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Tp copperhead survey

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Transcript

  • 1. Copperhead Snake Population Survey June 2006 Brazoria County, Texas Photos by Marty Cornell 1
  • 2. Copperhead Snake Population Survey PARTICIPANTS Marc Ealy Area Manager Nannie M. Stringfellow WMA Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Phil Huxford Member, Texas Master Naturalists Cradle of Texas Chapter Member, Friends of Brazoria Wildlife Refuges 2
  • 3. Southern Copperhead 3
  • 4. Collection Area County Road 946, Brazoria, Texas 4
  • 5. Collection Area County Road 946, Brazoria, Texas 5
  • 6. Catch from consecutive days, June 2006 6/25 6/26 6/27 6/23 6/24 6
  • 7. Tools for specimen examination 7
  • 8. Examining for evidence of past capture 8
  • 9. Designating Copperhead ID #198 Cloaca Scale 1 Scale 8 Scale 9 9
  • 10. Notching ID number in scales 10
  • 11. Coaxing immobilization 11
  • 12. Gotcha! 12
  • 13. Measuring length 13
  • 14. Recording Data 14
  • 15. Typical Data Snake ID number Capture date Length – Head to Cloaca (inches) Length – Head to Tail Notes (e.g. RC = Recapture) 15
  • 16. 25 Copperhead Snakes at Release 16
  • 17. Reference Texas Snakes: A Field Guide (Texas Natural History Guides) James R. Dixon (Author) John E. Werler (Author) Regina Levoy (Illustrator) 17
  • 18. Range 18
  • 19. Comparison Study Dixon-Werler Ealy-Huxford Geographic Area Entire Range About 1/4 acre Daily search Two hours/ window All night evening Length of study Several years Four years Observed March- May- activity November September 19
  • 20. Observations • Length – adult – up to 27” • Length shortly after birth – average 11” • Don’t travel more than 0.5 mile • Think they’re invisible • Move slowly • Strike quickly • Climb palmettos • Rarely climb trees (fall off) 20
  • 21. Conclusions • Both studies (Dixon-Werler and Ealy- Huxford) produced comparable results. • Copperheads are most active at temperatures 80o and above. 21

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