Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Tucker t facilitiesplan.doc
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Tucker t facilitiesplan.doc

281
views

Published on

I survey the students and faculty about the media center and discovered there were a number of changes to be made. I designed a media center that was user friendly.

I survey the students and faculty about the media center and discovered there were a number of changes to be made. I designed a media center that was user friendly.

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
281
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 1
    C. T. Walker Magnet School Media Center Plan
    Learning Today…..Leading Tomorrow
    Tabatha Tucker
    Facilities Plan (PSC/NCATE Key Assessment #3)
    Dr. Jones
    Fall 2010
  • 2. 2
    School History
    The school's history dates back to 1934, when it housed grades 1-7. The building was constructed with federal assistance and opened with an enrollment of 1500 students (500 over the building's specifications). When Richmond County schools were integrated in the 1970s, the enrollment of the school changed, decreasing to little over 500 students. Court-ordered busing was instituted to ensure racial balances in student population and to remedy fluctuating enrollment patterns. In 1980, the school became a magnet school, housing grades K-5. Like other magnet schools in the county, racial quotas maintain a racially balanced student body (45% African American, 45% Caucasian, 10% other).
  • 3. 3
    History Continue
    The magnet school concept brought changes in structural organization. During the first year as a magnet school, C. T. Walker housed 400 students who were admitted to the basis of a lottery that was conducted by community leaders and school officials for grades K-5.[1] Beginning with the 1981 school year, the sixth grade added to the school structure, followed by the seventh grade in 1982, and the eighth grade in 1983. In 1999, the C. T. Walker Magnet School celebrated its twentieth anniversary as a magnet school.
  • 4. 4
    School Profile
    Today C. T. Walker Magnet School serves students in grades K-8. We have 860 students currently enrolled at Walker. The school has a diverse population. There are a number of requirements the student must meet in order to be accepted. All kindergarten students are tested. In grades 1-8, the students must be on grade level, meet all standards on their latest CRCT test, and have a letter of recommendation from their current teacher. Finally, there is a policy in place based on race. There are a percentage of blacks, whites, and other races admitted.
  • 5. 5
    Mission Statement
    The mission of C. T. Walker Traditional Magnet School is to foster the development of basic skills, character, courtesy, respect, patriotism, responsibility, and citizenship in an environment where standards and limits are firmly established, understood, and consistently enforced for teaching and learning to take place.
  • 6. 6
    Mission and Philosophy
    The Mission of the Richmond County Public School System is to educate children to become lifelong learners and productive citizens.
    The Mission of the Instructional Services Department is to provide leadership and support for the professional growth of all staff which will result in maximum learning for all students.
  • 7. 7
    Mission and Philosophy
    In support of this Mission, the Media and Instructional Technology Department will provide instructional leadership in the use of information and resources, in collaborative planning for school-wide technology and in assisting in the access and selection of appropriate information technologies.
  • 8. 8
    Mission and Philosophy
    It is the philosophy of the Media and Instructional Technology Department that the Media Center is an instructional center for the entire school system and a resource center for the community. The Media Center is service-oriented, providing instructional media and technology services to students, faculty, staff and administrators of the system's school and departments and the community at large.
  • 9. 9
    Mission and Philosophy
    This philosophy extends to each school's individual media center, with each center's purpose being service to its students, faculty, staff and administration, based on the school's stated instructional needs and objectives as enumerated in their school improvement plan.
  • 10. 10
    Purpose
    The purpose of the Media and Instructional Technology Department is to provide service to the schools for educational media, instructional technology and computer services.
    Questions for print, non-print and technology are handled through this department.
  • 11. 11
    Purpose
    All allocation of funds for books, magazines and grants are issued through this department.
    It is the aim of the department to impart knowledge to the school, the faculty and the staff so they are better able to meet their students‟ needs. This will be done at both the school and the county level.
  • 12. 12
    Purpose
    Technology training will be provided for instructional services. Specific requests for Instructional Training may be sent to the Director of Media and Instructional
  • 13. 13
    State Standards for Media
    A brief synopsis of the Georgia Department of Education standards is as follows:
    Each school will have a media center.
    Media centers built after January 1, 1982 must contain the nine functional areas as required in A Guide for Planning and Construction of School Facilities in Georgia: Media Center Facilities.
  • 14. 14
    State Standards for Media
    Media specialists are assigned to schools based on FTE counts.
    Schools with 250 or fewer FTEs must have as a minimum of one half-time media specialist; the media center must be opened with adult supervision during the entire instructional day.
    Schools with more than 250 FTEs will have a least one full-time media specialist.
  • 15. 15
    State Standards for Media
    Media assistants will be assigned when the FTE count for a school reaches one third over base size, as determined by staff standards.
    A second media specialist shall be assigned according to a formula as schools’ FTE reaches a proscribed level over base size.
  • 16. 16
    State Standards for Media
    The Georgia Department of Education, the Georgia Accrediting Commission and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools standards will be followed for collection requirements. These standards include:
    An elementary/middle school media center must have a constantly growing collection requirements.
  • 17. 17
    State Standards for Media
    An elementary/middle school media center must have a constantly growing collection with a minimum of 10 books per student and other materials suitable for use in a sound instructional program.
    A high school media center must have a consistently growing collection with a minimum of 10 books per student and other materials suitable for use in sound instructional program.
  • 18. 18
    State Standards for Media
    For schools over 800 students the following formula will apply:
    Students Collections
    801 – 1,000 8,000 volumes + 6 volumes per student in excess to 800 students
    1,001 – 1,500 9,200 volumes + 5 volumes per student in excess to 1,000 students
    1,501 – 2,000 11,700 volumes + 4 volumes per student in excess to 1,500 students
  • 19. 19
    State Standards for Media
    2,001 – and above 13,700 volumes +3 volumes per student in excess of 2,000 students
    The materials collection shall include periodicals appropriate for and related to the interest of the students. Periodicals may be electronic.
    Non-print materials shall be provided as indicated by the needs of the instructional program and in accordance with expenditures.
    All materials shall be cataloged using the standard Dewey Decimal System and using the MARC format.
     Circulation records shall be kept for the purposes of evaluating student use of the media center.
     Each student shall have regular and frequent access to the media center.
  • 20. 20
    State Standards for Media
    All materials shall be cataloged using the standard Dewey Decimal System and using the MARC format.
    Circulation records shall be kept for the purposes of evaluating student use of the media center.
    Each student shall have regular and frequent access to the media center on both an individual and class group basis.
  • 21. 21
    State Standards for Media
    The media collection shall be weeded annually to remove materials that are badly worn or out of date.
    There shall be evidence that students have continual access to use books and other learning materials.
    There must be accessibility of the media center for both individual students and groups simultaneously throughout the instructional day during each day of the year. To this end, the center should be available for students and teachers to use according to instructional need rather than to a predetermined schedule.
  • 22. 22
    State Standards for Media
    To insure maximum use of school media resources, the center must be open every day that school is in session. The center should not be closed to facilitate meetings or testing programs. It is recommended the center accommodate students before and/or after the school day.
    Insuring accessibility during the inventory process may require some temporary alteration in the hours of operation, or in the availability of materials for circulation, or the level of services provided to students and staff. Such modifications should be approved by the school administrator and announced in advance, but should not include closing the facility.
  • 23. 23
    Media Policies
    REQUIREMENTS
    (a) Each local board of education shall adopt a media policy that
    1. Provides for the establishment of a media committee at the system level and each school.
    2. Requires development of procedures for the school system and for
    (i) Selecting materials locally,
    (ii) Handling requests for r reconsideration of materials,
  • 24. 24
    Media Policies
    (iii) Considering gifts of instructional resources
    (iv) Using non-school owned materials,
    (v) Complying with copyright law,
    (b) The local school superintendent shall appoint a system media contact person to serve as a liaison to the department.
    (c) Each school shall have a media center staffed by media personnel in accordance with Rule 160-5-1-22 Personnel Required and shall develop processes to implement system media policy and procedures. The following shall be included in school media program implementation.
    1. A plan for flexibly scheduled media center access for students and teachers in groups or as individuals simultaneously throughout each instructional day. Accessibility
  • 25. 25
    Media Policies
    1. A plan for flexibly scheduled media center access for students and teachers in groups or as individuals simultaneously throughout each instructional day. Accessibility
    shall refer to the facility, the staff, and the resources and shall be based on instructional need.
    2. A media committee that makes recommendations and decisions related to planning, operation, evaluation and improvement of the media program. This committee shall annually evaluate media services and develop a multi-year media plan for budget and services priorities.
  • 26. 26
    Media Policies
    3. Collaborative planning that includes joint determination by media specialist and teachers to ensure use of media center resources and services that support on-going classroom instruction and implementation of the state-adopted curriculum.
  • 27. 27
    Media Policies
    Each school unit shall have a Building Media and Technology Committee. This committee shall be composed of administrative, instructional and media personnel, parents, students, and community representatives.
    The Building Media and Technology Committee shall meet as often as needed or as required to meet the school's needs.
    The committee is charged with making recommendations for the media program in the school concerning;
  • 28. 28
    Media Policies
    1. Long- range program goals for all types of media used by the instructional program
    2. Budget priorities
    3. Reconsideration of materials
    4. Operational procedures
    5. Copyright adherence policies, including appointing an individual responsible for providing copyright information and obtaining copyright clearance where necessary
    6. Program evaluation, including expansion and deletion of services
  • 29. 29
    Media Policies
    7. Policies for disposition of gifts
    8. Policies for the use of non-school owned materials in the classroom
    9. Mechanism for the use of information sources outside the school
    10. Assist the media specialist in evaluating and prioritizing requests from the faculty and staff.
  • 30. 30
    New policies
    Currently the media center in only open Monday through Friday during normal school hours. It should be open on the weekend for student, who may not have resources at home and for the nearby community members.
    The nearby community members should be allowed to check out books and other resources from the media center.
    Literacy and GED classes should be offered on the weekend to the parents and community members.
  • 31. 31
    Media Center Profile
    One full time media specialist
    One full time media assistance
    Serves 860 students in grades k-8
    70 faculty and staff
  • 32. 32
    Survey for Students
    Do you feel there are enough fiction books? Yes No
    Do you feel there are enough non-fiction books? Yes No
    Would you like to see more work stations added? Yes No
    Do you feel there should be magazines added to the media center? Yes No
    How would you rate the print resources? 1 2 3 4 5
    How do you rate the media staff? 1 2 3 4 5
    Teachers please explain fiction, non-fiction, and print resources to the students.
    Instructions: Please circle yes or no for the first 4 questions and circle the number which best describe your opinion of the last two questions. 1—need some improvement, 2—good, but could be better, 3—very good resource, 4--excellent resource
  • 33. 33
    Results from Students
    The teachers and I counted the results of the survey. This is what we found.
    We need more fiction books.
    We need more non-fiction books.
    We need more print resources, because the ones we have are very old.
    Would love to have magazines added.
    Need more work stations.
    The media staff received more 3s from the students.
  • 34. 34
    Survey for the Teachers and Staff
    Do you feel there are enough fiction books? Yes No
    Do you feel there are enough non-fiction books? Yes No
    Would you like to see more work stations added? Yes No
    Do you feel there should be magazines added to the media center? Yes No
    How would you rate the print resources? 1 2 3 4 5
    How do you rate the media staff? 1 2 3 4 5
    If you could change one thing about the current media center, what would it book?
    Instructions: Please circle yes or no for the first 4 questions and circle the number which best describe your opinion of the last two questions. 1—need some improvement, 2—good, but could be better, 3—very good resource, 4--excellent resource
  • 35. 35
    Results from Teachers
    We need more fiction books.
    We need more non-fiction books.
    We need at least three new sets of encyclopedias for the number of students we have. The one set we have is out dated.
    There should be a variety of magazines and newspapers available for the students to enjoy. The teachers feel it would foster reading, even for those who don’t really like to read.
  • 36. 36
    Results from Teachers
    We need more work stations, because the computer labs are on the second floor of the building.
    The majority of the teachers rated the media center with a 3s and there were very few 4s
    There were a number of things the teachers wanted changed about the current facility, these are the most popular ones. First, the teachers would like to see is more teaching from the media specialists, explaining the concept of research.
  • 37. 37
    Results from Teachers
    The teachers also feel there isn’t enough resources for them to use. They would like a larger work room with more resources.
    Some of them would like to see some new, updated, colorful furniture added.
    Next, Some of them would like to have some input on the books that are ordered.
    Finally, some comfortable chairs for teens to make it more appealing and inviting.
  • 38. 38
    Media Center
    The media center is located on the first floor at the end of the main hallway. It is easily accessible from the outside of the building as well as the inside.
  • 39. 39
    Media Staff
    Media Assistance: Mrs. Williams
    Librarian: Mrs. Easterlin
  • 40. 40
    Current Facility plan
  • 41. 41
    Current Facility Plan
    On side with doors
    CR-conference room
    EC-equipment room
    PR-production room
    WR-work room
    BS-book shelves
    WS-work stations
    Well
    Opposite side of ms
    RR- restroom
    VR-video room
    Additional offices
    Circulation
    BS-book shelves
  • 42. 42
    Current Facility
    The circulation desk in located in the center of the media center. Students can be monitored all over the media center from the circulation area.
  • 43. 43
    Current Facility
    The media center can accommodate one class of about 25 students at time. The downfall is, there are only eight working computers available for research, which is not enough for a school with over 800 students.
  • 44. 44
    Computer work stations
    We don’t have enough computers for our school. We should have at least two labs with 30 computers in each. The labs should be located close to the media center. The labs are on the second floor.
  • 45. 45
    Non Fiction
    The current media center is to small. The last principal had some input on the actual plans for the renovations for the school, but not the previous media specialist.
  • 46. 46
    Non Fiction Continued
  • 47. 47
    Non Fiction Continued
  • 48. 48
    Young Adults
  • 49. 49
    Fiction
  • 50. 50
    Fiction Continued
  • 51. 51
    Easy Readers
  • 52. 52
    Early Readers
  • 53. 53
    Work Room
  • 54. 54
    Equipment Closet
  • 55. 55
    Production Room
  • 56. 56
    Conference Room
  • 57. 57
    The Well
  • 58. 58
    Additional Office Space
  • 59. 59
    Video Room
  • 60. 60
    Equipment room
    Teacher workroom
    Books shelves
    Computer lab with 25 computers
    Book shelves
    Book shelves
    Windows
    Book shelves
    Book shelves
    Work table
    Work table
    Work table
    Video room
    Office space
    Office space
    Restroom
    Work table
    Circulation desk
    Windows
    New Facility Plan
    The Well
    doors
    Comfortable chairs for teens
  • 61. 61
    New Spacious Work Room
  • 62. 62
    Computer Lab added to Media center
  • 63. 63
    Additional Bookshelves
    There should be more books available for the middle school student to use for research.
  • 64. 64
    Additional Bookshelves
    There should be more books available for the elementary students to read. Along with comfortable places for the students to sit. We have over 800 students.
  • 65. 65
    New Furniture
    There isn’t enough sitting space for the students. The current media center has hard chairs without cushions. These nice blue ones are soft and comfortable. They are just right for reading a good book.
  • 66. 66
    New Furniture
    We would order colorful furniture for the well, because it is dull and not very comfortable. It should be inviting, bright, and colorful.
  • 67. 67
    Comfortable bean bag chairs
  • 68. 68
    References
    http://www.rcboe.org/
    http://www.highsmith.com/library-furniture-20599145/
    http://www.txgenweb2.org/txlavaca/friench_simpson_library.htm