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  • Title Slide Program is the property of The Houston Audubon Society and Don Richardson Photographs are the property of the photographers. Copyright – 2005 by Don Richardson
  • Several Texas or TEXBIRDS members provided photographs.
  • Many photographs are from collections at Vireo (designated *) and Cornell.
  • Migration This American Redstart migrates across the Gulf of Mexico. Many warblers do just that. There are very good reasons why warblers migrate – some of them, you might not expect.

Tp warblers-presentation Tp warblers-presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Identifying Warblers On the Upper Texas Coast (A Seminar) Produced for the Houston Audubon Society by Don Richardson © 2005 Version - Preliminary
  • Special Photographs from Texas Photographers Linda Alley Erik Breden Bill Duke Dwayne Litteer
  • Photographs are from Vireo* and Cornell Photographers:
    • Johann Schumacher
    • John Heidecker
    • John Dunning
    • L. Page Brown
    • Lang Elliott
    • Linda Drake
    • Mike Hopiak
    • R. & N. Bowers*
    • William Paff
    • Wilson Bloomer
    • Smithsonian Inst.
    • Betty Cottrille
    • Bill Dyre
    • D. & M. Zimmerman*
    • D. & E. Phillips
    • Donald Waite
    • Doug Wechsler*
    • E. Endrigo*
    • Herbert Clark
    • Isidor Jaklin
    • J. Hoffman
    • Jack Murray
    • Jim Wedge
  • Migration The American Redstart (see left) migrates across the Gulf of Mexico. Many warblers do just that. They migrate for very good reasons. Some of them might surprise you.
  • The Genus Protonotaria The one species in the genus Protonotaria is a regular migrant and breeder on the Upper Texas Coast.
    • Prothonotary Warbler
    This one Protonotaria genus member is noted for its bright color, a large bill, a short tail and the unusual habit (for a warbler) of nesting in a cavity.
  • Prothonotary Warbler Protonotaria citrea Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Prothonotary Warbler Protonotaria citrea
  • The Genus Vermivora We’ll discuss six species in the genus Vermivora :
    • Blue-winged Warbler
    • Golden-winged Warbler
    • Brewster’s Warbler
    • Tennessee Warbler
    • Orange-crowned Warbler
    • Nashville Warbler
  • About Vermivora Warblers
    • Small with sharply pointed bills.
    • Lack strong contrasting patterns.
    • Most utilize nectar in non-breeding seasons.
    • Most nest on or near the ground.
    • They forage in dead leaf clusters.
  • Blue-winged Warbler Vermivora pinus Song © 2005 Bill Duke
  • Blue-winged Warbler Vermivora pinus © 2005 Bill Duke
  • Blue-winged Warbler Vermivora pinus
  • Golden-winged Warbler Vermivora chrysoptera Song
  • Golden-winged Warbler Vermivora chrysoptera
  • Brewster’s Warbler Blue-winged / Golden-winged Hybrid
  • Tennessee Warbler Vermivora peregrina Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Tennessee Warbler Vermivora peregrina © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Tennessee Warbler Vermivora peregrina © 2005 Bill Duke
  • Tennessee Warbler Vermivora peregrina
  • Orange-crowned Warbler Vermivora celata Song
  • Orange-crowned Warbler Vermivora celata © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Orange-crowned Warbler Vermivora celata © 2005 Linda Alley © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Nashville Warbler Vermivora ruficapilla Song
  • Nashville Warbler Vermivora ruficapilla
  • The Genus Parula We see just two species in the genus Parula on the Upper Texas Coast. One of them, the Tropical Parula, is pretty rare.
    • Northern Parula
    • Tropical Parula
  • About Parula Warblers
    • Small with green or black patches on the back.
    • Pale mandibles.
    • Buzzy songs.
    • Short tails.
    • Sexual dimorphism is limited and is strongest in the north.
  • Northern Parula Parula americana Song
  • Northern Parula Parula americana
  • Tropical Parula Parula pitiayumi Song
  • The Genus Dendroica Our largest genus is Dendroica . We’ll look at eighteen species.
    • Chestnut-sided Warbler
    • Cape May Warbler
    • Magnolia Warbler
    • Yellow-rumped Warbler
    • Black-throated Blue Warbler
    • Cerulean Warbler
    • Blackburnian Warbler
    • Black-throated Gray Warbler
    • Townsend’s Warbler
    • Black-throated Green Warbler
    • Grace’s Warbler
    • Yellow-throated Warbler
    • Prairie Warbler
    • Bay-breasted Warbler
    • Blackpoll Warbler
    • Pine Warbler
    • Palm Warbler
    • Yellow Warbler
  • About Dendroica Warblers
    • Most have contrasting plumage marks (eye patterns, tail spots, wingbars, flank streaks).
    • Sexual dimorphism is slight to strong.
    • Medium in size.
    • Of twenty-seven species, all but six reside in North America.
  • Chestnut-sided Warbler Dendroica pensylvanica Song
  • Chestnut-sided Warbler Dendroica pensylvanica © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Chestnut-sided Warbler Dendroica pensylvanica
  • Cape May Warbler - Male Dendroica tigrina Song
  • Cape May Warbler - Female Dendroica tigrina
  • Magnolia Warbler - Male Dendroica magnolia Song Call
  • Magnolia Warbler - Female Dendroica magnolia
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler Dendroica coronata Song Song Call © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Black-throated Blue Warbler Dendroica caerulescens Song Call
  • Black-throated Blue Warbler - Female Dendroica caerulescens
  • Cerulean Warbler Dendroica cerulea Song
  • Cerulean Warbler Dendroica cerulea
  • Blackburnian Warbler Dendroica fusca Song © 2005 Bill Duke
  • Blackburnian Warbler Dendroica fusca © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Blackburnian Warbler Dendroica fusca © 2005 Bill Duke
  • Blackburnian Warbler Dendroica fusca Song
  • Black-throated Gray Warbler Dendroica negrescens Song
  • Townsend’s Warbler Dendroica townsendi Song
  • Black-throated Green Warbler Dendroica virens Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Black-throated Green Warbler Dendroica virens © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Black-throated Green Warbler Dendroica virens
  • Yellow-throated Warbler Dendroica dominica Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Yellow-throated Warbler Dendroica dominica
  • Prairie Warbler Dendroica discolor Song
  • Bay-breasted Warbler Dendroica castanea Song
  • Bay-breasted Warbler Dendroica castanea © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Blackpoll Warbler Dendroica striata Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Blackpoll Warbler Dendroica striata
  • Blackpoll Warbler Dendroica striata
  • Pine Warbler Dendroica pinus Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Pine Warbler Dendroica pinus
  • Pine Warbler Dendroica pinus
  • Palm Warbler Dendroica palmarum Song
  • Palm Warbler Dendroica palmarum
  • Yellow Warbler Dendroica petechia Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Yellow Warbler Dendroica petechia © 2005 Dwayne Litteer
  • Yellow Warbler Dendroica petechia
  • Yellow Warbler Dendroica petechia © 2005 Linda Alley © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Yellow Warbler Dendroica petechia © 2005 Linda Alley
  • The Genus Mniotilta The only species in the genus Mniotilta on the Upper Texas Coast is the Black-and-white Warbler. It’s easy to identify.
    • Black-and-white Warbler
  • About Mniotilta Warblers
    • Medium sized.
    • Feed by crawling along branches and trunks in search of insects.
  • Black-and-white Warbler Mniotilta varia Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Black-and-white Warbler Mniotilta varia © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Black-and-white Warbler Mniotilta varia © 2005 Bill Duke
  • The Genus Oporornis The genus oporornis contains four species seen on the Upper Texas Coast but some are pretty rare.
    • Mourning Warbler
    • MacGillivray’s Warbler
    • Connecticut Warbler
    • Kentucky Warbler
  • About Oporornis Warblers
    • Medium-large in size.
    • Feed on or near the ground.
    • Olive above and yellow below.
    • Age and sex differences are moderate.
    • Chanting songs.
  • Mourning Warbler Oporornis philadelphia Song
  • Mourning Warbler Oporornis philadelphia
  • MacGillivray’s Warbler Oporornis tolmiei Song
  • MacGillivray’s Warbler Oporornis tolmiei © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Connecticut Warbler Oporornis agilis Song
  • Kentucky Warbler Oporornis formosus Song Call © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Kentucky Warbler Oporornis formosus Song Call © 2005 Linda Alley
  • The Genus Wilsonia On the Upper Texas Coast we can see three members of the genus Wilsonia .
    • Canada Warbler
    • Wilson’s Warbler
    • Hooded Warbler
  • About Wilsonia Warblers
    • Small in size.
    • Green or gray above.
    • Black markings on head or neck – prominent in males.
    • Have well developed rectil* bristles for fly catching.
    • Their long tail is often flicked about.
    * Rectil – Fine stiff feathers, developed into a tactile “insect net” around the mouth like the nightjars.
  • Canada Warbler Wilsonia canadensis Song © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Canada Warbler Wilsonia canadensis © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Canada Warbler Wilsonia canadensis
  • Canada Warbler Wilsonia canadensis
  • Wilson’s Warbler Wilsonia pusilla Song Call © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Wilson’s Warbler Wilsonia pusilla Song Call
  • Wilson’s Warbler Wilsonia pusilla
  • Hooded Warbler Wilsonia citrina Song
  • Hooded Warbler Wilsonia citrina © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Hooded Warbler Wilsonia citrina © 2005 Linda Alley
  • The Genera Helmitheros and Limnothlypis These genera contain just one species each and are listed respectively.
    • Worm-eating Warbler
    • Swainson’s Warbler
  • About Helmitheros 1 and Limnothlypis 2 Warblers
    • 1 -
    • Spike bill and short tail with bold head stripes.
    • Feeds low in dead leaves.
    • 2 -
    • One large terrestrial species.
    • Feeds on the ground, flipping dead leaves.
  • Worm-eating Warbler Helmitheros vermivorus Song Call
  • Worm-eating Warbler Helmitheros vermivorus
  • Worm-eating Warbler Helmitheros vermivorus © 2005 Bill Duke
  • Swainson’s Warbler Limnothlypis swainsonii Song © 2005 Erik Breden
  • Swainson’s Warbler Limnothlypis swainsonii
  • The Genus Seiurus The three species in the genus Seiurus are all ground feeders.
    • Ovenbird
    • Louisiana Waterthrush
    • Northern Waterthrush
  • About Seiurus Warblers
    • Large, walking, terrestrial species.
    • Brown or olive upperparts.
    • Streaked or spotted underparts.
    • Strong supercilium.
    • Tail bobbing behavior.
  • Ovenbird Seiurus aurocapillus Song
  • Louisiana Waterthrush Seiurus motacilla Song Call © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Louisiana Waterthrush Seiurus motacilla © 2005 Linda Alley © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Northern Waterthrush Seiurus noveboracensis Song Call
  • The Genus Geothlypis There is but one species in the genus Geothlypis in North America.
    • Common Yellowthroat
  • About Geothlypis Warblers
    • Large, skulking, and wren-like.
    • Prefers the marsh or dense brush.
    • Generally olive above, yellow below, males have a black mask.
  • Common Yellowthroat Geothlypis trichas Song Song Call
  • Common Yellowthroat Geothlypis trichas © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Common Yellowthroat Geothlypis trichas © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Common Yellowthroat ♀ Geothlypis trichas © 2005 Bill Duke
  • The Genus Icteria The only species in the genus Icteria is well named. It is truly the champion “loudmouth” of all the warblers.
    • Yellow-breasted Chat
  • About Icteria Warblers
    • One very large warbler.
    • Exceptionally thick bill.
    • Long tail.
    • Harsh, un-warbler-like voice.
    • Aurally loud but visually secretive.
  • Yellow-breasted Chat Icteria virens Song Call © 2005 Linda Alley
  • Yellow-breasted Chat Icteria virens
  • The Genus Setophaga The only species in the genus Setophaga is a regular migrant on the Upper Texas Coast.
    • American Redstart
  • About Setophaga Warblers
    • Strong sexual dimorphism.
    • Adult plumage reached in the second year.
    • Wing and tail spots are fanned regularly.
  • American Redstart Setophaga ruticilla © 2005 Bill Duke Song Call
  • American Redstart Setophaga ruticilla © 2005 Linda Alley
  • American Redstart Setophaga ruticilla
  • Houston Audubon Society We are one of the largest and most active chapters of the National Audubon Society. Houston Audubon is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization and is supported by member dues and donations from individuals, foundations and corporations. We receive limited funding from National Audubon Society and no funds from the city or state government. Contributions made to us remain in our 13-county area and support our activities. Our mission is to "promote the conservation and appreciation of birds and wildlife habitat."
  • Houston Audubon Sanctuaries include over 3000 acres of varied habitat including the internationally famous High Island and Bolivar Flats Sanctuaries.
  • The author of this program hopes you will help the Houston Audubon Society continue to maintain these sanctuaries and to obtain new ones. Please send a contribution to them. Houston Audubon Society 440 Wilchester Blvd. Houston, Texas 77079 Thank you from the author Don Richardson