Dermatomes and
Myotomes and its clinical
special test in upper limb
and lower limb
What is Dermatomes?
Dermatomes are areas on the surface of the skin that are control by specific
nerve roots from the spin...
Dermatome (sensory) test:
Pinprick test
• Gently touches the skin with the pin or back end and
asks the patient whether it...
• Test for abnormalities in sensitivity by pin or cotton.
• The patient should close his/her eyes and give the therapist f...
Upper Body Test Ponits
C2 - Occipital Protuberance
C3 - Supraclavicular Fossa
C4 - Acromioclavicular Joint
C5 - Lateral An...
BACK Upper Body Test Ponits
C2 - Occipital Protuberance
C3 - Supraclavicular Fossa
C4 - Acromioclavicular Joint
C5 - Later...
Upper Body Test Ponits
C2 - Occipital Protuberance
C3 - Supraclavicular Fossa
C4 - Acromioclavicular Joint
C5 - Lateral An...
V1 - Ophthalmic Division of Trigeminal Nerve (Upper Face)
V2 - Maxillary Division of Trigeminal Nerve (Mid Face)
V3 - Mand...
Full Dermatome Map
Myotome (motor) test:
What is myotomes?
Myotomes correspond to muscles that are controlled by specific nerve
roots from th...
C1 Myotome Upper cervical flexion
C2 Myotome Upper cervical extension/ Neck Rotation
C3 Myotome Cervical lateral flexion
C...
Cervical Plexus: C1-C4 nerve roots innervate the diaphragm, shoulder and neck.
Brachial Plexus : C5-T1 nerve roots innerva...
Upper Extremity Nerve Routes
C4 tested with resisted shoulder shrugs/elevation
C5 tested with resisted shoulder abduction
...
The Motor System (myotomes) Test of
Upper limb and Lower limb
• Note the position of the body that the patient assumes whe...
Systematically examine all of the major muscle groups of the
body.
For each muscle group:
1.Note the appearance or muscula...
0 No muscle contraction is detected
1
A trace contraction is noted in the muscle by palpating the muscle
while the patient...
Starting with the deltoids, ask the patient to raise both their arms in front of
them simultaneously as strongly as then c...
• Next, ask the patient to extend and raise both arms in front of them. Ask the
patient to keep their arms in place while ...
C6- Elbow flexion
Test the strength of lower arm flexion by holding the patient's wrist from above
and instructing them to...
Test the strength of wrist extension by asking the patient to extend their wrist
while the examiner resists the movement. ...
C7- Elbow extension
Now have the patient extend their forearm against the examiner's resistance.
Make certain that the pat...
C8- Finger Flexion
Examine the patient's hands. Look for intrinsic hand, thenar and hypothenar muscle
wasting.
Test the pa...
C8- Finger abduction & adduction
Test the intrinsic hand muscles once again by having the patient abduct or "fan
out" all ...
C8 & T1- Thumb Opposition
To complete the motor examination of the upper extremities, test the strength of
the thumb oppos...
L1 & L2 : Hip Flexion
Proceeding to the lower extremities, first test the flexion of the hip by asking the
patient to lie ...
Test extension at the knee by placing one hand under the knee and the other on
top of the lower leg to provide resistance....
L4: Ankle Dorsiflexion
Test dorsiflexion of the ankle by holding the top of the ankle and have the patient
pull their foot...
L5: Great toe extension
Ask the patient to move the large toe against the examiner's resistance "up
towards the patient's ...
S1&s2: Ankle plantar flexion and
eversion/knee flexion
Holding the bottom of the foot, ask the patient to "press down on t...
Ankle Plantar Flexion Knee Flexion
Levels Of Injury
with specific muscles
C4
Further innervation of
diaphragm & paraspinal
muscles
L1 to S5
Lower Limb Muscles
L1/2 Hip Flexors
L3 Knee Extensors
L4 Ankle Dorsiflexors
L5 Long Toe Extensors
S1/2 Ankle Plan...
Complete and Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury:
An incomplete injury means that the ability of the spinal cord to convey messa...
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
Special test for dermatomes and myotomes
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Special test for dermatomes and myotomes

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Special test for dermatomes and myotomes

  1. 1. Dermatomes and Myotomes and its clinical special test in upper limb and lower limb
  2. 2. What is Dermatomes? Dermatomes are areas on the surface of the skin that are control by specific nerve roots from the spinal cord Skin (sensation) is innervated by a single nerve roots called the dermatomes What is myotomes? Myotomes correspond to muscles that are controlled by specific nerve roots from the spinal cord Muscles (movement) are innervated by singe nerve roots called myotomes •Nerves and nerve roots are typically injured by compression or stretching forces •When a nerve root is damaged a deficit may occur in the corresponding limb •The evaluation of nerve root damage can be done by testing dermatomes and myotomes
  3. 3. Dermatome (sensory) test: Pinprick test • Gently touches the skin with the pin or back end and asks the patient whether it feels sharp or blunt Light touch test • Dabbing a piece of cotton wool on an area of skin Pain sensation (pin prick) and light touch sensation (cotton wool)
  4. 4. • Test for abnormalities in sensitivity by pin or cotton. • The patient should close his/her eyes and give the therapist feedback with regards to various stimuli. • All tests should be done on a specific dermatomes and should be compared bilaterally. • The sensory function of touch involves sensing surfaces and their textures and qualities. • Pinprick test and light touch test • Both test should be demonstrated to the patient first. • Both test begin distally and then move proximally Procedure
  5. 5. Upper Body Test Ponits C2 - Occipital Protuberance C3 - Supraclavicular Fossa C4 - Acromioclavicular Joint C5 - Lateral Antecubital Fossa C6 - Thumb C7 - Middle Finger C8 - Little Finger T1 - Medial Antecubital Fossa T2 - Apex of Axilla Lower Body Test Points L1 - Upper Anterior Thigh L2 - Mid Anterior Thigh L3 - Medial Femoral Condyle L4 - Medial Malleolus L5 - Dorsum 3rd MTP Joint S1 - Lateral Heel S2 - Popliteal Fossa S3 - Ischial Tuberosity S5 - Perianal Area Test Dermatomes at dots FRONT
  6. 6. BACK Upper Body Test Ponits C2 - Occipital Protuberance C3 - Supraclavicular Fossa C4 - Acromioclavicular Joint C5 - Lateral Antecubital Fossa C6 - Thumb C7 - Middle Finger C8 - Little Finger T1 - Medial Antecubital Fossa T2 - Apex of Axilla Lower Body Test Points L1 - Upper Anterior Thigh L2 - Mid Anterior Thigh L3 - Medial Femoral Condyle L4 - Medial Malleolus L5 - Dorsum 3rd MTP Joint S1 - Lateral Heel S2 - Popliteal Fossa S3 - Ischial Tuberosity S5 - Perianal Area
  7. 7. Upper Body Test Ponits C2 - Occipital Protuberance C3 - Supraclavicular Fossa C4 - Acromioclavicular Joint C5 - Lateral Antecubital Fossa C6 - Thumb C7 - Middle Finger C8 - Little Finger T1 - Medial Antecubital Fossa T2 - Apex of Axilla
  8. 8. V1 - Ophthalmic Division of Trigeminal Nerve (Upper Face) V2 - Maxillary Division of Trigeminal Nerve (Mid Face) V3 - Mandibular Division of Trigeminal Nerve (Lower Face)
  9. 9. Full Dermatome Map
  10. 10. Myotome (motor) test: What is myotomes? Myotomes correspond to muscles that are controlled by specific nerve roots from the spinal cord Muscles (movement) are innervated by singe nerve roots called myotomes
  11. 11. C1 Myotome Upper cervical flexion C2 Myotome Upper cervical extension/ Neck Rotation C3 Myotome Cervical lateral flexion C4 Myotome Shoulder shrugs (upper trapezious) C5 Myotome Shoulder abduction and external rotation (infraspinatus) C6 Myotome Elbow flexion and wrist extension C7 Myotome Elbow extension and wrist flexion C8 Myotome Thumb extension and ulnar deviation T1 Myotome Finger adduction and abduction L1 Myotome Hip flexion L2 Myotome Hip flexion (also adduction and medial rotation) L3 Myotome Leg/knee extension L4 Myotome Dorsiflexion L5 Myotome Great/Big toe extension S1 Myotome Ankle plantar flexion and eversion/knee flexion S2 Myotome Ankle plantar flexion and knee flexion S3 Myotome None S4 Myotome Bladdar and rectum Myotomes and Differentiating Nerve Lesions
  12. 12. Cervical Plexus: C1-C4 nerve roots innervate the diaphragm, shoulder and neck. Brachial Plexus : C5-T1 nerve roots innervate the upper limbs Lumbosacral Plexus: L1- L5, S2 nerve roots innervate the lower extremity
  13. 13. Upper Extremity Nerve Routes C4 tested with resisted shoulder shrugs/elevation C5 tested with resisted shoulder abduction C6 tested with resisted elbow flexion/ wrist extension C7 tested with resisted wrist flexion C8 tested with resisted thumb extension T1 fingers abduction & adduction Lower Extremity Nerve Routes The quick test for the lower extremity, to rule out a nerve root injury is to have the athlete do a squat. L1-L2 tested with resisted hip flexion L3 tested with resisted knee extension L4 tested with resisted foot dorsi flexion L5 tested with resisted great toe extension S1/S2 tested with plantar flexion
  14. 14. The Motor System (myotomes) Test of Upper limb and Lower limb • Note the position of the body that the patient assumes when sitting on the examination table. • Paralysis or weakness may become evident when a patient assumes an abnormal body position. • A central lesion usually produces greater weakness in the extensors than in the flexors of the upper extremities, while the opposite is true in the lower extremities: a greater weakness in the flexors than in the extensors
  15. 15. Systematically examine all of the major muscle groups of the body. For each muscle group: 1.Note the appearance or muscularity of the muscle (wasted, highly developed, normal). 2.Feel the tone of the muscle (flaccid, clonic, normal). 3.Test the strength of the muscle group. •Since this rating scale is skewed towards weakness, many clinicians further subclassify their finding by adding a + or -, e.g., 5- or 3+
  16. 16. 0 No muscle contraction is detected 1 A trace contraction is noted in the muscle by palpating the muscle while the patient attempts to contract it. 2 The patient is able to actively move the muscle when gravity is eliminated. 3 The patient may move the muscle against gravity but not against resistance from the examiner. 4 The patient may move the muscle group against some resistance from the examiner. 5 The patient moves the muscle group and overcomes the resistance of the examiner. This is normal muscle strength. Muscle Strength Grading:
  17. 17. Starting with the deltoids, ask the patient to raise both their arms in front of them simultaneously as strongly as then can while the examiner provides resistance to this movement. Compare the strength of each arm. The deltoid muscle is innervated by the C5 nerve root via the axillary nerve. C5- Shoulder
  18. 18. • Next, ask the patient to extend and raise both arms in front of them. Ask the patient to keep their arms in place while they close their eyes and count to 10. Normally their arms will remain in place. If there is upper extremity weakness there will be a positive pronator drift, in which the affected arm will pronate and fall. This is one of the most sensitive tests for upper extremity weakness. Pronator drift is an indicator of upper motor neuron weakness. In upper motor neuron weakness, supination is weaker than pronation in the upper extremity, leading to a pronation of the affected arm. The patient to the left does not have a pronator drift. C5- Shoulder
  19. 19. C6- Elbow flexion Test the strength of lower arm flexion by holding the patient's wrist from above and instructing them to "flex their hand up to their shoulder". Provide resistance at the wrist. Repeat and compare to the opposite arm. This tests the biceps muscle. The biceps muscle is innervated by the C5 and C6 nerve roots via the musculocutaneous nerve.
  20. 20. Test the strength of wrist extension by asking the patient to extend their wrist while the examiner resists the movement. This tests the forearm extensors. Repeat with the other arm. The wrist extensors are innervated by C6 and C7 nerve roots via the radial nerve. The radial nerve is the "great extensor" of the arm: it innervates all the extensor muscles in the upper and lower arm. C6- Wrist Extension
  21. 21. C7- Elbow extension Now have the patient extend their forearm against the examiner's resistance. Make certain that the patient begins their extension from a fully flexed position because this part of the movement is most sensitive to a loss in strength. This tests the triceps. Note any asymmetry in the other arm. The triceps muscle is innervated by the C6 and C7 nerve roots via the radial nerve.
  22. 22. C8- Finger Flexion Examine the patient's hands. Look for intrinsic hand, thenar and hypothenar muscle wasting. Test the patient's grip by having the patient hold the examiner's fingers in their fist tightly and instructing them not to let go while the examiner attempts to remove them. Normally the examiner cannot remove their fingers. This tests the forearm flexors and the intrinsic hand muscles. Compare the hands for strength asymmetry. Finger flexion is innervated by the C8 nerve root via the median nerve.
  23. 23. C8- Finger abduction & adduction Test the intrinsic hand muscles once again by having the patient abduct or "fan out" all of their fingers. Instruct the patient to not allow the examiner to compress them back in. Normally, one can resist the examiner from replacing the fingers. Finger abduction or "fanning" is innervated by the T1 nerve root via the ulnar nerve.
  24. 24. C8 & T1- Thumb Opposition To complete the motor examination of the upper extremities, test the strength of the thumb opposition by telling the patient to touch the tip of their thumb to the tip of their pinky finger. Apply resistance to the thumb with your index finger. Repeat with the other thumb and compare. Thumb opposition is innervated by the C8 and T1 nerve roots via the median nerve.
  25. 25. L1 & L2 : Hip Flexion Proceeding to the lower extremities, first test the flexion of the hip by asking the patient to lie down and raise each leg separately while the examiner resists. Repeat and compare with the other leg. This tests the iliopsoas muscles. Hip flexion is innervated by the L2 and L3 nerve roots via the femoral nerve.
  26. 26. Test extension at the knee by placing one hand under the knee and the other on top of the lower leg to provide resistance. Ask the patient to "kick out" or extend the lower leg at the knee. Repeat and compare to the other leg. This tests the quadriceps muscle. Knee extension by the quadriceps muscle is innervated by the L3 and L4 nerve roots via the femoral nerve. L3: Knee Extension
  27. 27. L4: Ankle Dorsiflexion Test dorsiflexion of the ankle by holding the top of the ankle and have the patient pull their foot up towards their face as hard as possible. Repeat with the other foot. This tests the muscles in the anterior compartment of the lower leg. Ankle dorsiflexion is innervated by the L4 and L5 nerve roots via the peroneal nerve.
  28. 28. L5: Great toe extension Ask the patient to move the large toe against the examiner's resistance "up towards the patient's face". This tests the extensor halucis longus muscle. The extensor halucis longus muscle is almost completely innervated by the L5 nerve root
  29. 29. S1&s2: Ankle plantar flexion and eversion/knee flexion Holding the bottom of the foot, ask the patient to "press down on the gas pedal" as hard as possible. Repeat with the other foot and compare. This tests the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles in the posterior compartment of the lower leg. Ankle plantar flexion is innervated by the S1 and S2 nerve roots via the tibial nerve. Test flexion at the knee by holding the knee from the side and applying resistance under the ankle and instructing the patient to pull the lower leg towards their buttock as hard as possible. Repeat with the other leg. This tests the hamstrings. The hamstrings are innervated by the L5 and S1 nerve roots via the sciatic nerve.
  30. 30. Ankle Plantar Flexion Knee Flexion
  31. 31. Levels Of Injury with specific muscles
  32. 32. C4 Further innervation of diaphragm & paraspinal muscles
  33. 33. L1 to S5 Lower Limb Muscles L1/2 Hip Flexors L3 Knee Extensors L4 Ankle Dorsiflexors L5 Long Toe Extensors S1/2 Ankle Plantarflexors
  34. 34. Complete and Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: An incomplete injury means that the ability of the spinal cord to convey messages to or from the brain is not completely lost; some sensation and movement is possible below the level of injury. A complete injury is indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the level of injury. But the absence of motor and sensory function below the injury site does not necessarily mean that there are no remaining intact axons or nerves crossing the injury site, just that they do not function appropriately following the injury.
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