE CULTIVATING COMMUNITY PORTLAND MAINE PERMACULTURE NEW ENGLAND ENVIRONMENTAL FINANCE CENTER, MUSKIE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE MAINE COUNCIL OF CHURCHES BELFAST CO-OP
  • 15. Why bridge silos between farmers & fishermen? Our food system includes farm and aquatic products Our foodshed and watershed are interconnected Our food security lies in resource conservation – natural & human
  • 16. Goal & Process The ultimate goal of By Land and By Sea is to amplify the voices of our farmers and fishermen and create a grassroots movement to advocate for their recommendations. Multi-level Discussions: Farmers & Fishermen NGOs, State Departments, Educational Institutions and other Organizations Policymakers Wholesalers/distributers
  • 17. Topics of Exploration Policy Market Access/Marketing Infrastructure/Processing/Transportation Consumer Education
  • 18. Maine Food Access & Resource Maps
  • 19. By Land & By Sea: Outcomes Outcomes in process: A shared strategic plan between organizations Better leveraging of resources, less duplication of efforts Policy recommendations for the next Governor of Maine Current impacts: Overall communication web is expanding Strategic conversations between farmers and fishermen, and between organizations are happening Policymaker connections are growing Interest in other U.S. regions and other countries to learn about and potentially replicate the process
  • 20. Recipes for Success PARTNERS: PORTLAND PUBLIC SCHOOL DEPARTMENT CULTIVATING COMMUNITY CUMBERLAND COUNTY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION MAINE ORGANIC FARMERS & GARDENERS ASSOCIATION PROP/COMMUNITIES PROMOTING HEALTH COALITION LOCAL SPROUTS COOPERATIVE
  • 21. Building on a successful one day event: The Maine Harvest Lunch
  • 22. How to move from one day event to year-round? Challenges… Seasonal availability Finding farm and fish products Processing – physical infrastructure, knowledge, time Budget Administrative & staff buy-in
  • 23. Seeking solutions… NESARE grant, allowing exploration: Creating more links to local food producers Building seasonal food processing capacity Strawberries, Rhubarb, Carrots, Zuchinni Recipe development & evaluation Revenue building streams for school kitchen Documentation & Toolkit to share with other schools
  • 24. Building the Recipes for Success Toolkit
  • 25. Recipes for Success: Outcomes Outcomes in process: Wiki Toolkit in development for other schools Exploring potential for Portland central kitchen to be a regional processing hub for neighboring school districts Other community partners utilizing kitchen in off hours for fee Current impacts: Better control over nutritional content of foods Favorable student response to evaluation Connections with local farmers have expanded Fish is on the radar!
  • 26. Q&A THANK YOU!