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Understanding the Complexities of the Immigrant Labour Market: October 4, 2011
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Understanding the Complexities of the Immigrant Labour Market: October 4, 2011

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This presentation details the factors involved in immigrant labour market integration. It describes both how to coordinate efforts to help immigrants become integrated and, how to engage employers …

This presentation details the factors involved in immigrant labour market integration. It describes both how to coordinate efforts to help immigrants become integrated and, how to engage employers and other stakeholders.


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  • (1) The total population count includes the non-immigrant population, the immigrant population and the non-permanent resident population. The non-permanent resident population is not shown separately in this table. (2) Non-immigrants are persons who are Canadian citizens by birth. Although most Canadian citizens by birth were born in Canada, a small number were born outside Canada to Canadian parents. (3) Immigrants are persons who are, or have ever been, landed immigrants in Canada. A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others are more recent arrivals. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number were born in Canada. Includes immigrants who landed in Canada prior to Census Day, May 16, 2006.
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    • 1. Understanding the Complexities of Immigrant Labour Market Integration: A Regional Perspective Making Connections: Labour Market Integration, Immigration & Essential Skills October 4, 2010 Racquel Sevilla Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC)
    • 2. Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC)
      • Convenes and collaborates with partners, creating opportunities for skilled immigrants to connect to the local labour market. [individual]
      • Works with key stakeholders, particularly employers, building their awareness and capacity to better integrate skilled immigrants into the workforce. [organizational]
      • Works with all levels of government, enhancing coordination and effecting more responsive policy and programs for skilled immigrant employment. [systemic]
    • 3. Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC) Leadership council of labour market participants
    • 4. Population by immigrant status Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census Geographic name Total population Non-immigrant Immigrant Canada 31,241,030 24,788,720 6,186,950 Ontario 12,028,895 8,512,020 3,398,725 Barrie - CMA (Ont.) 175,335 152,010 22,515 Brantford - CMA (Ont.) 122,825 106,515 15,935 Greater Sudbury / Grand Sudbury - CMA (Ont.) 156,395 145,555 10,450 Guelph - CMA (Ont.) 126,085 99,470 25,765 Hamilton - CMA (Ont.) 683,450 511,430 166,630 Kingston - CMA (Ont.) 148,475 128,935 18,505 Kitchener - CMA (Ont.) 446,495 339,390 103,060 London - CMA (Ont.) 452,580 360,780 87,420 Oshawa - CMA (Ont.) 328,070 273,165 53,920 Ottawa - Gatineau - CMA (Ont.) 1,117,120 905,740 202,735 Peterborough - CMA (Ont.) 115,140 103,815 10,795 St. Catharines - Niagara - CMA (Ont.) 385,035 311,545 70,320 Thunder Bay - CMA (Ont.) 121,055 108,155 12,600 Toronto - CMA (Ont.) 5,072,075 2,675,590 2,320,160 Windsor - CMA (Ont.) 320,730 242,445 74,770
    • 5. Permanent residents in Ontario by selected urban areas Source: CIC, Facts and figures 2009 – Immigration overview: Permanent and temporary residents Urban area 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Ottawa-Gatineau 7,816 8,483 7,156 5,960 6,366 6,377 6,279 5,798 6,286 6,297 Peterborough 114 132 124 130 151 175 161 161 152 201 Oshawa 422 532 544 607 756 839 745 859 734 800 Toronto 110,062 125,170 111,685 97,553 99,914 112,831 99,289 87,138 86,900 82,644 Hamilton 3,236 2,868 3,127 3,599 4,155 4,613 4,036 3,680 3,806 3,778 St. Catharines-Niagara 895 904 886 1,087 1,300 1,765 1,599 1,384 1,235 1,114 Kitchener 2,343 2,034 2,196 2,398 2,767 2,964 3,321 3,205 2,914 2,823 London 2,015 2,008 1,730 2,024 2,347 3,233 2,979 2,459 2,338 2,463 Windsor 2,892 2,939 2,450 2,502 2,729 2,981 2,781 2,215 1,951 1,892 Sarnia 137 128 102 105 136 161 157 169 139 127 Barrie 187 151 234 247 353 371 427 404 357 418 Thunder Bay 142 130 113 126 142 114 180 145 142 122 Ontario 133,510 148,641 133,588 119,722 125,094 140,525 125,892 111,315 110,878 106,867
    • 6. Key Factors
      • Immigrant labour market integration – factors to consider:
        • Coordination
        • Stakeholder & Employer Engagement
    • 7. Coordination – Challenges & Solutions
      • Challenge: Planning
        • Solution: Local Immigration Partnerships (LIPs)
      • Challenge: Immigrant Perspective
        • Solution: CIIP, Going to Canada Portal, Working in Canada Tool, Provincial & Municipal Websites
      • Challenge: Employer Perspective
        • Solution: CASIP Job Developers’ Network, Ottawa Job Match Network, Employer Gateway
    • 8. CASIP Job Developers’ Network
    • 9. Employer Gateway Concept
    • 10. Key Factors
      • Immigrant labour market integration – factors to consider:
        • Coordination
        • Stakeholder & Employer Engagement
    • 11. Relationship management, partnership development, solutions development Engagement Activities
    • 12. The Mentoring Partnership Outreach to organizations Training and mentoring resources Program management & QC Mentors Mentees
    • 13. Lessons Learned in Solutions Development
      • Need to be willing to experiment
      • Try again - timing matters
      • Leverage existing solutions
      • Be mindful of external factors
    • 14. Thank you! www.triec.ca New Realities. New Opportunities.