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Patron-Based Marketing in the Digital Age

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Two decades of arts consumer study has led the consulting firm TRG Arts to conclude that 2013 is the year choral organizations must frame their marketing efforts around The Patron. Knowing who buys …

Two decades of arts consumer study has led the consulting firm TRG Arts to conclude that 2013 is the year choral organizations must frame their marketing efforts around The Patron. Knowing who buys your tickets and subscribe and contributes, when and how much is the best way to inform how you package, price, and promote your programs. The best part: it’s a matter of focus. Every organization can use the information and skills they have to market better. In this three-hour workshop presented at the 2013 Chorus America conference, Joanne Steller and Amelia Northrup-Simpson shared best marketing practices that are patron-based, time-proven and updated for the digital age. You’ll learn strategic ideas on building lasting loyalty and revenue that can sustain your organization.

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  • Perhaps you know about TRG from our free webinars and other conference appearances, but to ensure that TRG is fully introduced, allow me to share that TRG Arts is a results-driven consulting firm that helps grow revenue and patronage in the United States, Canada and Australia. We provide arts, culture and entertainment clients with guidance and solutions that are patron-based (read ticket buyer, member, donor, event attendee…any PERSON engaged with an organization)…we provide our clients with guidance and solutions for sustainable revenue with patrons.Data informs every strategic solution we offer at TRG, and enhances the (truly) expert knowledge of the staff team on which TRG was built. And as the largest provider of community data networks in the US, we regularly study some 50 million transactions for trends on arts consumption, working harness the power of that data for client solutions and community benefit. 
  • TRG’s “brand” so to speak, was build on results from Day 1. We try to ensure that achieving results is a part of everything we do for clients and for those who attend our sessions online and at conferences. Our hope is that today, you’ll pick up ideas that you can take home to get results.
  • Thanks, Amelia. Today, we’re going to focus on Finding New Patrons….it’s important, and it’s what most of you came here to learn more about. But, this – Loyalty Growth – is the holy grail of arts marketing now. Everything we talk about will lead us to loyalty growth: after getting new patrons in to hear you sing, your next step will be to get them to come back….again and again to build a strong foundation of patronage. But the first step is finding them….
  • FOCUS – Whether your organization is large or small, you’ll never be able to do EVERYTHING. So focus your time and money where it counts most. And remember the rules of effective focus action:Set your target.Start.Do what you can with the resources you have.Keep going.
  • So: We’ve set our target: New Patrons. Now, let’s start by learning about where patrons come from.Our firm manages 19—soon to be 20 – arts data communities or networks across the U. S. IN our networks is TRANSACTIONAL data about how patrons spend their time and money. We look at transactions in overview….in aggregate…to understand arts consumer trends.
  • Here are the communities in our network of community data programs.Do you see your community on this map?Are you a member of your data network?Can you be a member? Do you have access to any list exchange in your community?WRITE DOWN THE ANSWER. And we’ll come back to your involvement.Now…let’s talk about some fundamental trends we know about from studying arts consumer data.Two years ago, our colleague Will Lester conducted a data analysis through the community data networks about the origin of patronage – where do patrons come from?I’m going to let Amelia take you through the broad findings we’ll apply to this next section of our session. Amelia
  • Three groups:Renewal-been sometime in the last year—maybe they’re a subscriber, evenReactivated-been before, but not in the last yearNew-brand new to you or to the arts community in your city
  • Conventional wisdom on audience make-up says that about ¾ are renewals, 20% are re-activated, and not a lot of brand new people…
  • Another stat: For those newbies, only 1 in 5 return… ever.
  • What if I told you that was HALF of your audience?
  • OK, Let’s review. Those of you who brought some database information with you, you may want to take a minute and pull it out.Starting at top right: RENEWAL – these are ticket buyers, subscribers, members, donors who were with you last year and are with you again. That’s not NEW patrons and it may not be more than a third of your patron base. Hear me say this: Whatever number of patrons this is, PRIZE them, VALUE them, TAKE CARE OF THEM. They are your foundation. You want to make more and more of this type of patron.Now, let’s think about who is in your database or your lists who haven’t heard you sing in a two or more years. We call them “reactivated” because that’s what you have to do to make them current again. If they came even once two or more years ago, getting them to come back is an actionable target. We urge you to target them because our arts consumer research tells us that reactivated patrons BEHAVE like new patrons. You have to start all over again with them, and that’s worth doing. Now look at the pie piece at top left – every night in every arts audience there is some portion – we found nearly one in four – was totally new TO THE ARTS. Is that an actionable target for you? In MOST cases, NO. This is that ubiquitous “EVERYBODY” that boards are famous for asking marketing folks to go out and find. There’s a time and a place for EVERYBODY, and we’ll talk about that later.But NOW, let’s focus on this pie piece – We’ve MARKED it TRADES because that’s how you go find them.Some of you are thinking…..I can’t trade my lists. In fact, here’s a question/comment one of you made in our survey.
  • Whoever this is…..CONGRATULATIONS. You are NOT competing. You are operating in a target rich environment. I know this because….we’ve got data on that too. TRG started studying “Patron Cross-over” two decades ago when I was still at the Kennedy Center. Those early studies identified what we called Culture Vultures……Patrons who came to EVERYTHING we did. That led to an important data-informed conclusion that our client study has corroborated year after year. And that is: the more a patron buys, the more a patron buys. Arts lovers are passionate….and their passion leads them to all the art forms and arts producers they love….and their money follows. So the data shows that your fear of competition is not worth wasting energy over. Put that on your not to do list. Think about how you can trade with those organizations in your community you think you are competing for. There’s another study I want to share here. Back in 2007, the opera companies in Philadelphia had this exact same concern – so many opera companies, so much competition. Philadelphia has a very large, very active data co-op and trading lists is easy……but still….many organizations do not want to trade. Amelia – tell us about the Opera America study.
  • In addition to the flagship Opera Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia boasts six other companies, more than most U.S. cities. Opera America was curious about the behaviors and attitudes of audiences in such an opera-rich city, and hired TRG and Shugoll Research to provide insight.
  • Now, you’d assume that if a patron living Philadelphia likes opera, they’d attend performances at multiple companies. But you’d be wrong. Only 6% do, which means that 94% of operagoers in Philadelphia have patron records with one company. We thought that was startling….until the qualitative research showed that Philadelphias --- for the most part – did not know that many of the smaller organizations existed. Remember: they didn’t want to trade. Here’s another finding….
  • For that 94%, the churn rate was 50%. In other words, half only go to the opera once and then they leave—and don’t come back. To attend ANY opera company.
  • However, for the 6% that attends performances at multiple opera companies—only a 15% churn. 15%--that’s equal to mortality and relocation numbers from USPS. This means that those who DID go to multiple opera company’s performances wereFAR more loyal. If a patron attends multiple performances, odds are, you’ll have them for life.
  • So the participants in this took action on that finding, deciding it was in the self-interest of an opera company to publicize other opera companies. Here, you see a screen shot of the big opera company’s web site. They began actively promoting other opera company’s performances alongside their own. Why? The more an opera lover buys, the more loyal they are going to be.
  • That’s what Philadelphia opera companies did, and reaped the benefits of new and loyal patronage. Joanne….
  • You saw the evidence, and now I’m going to be bold and say: TRADEYou saw in our study that something like one in four new patrons are going to concerts and attending performances and art museums in your community. But they AREN’T coming to your concerts. Why? You haven’t invited them. They don’t know what you’re doing. You can reach them if you trade your lists with others in your community.We’ll show you here shortly that those who buy with other arts organizations, are MORE LIKELY to buy with you than the rest of EVERYBODY in your community.Finally, not trading is self-limiting. Don’t cut yourself off from this important source of new patrons. Now let’s talk about how to trade….
  • Remember this? How many of you are in one of these networks?How many of you have access to some kind of trading cooperative?If you don’t or don’t know….stay with us. Here’s the first step for trading.
  • Remember: we want actionable targets. When you trade, especially when you’re small and want to trade with bigger organizations, you can’t ask for everything they have. That’s wasted time and effort for them, and it provides you too much information that’s not useful. The first thing you want to do is understand where your patrons live. That means a zip code analysis of your current list of active patrons. In what zip codes do most of your patrons live. Don’t guess – it’s tempting, you might guess right –but you might not. Study the facts. Record the information.These are the zip codes where you’ll want to include in your trade.Those of you who belong to one of our networks – you can select trades based on zip code.With Opera America we investigated crossover between opera organizations. We do a similar study—in a “road atlas” type of chart—for our communities showing the cross-over from organization to organization.
  • Typically when arts marketers request a trade list, they have to guess as to which organizations in town have crossover with their own organization. In some cases they guess right, mostly they guess wrong. In our data networks, organizations can use data rather than guessing about who their audience is or isn’t. Here’s how it works:
  • For example, in this community, the Chamber Music organization has the highest crossover rate. We found that across our communities, it is not uncommon to find high cross over surprises – surprised cross over is high, also surprised cross over is low. The data – not instinct – tells the story. What if you don’t belong to a network?
  • This is from client study and my own experience. Choral music lovers also attend:Orchestra concertsOpera companiesAnd yes…other choruses.
  • Data is our company’s favorite four-letter word. Why? One of our colleagues said it best: If you take good care of your data, your data will take good care of you.
  • To build sustainable revenue, you rely on people. To contact those people and maintain relationships with them, you need data.
  • You have heard and will keep hearing about Data…..we say data is how we start…do what we can do…and keep going with our strategies to build sustainable revenue. You all know what I mean by data, right? Think about each patron you have: what is the record of their participation in your lists or data base. It’s biographical right? Name, address, phone, email addressAnd it’s transactional…..what they bought, how much they paid, how much they donated. But the problem --- and it’s a BIG problem for the whole arts industry is this:
  • There’s so much competition for your limited time and money…..this is what happens. Data gets neglected. This happens really easily. All of us at TRG are on a mission to turn this around. We know that an investment in keeping data right and well pays off in so many ways.We want you to pay attention to your data – whatever you have.
  • Adopt this. Collect patron data right and well. Manage it right and well.All within your own capacity. Let’s talk about what you’ve got……Where do you keep this information? How many of you use Brown Paper Tickets?How many names do you have in your database?   If you categorize them by type of transaction (e.g. subscriber, donor, ticket buyer, etc.), make a note of how many in each category as well as the total number.How recently and frequently is this list of names updated for change of address, etc.Is someone assigned to keep adding names to your list of patrons?  If so, how often is this done?  What are the sources of new patron information? A number of you use Brown Paper Tickets, right? Show of hands?
  • Raffle ideas included roses, tix
  • This is another mindset we need to reestablish. The single best way to get a prospect to become a new patron is to put the right offer in front of the right prospect at the right time. That is direct marketing – talking directly to the people you want to come hear you sing. Can it really be that simple. It is but there’s still a high degree of skepticism. click
  • Here’s what a couple of you had to say…..Advertising – In all the years I’ve been a marketing professional in the arts, I’ve heard this constantly. These days, I can almost always tell who is saying: we MUST advertise either owns the newspaper in town or one of the broadcast outlets. Advertising goes to EVERYONE – remember how we talked about that? It’s wasteful.Second comment– You are not alone here either. We would tell you this….some concerts will by there very nature be more broadly attractive than others. You can spend all the money you want on some programs – my personal favorite was an all Penderecki program that Rostropovich conducted my first week at the Kennedy Center --- nothing got the public to come. A small dedicated audience came – mostly subscribers –but not the general public. Where did my advertising money for that program go? Down the toilet. Finding those dedicated music lovers who would not miss hearing all Penderecki with Slava playing the cello – I could have found where? In my data base. I needed to have reached out talked to them directly. How?
  • These are the three basic media. We could talk for a whole session about each. Attend Amelia’s session this Friday and you’ll get more detail. Here’s a point I want to make about direct marketing – one channel reinforces the other. It’s not all one or the other, it’s whatever mix you can use to reinforce messages. We want to share another study we did last year:
  • Better cost of sale – here’s how you calculate it. The lower the cost of sale the higher the return on investment.But LOW cost of sale is not the objective. RIGHT SIZING cost of sale is the way ROI is optimized. Let’s look at some examples.How many of you brought your recent sales histories. Pull them out now. Take a quick break while we look at a few.
  • Our time ran out before we could get to this section of our presentation.  Feel free to browse these slides, or get a more in-depth understanding by watching our recorded webinar called Plant Loyalty Now: http://bit.ly/17VCbzd
  • How do we view loyalty? In the context of analysis of fully integrated behavior that we call a Loyalty Snapshot.For more than a decade, TRG has been doing a trademarked form of loyalty analysis that we call theAdvocate, Buyer, Tryer Pyramid. We look at all the households and all their transactions as recorded in an organization’s database. We study the recency, frequency and monetary investments by each household. The resulting analysis ranks everyhousehold from top to bottom.
  • Nine out ten patron households in the databases of arts organizations are patrons we call Tryers. They are one-time or infrequent and long-ago lapsed customers. In our terminology – Tryers– are the least loyal, hardest to acquire and hardest to hold onto .And, they form the foundation of arts patronage today. The instability created by too many Tryers in the patron base – the cracks in the pyramid so to speak – is a real threat to our arts organizations. So we bring this news to you – not be alarmist, although the numbers are alarming. We prefer to think of it as a call to action. And, in that call – pay attention to the dominant behavior pattern among Tryers.
  • Buyers, are actively engaged in the organizations we study. They are subscribers….members…frequent ticket buyers and visitors. “And” is the defining factor among Buyers….hold that thought. So two loyal, actively engaged groups of patrons, right? And, here’s the sad truth: Advocates and Buyers together account for 10% or less of all patrons.
  • Patrons in the top rank, we call, Advocates – these are the organization’s most loyal patrons . One defining characteristic is: they are donors.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Patron-based Marketingin the Digital AgeJune 12, 2013Seattle, Washington
    • 2. Joanne StellerVice President Strategic CommunicationsAmelia Northrup-SimpsonStrategic Communications Specialist
    • 3. 3
    • 4. 4
    • 5. 5
    • 6. 6Today’s Agenda1. Finding New Patrons: Scoping the Job2. Where Patrons Come From3. Learn to Love Data4. Talk to Patrons Directly5. Getting Patrons to Come BackClinic: Questions You Asked(What happens in Seattle, stays in Seattle)
    • 7. 7Finding New PatronsScoping the Job1
    • 8. 8How do we….Let the communities we representactually know about us?Maximize our exposure(with limited budget)?
    • 9. 9Target Your Search
    • 10. 10Reach Those Who Matter Most
    • 11. 11Set TargetStartKeep GoingDo What YouCan
    • 12. 12Where New PatronsCome From2
    • 13. 13New: Minnesota
    • 14. 14Who’s in youraudience?Renewal, Reactivated, and New
    • 15. 15
    • 16. 16Only 1 in 5 first timepatrons ever return
    • 17. 17Half of all Households are First-Timers
    • 18. 18
    • 19. 19
    • 20. 20Audience Origin
    • 21. 21We are a small chorus in a city with manychoruses. Everyone competes for the samepatrons and also competes for those newpatrons. We do not have the knowledge,experience, or staff to compete with largeroperations who can focus on this.
    • 22. 22Opera America Study
    • 23. 236% Attend MultipleOrganizations
    • 24. 24Single OrganizationBuyers:50% Churn Overall
    • 25. 25Multi-OrganizationBuyers:15% Churn Overall
    • 26. 26
    • 27. 27
    • 28. 28Why trade?1. New patrons are already active with otherarts organizations….but not your chorus.2. The more arts patrons buy with OTHERarts organizations, the more likely theyare to buy your concerts.3. Collaboration (trading) builds audienceand loyalty; ―competition‖ limits.
    • 29. 29New: Minnesota
    • 30. 301. Geography:Where Do Your Patrons Live?
    • 31. 31TotalCrossoverArtistsRepertoryTheatreBag&BaggageCappellaRomanaChamberMusicNorthwestMiracleTheatreGroupNWChildrensTheater&SchoolOregonBalletTheatreOregonChildrensTheatreOregonHistoricalSocietyOregonSymphonyOregonZooPortlandBalletPortlandCenterStageArtists Repertory Theatre 16,995 11,263 2.0% 2.3% 3.5% 4.0% 14.6% 13.1% 3.7% 3.4% 24.0% 7.4% 1.2% 41.9%Bag&Baggage 4,165 1,917 8.1% 1.0% 0.7% 1.7% 8.2% 8.5% 2.7% 0.8% 11.6% 10.6% 0.6% 15.9%Cappella Romana 12,082 2,515 3.3% 0.3% 1.7% 1.2% 3.7% 4.2% 0.7% 1.3% 8.5% 2.0% 0.5% 6.7%Chamber Music 2,367 1,917 24.8% 1.2% 8.8% 3.5% 14.2% 22.6% 3.1% 8.4% 51.5% 7.3% 1.8% 39.9%Miracle Theatre Group 10,892 3,021 6.2% 0.7% 1.3% 0.8% 6.0% 4.8% 1.7% 0.9% 6.9% 3.3% 0.6% 12.0%Northwest ChildrensTheater47,962 20,407 5.2% 0.7% 0.9% 0.7% 1.4% 10.3% 5.6% 1.1% 11.6% 13.4% 1.7% 14.8%Oregon Ballet 45,421 20,717 4.9% 0.8% 1.1% 1.2% 1.2% 10.9% 3.7% 1.3% 14.8% 12.5% 1.8% 14.9%Oregon Childrens Theatre 9,871 6,563 6.3% 1.1% 0.9% 0.7% 1.9% 27.4% 17.0% 1.2% 13.6% 32.9% 2.0% 18.3%Oregon Historical 5,333 3,028 10.8% 0.6% 2.9% 3.7% 1.8% 9.5% 11.2% 2.2% 27.7% 11.0% 0.9% 23.6%Oregon Symphony 62,167 26,991 6.6% 0.8% 1.6% 2.0% 1.2% 9.0% 10.8% 2.2% 2.4% 7.3% 0.9% 17.3%Oregon Zoo 81,388 20,213 1.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.2% 0.4% 7.9% 7.0% 4.0% 0.7% 5.6% 0.7% 6.0%Portland Ballet 4,327 2,179 4.7% 0.5% 1.3% 1.0% 1.5% 18.3% 19.4% 4.6% 1.1% 12.2% 13.2% 14.1%Portland Center Stage 58,746 30,325 12.1% 1.1% 1.4% 1.6% 2.2% 12.1% 11.5% 3.1% 2.1% 18.3% 8.3% 1.0%2. CrossoverWhat ELSE Do My Patrons Attend?
    • 32. 32TotalCrossoverArtistsRepertoryTheatreBag&BaggageCappellaRomanaChamberMusicNorthwestMiracleTheatreGroupNWChildrensTheater&SchoolOregonBalletTheatreOregonChildrensTheatreOregonHistoricalSocietyOregonSymphonyOregonZooPortlandBalletPortlandCenterStageArtists Repertory Theatre 16,995 11,263 2.0% 2.3% 3.5% 4.0% 14.6% 13.1% 3.7% 3.4% 24.0% 7.4% 1.2% 41.9%Bag&Baggage 4,165 1,917 8.1% 1.0% 0.7% 1.7% 8.2% 8.5% 2.7% 0.8% 11.6% 10.6% 0.6% 15.9%Cappella Romana 12,082 2,515 3.3% 0.3% 1.7% 1.2% 3.7% 4.2% 0.7% 1.3% 8.5% 2.0% 0.5% 6.7%Chamber Music 2,367 1,917 25% 1.2% 8.8% 3.5% 14.2% 23% 3.1% 8.4% 51% 7.3% 1.8% 40%Miracle Theatre Group 10,892 3,021 6.2% 0.7% 1.3% 0.8% 6.0% 4.8% 1.7% 0.9% 6.9% 3.3% 0.6% 12.0%Northwest ChildrensTheater47,962 20,407 5.2% 0.7% 0.9% 0.7% 1.4% 10.3% 5.6% 1.1% 11.6% 13.4% 1.7% 14.8%Oregon Ballet 45,421 20,717 4.9% 0.8% 1.1% 1.2% 1.2% 10.9% 3.7% 1.3% 14.8% 12.5% 1.8% 14.9%Oregon Childrens Theatre 9,871 6,563 6.3% 1.1% 0.9% 0.7% 1.9% 27.4% 17.0% 1.2% 13.6% 32.9% 2.0% 18.3%Oregon Historical 5,333 3,028 10.8% 0.6% 2.9% 3.7% 1.8% 9.5% 11.2% 2.2% 27.7% 11.0% 0.9% 23.6%Oregon Symphony 62,167 26,991 6.6% 0.8% 1.6% 2.0% 1.2% 9.0% 10.8% 2.2% 2.4% 7.3% 0.9% 17.3%Oregon Zoo 81,388 20,213 1.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.2% 0.4% 7.9% 7.0% 4.0% 0.7% 5.6% 0.7% 6.0%Portland Ballet 4,327 2,179 4.7% 0.5% 1.3% 1.0% 1.5% 18.3% 19.4% 4.6% 1.1% 12.2% 13.2% 14.1%Portland Center Stage 58,746 30,325 12.1% 1.1% 1.4% 1.6% 2.2% 12.1% 11.5% 3.1% 2.1% 18.3% 8.3% 1.0%
    • 33. 33TotalCrossoverArtistsRepertoryTheatreBag&BaggageCappellaRomanaChamberMusicNorthwestMiracleTheatreGroupNWChildrensTheater&SchoolOregonBalletTheatreOregonChildrensTheatreOregonHistoricalSocietyOregonSymphonyOregonZooPortlandBalletPortlandCenterStageArtists Repertory Theatre 16,995 11,263 2.0% 2.3% 3.5% 4.0% 14.6% 13.1% 3.7% 3.4% 24.0% 7.4% 1.2% 41.9%Bag&Baggage 4,165 1,917 8.1% 1.0% 0.7% 1.7% 8.2% 8.5% 2.7% 0.8% 11.6% 10.6% 0.6% 15.9%Cappella Romana 12,082 2,515 3.3% 0.3% 1.7% 1.2% 3.7% 4.2% 0.7% 1.3% 8.5% 2.0% 0.5% 6.7%Chamber Music 2,367 1,917 25% 1.2% 8.8% 3.5% 14.2% 23% 3.1% 8.4% 51% 7.3% 1.8% 40%Miracle Theatre Group 10,892 3,021 6.2% 0.7% 1.3% 0.8% 6.0% 4.8% 1.7% 0.9% 6.9% 3.3% 0.6% 12.0%Northwest ChildrensTheater47,962 20,407 5.2% 0.7% 0.9% 0.7% 1.4% 10.3% 5.6% 1.1% 11.6% 13.4% 1.7% 14.8%Oregon Ballet 45,421 20,717 4.9% 0.8% 1.1% 1.2% 1.2% 10.9% 3.7% 1.3% 14.8% 12.5% 1.8% 14.9%Oregon Childrens Theatre 9,871 6,563 6.3% 1.1% 0.9% 0.7% 1.9% 27.4% 17.0% 1.2% 13.6% 32.9% 2.0% 18.3%Oregon Historical 5,333 3,028 10.8% 0.6% 2.9% 3.7% 1.8% 9.5% 11.2% 2.2% 27.7% 11.0% 0.9% 23.6%Oregon Symphony 62,167 26,991 6.6% 0.8% 1.6% 2.0% 1.2% 9.0% 10.8% 2.2% 2.4% 7.3% 0.9% 17.3%Oregon Zoo 81,388 20,213 1.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.2% 0.4% 7.9% 7.0% 4.0% 0.7% 5.6% 0.7% 6.0%Portland Ballet 4,327 2,179 4.7% 0.5% 1.3% 1.0% 1.5% 18.3% 19.4% 4.6% 1.1% 12.2% 13.2% 14.1%Portland Center Stage 58,746 30,325 12.1% 1.1% 1.4% 1.6% 2.2% 12.1% 11.5% 3.1% 2.1% 18.3% 8.3% 1.0%OrchestrasOpera CompaniesOther Choruses
    • 34. 34 3Learn to LoveDATA
    • 35. 35REVENUEPEOPLE
    • 36. 36
    • 37. 37
    • 38. 38
    • 39. 39YOUR DATAMake it the best it can beCollect patron contact informationInvest in consistent data entryKeep it central and updatedKeep adding new information
    • 40. 40Collect contact informationHow?• Online sales (Brown Paper Tickets=win)– Ask for name, street address, email & phone– Require those fields– Verify email by having them type it twice
    • 41. 41Collect contact informationWhat else?• Alvin Ailey School ―Ambassadors‖ collect cardsfrom audience during intermission• Volunteers help patrons fill out cards in ticketline to ―speed up the process‖• Audience survey in program with raffle• Fill out the card, keep the pen• Hershey’s kiss or $1 off next ticket for contactinfo
    • 42. 42 4Talking toPatrons Directly
    • 43. 43How do I move into the 21st century with a 50-yearold organization that is consistently in the redthinking that advertising is the way to bring peopleto the concerts and to raise money?We do very eclectic programs. Our marketingcosts are very high, as we need to market everyconcert or event. [We need] help maximizingexposure for marketing costs.
    • 44. 44Reach Out DirectlyAnd the best advertising?Your web site!
    • 45. 45Direct Mail Dead?
    • 46. 46
    • 47. 47
    • 48. 48
    • 49. 49Why? Better Cost of SaleCost of Sale is a measure of revenue vs.expenses.How to calculate: $ spent on campaign$ earned from campaign
    • 50. 50 5Getting Patronsto Come Back
    • 51. 51
    • 52. 52
    • 53. 53
    • 54. 54
    • 55. 551
    • 56. 56BLOCKBUSTERSBuild Loyal ProspectsBest-selling programs and events• Biggest incentive to buy, come back• Deserves greatest investment• Greatest ROI• Rewards all levels of loyalty
    • 57. 57Personal contactAsk them to add it on, or ifthey’d like extra ticketsThanks. Welcome!―Don’t miss this.‖
    • 58. 582
    • 59. 59UPGRADESEvery patron’sNext stepMake a plan for every patron typeFocus first on biggest opportunities• Consider the whole picture• Choose efforts you can do best• Collaboration gets the best results• Learn to up-sell
    • 60. 60Next Step: ReactivateMessage: ―Welcomeback‖How? Treat them like afirst timer and a valuedpatron.Next Step: Come backMessage: ―Welcome—thanks for joining us‖How? Make the firsttime the best possible.Next Step: Come back againMessage: ―Thanks, and mightyou wish to _____?‖How? Foster furtherengagement by making the ask
    • 61. 61Add a donationRenew & Upgrade
    • 62. 62Loyalty reduces costs, increases net returnDemonstrated in this Performing Arts ExampleIMPACTSingle TicketBuyersNewSubscribersRenewingSubscribersRenewingSubscriber-DonorsNet Per Ticket/Package Yield $53.84 $156.05 $341.51 $550.42Cost of Sale 20% 25% 3% 3%RenewalRates23% 46% 69% 88%
    • 63. 63What else?(your question here)

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