Maximizing ee investments with real time data visibility

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  • 1. Maximizing EE Investments with Real-Time Data Visibility Memphis & Shelby County Sustainability Summit | June 26, 2013
  • 2. 2 About EnerNOC Proven Customer Track Record (as of 3.31.2013) • 6,000 C&I demand response customers across 14,000 sites • 24,000 – 27,000 MW of Peak Load Under Management • Over $550 million in customer payments/savings to date • Simple, risk-free commercial agreements Full Value and Technology Offering • Energy management application platform addresses demand and supply-side • Combine technology, managed services, and market access • More than $150 million invested to date in technology • 24/7/365 Network Operations Center, real-time metering and web-based monitoring World-Class Team and Resources • 700 employees and growing fast – multiple “top places to work” awards • Publicly traded on the U.S. NASDAQ (ENOC) • $115 million in cash and cash equivalents on balance sheet
  • 3. 3 EnerNOC’s Demand Response Footprint North America United Kingdom Australia and New Zealand
  • 4. 4 Program Name TVA-EnerNOC Demand Response – Phase II Territory Service Territories of eligible Distributors Demand Response Types Curtailment Capacity Payments Yes - $22/kW-yr Energy (Event) Payment Energy payments equal to product of heat rate and gas index, currently $40- 50/MWh $225/MWh or more for emergency energy Program Period Year-round; Summer (April – October), Winter (November – March) Program Hours Summer: 12PM – 8PM CT Winter: 5AM – 1PM CT Maximum Events Peak Events: 40 economic hours, in lieu of peaking power plants Event Notification 30 minutes Response Duration 2 – 8 hours Event History 2009: 2 Events 2010: 12 Events 2011: 5 Events 2012: 4 Events TVA-EnerNOC Demand Response Program
  • 5. 5 How Demand Response Events Work Notify Respond Restore
  • 6. 6 Equipment Curtailment Plan kW Reduction HVAC • (7) 4 ton package units • (7) 3 ton package units • (4) 15 ton package units • (9) 10 ton rooftop package units • (123) 3 ton class room split units • (4) 30 HP heat pumps • (97) wall-mount classroom units • (5) roof-top units; total of 36 tons of cooling • (12) roof-top units for a total of 75 tons of cooling 975 kW Total Curtailment 975 kW Curtailment Case Study: Primary School • A public school system at multiple locations shuts down rooftop package units, heat pumps, and wall mount classroom units.
  • 7. 7 Equipment Curtailment Plan kW Reduction HVAC • Shut down both 120-ton chillers and all 4 associated compressors • Slow down 3 large air handlers to 25% through EMS in security office • Turn off both 300-ton chillers (usually only 1 running) • Shut down auditorium air handlers (2 x 50 tons) through EMS • Shut off all other air handlers (5 x 20 tons and 4 x 10 tons) 200 kW Lighting, Fans, Compressors • Turn off hallway lights using night setback switches in security office • Put garage lights into nighttime mode (50 x 150-watt high pressure sodium) • Shut off all lights and raise temp. set point in City Council Room • Send internal email to city hall staff asking them to turn off lights, raise temps, etc. •Turn off all 300-watt flood lights in auditorium (a few from emergency circuit will remain on) • Turn off half to 3/4 of lobby and hallway lighting (44 x 400-watt bulbs, and 22 x 250-watt bulbs) 200 kW Total Curtailment 400 kW Curtailment Case Study: City Government • A government building turns down lighting, chillers, and air handlers.
  • 8. 8 Demand Response: A customer’s perspective
  • 9. 9 What’s Wrong with this Picture?
  • 10. 10 What’s Wrong with this Picture?
  • 11. 11 Commercial Property: Night setback This property was well managed and had been setting back every evening to 500kw In late December, it began to not set back as far as it could be during non-operating hours. By re-setting its evening operations, this property was able to save $7,700 SAVINGS kW Savings $7,700 kWh Savings: 250 kW 77,500 kWh Reduced Carbon Emissions: 40,800 kg
  • 12. 12 Commercial Property: Demand Spikes 330 kW 71,600 kWh 1. Determine reason for demand increase after 5pm 2. Alert facility managers to demand spikes. 1. 2. SAVINGS $7,100 kW Savings kWh Savings: 37,700 kg Reduced Carbon Emissions:
  • 13. 13 Relative Cost of Renewable Electricity in US $0.03 $0.04 $0.06 $0.07 $0.08 $0.16 $0.23 $0.35 $0.00 $0.05 $0.10 $0.15 $0.20 $0.25 $0.30 $0.35 $0.40 EnergyEfficiency LargeHydro Geothermal OnshoreWind Biomass SolarThermal Utility-ScaleSolarPV RooftopSolarPV 2010 Average $/kWh Source: REN21, Renewables 2010 Global Status Report, DOE EIA.
  • 14. 14 The cheapest kWh is the one never used – it also happens to be the greenest!
  • 15. Ryan Gooch Program Operations Manager (m): 615-410-6532 rgooch@enernoc.com www.enernoc.com